Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 317
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1. Adler, Belinda
    et al.
    Boström, Tove
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ekström, Simon
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Laurell, Thomas
    Miniaturized and Automated High-Throughput Verification of Proteins in the ISET Platform with MALDI MS2012In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 84, no 20, p. 8663-8669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major bottleneck in high-throughput protein production is the validation step, which is why parallel and automated sample processing methods are highly desirable. Also, a miniaturized sample preparation format is preferred, as the reduction of reagent volumes significantly decreases the analysis cost per sample. We have developed an automated and miniaturized protein sequence verification protocol for recombinant proteins utilizing peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS analysis. The integrated selective enrichment target (ISET) platform, previously developed in our group, with its dual functionality, being both a sample preparation platform and a MALDI target plate, is employed. All steps including immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of protein on cobalt-loaded beads, tryptic digestion, and MALDI MS analysis are performed in an array format, without any sample transfers, on the same ISET chip. The automated configuration reduced the sample preparation time significantly. Starting with crude lysate, a full plate of 48 purified, digested samples prepared for MALDI-MS can be generated in 4 h, with only 30 min of operator involvement. This paper demonstrates the utility of the method by parallel analysis of 45 His-tagged human recombinant proteins.

  • 2. Agnarsdottir, Margret
    et al.
    Sooman, Linda
    Bolander, Asa
    Stromberg, Sara
    Rexhepaj, Elton
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Gallagher, William
    Lennartsson, Johan
    Ekman, Simon
    Uhlen, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Hedstrand, Hakan
    SOX10 expression in superficial spreading and nodular malignant melanomas2010In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 468-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SOX10 is a transcription factor expressed in nerve cells and melanocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the protein expression pattern of SOX10 in malignant melanoma tumors and to analyze whether the results correlated with clinical parameters and the proliferation marker Ki-67. Furthermore, proliferation and migration were analyzed in three different cell lines employing SOX10 small interfering RNA-mediated silencing. Expression patterns were determined in 106 primary tumors and 39 metastases in addition to 16 normal skin samples and six benign nevi employing immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays. The immunohistochemical staining was evaluated manually and with an automated algorithm. SOX10 was strongly expressed in the benign tissues, but for the malignant tumors superficial spreading melanomas stained stronger than nodular malignant melanomas (P = 0.008). The staining intensity was also inversely correlated with T-stage (Spearman's rho = -0.261, P = 0.008). Overall survival and time to recurrence were significantly correlated with SOX10 intensity, but not in multivariate analysis including T-stage. With the automated algorithm there was an inverse correlation between the SOX10 staining intensity and the proliferation marker, Ki-67 (rho = -0.173, P = 0.02) and a significant difference in the intensity signal between the benign tissues, the primary tumors and the metastases where the metastases stained the weakest (P <= 0.001). SOX10 downregulation resulted in variable effects on proliferation and migration rates in the melanoma cell lines. In conclusion, the SOX10 intensity level differed depending on the tissue studied and SOX10 might have a role in survival. No conclusion regarding the role of SOX10 for in-vitro proliferation and migration could be drawn. Melanoma Res 20:468-478

