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  • 1.
    Abshirini, Ehsan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Legeby, Ann
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Flood Resilient Cities: A Syntactic and Metric Novel on Measuring the Resilience of Cities against Flooding, Gothenburg, Sweden2017In: Journal of Geographic Information System, ISSN 2151-1950, E-ISSN 2151-1969, Vol. 9, p. 505-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flooding is one of the most destructive natural disasters which have rapidly been growing in frequency and intensity all over the world. In this view, assessment of the resilience of the city against such disturbances is of high necessity in order to significantly mitigate the disaster effects of flooding on the city structures and the human lives. The aim of this paper is to develop a method to assess the resilience of a river city (the city of Gothenburg in Sweden), which is prone to flood Hazard, against such disturbances. By simulating flood inundation with different return periods, in the first step, the areas of impact are determined. To assess the resilience, two different methods are followed. One is a syntactic method grounded in the foreground network in space syntax theory and the other is based on measuring accessibility to the essential amenities in the city. In the first method, similarity and sameness parameters are defined to quantitatively measure the syntactic resilience in the city. In the next step, accessibility to amenities and the minimum distance to amenities before and after each disturbance is measured. The results, in general, show that such disturbances affect the city structure and the resilience of the city differently. For instance, the city is more resilient after flooding ac- cording to accessibility measures. This clearly means that the answer to the question of resilience is mainly dependent on “resilience of what and for what.”

    Download full text (pdf)
    Abshirini et al - Flood Resilient Cities
  • 2.
    Ahmed, Lamia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Smoliakova, Mariia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Beyond survival: Building resilient communities through co-creation for the Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With our project, we are focusing on the Rohingya refugee issue. In 2017 thousands of people had to cross the borders of Myanmar due to mass genocide triggered by ethnic cleansing and around 800,000 of them flee to Bangladesh as refugees. Whereas, Bangladesh has 2 million informal settlers of its own known as internally displaced people (IDPs) who have been displaced due to extreme climatic conditions. So, we are dealing with the issue of how refugees can coexist in a country where there are already thousands homeless. 

    Currently, the government has built a settlement for 100,000 people on a newly emerged island, Bhashan Char in the Bay of Bengal. Thousands of Rohingya refugees are already being relocated there. However, with the predicted sea-level rise not only the island but the majority of the coastal area of Bangladesh might go underwater. Our project is an attempt to imagine a resilient community, where both refugees and Bangladeshi people will be able to coexist in Bhashan Char, build empathy for each other, and be connected with the surroundings. Simultaneously, be able to co-develop preparedness for future changes connected to sea-level rise using local potential. 

    Hence, the aim of our project is to establish conditions of co-existence for the refugees and IDPs of Bangladesh where they can co-create resilient communities in connection with the local context and the changing environment. 

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  • 3.
    Ahmed, Saba Farheen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Post-Extraction Mine-Scape. Alternate Production and Recreation Protocol for Slite.2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Quarrying of limestone on the Swedish island of Gotland dates all the way back to the 5th century but saw the rise of its modern form during the early 20th century, with the establishment of Cementa AB at Slite, which since then has developed as an industrial town. Cementa has been progressively mining limestone in three large open pit quarries in Slite. Their factory accounts for approximately three quarters of Sweden’s cement production and is considered to be a vital part of the construction industry. However, the ecological and social damages caused by the extractive procedures far exceed the economic incentive and has triggered numerous debates on whether they should be allowed to continue production.  

    This project henceforth envisions an alternate post-extraction future for Slite’s mine-scape, where the production of cement will shift from extracting limestone to growing limestone using calcareous microalgae. The leftover quarries will be regenerated, the factory will be repurposed, and the contextual industrial land will be developed, improved, and enhanced for the benefit of the surrounding community and visitors. By shifting to a net-zero carbon method of producing cement, alternate industries will develop in place which will also resolve Slite’s socio-economic dependency on limestone and diversify its mono-cultural economy.

    A 30-year protocol is planned to transform the urban-industrial fabric of Slite into a microalgae farming field and extreme sports destination - creating an anthroposcenic garden in which production, everyday life and leisure are meant to be compatible. While the quarries will undergo a natural rewilding process, this proposal does not intend to artificially restore the quarries entirely to their original landscapes but rather acknowledge our anthropogenic actions as irreversible and consequential; and hence engage with this damaged landscape to find new uses for it. 

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  • 4.
    Albertini, Vittoria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    THE WALKABLE CITY: ALONG THE EDGE OF STOCKHOLM. Developing the edge to reconnect a former industrial site to the city2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Stockholm is an archipelago of islands connected by water that historically has been an important resource for the city and for the industries, which found an easy access for ships and therefore they settled on strategic positions along the edges.

    This thesis investigates the topics of water, industrial heritage and edges in the city of Stockholm: these aspects are strong in their individual identity but they also interact in a powerful and interesting way.

    This work intervenes where this pattern is still visible -due to the presence of water and industries- but not accessible because it lacks the third element of connection with the city.

    The aim is therefore to investigate strategies that increase and reconnect the potential of these aspects that got disconnected through time.

    To obtain accessibility and usability, the edge was transformed and redefined to enhance the experience of walking along it.

    An analysis was carried out and a proposal was designed for the site of Lövholmen, which has these characteristics -the water, a strong industrial heritage and proximity to the city- that are now disconnected.

    The opening of the edge and possibilities of walking will transform and reconnect the site - and the richness in it- with the city of Stockholm. 

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    MasterThesis_Albertini_Panels
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    MasterThesis_Albertini_Abstract Booklet
  • 5.
    Andersson, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Interdependence of resources2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The demand for natural resources is increasing, leading to more exploitations in northern Sweden. This project is situated in the region of Norrbotten, which is currently undergoing significant transformations due to continued mining activity, energy production, and forestry. These activities are claiming, destroying, and disrupting large areas of land. In addition, little of the resources produced from these activities benefit the communities. Sami people were nomads, moving to different hunting, fishing, and reindeer land. However, the Sami community has had southern models imposed upon them, which has affected the loss of Sami knowledge and culture.

