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  • 1. Ahlstrom, L.
    et al.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Hagberg, M.
    Ahlberg, K.
    Women with Neck Pain on Long-Term Sick Leave — Approaches Used in the Return to Work Process: A Qualitative Study2016In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose There are difficulties in the process of return to work (RTW) from long-term sick leave, both in general and regarding sick leave because of neck pain in particular. Neck pain is difficult to assess, problematic to rehabilitate, and hard to cure; and it is not always easy to decide whether the pain is work-related. The outcome of RTW could be dependent upon individuals’ approaches, defensive or offensive behaviors, and choices related to their self-efficacy. The aim of this study was to identify approaches used in the RTW process among women with neck pain on long-term sick leave from human service organizations. Methods This is a qualitative descriptive study based on grounded theory. A Swedish cohort of 207 women with a history of long-term sick leave with neck pain from human service organizations answered open-ended written questions at 0, 6, and 12 months, and 6 years; and 16 women were interviewed. Results Individuals expressed their coping approaches in terms of fluctuating in work status over time: either as a strategy or as a consequence. Periods of sick leave were interwoven with periods of work. The women were either controlling the interaction or struggling in the interaction with stakeholders. Conclusions Return to work outcomes may be improved if the fluctuating work status over time is taken into account in the design of rehabilitation efforts for women with a history of long-term sick leave and with chronical musculoskeletal conditions.

  • 2.
    Ahlstrom, Linda
    et al.
    Högskolan Borås.
    Larsson Fallman, Sara
    Högskolan Borås.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Public Health and Community Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Return to work from long-term sick leave: a five-year prospective study of the importance of adjustment latitudes at work and home2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Adjustment latitude among employees, i.e. adjusting work to individual’s health capacity, has been associated with successful return to work (RTW) in cross-sectional studies. The aim is to investigate the long-term importance of adjustment latitude at the workplace and at home, as well as attitudes (own and colleagues) for increased work ability (WA), working degree (WD) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among female human service workers (HSW) on long-term sick leave in Sweden.

    Methods

    A cohort of female HSW (n=324) on long-term sick leave (>60 day) received a questionnaire at four times (0, 6, 12, 60 months). Prevalence ratios (PR) were used to examine possible relationships between explanatory factors and outcomes. Linear mixed models were used for longitudinal analysis of the repeated measurements of WA Score (0-10), WD (0-100%) and HRQoL (0-100). Analyses were performed with different models; the explanatory variables for each model were adjustment latitude, attitudes towards breaks at work, shared or single household and amount of household work.

    Result

    Having more adjustment latitude at work was associated with both increased WA and RTW compared to having few adjustment latitude opportunities. Adjustments related to working-pace were strongly associated with increased WD (PR 3.29(95%CI=1.71-6.26)), as were adjustments to working-place. Having opportunities to take short breaks at work, and a general acceptance at work to take short breaks was associated with increased WA. At home, a higher responsibility for household work (PR 1.98(95%CI=1.33-2.95)) was related to increased WA and RTW. Individuals with possibilities for adjustment latitude, especially pace and place, at work, and an acceptance to take breaks at work, increased in WA score significantly more over time and had higher WA score compared with individuals not having such opportunities at work. These prospective results were similar for the outcome WD and HRQoL.

    Conclusions

    The results highlight the importance of possibilities for adjustment latitude at work and at home, as well as accepting attitudes to take short breaks to increase WA and RTW among female human service workers previously on long-term sick leave.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lean Projects and Sustainability in the Swedish Agricultural Sector2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Work environment, Lean and Agriculture2014In: PROCEEDINGS: 11th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organisational Design and Management & 46th Annual Nordic Ergonomics Society Conference: Volume I + II, IEA Press , 2014, p. 661-666Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean has become the predominant management concept in industry, but its effect on the work environment is debated. Lean has now reached farms and garden nurseries. This paper aims to identify consequences for the physical and psychosocial work environment when Lean was applied in micro-businesses in the agricultural sector. Observations, a questionnaire and interviews were used as methods. It was concluded that the psychosocial work environment became more structured and less stressful. The physical work environment was partly improved by less transportation on the farm. However, consideration of the physical work environment was insufficient.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Hansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Systematisk kunskapsbrist i skolan?: Arbetsmiljöarbete utan udd2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish employers are obliged by law to systematically plan, direct and control activities so that the working environment meets the prescribed requirements. However, evidence indicates that this work is not performed satisfactorily in many schools. This case study aims at mapping out and clarifying how measures towards planning, directing and controlling activities are organized in two public compulsory schools.

     

    The overall purpose of the study is to shed light on elements and conditions that hinder a successful implementation of work environment measures. Our main research questions are: Does the way the municipalities have organized the working environment measures reach the requirements in the law and how controls and follow-ups are performed. Data was collected through the municipalities’ steering documents together with a survey in combination with follow-up interviews with key figures.

     

    Results show that the working environment measures in both schools are organized and performed in similar ways and that the problems reported to a large extent are the same. The unanimous picture shows an organization that is not capable of identifying and handling all important risks. Conclusions from the study indicate that there is a lack of knowledge concerning working environments measures on all levels in the organizations.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Lisa
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Det passar inte alla: Arbetstillfredställelse, produktivitet och stress i kontorslandskap2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The open-plan offices at Boliden has been renovated. The company wanted an evaluation of what the employees thought about the physical work environment in the new offices. The company also wanted the study to present improvement for deficiencies in the physical environment.

     

    The aim of this study was to identify positive and negative aspects of the physical working environment factors and to identify correlation between the physical work environment factors and job satisfaction, productivity and stress. A second purpose was also to present some improvement for the physical work environment. A part of the questionnaire was to evaluate if there existed any difference between the sexes regarding the physical work environment. To examine these aspects this study used a questionnaire as well a system group seminar to develop possible improvements.