  • 3. Ahlin, G.
    et al.
    Hilgendorf, C.
    Karlsson, J.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Artursson, P.
    Endogenous Gene and Protein Expression of Drug-Transporting Proteins in Cell Lines Routinely Used in Drug Discovery Programs2009In: Drug Metabolism And Disposition, ISSN 0090-9556, E-ISSN 1521-009X, Vol. 37, no 12, p. 2275-2283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the gene and protein expression profiles of important drug-transporting proteins in human cell lines commonly used for studies of drug transport mechanisms. Human cell lines used to transiently or stably express single transporters [HeLa, human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293] and leukemia cell lines used to study drug resistance by ATP-binding cassette transporters (HL-60, K562) were investigated and compared with organotypic cell lines (HepG2, Saos-2, Caco-2, and Caco-2 TC7). For gene expression studies, real-time polymerase chain reaction was used, whereas monospecific polyclonal antibodies were generated and used to investigate protein expression by immunohistochemistry. Thirty-six transporters were studied for gene expression, and nine were studied for protein expression. The antibodies were validated using expression patterns in human tissues. Finally, the function of one ubiquitously expressed transporter, MCT1/SLC16A1, was investigated using [C-14]lactic acid as a substrate. In general, the adherent cell lines (HeLa, HEK293) displayed low transporter expression, and the expression patterns were barely affected by transfection. The leukemia cell lines (K562, HL-60) and Saos-2 also had low endogenous transporter expression, whereas the organotypic cell lines (HepG2 and Caco-2) showed higher expression of some transporters. Comparison of gene and protein expression profiles gave poor correlations, but better agreement was obtained for antibodies with a good validation score, indicating that antibody quality was a significant variable. It is noteworthy that the monocarboxylic acid-transporting protein MCT1 was significantly expressed in all and was functional in most of the cell lines, indicating that MCT1 may be a confounding factor when the transport of small anionic drugs is investigated.

  • 4. Ahmad, Yasmeen
    et al.
    Boisvert, Francois-Michel
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lamond, Angus I.
    Systematic Analysis of Protein Pools, Isoforms, and Modifications Affecting Turnover and Subcellular Localization2012In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 11, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In higher eukaryotes many genes encode protein isoforms whose properties and biological roles are often poorly characterized. Here we describe systematic approaches for detection of either distinct isoforms, or separate pools of the same isoform, with differential biological properties. Using information from ion intensities we have estimated protein abundance levels and using rates of change in stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture isotope ratios we measured turnover rates and subcellular distribution for the HeLa cell proteome. Protein isoforms were detected using three data analysis strategies that evaluate differences between stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture isotope ratios for specific groups of peptides within the total set of peptides assigned to a protein. The candidate approach compares stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture isotope ratios for predicted isoform- specific peptides, with ratio values for peptides shared by all the isoforms. The rule of thirds approach compares the mean isotope ratio values for all peptides in each of three equal segments along the linear length of the protein, assessing differences between segment values. The three in a row approach compares mean isotope ratio values for each sequential group of three adjacent peptides, assessing differences with the mean value for all peptides assigned to the protein. Protein isoforms were also detected and their properties evaluated by fractionating cell extracts on one- dimensional SDS- PAGE prior to trypsin digestion and MS analysis and independently evaluating isotope ratio values for the same peptides isolated from different gel slices. The effect of protein phosphorylation on turnover rates was analyzed by comparing mean turnover values calculated for all peptides assigned to a protein, either including, or excluding, values for cognate phosphopeptides. Collectively, these experimental and analytical approaches provide a framework for expanding the func- tional annotation of the genome.

  • 5.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Ehn, M.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Pyrosequencing: History, biochemistry and future2006In: Clinica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0009-8981, E-ISSN 1873-3492, Vol. 363, no 02-jan, p. 83-94Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pyrosequencing is a DNA sequencing technology based on the sequencing-by-synthesis principle. Methods: The technique is built on a 4-enzyme real-time monitoring of DNA synthesis by bioluminescence using a cascade that upon nucleotide incorporation ends in a detectable light signal (bioluminescence). The detection system is based on the pyrophosphate released when a nucleotide is introduced in the DNA-strand. Thereby, the signal can be quantitatively connected to the number of bases added. Currently, the technique is limited to analysis of short DNA sequences exemplified by single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis and genotyping. Mutation detection and single-nucleotide polymorphisin genotyping require screening of large samples of materials and therefore the importance of high-throughput DNA analysis techniques is significant. In order to expand the field for pyrosequencing, the read length needs to be improved. Conclusions: Th pyrosequencing system is based on an enzymatic system. There are different current and future applications of this technique.