    This project challenges the dominant narrative of ‘green development’, stating that the exploitations are not sustainable or just. Through the lens of sustainability, the project understands the practices of Sami culture and the value of local ecologies in the region to derive solutions. By building on nomadic practice and utilizing the land like the Sami community, this project generates resilient, productive landscapes. This project puts forward an alternative future scenario, one where Sweden is based on a distributed, decentralized structure. This thesis aims to provide strategies for a more self-sufficient, interdependent region where the connection between local communities and local ecologies is re-established.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Ayarzagoitia, Diego
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    EBC Eco business Community: Sustainable Urban Prototype2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The intention of this project is to create a Sustainable Urban Prototype for the typical Mexican growing city.  Located in the heart of San Pedro Garza Garcia, Mexico, The "Centrito Valle" business center has the potential to become an area full of life, that offers a great place to live, work, entertain, socialize, shop and workout. Eight main issues were identified and were tackled by this proposal: 1. Insufficient Parking, 2. Lack of Public Space, 3. Need for Collaborative Planning, 4. Investment Plan, 5. Lack of Incentives 6. Traffic, 7. Obsolete Resource Management, and 8. Landscape Design. A new institution was formed: EBC Eco Business Community, aiming to balance between the social, economic and ecological aspects of society. This institution combines specific strategies between the models of BID: Business Improvement District, and Environmental Governance.  EBC has the intention to organize the currently seven hundred different plot owners, to join and guide their efforts towards an integrated sustainable development.  EBC will propose a set of guidelines and ideas that will help create a sustainable Urban Prototype that could later on be multiplied into other growing cities in Mexico.  The outcome of the proposal clearly shows the possibilities and potential of how this area could be completely transformed.

  • 7.
    Aydilek, Emre
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Eroglu, Ali
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Ulvsunda as Urban Catalyst2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Bai, Kunyu
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Maximum Sustainability: Organic Urban Renewal of Gudaoxiang Historical District in Changsha2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Bakratsa, Fani
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Cities beyond growth: Creating alternative tools to transform urban crisis' into urban asset2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    What is the future scenario of crisis cities? How is the urban planning paradigm going to affect cities facing crisis? This thesis has as its departure point the post-crisis cities and the problems these cities have to confront. Discussions and debates concerning the economic crisis have now conquered the political discussions and policies in Europe. Since many cities worldwide suffer from the cut down policies and austerity measures, most of the urban environments are being under major change.

    The main objective of this Master Thesis is to explore the main characteristics of cities in crisis and then transform this backdrop into a strong element through a design proposal for a sustainable future. Encouraged by the idea that individuals and communities can build up their own economy and their own sustainable environment, initiatives and efforts have been taken. Embracing the already existing and implementing new bottom up initiatives, for the creation of a less consuming lifestyle, specific urban tools are developed. This thesis investigates an alternative economic pattern and how this could be implemented in a greek neighborhood, suffering from the consequences of crisis, basically, reversing the notion of what growth actually is.

    In this approach, economic degrowth is used as an urban asset rather than being addressed as an urban problem.  The idea is that post-crisis cities, struggling with decline and unemployment, can simply adapt a different socioeconomic and more resilient lifestyle that is not based on consumption and materialism. This thesis is about challenging the current concept of ‘growth’, more in terms of quality rather than quantity. 

  • 10.
    Barthel, Stephan
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Colding, Johan
    Stockholm Resilience Center.
    Gren, Åsa
    Beijerinstitutet för Ekologisk Ekonomi.
    Legeby, Ann
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Lars, Marcus
    Chalmers.
    Nytt miljonprogram unik chans att lösa flera frågor2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Dolt värde av enorma mått. Ett nytt miljonprogram kan förskräcka, men kan vara just vad Sverige behöver. Men vi ska inte upprepa misstagen från förra gången. Istället måste politierna nu ta fasta på denna unika chans at ta itu med vår tids stora utmaningar som integration, tillväxt och hållbarhet. 

  • 11. Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Colding, Johan
    Ernstson, Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Grahn, Sara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Erixon, Hanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Marcus, Lars
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Kärsten, Carl
    Torsvall, Jonas
    Chans sätta Stockholm på kartan2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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    Sätta Stockholm på kartan
  • 12.
    Berghauser Pont, Meta
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Ståhle, Alexander
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Marcus, Lars
    Chalmers.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Fitger, Martin
    XMN Software AB.
    Legeby, Ann
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Stavroulaki, Ioanna
    Chalmers.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Miranda Carranza, Pablo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Architectural Technologies.
    Nordström, Tobias
    Spacescape AB.
    PST2019Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    PST is a tool for performing space syntax and regular accessibility analyses. It currently consists of two main parts - a C++ and Python library called Pstalgo and a plugin for the desktop application QGIS.

    PST is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or (at your option) any later version. The GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to share and change all versions of a program--to make sure it remains free software for all its users.

    For latest download visit either the Chalmers publication page, or find "Releases" on the Github page.

  • 13.
    Bergström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Structures for the co-created city2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project seeks new forms of housing production that answer to the disappearance of the welfare state and provides structures for self-organization. It stretches the limits of the housing policies and explores new flexible design solutions. It addresses social and economical adaptability where both the city and the dwellers have responsibility for the process and development of new housing. The adaptable city is a city where dwellers co-create their housing environment. 

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    fulltext
  • 14.
    Bergström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, History and Theory of Architecture.
    Marcus, Lars
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    KI Arkitektur och kunskapsmiljö: Tävlingen/Etableringen/Förnyelsen2010 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities, like many other institutions in today’s society, are to such an extent connected to their buildings that activity and built structures can be difficult to separate from each other. What we can begin to see is how people have always used building to establish and maintain both societal functions and more everyday customs and practices. Activities that manage to establish themselves in built form become a natural and supportive part of our material reality, whereas activities that do not may have problems surviving. In our times, characterized by continuous change, established solutions can also be in the way of new development and hinder us from seeing how the built environment could be designed in a different way.

    Seen from this perspective, KI – Karolinska Institutet – constitutes an interesting example between consciously shaped environment and highly qualified academic activity. Karolinska Institutet is since long one of Swedens most creative knowledge environments. The institute’s buildings have come to over a long period of time and is characterized by high ambitions, where different ideas of the conditions of knowledge production have governed both the overall plan and the design of individual buildings. By clarifying these ideas, and simultaneously investigating how the built result works, we hope to contribute not only to the understanding of the development of Karolinska Institutet, but to e more general knowledge of the relation between architecture and knowledge environment as well.

     

  • 15.
    Björn, Hellström
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Universell utformning i den kommunala samhällsbyggnadsprocessen: Om konsten att bygga en organisation med spelrum för reflektion, kreativitet och professionellt omdöme2022In: Jämlik livsmiljö: Universell utformning och tillgänglighet som stadsbyggnadsutmaning / [ed] Daniel Koch, Stockholm: Kungliga tekniska högskolan, 2022, p. 17-46Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This part-report/chapter is part of a research report that presents findings from a research project on universal design from a systems perspective. This perspective includes “systems” in several aspects: planning systems, political systems, organizations, social systems, and spatial systems. The focus is on planning systems and spatial systems, addressing challenges and queries in how to understand molar (larger scale, system) perspectives of universal design as interlinked with molecular (local) aspects. The reoport contains a general discussion and conclusion of the project as a whole and three studies, focusing on process and governance, developing models and methods, and investigating universal design challenges in relation to system world, life world, and material world respectively.