     

    The results from the questionnaire show that the employees were pleased with the ventilation, the furniture’s functionality and the aesthetics of the office. The questionnaire also found dissatisfaction with glare, outlook and temperature but mostly the audial privacy in the office.

     

    Previous studies have shown that there is a correlation between physical work environment factors, job satisfaction and productivity but inconsistent evidence for work environment and stress. This study showed significant relationship between the auditory privacy, job satisfaction and productivity but not between auditory privacy and stress, which corresponds to the previous studies.

     

    The improvements presented at the system group seminar was to introduce guidelines to reduce noise and divide the office into smaller offices. To improve the auditory privacy this study suggests that a combination of redeploying employees in the open-plan office, dividing the office in to smaller office areas and introduces guidelines of how the employees should behave in the open-plan office.

  • 7.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Ahlstrom, Linda
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    The importance of healthcare managers’ organizational preconditions and support resources for their appraisal of planned change and its outcomes2017In: Journal of Hospital Administration, ISSN 1927-6990, E-ISSN 1927-7008, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Healthcare managers are expected to lead and manage planned organizational change intended to improve healthcare process quality. However, their complex working conditions offer limited decision control, and healthcare managers often feel ill prepared and inadequately supported to perform their duties. Healthcare managers have previously described their need for organizational support, but we lack knowledge of the preconditions and resources that help managers implement planned change.Methods: This prospective cohort study examined healthcare managers at three Swedish hospitals implementing lean production and two Swedish hospitals implementing their own improvement model. Questionnaire data from 2012, 2103, and 2014 were used in following up. We used t-tests and a linear mixed model design in analysing the data.Results: Healthcare managers who perceived strong support from managers, employees, colleagues, and the organization and managers with the longest managerial experience had the least negative appraisal of change. Managers who perceived strong support from employees, management, and the organizational structure perceived higher levels of healthcare process quality.Conclusions: Long managerial experience and strong support from managers, employees, and the organization are important formanagers’ appraisal of, work on, and successful implementation of planned change. Top management must therefore ensure that the healthcare managers have sufficient managerial experience and support before they delegate to them the responsibility to implement planned change.

  • 8.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Health care managers' views on and approaches to implementing models for improving care processes2016In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 24, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To develop a deeper understanding of health-care managers' views on and approaches to the implementation of models for improving care processes. Background: In health care, there are difficulties in implementing models for improving care processes that have been decided on by upper management. Leadership approaches to this implementation can affect the outcome. Method: In-depth interviews with first- and second-line managers in Swedish hospitals were conducted and analysed using grounded theory. Results: 'Coaching for participation' emerged as a central theme for managers in handling top-down initiated process development. The vertical approach in this coaching addresses how managers attempt to sustain unit integrity through adapting and translating orders from top management. The horizontal approach in the coaching refers to managers' strategies for motivating and engaging their employees in implementation work. Conclusion and implications for nursing management: Implementation models for improving care processes require a coaching leadership built on close manager-employee interaction, mindfulness regarding the pace of change at the unit level, managers with the competence to share responsibility with their teams and engaged employees with the competence to share responsibility for improving the care processes, and organisational structures that support process-oriented work. Implications for nursing management are the importance of giving nurse managers knowledge of change management.

  • 9.
    Antonsson Lundberg, Ann-Beth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. IVL Svenska Miljöinstitutet AB.
    Företagshälsovård2014In: Människan i arbetslivet: Teori och praktik / [ed] Eva Holmström, Kerstina Olsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB , 2014, 2:1, p. 199-223Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Antonsson Lundberg, Ann-Beth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. IVL Svenska Miljöinstitutet AB.
    Hasle, Peter
    Aalborg Universitet.
    How can the context affect what strategies are effective in improving the working environment in small companies?2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Antonsson Lundberg, Ann-Beth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. IVL Svenska Miljöinstitutet AB.
    Hasle, Peter
    Aalborg Universitet.
    What kind of knowledge do small companies need to improve their working environment?2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12. Arman, Rebecka
    et al.
    Wikström, Ewa
    Tengelin, Ellinor
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Work activities and stress among managers in health care2012In: The Work of Managers: Towards a Practice Theory of Management / [ed] Tengblad, Sten, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter reports on the work activities, time-use patterns, and stress patterns of ten health care managers in Sweden. The qualitative and quantitative evidence reveals the fragmentation in their nine-hour working days where each activity, on average, lasts only ten minutes. The time-use patterns vary individually though some patterns are related to position and unit type. Activities deal with the coexisting and competing logics of employeeship, administration, and strategy and risk handling. None of the managers’ approaches for handling the multiple legitimation processes and delimiting their workload boundaries really challenges the complexity of the coexistence of the multiple logics or the boundlessness of their working hours. Using biophysical measures, the research finds that stress reported by the managers is caused by (a) interruptions during challenging tasks and (b) personal situations such as private dilemmas and conflict-loaded or ineffective meetings. It is important to acknowledge managers’ fragmented working situation and to recognize that management should be seen as collective process, or as part of an administrative system.