  • 6.
    Akan, Pelin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Alexeyenko, Andrey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Costea, Paul Igor
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hedberg, Lilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Werne Solnestam, Beata
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hallman, Jimmie
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Comprehensive analysis of the genome transcriptome and proteome landscapes of three tumor cell lines2012In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 4, p. 86-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We here present a comparative genome, transcriptome and functional network analysis of three human cancer cell lines (A431, U251MG and U2OS), and investigate their relation to protein expression. Gene copy numbers significantly influenced corresponding transcript levels; their effect on protein levels was less pronounced. We focused on genes with altered mRNA and/or protein levels to identify those active in tumor maintenance. We provide comprehensive information for the three genomes and demonstrate the advantage of integrative analysis for identifying tumor-related genes amidst numerous background mutations by relating genomic variation to expression/protein abundance data and use gene networks to reveal implicated pathways.

  • 7.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Garme, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Magnell, Marie
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Vägen från student till ingenjör: exempel från två kandidatexamenskurser och ett förslag om en programsammanhållande byggnadsställning2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8. Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    et al.
    Sibbons, P.
    Williams, G.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Metcalfe, S. M.
    The E3 Ligase Axotrophin/MARCH-7: Protein Expression Profiling of Human Tissues Reveals Links to Adult Stem Cells2010In: Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, ISSN 0022-1554, E-ISSN 1551-5044, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 301-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Axotrophin/MARCH-7 was first identified in mouse embryonic stem cells as a neural stem cell gene. Using the axotrophin/MARCH-7 null mouse, we discovered profound effects on T lymphocyte responses, including 8-fold hyperproliferation and 5-fold excess release of the stem cell cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Our further discovery that axotrophin/MARCH-7 is required for targeted degradation of the LIF receptor subunit gp190 implies a direct role in the regulation of LIF signaling. Bioinformatics studies revealed a highly conserved RING-CH domain in common with the MARCH family of E3-ubiquitin ligases, and accordingly, axotrophin was renamed "MARCH-7." To probe protein expression of human axotrophin/MARCH-7, we prepared antibodies against different domains of the protein. Each antibody bound its specific target epitope with high affinity, and immunohistochemistry cross-validated target specificity. Forty-eight human tissue types were screened. Epithelial cells stained strongly, with trophoblasts having the greatest staining. In certain tissues, specific cell types were selectively positive, including neurons and neuronal progenitor cells in the hippocampus and cerebellum, endothelial sinusoids of the spleen, megakaryocytes in the bone marrow, crypt stem cells of the small intestine, and alveolar macrophages in the 7 lung. Approximately 20% of central nervous system neuropils were positive. Notably, axotrophin/MARCH-7 has an expression profile that is distinct from that of other MARCH family members. This manuscript contains online supplemental material at http://www.jhc. org. Please visit this article online to view these materials. (J Histochem Cytochem 58:301-308, 2010)

  • 9.
    Alm, Tove
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Interaction engineered three-helix bundle domains for protein recovery and detection2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    HTML clipboard The great advances in DNA technology, e.g. sequencing and recombinant DNA techniques, have given us the genetic information and the tools needed to effectively produce recombinant proteins. Recombinant proteins are valuable means in biotechnological applications and are also emerging as alternatives in therapeutic applications. Traditionally, monoclonal antibodies have been the natural choice for biotechnological and therapeutic applications due to their ability to bind a huge range of different molecules and their natural good affinity. However, the large size of antibodies (150 kDa) limits tissue penetration and the recombinant expression is complicated. Therefore, alternative binders with smaller sizes have been derived from antibodies and alternative scaffolds.