    This part-report/chapter concerns process and governance, and is in Swedish. See the whole volume for a brief English summary of the entire collection. 

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    Hellström B -- Universell utformning i den kommunala samhälls­ byggnadsprocessen (Jämlik livsmiljö, 2022)
  • 16.
    Bolt, Ellinor
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Adaptable classroom lighting for pedagogical activities2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Classroom lighting has been installed in the same way since the 1960s, in straight lines offluorescent tubes, even if the teaching values have changed remarkably. There is a need for knowledge exchange that bridges lighting design theory and pedagogy and studies on how the current situation impacts education. Furthermore, there are few studies on new ways of illuminating classrooms. This thesis explores two case studies: one standard classroom built in the 1960s and a classroom redesigned in 2020 with adaptable lighting. The two case studies are used to derive a design concept that can be installed in any standard classroom. Moreover, during the autumn and winter in Sweden, electric light is crucial to support circadian rhythms, and there is a need for adaptability and change throughout the day.

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    fulltext
  • 17.
    Boltakke, Lubna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Reviving Skellefteå2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The changes that we are seeing and anticipating are largely due to human behaviour. Arctic sea ice is at the lowest levels ever recorded. The volume of Arctic ice has decreased dramatically over the past decade. . The consequences of losing the Arctic ice cover are expected to be enormous if the ice is no longer able to reflect sunlight, as the region could warm more than it is now. And water quality would go to its lowest levels since the flooding levels is higher. 

    Industry also is considered as major source of water pollution; it produces pollutants very harmful to people and the environment. Many industrial plants use freshwater surfaces for the transfer of waste from the factory to rivers, lakes and oceans.

    This could lead to increased ocean temperatures with unknown effects on the weather system. Moreover, the natural habitats of many species are being destroyed. Environmentally destructive practices and the increasing number of people living in harm's way can exacerbate natural disasters. Through forest degradation and river engineering. Filling wetlands, destabilizing the climate, we are changing the natural system so that its ability to protect us diminishes.

    Cities around industrial locations can lose their vigor and vitality just as surely as a once hot product can lose its cutting edge cool.

    Meanwhile working on city development into ecological perspective means gathering all the systems together in circular system make post industrial future cities greener place to live and fresher attractive centres. 

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    fulltext
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 18.
    Boric, Bojan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Rethinking Urban Development in China2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Boric, Bojan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Squares for Public Life2011In: New Urban Topologies: The Chisinau and Minsk Experience / [ed] Rebecka Gordon, Färgfabriken, Svenska Institutet: Färgfabriken, Svenska Institutet , 2011, p. 75-75Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Boric, Bojan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    The Ghost Boulevard2020Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1947, Soviet architect Alexey Shchusev developed a large-scale urban renewal project for the post-war city of Chisinau, the then-capital of the SSR of Moldova. Part of the master plan was the construction of Boulevard D. Cantemir, which would cut through the city’s historic fabric. Only two sections of the boulevard were built before the project was abandoned. During the period of radical institutional political and economic shift towards a market economy in the early 1990s, initiatives to build the boulevard re-emerged through red lines, zoning documents, and planning regulations. The lack of political consensus caused planning paralyses over the city, creating a legal void where different actors competed to appropriate spaces. The power of the red lines has prompted various kinds of materializations of the boulevard. The real battle takes place in the sphere of the imaginary, and memory management is one of the main planning tools. Exploring the trajectory of the “Ghost Boulevard,” I reveal conflicting political and economic agendas and the many forces that constitute complex processes of planning today.

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    fulltext
  • 21. Borrion, Hervé
    et al.
    Ekblom, Paul
    Alrajeh, Dalal
    Borrion, Aiduan Li
    Keane, Aidan
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design. Chalmers Institute of Technology.
    Mitchener-Nissen, Timothy
    Toubaline, Sonia
    The Problem with Crime Problem-Solving: Towards a Second Generation Pop?2020In: British Journal of Criminology, ISSN 0007-0955, E-ISSN 1464-3529, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 219-240, article id azz029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his 2018 Stockholm prize winner lecture, Goldstein highlighted the need for problem-oriented policing (POP) to be not only effective but also fair. Contributing to the development of POP, this study examines how a wider perspective on problem-solving generally, and scoping in particular, can be adopted to address some of the growing challenges in 21st century policing. We demonstrate that the concept of ‘problem’ was too narrowly defined and that, as a result, many problem-solving models found in criminology are ill-structured to minimize the negative side-effects of interventions and deliver broader benefits. Problem-solving concepts and models are compared across disciplines and recommendations are made to improve POP, drawing on examples in architecture, conservation science, industrial ecology and ethics.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Borrion et al - The Problem with Crime Problem-Solving (BJC 2020)
  • 22.
    Borrion, Hervé
    et al.
    UCL University College London.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Architecture2018In: Routledge Handbook of Crime Science / [ed] Richard Wortley, Aiden Sidebottom, Nick Tilley, Gloria Laycock, New York: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 145-166Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on crime prevention in relation to architecture as a discipline and as built material environment. It discusses earlier research and presents developments from the EU project ‘Resilient Infrastructure and Building Security’ (RIBS). In the chapter, we insist on the term ‘architecture’ (instead of the ostensibly more neutral term ‘built environment’) as historical, social, aesthetical and cultural values ought to be considered in crime prevention discussions. The chapter begins with an overview of the main principles and theoretical developments in the field of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED). This is followed by a section illustrating important contributions that architects have made to the instantiation of criminological principles. The last section of the chapter presents computational tools that have been developed to support architects in designing more secure and more resilient buildings. We conclude with critically examining and discussing what contribution these elements have made to enhance and nuance CPTED concepts, methods and practices.

  • 23.
    Brolund de Carvalho, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Schalk, Meike
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Mattsson, Helena
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    The group BiG (Bo i Gemenskap): Living and working in community2019In: AHRA conference 'Collective Life', 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Chavosh, Ardalan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Handbook of Waste and Network of Re-use2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The intelligent handling of waste is a pressing issue today. Up until the 19th century it had been however an integral part of societies especially when it comes to the waste generated by construction and demolition (Bahamon and Sanjines, 2010). After industrial revolution (1750-1850) which opened the gates of mass production and mass consumption followed and supported by two major forces of capitalism and the dramatic increase in world population, the generation of waste accelerated correspondingly and in a global scale.