  • 13.
    Bengt, Halling
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lean Implementation: the significance of people and dualism2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean, with its origins at the Toyota Motor Company, is a concept that is known to increase effectiveness in manufacturing. The Lean concept is now argued to be relevant not only in manufacturing but in service and health-care delivery as well. The reported results of Lean implementation efforts are divided. There are reports that most of the Lean implementation efforts are not reaching the goal; on the other hand, there are reports of promising results. The divided results from Lean implementation efforts show how important it is to research and identify factors that are barriers to successful implementation of Lean. This thesis aims to contribute knowledge about barriers to Lean implementation by collecting empirical findings from manufacturing and health care and structuring the perceived barriers and difficulties to Lean implementation. My first study aimed to compare similarities and divergences in barriers to Lean described by key informants in manufacturing and health care. The data was collected via semi-structured interviews. Findings showed that the perceived difficulties and barriers are much the same in manufacturing and health care. The second study was a case study at a manufacturing firm, researching how the views on Lean of the managers implementing Lean influence its implementation. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews with 20 individuals and covered all hierarchical management levels in the company. Findings showed that managers' views on Lean influence the implementation but also that learning during the implementation process can alter managers' views of Lean. The third study aimed to research how management of Lean is described in the literature. This was done through a literature review. The findings showed that Lean management is a matter of dualism, consisting of two complementary systems of action, management and leadership, which are related to the two basic principles of Lean, continuous improvement and respect for the people.

  • 14. Bergman, Caroline
    et al.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Skagert, Katrin
    Exploring communication processes in workplace meetings: A mixed methods study in a Swedish healthcare organization2016In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 533-541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: An efficient team and a good organizational climate not only improve employee health but also the health and safety of the patients. Building up trust, a good organizational climate and a healthy workplace requires effective communication processes. In Sweden, workplace meetings as settings for communication processes are regulated by a collective labor agreement. However, little is known about how these meetings are organized in which communication processes can be strengthened. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore communication processes during workplace meetings in a Swedish healthcare organization. METHODS: A qualitatively driven, mixed methods design was used with data collected by observations, interviews, focus group interviews and mirroring feedback seminars. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and conventional content analysis. RESULTS: The communication flow and the organization of the observed meetings varied in terms of physical setting, frequency, time allocated and duration. The topics for the workplace meetings were mainly functional with a focus on clinical processes. Overall, the meetings were viewed not only as an opportunity to communicate information top down but also a means by which employees could influence decision-making and development at the workplace. CONCLUSIONS: Workplace meetings have very distinct health-promoting value. It emerged that information and the opportunity to influence decisions related to workplace development are important to the workers. These aspects also affect the outcome of the care provided.

  • 15.
    Birgisson, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Sjölander, Peta White
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Snickars, Folke
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Kjellberg, Peter
    KTH.
    Perhson, Susanna
    KTH.
    Eriksson, Thomas
    KTH.
    Reitberger, Göran
    KTH.
    RAE2012: KTH Research Assessment Exercise 20122012Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16. Bramberg, Elisabeth Bjork
    et al.
    Nyman, Teresia
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Alipour, Akbar
    Bergstrom, Gunnar
    Elinder, Liselotte Schafer
    Hermansson, Ulric
    Jensen, Irene
    Development of evidence-based practice in occupational health services in Sweden: a 3-year follow-up of attitudes, barriers and facilitators2017In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 90, no 4, p. 335-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish government initiated an investigation of how to secure and develop the competence of the occupational health services. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate whether the development of evidence-based practice (EBP) in the Swedish occupational health services in relation to attitudes, knowledge and use improved during the first 3 years of the government's initiative. The study has a mixed methods design combining questionnaires and interviews with data collection at baseline and at 3-year follow-up. The response rate was 66% at baseline and 63% at follow-up. The results show that practitioners' knowledge of EBP was moderate at baseline and improved at follow-up (p = 0.002; 95% CI 0.01; 0.21). Practitioners experienced lower levels of organizational and managerial support for EBP at follow-up (p < 0.001; 95% CI 0.18; 0.38). The results revealed that managers viewed responsibility for implementing EBP as a matter for individual practitioners rather than as an organizational issue. Occupational health service managers and practitioners are generally positive to EBP. However, the findings emphasize the need to educate managers in how to support EBP at the organizational level by creating an infrastructure for EBP in the OHS.

  • 17. Brorsson, Anna
    et al.
    Ohman, Annika
    Lundberg, Stefan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Nygard, Louise
    Being a pedestrian with dementia: A qualitative study using photo documentation and focus group interviews2016In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 1124-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to identify problematic situations in using zebra crossings. They were identified from photo documentations comprising film sequences and the perspectives of people with dementia. The aim was also to identify how they would understand, interpret and act in these problematic situations based on their previous experiences and linked to the film sequences. A qualitative grounded theory approach was used. Film sequences from five zebra crossings were analysed. The same film sequences were used as triggers in two focus group interviews with persons with dementia. Individual interviews with three informants were also performed. The core category, the hazard of meeting unfolding problematic traffic situations when only one layer at a time can be kept in focus, showed how a problematic situation as a whole consisted of different layers of problematic situations. The first category, adding layers of problematic traffic situations to each other, was characterized by the informants' creation of a problematic situation as a whole. The different layers were described in the subcategories of layout of streets and zebra crossings, weather conditions, vehicles and crowding of pedestrians. The second category, actions used to meet different layers of problematic traffic situations, was characterized by avoiding problematic situations, using traffic lights as reminders and security precautions, following the flow at the zebra crossing and being cautious pedestrians. In conclusion, as community-dwelling people with dementia commonly are pedestrians, it is important that health care professionals and caregivers take their experiences and management of problematic traffic situations into account when providing support.

  • 18.
    Brännmark, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Leaninspirerade förändringar och personalens upplevelser2013In: Lean i arbetslivet / [ed] Sederblad, Per, Stockholm: Liber, 2013, 1, p. 103-121Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    De anställdas upplevelser av hur de kommer att påverkas av ett förändringskoncept är en avgörande faktor för om konceptet kommer att få reellt genomslag eller inte. Det här kapitlet behandlar denna centrala aspekt av leankonceptet – hur personalen upplever leaninspirerade förändringar. Just denna fråga finns det mycket lite empirisk forskning kring, så väl internationellt som i Sverige.