    In this thesis, two structurally similar domains, Zbasic and ABDz1, have been used as purification tags in different contexts. They are both three-helical bundles and derived from bacterial surface domains, but share no sequence homology. Furthermore, by redesign of the scaffold used for ABDz1, a molecule intended for drug targeting with extended in-vivo half-life has been engineered. In Papers I and II, the poly-cationic tag Zbasic is explored and evaluated. Paper I describes the successful investigation of Zbasic as a purification handle under denaturating conditions. Moreover, Zbasic is evaluated as an interaction domain in matrixassisted refolding. Two different proteins were successfully refolded using the same setup without individual optimization. In Paper II, Zbasic is further explored as a purification handle under non-native conditions in a multi-parallel setup. In total, 22 proteins with varying characteristics are successfully purified using a multi-parallel protein purification protocol and a robotic system. Without modifications, the system can purify up to 60 proteins without manual handling. Paper I and II clearly demonstrate that Zbasic can be used as an interaction domain in matrix-assisted refolding and that it offers a good alternative to the commonly used His6-tag under denaturating conditions. In paper III, the small bifunctional ABDz1 is selected from a phage display library. Endowed with two different binding interfaces, ABDz1 is capable of binding both the HSA-sepharose and the protein A-derived MabSelect SuRe-matrix. The bifunctionality of the domain is exploited in an orthogonal affinity setup. Three target proteins are successfully purified using the HSA-matrix and the MabSelect SuRe-matrix. Furthermore, the purity of the target proteins is effectively improved by combining the two chromatographic steps. Thus, paper III shows that the small ABDz1 can be used as an effective purification handle and dual affinity tag without target specific optimization. Paper IV describes the selection and affinity maturation of small bispecific drug-targeting molecules. First generation binders against tumor necrosis factor-α are selected using phage display. Thereafter on-cell surface display and flow cytometry is used to select second-generation binders. The binding to tumor necrosis factor-α is improved up to 30 times as compared to the best first generation binder, and a 6-fold improvement of the binding strength was possible with retained HSA affinity. Paper III and IV clearly demonstrate that dual interaction surfaces can successfully be grafted on a small proteinaceous domain, and that the strategy in paper IV can be used for dual selection of bifunctional binders.

  • 10.
    Alm, Tove
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Nilvebrant, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Löfblom, John
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Engineering bispecificityinto a single albumin-binding domain aimed for drug-targeting and extended in vivo half-life extension.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Alm, Tove
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Steen, Johanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ottosson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    High-throughput protein purification under denaturating conditions by the use of cation exchange chromatography2007In: Biotechnology Journal, ISSN 1860-6768, Vol. 2, p. 709-716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A high-throughput protein purification strategy using the polycationic Z(basic) tag has been developed. In order for the strategy to be useful both for soluble and less soluble proteins, a denaturating agent, urea, was used in all purification steps. First, four target proteins were genetically fused to the purification tag, Z(basic). These protein constructs were purified by cation exchange chromatography and eluted using a salt gradient. From the data achieved, a purification strategy was planned including stepwise elution to enable parallel protein purification using a laboratory robot. A protocol that includes all steps, equilibration of the chromatography resin, load of sample, wash, and elution, all without any manual handling steps, was handled by the laboratory robot. The program allows automated purification giving milligram amounts of pure recombinant protein of up to 60 cell lysates. In this study 22 different protein constructs, with different characteristics regarding pI and solubility, were successfully purified by the laboratory robot. The data show that Z(basic) can be used as a general purification tag also under denaturating conditions. Moreover, the strategy enables purification of proteins with different pI and solubility using ion exchange chromatography (IEXC). The procedure is highly reproducible and allows for high protein yield and purity and is therefore a good complement to the commonly used His(6)-tag.