    The mass extraction of natural resources on one hand (limited amount of natural resources), and the problems caused by waste landfilling and incineration such as pollution and diseases on the other hand, made us stop this linear extraction-to-waste trend and recognize recycling as a solution. Recycling chiefly addresses a sustainable approach to reduce the negative effects of waste and at the same time involves processing used materials (waste) into new products to prevent waste of potentially useful materials (Eco Cloud), however through recycling not only some energy has to be consumed to make this process run but also some portion of pollution would be generated as a side effect. What is more is that up until today recycling has been neither in many cases economically profitable nor has it been possible to recycle all the amount of waste. For instance In US- as the most consuming society on the planet Earth- only 34% of the municipal solid waste can be recycled and the rest ends up in either landfills or incinerators (EPA,2010).

    This project is to mainly focus on the definition of a rather comprehensive network (Network of Reuse) which sits right before recycling through which as much as possible of the total amount of waste could be directly absorbed back into the society (with minor changes in some cases) in different scales, the resultants of which would be claimed not to be only less energy consumption and less pollution caused through processing waste (as in recycling) but also avoiding a considerable amount of unrecycled materials from ending up in landfills and incineration. In fact the assumed network-which is simulated by the smart grid model- could be said to be a complementary section added to the existing trend today and is on no account against recycling. Like any other network, the network of reuse is based upon strategies, tools, and policies. The rhizomic growing structure of this network-that is in contrast to the tree structure of recycling- suggests a bottom up movement in handling waste and empowering people while the proposed time-line strategy is assumed to be moving from entertainment towards a coherent business network. In fact the project itself suggests the necessity of more bottom up structures to happen in our future planning. The entire project is highly founded upon research and could be applied in a variety of actual designs and concrete cases. Therefore, in this project no specific site is being addressed directly but the actual need for adding the supposed network is explored.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Handbook of Waste and Network of Re-use by Ardalan Chavosh
  • 25.
    Choi, Eunyoung
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    On the Potentials and Problems of Pedestrianization: The Use of Car-­free Streets2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will discuss how the car-free streets are used by the pedestrians in residential neighborhoods and how it affects the walkability of the built environment. The discussion is based on empirical evidence, the results from a case study in Stockholm, Sweden. The project was a qualitative observation study in three residential areas in Stockholm with the aim of understanding and developing the concept of ‘walkability’ in the Scandinavian urban context. The walking behavior of residents was observed, and the data on walking behavior patterns and pedestrian route choices have been analyzed in relation to different properties of the built environment.

    In this paper, the focus will be on how car-free streets are used by pedestrians in residential areas. The comparison of the walking behavior in three residential neighborhoods with different conditions in the built environment will be described, focusing on how the car-pedestrian interaction seems to take place. It will develop the discussion on how the car-free design affects the walkability by enhancing or impeding different qualities such as traffic safety, crime safety, land-use diversity, etc. All of the three studied areas include pedestrian-only streets/paths in different conditions with different forms, which allow the discussion on different ways of implementing car-free environment in urban design practices. The results from this case study imply that, although car-free design is often adopted in order to create a pedestrian-friendly environment, it is important to be cautious in its design since, according to how it is implemented, it may also reduce the walkability of the environment. 

  • 26.
    Choi, Eunyoung
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Understanding Walkability: Dealing with the complexity behind pedestrian behavior2013In: Proceedings of the Ninth International Space Syntax Symposium / [ed] Y O Kim, H T Park and K W Seo, Seoul: Sejong University , 2013, , p. 14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of pedestrian-friendly urban environments has been of increasing importance lately in urban planning and design. In order to develop a better knowledge about the walkability of the built environment, it is important to understand the complexity behind walking behavior. Since different kinds of walking activities vary in their goal, effort, frequency, duration, etc., they also vary in how strongly and in what aspect they are influenced by the condition of urban form and also in the qualities in the built environment that the pedestrian prioritize during the walking activity. With an empirical study in three residential areas in Stockholm, Sweden, this study investigated the different types and aspects of walking activities in how they are influenced by and interact with the built environment. The results of the observation study of walking behavior showed that the condition of the built environment related to the density, connectivity, and land-use diversity seem to influence the amount and diversity of walking activities that occur in the given environment and also affect how the walking activities are conducted. This is related to the degree of the potential of the urban form in providing the different qualities that the pedestrians may desire from the environment in their walking activities, which is not only related to providing walking destinations and possible routes, but also qualities that may enhance the experiential quality of walking. Investigating the different aspects of walking in how they occur and are conducted in the urban environment is important in understanding why and how different conditions of the urban form may discourage or encourage walking. This may not only be useful in providing insights for more accurate knowledge on walkability, but may also assist a better understanding and application of other urban design theories on pedestrian movement as well.

    Download full text (pdf)
    SSS9_Eunyoung Choi_Understanding Walkability
  • 27.
    Choi, Eunyoung
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Understanding Walkability: From 3 Neighborhoods in Stockholm, Sweden2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus on pedestrian-friendly environment has increased among urban planners and designers. Also, with the aim of enhancing public health, ‘walkability research’ has been actively done with the preventive medicine field, where the correlation between the built environment and physical activity has been explored. Results from existing studies show the importance of the urban environment on walkability and provide evidence on correlation between different built environment attributes and walking activity. However, better understanding of both the built environment factors and walking activity is necessary in order to improve the measurement of the built environment attributes and to provide better knowledge on designing a walkable environment. 

    This paper includes results from a case study in Stockholm, Sweden, an observation study of three residential neighborhoods with the aim of understanding and developing ‘walkability’ in the Swedish context. The walking behavior of residents was observed, and the data on walking behavior patterns and pedestrian route choices have been analyzed in relation to different factors of the built environment. In this paper, the discussion will mainly be on the three factors that existing walkability research has most consistently proven correlation with walking: density, land-use diversity, and connectivity. Preliminary result shows that these factors seem to influence the quantity or the quality of walking activity and suggests how these factors could be dealt as a design problem. Also it suggests that the built environment attributes influence the walking behavior differently according to type/aspect of the walking activity.

  • 28.
    Choi, Eunyoung
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Urban form and walking behavior: Understanding different aspects of walking activity2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The planning and design of the walkable environment is receiving more and more attention for its various benefits related to public health, sustainability, economy, or social life. Therefore, there is a growing need for knowledge about the walkability of the built environment. This presentation will report part of a research project on the relationship between urban form and walking behavior. One important issue dealt in this study is the investigation of the different aspects of walking through partitioning walking activities when studying how they are influenced by the built environment.