    I kapitlet redovisas en studie av personalens erfarenheter från leanarbetet i medelstora svenska tillverkningsföretag som ingått i det nationella programmet Produktionslyftet. Programmet kan ses som ett exempel på en ”svensk tolkning” av lean. Produktionslyftet har fått stort genomslag i den svenska diskussionen om lean, men samtidigt har konsekvenserna av lean ur ett arbetsmiljöperspektiv inte utvärderats på ett genomgripande sätt.

  • 19.
    Brännmark, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Holden, Richard J
    Departments of Medicine and Biomedical Informatics, Center for Research and Innovation in Systems Safety, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.
    Packages of participation: Swedish employees´experience of Lean depends on how they are involved2013In: IIE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors, ISSN 2157-7323, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 93-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lean production is a dominant approach in Swedish and global manufacturing and service industries. Studies of Lean’s employee effects are few and contradictory. Purpose: Employee effects from Lean are likely not uniform. This article investigates the effect of employees’ participation on their experiences of Lean. Method: This study investigated how different packages of employee participation in Lean affected manufacturing workers’ experiences of Lean. During 2008–2011, qualitative and quantitative data were collected from Swedish manufacturing companies participating in the national Swedish Lean production program Produktionslyftet. Data from 129 surveys (28 companies), 39 semi-structured interviews, and 30 reports were analyzed. In the main analysis, comparisons were made of the survey-reported Lean experiences of employees in three groups: temporary group employees (N = 36), who participated in Lean mostly through intermittent projects; continuous group employees (N = 69), who participated through standing improvement groups; and combined group employees (N = 24), who participated in both ways. Results: Continuous group employees had the most positive experience of Lean, followed by the combined group. Temporary group employees had the least positive experiences, being less likely than their counterparts to report that Lean improved teamwork; occupational safety; and change-related learning, decision making, and authority. Conclusions: These findings support the importance of continuous, structured opportunities for participation but raise the possibility that more participation may result in greater workload and role overload, mitigating some benefits of employee involvement. Consequently, companies should consider involving employees in change efforts but should attend to the specific design of participation activities.

  • 20.
    Callert Jakobsson, Helene
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Rätt från början: Att verka för användbara och tillgängliga lokaler inom hälso- och sjukvård2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Occupational injuries are a problem in healthcare in Sweden. Both occupational accidents and most of all occupational diseases caused by great physical workloads constitute a large proportion of work related musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) of healthcare professionals. The aim of the study was to explore and describe the work process in the design teams of the building design process. The main focus was the building design process of health care buildings and the design teams where ergonomists and safety engineers are asked to participate. The purpose was to create a knowledge base consisting of this study and an appendix with methods and relevant literature. Eight people with different professions were interview. All of them had a good hold on the building design processes and on hospital architecture issues. Among them there were two ergonomists and two safety engineers. The result indicates that ergonomists and safety engineers were those who possessed the knowledge of working environment factors such as ergonomics in the building design processes. The methodology was to follow the agreed plan for the building design process established by the project Manager. Moreover the role of the ergonomists and safety engineers in the design team was to coach and supervise particularly the healthcare professionals. The main approach was to create a good dialogue and conversation and to keep a solution-oriented approach in the design team. Furthermore the most important method was to visualize drawings of Architects which made it possible for the healthcare workers to be able to audit the drawings correctly. This procedure gave the healthcare professionals a decision-making support which helped them to make well-reasoned decisions about their future work environment. The conclusion indicates that ergonomists and safety engineers are important because of their unique knowledge of working environment, especially ergonomics. Ergonomists and safety engineers need to be involved in the early phases of the building design process in order to be able to influence the design of new workspaces. The participation of these two professions in the design team may also benefit the healthcare workers with a future work environment which is largely designed according to their requirements and needs and will probably help to prevent MSDs. In the future there is a need for a specific education just for the ergonomists and the safety engineers participating in the building design process of healthcare buildings. There are great opportunities for them to develop their role towards a more prominent one in the building design process.

    Keywords: Ergonomists, safety engineers, building design process, health care architecture, methods, procedures

  • 21.
    Carlström, Malin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Design for Human Behaviour and Automation: Development and Evaluation of a Holistic Warning Approach2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A human-centered approach when developing new support systems in vehicles has the potential to enable the driver to make safe decisions in the transition between manual and automatic control. However, careful considerations have to be taken. Not only would the design of the systems, in terms of interface be important, but also what kind of activities the systems support. The aim of this study was to identify an appropriate activity to support the cognitive processes for truck drivers, develop an interface for this activity, and evaluate it in driving situations. This was executed in three sub-studies: the Pre-study, the Design-study, and the Evaluation study.

    In the Pre-study, the aim was to investigate for what kind of driver-related activity distribution and long haulage truck drivers need a driver support and interface. This was investigated via contribution from truck drivers, HMI/Ergonomics experts, as well as engineers. The activity chosen to support was detecting objects around the vehicle. However, reconsiderations were made due to constrains in the simulator. Suggested by Scania’s Vehicle Ergonomics group a holistic system was chosen; an interface approach enabling for more technologies to be included within the same interface, reducing the amount of modalities a driver can be exposed to.

    The Design-study addressed the aim of designing an interface for the Holistic system with truck drivers’ cognitive workload in focus. A LED-prototype was built running along the window edges inside the cab of Shania’s Vehicle Ergonomics groups’ simulator, to create warning signal concepts. Literature findings, the LED-prototype, and the simulator were used in an iterative process to design and improve warning signal concepts, until two final concepts were created. The holistic system informs of hazards around and near the vehicle by lighting the area risky objects occurs to guide drivers’ attention and this was done either with 1) the informative display or, 2) the directional display. The Informative display conveys information of a hazard location and type, and the Directional display exclusively conveys information of the hazard location.