  • 12.
    Alm, Tove
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Yderland, Louise
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Nilvebrant, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Halldin, Anneli
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    A small bispecific protein selected for orthogonal affinity purification2010In: BIOTECHNOL J, ISSN 1860-6768, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 605-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel protein domain with dual affinity has been created by randomization and selection. The small alkali-stabilized albumin-binding domain (ABD(star)), used as scaffold to construct the library, has affinity to human serum albumin (HSA) and is constituted of 46 amino acids of which 11 were randomized. To achieve a dual binder, the binding site of the inherent HSA affinity was untouched and the randomization was made on the opposite side of the molecule. Despite its small size and randomization of almost a quarter of its amino acids, a bifunctional molecule, ABDz1, with ability to bind to both HSA and the Z(2) domain/protein A was successfully selected using phage display. Moreover, the newly selected variant showed improved affinity for HSA compared to the parental molecule. This novel protein domain has been characterized regarding secondary structure and affinity to the two different ligands. The possibility for affinity purification on two different matrices has been investigated using the two ligands, the HSA matrix and the protein A-based, MabSelect SuRe matrix, and the new protein domain was purified to homogeneity. Furthermore, gene fusions between the new domain and three different target proteins with different characteristics were made. To take advantage of both affinities, a purification strategy referred to as orthogonal affinity purification using two different matrices was created. Successful purification of all three versions was efficiently carried out using this strategy.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Pelve, Erik A.
    Lindeberg, Stefan
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Bernander, Rolf
    Replication-biased genome organisation in the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus2010In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 11, p. 454-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Species of the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus harbour three replication origins in their single circular chromosome that are synchronously initiated during replication. Results: We demonstrate that global gene expression in two Sulfolobus species is highly biased, such that early replicating genome regions are more highly expressed at all three origins. The bias by far exceeds what would be anticipated by gene dosage effects alone. In addition, early replicating regions are denser in archaeal core genes (enriched in essential functions), display lower intergenic distances, and are devoid of mobile genetic elements. Conclusion: The strong replication-biased structuring of the Sulfolobus chromosome implies that the multiple replication origins serve purposes other than simply shortening the time required for replication. The higher-level chromosomal organisation could be of importance for minimizing the impact of DNA damage, and may also be linked to transcriptional regulation.

  • 14. Andersson, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Stromberg, Sara
    Backvall, Helena
    Kampf, Caroline
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Wester, Kenneth
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Analysis of protein expression in cell microarrays: A tool for antibody-based proteomics2006In: Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, ISSN 0022-1554, E-ISSN 1551-5044, Vol. 54, no 12, p. 1413-1423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue microarray (TMA) technology provides a possibility to explore protein expression patterns in a multitude of normal and disease tissues in a high-throughput setting. Although TMAs have been used for analysis of tissue samples, robust methods for studying in vitro cultured cell lines and cell aspirates in a TMA format have been lacking. We have adopted a technique to homogeneously distribute cells in an agarose gel matrix, creating an artificial tissue. This enables simultaneous profiling of protein expression in suspension- and adherent-grown cell samples assembled in a microarray. In addition, the present study provides an optimized strategy for the basic laboratory steps to efficiently produce TMAs. Presented modifications resulted in an improved quality of specimens and a higher section yield compared with standard TMA production protocols. Sections from the generated cell TMAs were tested for immunohistochemical staining properties using 20 well-characterized antibodies. Comparison of immunoreactivity in cultured dispersed cells and corresponding cells in tissue samples showed congruent results for all tested antibodies. We conclude that a modified TIVIA technique, including cell samples, provides a valuable tool for high-throughput analysis of protein expression, and that this technique can be used for global approaches to explore the human proteome.

  • 15. Andersson, Sandra
    et al.
    Konrad, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ashok, Nikhil
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Asplund, Anna
    Antibodies biotinylated using a synthetic Z-domain provide stringent in situ proteindetectionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Andersson Svahn, Helene
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). University of Twente, Netherlands .
    Van Den Berg, A.
    Single cells or large populations?2007In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 544-546Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Andersson-Gunneras, S.
    et al.
    Mellerowicz, E. J.
    Love, J.
    Segerman, B.
    Ohmiya, Y.
    Coutinho, P. M.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Henrissat, B.
    Moritz, T.
    Sundberg, B.
    Biosynthesis of cellulose-enriched tension wood in Populus: global analysis of transcripts and metabolites identifies biochemical and developmental regulators in secondary wall biosynthesis2006In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 144-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stems and branches of angiosperm trees form tension wood (TW) when exposed to a gravitational stimulus. One of the main characteristics of TW, which distinguishes it from normal wood, is the formation of fibers with a thick inner gelatinous cell wall layer mainly composed of crystalline cellulose. Hence TW is enriched in cellulose, and deficient in lignin and hemicelluloses. An expressed sequence tag library made from TW-forming tissues in Populus tremula (L.) x tremuloides (Michx.) and data from transcript profiling using microarray and metabolite analysis were obtained during TW formation in Populus tremula (L.) in two growing seasons. The data were examined with the aim of identifying the genes responsible for the change in carbon