    Three residential areas from Stockholm, Sweden were selected for the empirical study. An on-site observation study in these selected neighborhoods investigated the walkability of the built environment and the walking behavior of the pedestrians in the areas. Combining both qualitative and quantitative methods, the walking behaviors of the individuals of the areas were documented in detail by observing: the route choices made for the walking trips by tracking pedestrians / the details in the walking behavior during the walking activity tracked / the presence of different types of walking activities taking place in the area / the level of pedestrian density and its patterns. By obtaining hard data on real behaviors of walking in different situations, which includes around 2000 observed walking trips, the field study provides a detailed description of the walking activities and their patterns in the selected neighborhoods. GIS analyses of the condition of the built environment in the study areas were also conducted.

    The data from the observation study are analyzed mainly around factors such as land-use diversity, density, and connectivity. The analysis confirms the significance of these factors discussed in improving the walkability of the urban environment. Moreover, an important outcome from this study is that walking activities differ in how they are influenced by various factors of the built environment. Since different kinds of walking activities vary in their goal, effort, frequency, duration, etc., they also vary in how strongly and in what aspect they are influenced by the condition of urban form and also in the qualities the pedestrian searches for and desires from the built environment. For example, the results of the empirical study show how various purposes of walking differently relate to the built environment in their route choice or frequency and how the different conditions of the environment also seem to influence the presence and characters of the different walking activities of their inhabitants.

    This study suggests that in order to produce more accurate knowledge about the planning and design of walkable environments for researchers and practitioners in the field of urban planning, design, and architecture, acknowledging the different types of walking activity may be crucial in investigating their relationship to the built environment.

  • 29.
    Choi, Eunyoung
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Walkability and the complexity of walking behavior2014In: A/Z ITU Journal of the Faculty of Architecture, ISSN 1302-8324, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 87-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of pedestrian-friendly urban environments has been of increasing importance lately in urban planning and design. In order to develop a better knowledge about the walkability of the built environment, it is important to understand the complexity behind walking behavior. Since different kinds of walking activities vary in their goal, effort, frequency, duration, etc., they also vary in how strongly and in what aspect they are influenced by the condition of urban form. With an empirical study in three residential areas in Stockholm, Sweden, this study investigated the different types of walking activities in how they interact with the built environment. The results showed that the condition of the built environment related to the density, connectivity, and land-use diversity seems to influence the amount and diversity of walking activities and also affect how the walking activities are conducted. This is related to the degree of the potential urban form has in providing the different qualities that the pedestrians desire from the environment, which is not only related to providing walking destinations and possible routes, but also qualities that enhance the experiential quality of walking. Investigating the different aspects of walking in how they occur and are conducted in the urban environment is important in understanding why and how different conditions of the urban form discourage or encourage walking. This is not only useful in providing insights for more accurate knowledge on walkability, but also assists a better understanding and application of other urban design theories on pedestrian movement as well.

  • 30.
    Choi, Eunyoung
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Walkability as an Urban Design Problem: Understanding the activity of walking in the urban environment2012Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The planning and design of the walkable environment is receiving more and more attention for its various benefits related to public health, sustainability, economy, or social life. Therefore, there is a growing need for knowledge about the walkability of the built environment. While urban planning, design, and transportation research have also examined walking in urban environments, a recently growing field of research usually referred to as walkability research have been actively investigating the relation between the built environment and walking behavior through correlation analysis. Although one must acknowledge the value of current walkability research to be used as the framework which can make significant contributions to urban design research and practice, it also has a few shortcomings in terms of applicability. There is also a problem that the design factors that are often discussed as promoting walking or creating ‘pedestrian-friendly environments’ in urban design theories and discourses are often based on little evidence and that these factors have been shown to be insignificant in the quantitative analyses on the amount of walking. This project aims to support urban design knowledge and practice and to contribute to the broader field of “walkability” by refining the methods and measures used to analyze the relation between walking behavior and physical environment. Its goal is to integrate knowledge from the medical field of walkability with urban design research and provide new empirical knowledge about the concrete level in which urban design and architectural practice operates.

    What has been done during the earlier part of this PhD research project and is presented in this licentiate thesis is producing knowledge for a better understanding of the complexity behind the relationship between the built environment and walking. Through literature review from different fields and also through an empirical study, this project tried to investigate the concept of walkability by trying to understand the different ways/aspects in which the built environment influences walking, e.g. directly influencing the quantity of walking through providing destinations, or enhancing the experiential quality of walking by determining the condition as a walking environment. It also investigated the different aspects of walking by partitioning walking activities in understanding how they are influenced by different properties of the built environment. By partitioning both the influence of the built environment on walking and walking activity, the knowledge that this thesis tries to produce is not only on whether or not, but more on how and why the built environment influences walking behavior. Three residential areas from Stockholm were selected for the empirical study. The results of the empirical study show how the various factors and condition of the built environment influence walking with different effects and leverage and the importance of investigating the factors on different levels and from different aspects. Also, it seems that the different types of walking are related to how they are influenced by the built environment, and the different conditions of the environment also seem to influence the presence and characters of the walking activities of their inhabitants. The findings from this project provide insights into how we can better understand the interaction between the built environment and walking behavior in influencing each other.

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    fulltext
  • 31.
    Choi, Eunyoung
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Movement and the connectivity of streets: A closer look at route distribution and pedestrian density2015In: SSS 2015 - 10th International Space Syntax Symposium, The Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Correlations between pedestrian movement and connectivity of streets have been frequently found in numerous studies. The configuration of the street network and its relation to observed movement patterns found in space syntax research is, of course, a significant part from them. With an attempt to further investigate the relation between urban form and movement behaviour, this study tests the correlation between configurational measures and a more detailed data on pedestrian movement. Observed in three residential neighbourhoods from Stockholm, the first part of data collected is the number of pedestrian per street segment (on a given moment). This so-called ’snapshot’ data of the pedestrian density is tested with the configurational measures of the street network. The preliminary result shows a significant degree of correlation between pedestrian density and configuration. More importantly, another set of data on pedestrian movement is the data of 200 individual trips made in one of the three study areas (with highest average movement density). The detailed data on individual walking trips is obtained through random on-site tracking of pedestrians, and includes the route and the details of the trip character. This data is also tested in its correlation to configuration measures. An interesting result from this is the large difference in the degrees of correlation found for origin/destination segments and route-in-between segments. The result also shows that the degree of correlation also differs according to the character of the walking activity e.g. utilitarian, recreational, etc. Testing with data on movement containing more details of pedestrian behaviour, this study tries to investigate how urban form interacts with pedestrian movement in the aspect of street connectivity.