    The Evaluation study explored how drivers were affected by, and how they perceived, the holistic interface design regarding mental workload and hazard detection. A user simulator test was designed to collect data within the areas of ‘Event detection’, ‘Workload’, ‘Driving performance’ and ‘Subjective opinion’. Fourteen professional truck drivers assessed three conditions: 1) Baseline (driving without a system), 2) the Informative display, and, 3) the Directional display, while being exposed to potential hazards. To further increase workload, a secondary task was performed at the end of each condition.

    The results showed that the Informative display did not only result in more ‘Detection hits’, instances when a driver responded to a present hazard, but also significantly decreased reaction time to detect a hazard. However, in terms of acceptance, the two concepts were considered equally preferred. As the Informative display showed to be more efficient in terms of hazard detection, this should be investigated further. A holistic interface enables for more systems to be included within the same interface, reducing the amount of alarms and modalities drivers are exposed to if designed skillfully. Thus, more support systems can be included in future vehicles, without causing unnecessary distraction when applying a holistic interface approach.

  • 22.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Imbalanced logics of communicating with media in open management of health care service in Sweden: the managers perspectives and approaches2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Studiematerial: Hållbart chefskap i hälso- och sjukvården - med vinjetter om engagemang, stress, tidsanvändning, medarbetarskap och vårdpraktik2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta är ett studiematerial som syftar till att stödja chefer i det vardagliga arbetet med avseende på hållbart ledarskap, chefskap och tidsanvändning. Med hållbarhet menar vi utifrån både verksamhets- och individ-/hälsoperspektiv. Studiematerialet kan användas för analys, reflektion och utveckling av ledarskap och chefskap.

  • 24.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    KTH.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Strömgren, Marcus
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Nyorientering av svensk sjukvård: Verksamhetstjänande implementeringslogiker bygger mer hållbart engagemang och utveckling - i praktiken2016Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Jutengren, Göran
    Högskolan Borås.
    Hur kan stödresurser understödja hållbart ledarskap bland chefer i vården?2013In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 90, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Chefer kan ha stor betydelse för anställdas hälsa, stress, engagemang i arbetet och prestation. Få tidigare studier har undersökt vilket stöd chefer behöver för ett hållbart och bra ledarskap. Artikeln presenterar resultat från en prospektiv studie om betydelsen av chefers stödresurser för hållbart ledarskap. I studien, som är en del av Chefios-projektet, ingår chefer i kommunal vård och omsorg (n=344). Data från enkätstudier med instrumentet ”Gothenburg Manager Stress Inventory” har analyserats. Resultatet visar att ett stödjande privatliv och en personlig inställning till chefsuppdrag har stor betydelse för chefers hållbarhet över tid. Chefens kontrollspann och erfarenhet som chef påverkade betydelsen av stödresurser. För chefer med kortare chefserfarenhet eller fler underställda (>30) har även stöd från ledning, chefskollegor och externt stöd betydelse.

  • 26.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    ETT ARBETSMATERIAL FÖR ATT STÖDJA Hållbart och hälsofrämjande ledarskap i vardag och förändring2016Report (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Health-Promoting Managerial Work: A Theoretical Framework for a Leadership Program that Supports Knowledge and Capability to Craft Sustainable Work Practices in Daily Practice and During Organizational Change2017In: Societies, ISSN 1090-9389, E-ISSN 2075-4698, Vol. 7, no 2, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to describe a theoretical framework, i.e., theoretical underpinnings and pedagogical principles, for leadership programs that support managers' evidence-based knowledge of health-promoting psychosocial work conditions, as well as their capability to apply, adapt, and craft sustainable managerial work practices. First, the theoretical framing is introduced, i.e., a system theory that integrates key work conditions with a practical perspective on managerial work and organization. Second, pedagogical principles and measures for leaders' training in integrated handling across system levels are described. Last, we present summarized results from an intervention study applying the theoretical framework and pedagogical principles. The complexity of interactions among different factors in a work system, and the variety in possible implementation approaches, presents challenges for the capability of managers to craft sustainable and health-promoting conditions, as well as the evaluation of the program components. Nevertheless, the evaluation reveals the strength of the program, in providing holistic and context-sensitive approaches for how to train and apply an integrative approach for improving the work environment.

  • 28.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Hållbart ledarskap - I vardag och förändring2016Report (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Fredman, Margareta
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    Lean i hälso- och sjukvården2013In: Lean i Arbetslivet / [ed] Per Sederblad, Stockholm: Liber, 2013, 1, p. 142-161Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Strömgren, Marcus
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. University of Borås, Sweden.
    Holden, Richard
    Lean implementation approaches at different levels in Swedish hospitals: the importance for working conditions, worker engagement, health and performance2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Swedish healthcare organizations are investing heavily in internal reforms. Lean has been frequently used as an overall concept to improve care processes and decrease costs. Some evidence shows positive results, especially if work environment issues are considered in parallel with other desired outcomes. However, there are considerable difficulties in evaluating lean as a concept since its application and interpretation seem to vary widely. Further, like for other management concepts, lean outcomes crucially depend on the implementation process.

    Aim

    This program investigates implementations of lean and lean-like developments of processes of care, and how these affect the working conditions, health, and performance of healthcare employees. We also investigated organizational factors and conditions that mediated specific outcomes.