  • 32.
    Choi, Eunyoung
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Sardari sayyar, Sara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Urban Diversity and Pedestrian Behavior: Refining the concept of land-use mix for walkability2012In: EIGHTH INTERNATIONAL SPACE SYNTAX SYMPOSIUM / [ed] Margarita Greene, José Reyes, Andrea Castro, Santiago de Chile: PUC , 2012, p. 8073:1-8073:15Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While land-use mix has continuously been referred to for its importance for walkability, current researchdemands further investigation to refine the concept and develop the measurement for it so that it may bestcapture the way it influences walking behavior. This study combines two on-going research projects dealingwith issues in urban form, one on urban diversity and the other on walkability, both trying to develop theconceptualization and the measurement of these qualities. Regarding diversity, scales and categorizations astwo essential factors for evaluating diversity are examined in this study by the implementation of analysis atvarious configurational levels and on access to variety. From the research project on walkability, a qualitativeobservation study was conducted examining the subjective measurement of pedestrian density and itspatterns, the route choices made in the walking trips observed while tracking pedestrians, and the differenttypes of walking activities taking place in the study areas. By obtaining hard data on real behaviors of walkingin different situations, it provides a detailed description of the walking activities and their patterns in threeneighborhoods in Stockholm, Sweden, where the quantitative analysis regarding diversity was also conducted.Therefore, in this study the multi-level analyses searching for the proper and useful scale for measuringdiversity are compared with the descriptive data on walking behavior, in order to test their validity andapplicability in walkability research. The results show that areas with higher degree of diversity in the builtenvironment contribute to higher degree of diversity in walking behavior by providing variety in both thecomposition of pedestrians and the type of walking activities, which may ultimately enhance the walkability ofan area. The comparison of the quantitative analysis of the built environment with the description of thewalking activities show the potential of the analysis presented in this paper as a tool in measuring factorsrelated to walkability, and the process allows a better understanding of the walkability as a complex subject.Certain parts of the analyses especially show strength in being a more precise measurement and a betterrepresentation of the built environment attributes than the ones done in the earlier walkability studies.Although the analyses and discussions presented in this paper yet have limitations in fully exploring the issueof diversity and walkability of the urban form, they provide insight and knowledge for the development ofeach project.

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    fulltext
  • 33.
    Classon, Ida-Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    To Exist Between Frames: neighborliness, territoriality, in-between areas and their cultural practices2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary urban development seems to, globally and simultaneously, aim for the same results; densification, connections and an active urban life. In Stockholm this is emphasized through the comprehensive plan, The Walkable City. This thesis aims to research the com- plexities of open space, in-between areas and cultural practices on borders of territories.

    I have visited two neighborhoods, one in Stureby, Stockholm and one in Madison, Wisconsin as part of an art-based research where places for cultural practices have been observed and performed by me as a way to investigate in-between areas and what role they take in everyday lives. I have met with inhabitants for observations and interviews as well as performing an everyday life of my own when staying in Madison for two weeks. I have used a few different pictures of neighborliness to see what exists between the frame of the pictures and the situation, and related this to Miwon Kwon’s notion about places situated next to each other.

    I have also looked into the concept of territory, the ambiguous space between them and the communication that occurs on interfaces. In Stockholm's comprehensive plan and the research of Alexander Ståhle, I see an aiming for densification through connections, e.g. in walkability. I emphasize on a difference between connections and communication.

    With this thesis I suggest to change the topic of a planning discussion going on in Stockholm as well as globally, from how to create walkability to how to make use of interfaces of ambiguous open space when densifying cities.

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    Ida-Maria Classon Master Thesis
  • 34.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    The Royal Swedish Academy of the Sciences.
    Marcus, Lars
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Ekosystemtjänster i Stockholmsregionen2013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    Univ Gävle, Dept Bldg Engn Energy Syst & Sustainabil Sci, Kungsbacksvagen 47, SE-80176 Gävle, Sweden.;Royal Swedish Acad Sci, Beijer Inst Ecol Econ, POB 50005, SE-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Samuelsson, Karl
    Univ Gävle, Dept Bldg Engn Energy Syst & Sustainabil Sci, Kungsbacksvagen 47, SE-80176 Gävle, Sweden.;Univ Gävle, Dept Comp & Geospatial Sci, Kungsbacksvagen 47, SE-80176 Gävle, Sweden..
    Marcus, Lars
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Architecture & Civil Engn, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Gren, Asa
    Royal Swedish Acad Sci, Beijer Inst Ecol Econ, POB 50005, SE-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Legeby, Ann
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Pont, Meta Berghauser
    Univ Gävle, Dept Comp & Geospatial Sci, Kungsbacksvagen 47, SE-80176 Gävle, Sweden..
    Barthel, Stephan
    Univ Gävle, Dept Bldg Engn Energy Syst & Sustainabil Sci, Kungsbacksvagen 47, SE-80176 Gävle, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Kraftriket 2B, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Frontiers in Social-Ecological Urbanism2022In: Land, E-ISSN 2073-445X, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 929-, article id 929Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a new approach in urban ecological design, referred to as social- ecological urbanism (SEU). It draws from research in resilience thinking and space syntax in the analysis of relationships between urban processes and urban form at the microlevel of cities, where social and ecological services are directly experienced by urban dwellers. The paper elaborates on three types of media for urban designers to intervene in urban systems, including urban form, institutions, and discourse, that together function as a significant enabler of urban change. The paper ends by presenting four future research frontiers with a potential to advance the field of social-ecological urbanism: (1) urban density and critical biodiversity thresholds, (2) human and non-human movement in urban space, (3) the retrofitting of urban design, and (4) reversing the trend of urban ecological illiteracy through affordance designs that connect people with nature and with each other.

  • 36.
    Crespo Uribe, Carolina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Between Chinampas: Recovering the prehispanic urban structure towards a sustainable megacity in the Tláhuac borough.2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The area that once were “The Great Tenochtitlán”, the aztec city surrounded by five lakes, greenery and impressive sustainable systems for housing and agriculture has turned out to be a megacity growing uncontrollably, leaving a negative environmental and social impact within. Over the last 60 years the population has increased from 5.2 to 8.8 million (INEGI 2010) in the Distrito Federal and from 5.7 to 20.8 million in the ZMVM (Metropolitan Area of the Mexican Valley) known as Mexico City, area which is projected to be the third biggest city in the world by 2015 (United Nations 2005).

    Research Questions: What would it take for a megacity such as Mexico City to take a shift into sustainable urban design and re-development? How can infrastructures such as transit, waste management systems and public spaces interact in a hybrid urban fabric of blue and green structures, in which the natural landscape and the built environment complement each other?

    Aim: The aim of this study is to address a research in one of the 16 boroughs of Distrito Federal: Tláhuac, which will be the place for the first metro line reaching the urbanized south-east, therefore the activation of the area is imminent. Tláhuac is a borough with an agricultural-urban character. The area is inhabited by middle-low income families. Its connection to the city, commercial areas and public space is deplorable. The site has large areas of non-utilized agricultural land, these areas are constantly squatted, one large plot of land with these characteristics is right next to the site where the new metro line will be built.