    Method

    Mixed method design: questionnaire to employees (n=880) and managers (n=320), qualitative interviews (n=55) and observations with follow up during three years. Five hospitals were selected, and within them five units that were connected by their flow of acute care patients, i.e. the emergency unit, the medical and surgical emergency ward (or ICU at small hospital) as well as one medical and one surgical ward. Initially we used qualitative-driven analyses and thereafter quantitative-driven mixed method analysis.

    Results

    The implementation strategies varied between the hospitals and between the strategic and operative levels. Strategic managers also used different approaches to overcome the gap between strategic and operative levels. Operative managers shared similarities in their stepwise and coaching approaches encouraging participation among employees, but differences regarding how assignments were delegated. Social capital and attitudes among health care profession were of importance for employees’ work engagement and active engagement in development work.

  • 31.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Högskolan i Borås, Sweden.
    Fallman, S. L.
    Ahlstrom, L.
    Return to work from long-term sick leave: a six-year prospective study of the importance of adjustment latitudes at work and home2015In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 171-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim was to investigate the long-term importance of adjustment latitude for increased work ability and return to work among female human service workers on long-term sick leave. Methods: A cohort of female human service workers on long-term sick leave (>60 days) was given a questionnaire four times (0, 6, 12, 60 months). Linear mixed models were used for longitudinal analysis of the repeated measurements of work ability and return to work. Results: Having a higher level of adjustment latitude was associated with both increased work ability and return to work. Adjustments related to work pace were strongly associated with increased work ability, as were adjustments to the work place. Having individual opportunities for taking short breaks and a general acceptance of taking short breaks were associated with increased work ability. At home, a higher level of responsibility for household work was related to increased work ability and return to work. Individuals with possibilities for adjustment latitude, especially pace and place at work, and an acceptance of taking breaks had greater increased work ability over time and a greater work ability compared with individuals who did not have such opportunities.Conclusions: This study highlights the importance of opportunities for adjustment latitude at work to increase work ability and return to work among female human service workers who have been on long-term sick leave. The results support push and pull theories for individual decision-making on return to work.

  • 32.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Galvin, Kathleen
    Hull University, UK.
    Crafting life-world led leadership2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Jutengren, Göran
    Högskolan Borås.
    Ahlborg, Gunnar
    Institutet för Stressmedicin.
    Chefsspecifika stressorer och stödresurser: betydelse för hållbart ledarskap bland chefer i vård och omsorg2014In: Chefskapets förutsättningar och konsekvenser: Metoder och resultat från CHEFiOS projektet – slutrapport I / [ed] Annika Härenstam, Göteborg: Institutet för Stressmedicin , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Strömgren, Marcus
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Holden, Richard J.
    School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, Indianapolis, US.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Health care clinicians' engagement in organizational redesign of care processes: Health care clinicians' engagement in organizational redesign of care processes2018In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 68, p. 249-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish health care system is reorienting towards horizontal organization for care processes. A main challenge is to engage health care clinicians in the process. The aim of this study was to assess engagement (i.e. attitudes and beliefs, the cognitive state and clinical engagement behaviour) among health care clinicians, and to investigate how engagement was related to work resources and demands during organizational redesign. A cohort study was conducted, using a questionnaire distributed to clinicians at five hospitals working with care process improvement approaches, two of them having implemented Lean production. The results show that kinds of engagement are interlinked and contribute to clinical engagement behaviour in quality of care and patient safety. Increased work resources have importance for engagements in organizational improvements, especially in top-down implementations. An extended work engagement model during organizational improvements in health care was supported. The model contributes to knowledge about how and when clinicians are mobilized to engage in organizational changes.

  • 35.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Health care professionals’ motivation, engagement and collaboration in organizational developments of processes of care2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Strömgren, Marcus
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Holden, Richard
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lean implementation at different levels in Swedish hospitals: the importance for working conditions and stress2015In: International Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics, ISSN 2045-7812, Vol. 3, no 3-4, p. 235-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare organisations in Sweden are reorienting toward horizontal organisation around care processes. This paper's aim was to investigate how implementation approaches for improvements of care processes in line with lean production (LP), at hospital strategic and operative levels, are associated with working conditions and stress-related health among the employees. Five hospitals working with improvements to care processes were studied using questionnaires to employees (n = 1,303) and interviews at strategic and operative levels at baseline and follow-up. The process redesign implementation strategies varied between the strategic and operative levels. There were associations between a higher degree of LP at operative level and increased work resources and decreased work demands. Physical, cognitive and mental stress-related symptoms were only weakly associated with strategic or operative LP initiatives. There was evidence of more beneficial or improved working conditions in relation to higher degree of LP at operative levels.

  • 37.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Wramsten Wilmar, Maria
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Jacobsson, Christian
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Ahlborg, Gunnar
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Ledarskap i vården: Att möta media och undvika personfokuserade drev2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Mote med media ar alltmer vanligt for chefer i varden och en viktig del av arbetet. Motet med media har idag ocksa fatt betydelse for chefens psykosociala arbetsmiljo och hallbarhet da personfokuserat, negativt och kritiskt fokus i media kan vara utmanande och fa vidare konsekvenser. Medvetenhet om mojligheter och risker vid mediakommunikation samt proaktiva forberedelser hos individen och organisationen kan ha avgorande betydelse for att understodja mer saklig och korrekt beskrivning i media samt for att undvika personfokuserade drev. Genom en utvecklad forstaelse och handlingsberedskap samt stod i ledningsgrupper till den som moter media kan negativa konsekvenser minska.

  • 38.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Arbetsmiljö och lärande i Lean och kvalitetsutveckling2014In: Lärande i arbetslivet möjligheter och utmaningar: en vänbok till Per-Erik Ellström / [ed] Henrik Kock, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Frågan om vilka konsekvenser lean och kvalitetsutveckling får för arbetsmiljö och lärande är avgörande för de anställdas acceptans av dessa koncept, men också avgörande för konceptens systemeffektivitet. Hur dessa samband ser ut har behandlats i ett flertal artiklar (Landsbergis, 1999; Westgaard och Winkel, 2007; Hasle et al., 2012; Adler and Borys, 1994; Adler and Cole, 1995; Appelbaum, 1996). Inriktningen på förändringarna och den kultur som finns i organisationerna synes spela avgörande roll för utfallet. Samtidigt finns det anledning att mera i detalj studera dessa samband. Det finns också studier som har kopplat ihop arbetsförhållanden och lärande. Utifrån definitioner på vad som karaktäriserar det goda arbetet har lärande och möjligheter att utvecklas lyfts fram som viktiga faktorer (Thorsrud, 1969). Detta kapitel syftar till att beskriva olika konsekvenser som kan uppstå för lärande och arbetsmiljö i samband med att organisationer inför lean eller initierar kvalitetsutveckling i sin verksamhet. Ett andra syfte är att koppla dessa konsekvenser till de förändringsansatser som genomförs.

  • 39.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Helix, Linköping University.
    Arbetsplatsnära FoU från olika synvinklar2016In: Book of Abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Interactive research: a strategy for ergonomics interventions2015In: Proceedings 19th Triennial Congress of the IEA, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for more ergonomics intervention studies. Reasons are that the knowledge about applications as well as methodology need to be developed (Karsh et al., 2001) It is difficult for ergonomics researchers to get access to organizations that perform interventions. One reason is that extensive resources are needed from the organizations. In order to ollaborate with the researchers, they need to see this collaboration as useful and that they get useful advice or knowledge that can be applied in their operations. Interactive research is a form of participatory research (Aagaard Nielsen and Svensson, 2006), that may offer a solution to the difficulties to perform ergonomics intervention research. Interactive research has been developed from Action research in order to avoid the weaknesses of Action research, such as: - the strong involvement of the researcher in the practical change process makes the change vulnerable in the long-term, - a focus rather on local understanding than in general knowledge creation, - high time and resource demands, - limited output in terms of theory development. Interactive research focuses more on the research and knowledge creation than on the development processes. The research is conducted in a partnership with the practitioners so that the researchers and practitioners together have defined research questions of high priority. Further, the planning of the study as well as the knowledge creation process takes place jointly together with the practitioners (Svensson et al., 2007). There is a clear division of responsibilities, where the interactive researcher is only responsible for the research, and the practitioners only responsible for the implementation of the operational changes and actions taken in the organization. One model for the principles of interactive research was proposed by Ellström et al. (1999), which clarifies the different roles of the practitioners and the researchers. The aim of this paper is to summarize experiences from the use of interactive research in five ergonomics intervention programs.

  • 41.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Helix, LiU.
    Keynote: The hidden relationship between ergonomics and quality2017In: 48th Annual Conference of the Association of Canadian Ergonomists, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SUMMATIVE STATEMENT 

    There is strong evidence that insufficient ergonomics cause quality deficiencies in production. Despite this, it has not yet been accepted that ergonomics is an important production factor. Reasons for this situation and possible actions are discussed.

     

    PROBLEM STATEMENT 

    The scientific literature reports many examples of relationships between ergonomics and quality. However, this knowledge has not been sufficiently systematized for ergonomics to become generally accepted as a production factor.

     

    RESEARCH OBJECTIVE

    The objective of this paper is to summarize different perspectives on the relationship between ergonomics and quality, and to discuss the formation of this knowledge on a generalized level.

     

    RESULTS

    There is a large number of studies and reviews that have identified strong relationships between the quality performance of individuals and different ergonomics aspects such as light, noise, vibration, ventilation, climate, cognition and physical ergonomics. Further, there are also a large number of studies that have identified a relationship between ergonomics and quality output for the organization in different production settings. There are also examples when causality has been shown. All together, this evidence point to that good ergonomics is a precondition for quality performance, in other words an important production factor.

     

    DISCUSSION

    The strong relationship between ergonomics and quality might be accepted within the ergonomics discipline, but not as a production factor and not in working life. TQM and Lean address quality and some aspects of work design as important production factors. There are many reasons why it is not generally recognized that ergonomics is an important production factor. Some of them might be that the research literature is not explicit on this point, the ergonomics knowledge is not spread to the production discipline, and that ergonomics is seen an additional luxury for the employees, provided when the economy of the organization is sufficiently strong. Still another reason might be that there are also examples of how ergonomics improvements can be shown to be unprofitable for the organization.

     

    CONCLUSIONS  

    A large number of research studies show strong evidence that insufficient ergonomics cause quality deficiencies in production, both on an individual and on an organizational level, confirming that ergonomics is a production factor. It is a problem that this knowledge is not formed, disseminated and accepted by production engineers and managers.

     

  • 42.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Helix, LiU.
    Lean in retail – implementation in stores2017In: / [ed] Anna-Lisa Osvalder, Mikael Blomé, Hajnalka Bodnar, Lund, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose

    Lean has been implemented to varying degrees in different organizations and in different branches. Mass-producing manufacturing industries were early in this respect, and later followed by e.g. healthcare, authorities and municipalities. Presently, some stores are implementing Lean-inspired working methods. The purpose of this paper is to identify different ways of working with and implementing Lean in stores.

     

    Methods

    The methods used were case studies in 9 stores. The stores were visited and data were collected through observation of working methods and artefacts in the stores, interviews were conducted with employees and managers, and a questionnaire was answered by a sample of those working in the stores. Finally, documents were collected and photographs were taken.