    Methodology and Design Tools: The study and design is supported by the emergent discipline: Landscape Urbanism, its theory of infrastructural landscapes is used as a way to conceal the urban and the regional, and so as the belief that “Landscape has replaced architectural form as the primary medium of city making” (Waldheim 2006). The methodologies used are literature review and spatial analysis. The final outcome is a new way to do urbanism in the post-agricultural areas of Mexico City, by including the preexistent landscapes as the urban fabrics when developing towards a more urban character. The basic design tools are; infrastructural landscapes throughout the use of the canals and chinampas, urban agriculture, eco-housing, recycling stations and inclusion of new services and community areas.

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    Between Chinampas
  • 37. Cupers, Kenny
    et al.
    Gabrielsson, Catharina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Mattsson, Helena
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, History and Theory of Architecture.
    Neoliberalism on the Ground: Architecture and Transformation from the 1960s to the Present2020Other (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Demidova, Anastasiia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Homescape2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Home is a complex and multifaceted concept that holds significant importance on both individual and societal levels. Despite its rich and diverse nature, the definition of a home is often limited to the domestic scale of an apartment or house, disregarding the importance of creating a home-connection to a larger urban site and shifting the attention away from public and communal spaces.This thesis project seeks to explore and map what constitutes a home on both domestic and urban scales, with a focus on the Lövholmen area in Southern Stockholm, which is currently undergoing urban redevelopment to become a residential neighbourhood.While the current urban plan for Lövholmen follows a generic approach, “Homescape” proposes an alternative urban design that enhances space and creates a home on an urban level. By interconnecting domestic and urban spaces, the aim is to create a home beyond the traditional boundaries of private residence. By building on the richness of the concept and practice of home, this project offers a critique of generalised urban development projects, and expands the notion of home to include the wider cityscape.

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    fulltext
  • 39. Derix, Christian
    et al.
    Izaki, Åsmund
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Spatial computing for the new organic2013In: Architectural Design, ISSN 0003-8504, E-ISSN 1554-2769, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 42-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Diebäcker, Tarek
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Wernecke, Meike Sigrid
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Moments of Transition. Transitional Spaces as Agents for Social Change in Favour of Youths.2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This design thesis is situated in Stockholm’s northernmost suburbs of the Järva area. The area was mainly developed during the era of the Million Homes Programme (1965-1974) and is today commonly considered as one of the city’s socially most challenged areas. The idea of Moments of Transitions addresses possible transitions in three aspects: generational, social and spatial.

    The key protagonists of this project are local youths who – by growing up and into their urban environments – have a strong stake in the future of the Järva area. As of today, they are a social group with limited influence on decision-making processes and whose needs are rarely taken into account in urban development projects. Challenging the status quo, this thesis aims to present potentials for social change in the favour of youths.

    This project first presents an analysis of the historic development of Järva, ongoing planning projects and local contexts. Subsequently, a framework for Moments of Transition is established and developed in three instances. Each of those centers around one decisive theme for local youths: re_mediation, motion and imaginations. Together, they shall help in building a suburb where youths want to continue to live in.

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    fulltext
  • 41.
    Dincel, Seren
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lighting Design.
    Besenecker, Ute
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lighting Design.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Zielinska-Dabkowska, Karolina M.
    Gdańsk University of Technology, Faculty of Architecture (GUT).
    Light formed through urban morphology and different organism groups: First findings from a systematic review.2024In: IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environment, ISSN 1755-1307, E-ISSN 1755-1315, Vol. 1320, p. 1-12, article id 012002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevailing implementation and usage of contemporary lighting technologies and design practices in cities have created over-illuminated built environments. Recent studies indicate that exposure to electric lighting effects formed through spatial characteristics has visual, physiological, and behavioural effects on both humans and non-humans, such as wildlife. In order to gain a better understanding of the impact that electric lighting has on space and different organism groups, a comprehensive literature review was conducted applying PRISMA 2020 systematic review guidelines. Results of the searches from various databases, such as Web of Science, PubMed and Scopus, identified 5260 related studies. A total of 55 papers connected to four themes: (1) urban morphology; (2) human visual impressions; (3) ecological impacts; and (4) design approaches and methods were analysed with a focus on urban morphology. The review provided the following general findings: lighting properties alone are inadequate to depict visual impressions of pedestrians, patterns formed through light interacting with spatial characteristics can contribute to understanding how spaces are visually perceived and help characterising the exposure of wildlife organisms to potential disturbances.

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    Dincel_2024_IOP_Conf._Ser.__Earth_Environ._Sci._1320_012002
  • 42.
    Ekmekci, Onur
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Neoliberal Urbanization in the case of Istanbul: Spatial Manifestations and Ways of Contesting It2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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    Onur_Ekmekci Thesis
  • 43.
    Fagerberg, Erika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Ziakouli, Marina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    RIN♀EBY - Exploring feminist design tools2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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    RIN♀EBY - Exploring feminist design tools
    Download full text (pdf)
    Project reflections
  • 44. Fagerholm, Nora
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Karl
    Eilola, Salla
    Giusti, Matteo
    Hasanzadeh, Kamyar
    Kajosaari, Anna
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Korpilo, Silviya
    Kyttä, Marketta
    Legeby, Ann
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Liu, Yu
    Præstholm, Søren
    Raymond, Christopher
    Rinne, Tiina
    Stahl Olafsson, Anton
    Barthel, Stephan
    Analysis of pandemic outdoor recreation and green infrastructure in Nordic cities to enhance urban resilience2022In: npj Urban Sustainability, E-ISSN 2661-8001, Vol. 2, no 1, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent empirical research has confirmed the importance of green infrastructure and outdoor recreation to urban people’s well- being during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, only a few studies provide cross-city analyses. We analyse outdoor recreation behaviour across four Nordic cities ranging from metropolitan areas to a middle-sized city. We collected map based survey data from residents (n = 469–4992) in spring 2020 and spatially analyse green infrastructure near mapped outdoor recreation sites and respondents’ places of residence. Our statistical examination reveals how the interplay among access to green infrastructure across cities and at respondents’ residential location, together with respondents’ socio-demographic profiles and lockdown policies or pandemic restrictions, affects outdoor recreation behaviour. The results highlight that for pandemic resilience, the history of Nordic spatial planning is important. To support well-being in exceptional situations as well as in the long term, green infrastructure planning should prioritise nature wedges in and close to cities and support small-scale green infrastructure

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    Fagerholm et al - Analysis of pandemic outdoor recreation (NPJUS, 2022)
  • 45.
    Farantatou, Eirini
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    FLOODING THE CITY: CREATING DYNAMIC SPACES FOR WATER2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on areas prone to inland floods and more specifically on the municipality of Acharnes, Attica, Greece. Usually, flood risk management strategies are treated as an engineering problem. Here, the floodplains/wetlands are going to be addressed as an asset and reveal the role of the landscape as a dynamic way for climate change mitigation and adaptation. Furthermore, such an approach can also offer potentials not only for water quality and management but also for benefiting the public spaces and open a discussion concerning awareness and engagement.