     

    Results

    A few stores worked according to some the principles of Lean, and other stores had implemented some of the Lean tools. Other stores had statements of the values for the organization on display. Continuous improvement and 5S were two commonly used tools. Visualisation by using whiteboards and KPIs were also applied in several stores, and daily meetings between the store manager and the employees were also taking place in a few stores. Waste reduction has been used for a long time in stores handling fresh food, as well as substantial work in order to improve the logistics. These are aspects that Lean include, but were present in the stores before Lean was introduced.

     

    Discussion with practical implications

    Few examples of a long-term Lean tradition exist. Disseminating good examples that are also good for the work environment of the employees could support a more holistic way of working with Lean and improve working conditions in the future.

     

    Conclusions

    The use of Lean in stores is under development, and several stores have started to introduce Lean-inspired working methods, such as Continuous improvement, 5S, customer orientation, visualization, daily whiteboard meetings and waste reduction.

     

  • 43.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Brännmark, Mikael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Elg, M
    Eriksson, A
    Halling, Bengt
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Halvarsson, A
    Kock, H
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Andersson, K
    Håkansson, Malin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Langstrand, J
    Poksinska, Bozena
    Renström, Jonas
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Svensson, L
    Vänje, Annika
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lean and working conditions: a current position2013In: HELIX Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Helix Vinn Excellence Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Halvarsson, A
    Kock, Henrik
    Lindskog, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Helix Vinn Excellence Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Sustainability and development of Lean implementations2014In: Human Factors in Organizational design and management - XI, 2014, p. 165-169Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean production has become a major change strategy in Swedish public organizations. The aim of this paper was to identify factors that support or counteract sustainability and development of Lean implementations in public organizations. In an interactive research project including interviews and questionnaires, seven public organizations were followed during a three year period. Some factors supported and other factors counteracted sustainability and development of Lean. In conclusion, lack of sustained change was to a  large extent due to replacement of the top managers in five of the organizations and introduction of another change philosophy, low political and managerial ownership and financial problems.

  • 45.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Halvarsson, A.
    Lindskog, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lean implementation, work environment and sustainability2015In: Sustainable Development in Organizations: Studies on Innovative Practices / [ed] Elg, M., Ellström, P-E., Klofsten, M., and Tillmar, M, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 29-41Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean is introduced in industry as well as in the public sector. Previous research has criticized Lean for creating bad working conditions. Also sustainability of organizational changes is claimed to be low. The aim of this chapter is to describe consequences for working conditions and sustainability as a result of implementations of Lean in manufacturing industry and in the public sector. A second aim is to give examples of the type of knowledge produced in an interactive research approach and to discuss the use of interactive research when implementing Lean. Two programs for implementing Lean were assessed through interactive research. The research showed that there is a huge variation between organizations regarding how Lean is interpreted, how it is implemented, and also regarding the outcomes. The majority of the employees in the manufacturing companies experienced that Lean meant improved working conditions, e.g. more participation, learning and development. However they also experienced more stress and repetitive work. For the public organizations, the employees experienced on average that the working conditions had deteriorated. Sustainability of the changes was also substantially lower than for the manufacturing companies. The interactive research approach enabled deep access to a broad sample of organizations and contributed to better relevance and validity of the research results.

  • 46.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Halvarsson, Agneta
    Kock, Henrik
    Lindskog, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Work environment in Swedish Lean implementations2014In: Human Factors in Organizational Design and Management - XI, 2014, p. -660Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean Production has spread from industry to the public sector and administration, and is now the dominating change concept in Sweden. The influence of Lean on the work environment has been debated. However, both positive and negative work environment consequences have been reported in different studies and in different contexts. The aim of this presentation is to describe consequences for the work environment following Lean implementations and to further knowledge about conditions that influence the work environment.

  • 47.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Karltun, Johan
    Jönköpings Tekniska Högskola.
    Vogel, Kjerstin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    ”Hälsa, produktivitet och kvalitet vid arbete med kniv – en interventionsstudie”, dnr 120158: Slutrapport till AFA Försäkring2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Karltun, Johan
    Jönköpings Tekniska Högskola.
    Vogel, Kjerstin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Interactive research and HTO as an industry development model2014In: Human Factors in Organizational design and Management - Xi Nordiv Ergonomics Society Annual Conference, Copenhagen 2014 / [ed] Broberg, Fallentin, Hasle, Jensen, Kabel, Larsen, Weller, 2014, p. 337-342Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meat cutting has since long shown high frequencies of work-related disorders and injuries. The meat cutting industry initiated an interactive research project to assist the companies in creating a better work environment considering also the profitability. After an initial diagnosis, a broad strategy was formed and four mixed groups focusing personal development, technological developments, work organization and work environment started working. The results from these further initiated focused studies that were performed in close interaction with the industry. During the four year project a continuous reduction of usculoskeletal disorder problems in the industry and other substantial effects were observed.

  • 49.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Rolfö, Linda
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Slutrapport: Projektering och planering av nya arbetsmiljöer2016Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Yeow, P.H.P.
    Integrating Ergonomics and Quality Concepts2015In: Evaluation of Human Work / [ed] Wilson, J.R & Sharples, S, Taylor & Francis, 2015, 4, p. 931-956Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book chapter presents an overview of the relationship between ergonomics and quality. It also proposes a framework to integrate ergonomics concepts with quality concepts. The literature reviewed confirms that there is a strong mutual relationship between ergonomics and quality, and that ergonomics deficiencies lead to quality deficiencies. Further, the implementation of quality improvements often lead to better work conditions and better ergonomics. There are many compatibilities and similarities between the two knowledge fields. The framework describes how of quality and ergonomics concepts may be complementary or contradictory, and offers a new perspective for quality and ergonomics practitioners to integrate ergonomics with an organisation’s quality functions.

12345 1 - 50 of 213
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