    Within the context of Attica, flood prone areas are not only ecologically deprived but also places of inequalities and loose social capacities. Acharnes is not an exception. Thus, the vision of this thesis is to investigate an alternative way for flood resistance by incorporating tools and methods capable of strengthening local communities.

    The thesis will investigate the following questions:

    •How can cities adapt to water issues and how can public space be used towards this end?

    •Can design for flood management be incorporated into a greater strategy connected to building relations?

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    Flooding the city
  • 46.
    Feng, Chen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Legeby, Ann
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Accessibility patterns based on steps, direction changes, and angular deviation: Are they consistent?2022In: Proceedings: 13th International Space Syntax Symposium / [ed] Akkelies van Nes, Remco E. de Koning, Western Norway University of Applied sciences , 2022, p. 534:1-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modeling spaces and their relationships is at the core of syntactic analysis, including reach analysis. In a syntactic model, two spaces can be described as close together or far apart based on the directional distance between them. In this study, we compare three different ways of measuring directional distance—namely, by number of steps, by number of direction changes, and by angular deviation—in the context of accessibility and reach analysis. By graphically showing how choosing a different way of measuring directional distance can result in a different reach or accessibility pattern, we provide an intuitive understanding of the different natures of the syntactic measures. By demonstrating how the modeling conventions and the geometric composition of lines at a local scale can have a huge impact on the results of syntactic analysis at a larger scale, we call for more attention to the conventions and principles used for modeling street networks.

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    Feng C, D Koch & A Legeby -- Accessibility patterns based on steps, direction changes, and angular deviation (SSS13, 2022)
  • 47.
    Frykholm, Hannes
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Building the City from the Inside: Architecture and Urban Transformation in Los Angeles, Porto, and Las Vegas2020Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Positioned in the research field of “interior urbanism” (Rice, 2016), this thesis considers entrance situations that occur between buildings and cities in order to develop new ways of investigating the relationship between architecture and urban transformation. From the main research question—How does architecture mediate urban transformation?—the thesis focuses on experience-driven narratives about the city (Pine & Gilmore, 2011). Looking at the means by which architecture situates the subject in an urban experience, the thesis asks how the experience contributes to a particular attention to the city. This approach intends to shed light on architecture’s role in both mediating and challenging neoliberal urbanism (Peck, Theodore, & Brenner, 2009; Fraser, 2019). The thesis argues for analyzing large-scale processes of urban transformation by placing a sharpened empirical focus on the built environment. This is tested by a transversal research method (Frichot, Gabrielsson, Havik, & Jobst, forthcoming) that intersects multiple investigative techniques. 

    The three cases that are addressed—the Westin Bonaventure Hotel in Los Angeles, the Casa da Música in Porto, and Wynn Casino in Las Vegas—each epitomize a particular discourse about architecture and urbanization. Through observations and the analysis of the three cases, the thesis unpacks three dimensions of architectural experience of the city: first, by highlighting the spatial logic of a stretched threshold; second, by considering temporality and ways of waiting; and third, by observing the labor that is necessary to keep the interior environment intact. A recurring narrative in these buildings lies in the suggestion that the process of urban redevelopment never ends. Together, the cases point to an oft-overlooked parallel between the refurbishment of building interiors and exterior urban transformations, adding empirical nuances to what has been labelled the “architecture of neoliberalism” (Spencer, 2016). The threshold between building and city is shown to be a fragile and unstable territory, which is under continuous negotiation and where the claims of multiple actors, conditions, and events come together. 

    The thesis attempts to make a contribution in three ways: by developing transversal methods, by considering the threshold as knowledge device, and by exploring micro-scale investigations of urban transformation. The project points to how the stretched threshold of these projects speak of a transforming relationship between architecture and capitalism, where the city is reconfigured through the stretching of interiors out to adjacent sidewalks and squares. If the city is built from the expanding insides of architecture, the city is by definition an unfinished project. To think of the instability of architecture not as a shortcoming but as a virtue opens up for a continuous engagement with the city as the unfinished construction site of a democratic project.

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    fulltext
  • 48.
    Frykholm, Hannes
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design. 820511-8634.
    Tengvall, Olga
    Infrastructural Love2017In: Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies / [ed] Hélène Frichot, Catharina Gabrielsson, Helen Runting, London: Routledge, 2017, 1, p. 1-5Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this project we will formulate a feminist critique of Sylvia Lavin’s concept of “kissing architecture” (Lavin, 2011) for the purpose of developing a discussion on the politics of infrastructure and affect. We begin by noticing some of the potential risks in Lavin’s reading of the architectural kiss, such as the dichotomy between femininity/masculinity still haunting her definition, as well as the institutional character of many of the considered projects. As useful as the concept of kissing can be to describe transgressions between different worlds, it needs to be better situated in everyday life, outside museums and art galleries. Trying to expand on Lavin’s concept we argue that the political dimension of kissing can be explored in the repeated production of affect outside the traditional love affair and outside the traditional institutions for such love.

  • 49.
    Fröler, Amanda
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Justice for Loose Space: Exploring Stockholm Under the Bridges2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Stockholm is a city of bridges. But we rarely pay attention to what happens below them. Many of these spaces are centrally located in the city, yet perceived as peripheral due to their uncertain programmatic status and rough physical appearance, also referred to as loose space. Some are integrated in the urban fabric; others are more inaccessible and thus become forgotten spots detached from the rapid development of the rest of the city.

    The space below the bridges of Skanstull is an example of the latter. After many years of being in the shadow of the city, giving space for outdoor parties, graffiti painters and more recently urban farming, it is now being under pressure of a large scale redevelopment project.

    But do these spaces carry meaning that is neglected in the common notion of public space? How can we as planners use our tools in order to encourage the existence of a larger diversity of forms, spaces and uses?

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    Justice for Loose Space
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    ljud
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    ljud
    Download (mp3)
    ljud
  • 50.
    Gabrielsson, Catharina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    De odlar det lokala motståndet2013In: Arkitektur, ISSN 0004-2021, no 7, p. 36-43Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Reportage från antroposofernas Järna. Landskapet där en spelplats för alternativ odling, nu också blivit ett centrum för EU-finansierade visioner om framtidens matproduktion, Ecological Recycling Agriculture (ERA).

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