  • 18.
    Andrade, Jorge
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Andersen, Malin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Berglund, Lisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Applications of grid computing in genetics and proteomics2007In: Applied Parallel Computing: State Of The Art In Scientific Computing / [ed] Kagstrom, B; Elmroth, E; Dongarra, J; Wasniewski, J, 2007, Vol. 4699, p. 791-798Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential for Grid technologies in applied bioinformatics is largely unexplored. We have developed a model for solving computationally demanding bioinformatics tasks in distributed Grid environments, designed to ease the usability for scientists unfamiliar with Grid computing. With a script-based implementation that uses a strategy of temporary installations of databases and existing executables on remote nodes at submission, we propose a generic solution that do not rely on predefined Grid runtime environments and that can easily be adapted to other bioinformatics tasks suitable for parallelization. This implementation has been successfully applied to whole proteome sequence similarity analyses and to genome-wide genotype simulations, where computation time was reduced from years to weeks. We conclude that computational Grid technology is a useful resource for solving high compute tasks in genetics and proteomics using existing algorithms.

  • 19. Arabi, A.
    et al.
    Ullah, K.
    Branca, R. M. M.
    Johansson, J.
    Bandarra, D.
    Haneklaus, M.
    Fu, J.
    Ariës, I.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Den Boer, M. L.
    Pokrovskaja, K.
    Grandér, D.
    Xiao, G.
    Rocha, S.
    Lehtiö, J.
    Sangfelt, O.
    Proteomic screen reveals Fbw7 as a modulator of the NF-kappa B pathway2012In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 3, p. 976-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fbw7 is a ubiquitin-ligase that targets several oncoproteins for proteolysis, but the full range of Fbw7 substrates is not known. Here we show that by performing quantitative proteomics combined with degron motif searches, we effectively screened for a more complete set of Fbw7 targets. We identify 89 putative Fbw7 substrates, including several disease-associated proteins. The transcription factor NF-κB2 (p100/p52) is one of the candidate Fbw7 substrates. We show that Fbw7 interacts with p100 via a conserved degron and that it promotes degradation of p100 in a GSK3 2 phosphorylation-dependent manner. Fbw7 inactivation increases p100 levels, which in the presence of NF-κB pathway stimuli, leads to increased p52 levels and activity. Accordingly, the apoptotic threshold can be increased by loss of Fbw7 in a p100-dependent manner. In conclusion, Fbw7-mediated destruction of p100 is a regulatory component restricting the response to NF-κB2 pathway stimulation.

  • 20.
    Ardalan, Arman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kluetsch, Cornelya F. C.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Zhang, Ai-bing
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Erdogan, Metin
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Houshmand, Massoud
    Tepeli, Cafer
    Ashtiani, Seyed Reza Miraei
    Savolainen, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Comprehensive study of mtDNA among Southwest Asian dogs contradicts independent domestication of wolf, but implies dog–wolf hybridization2011In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 373-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity indicate explicitly that dogs were domesticated, probably exclusively, in southern East Asia. However, Southwest Asia (SwAsia) has had poor representation and geographical coverage in these studies. Other studies based on archaeological and genome-wide SNP data have suggested an origin of dogs in SwAsia. Hence, it has been suspected that mtDNA evidence for this scenario may have remained undetected. In the first comprehensive investigation of genetic diversity among SwAsian dogs, we analyzed 582 bp of mtDNA for 345 indigenous dogs from across SwAsia, and compared with 1556 dogs across the Old World. We show that 97.4% of SwAsian dogs carry haplotypes belonging to a universal mtDNA gene pool, but that only a subset of this pool, five of the 10 principal haplogroups, is represented in SwAsia. A high frequency of haplogroup B, potentially signifying a local origin, was not paralleled with the high genetic diversity expected for a center of origin. Meanwhile, 2.6% of the SwAsian dogs carried the rare non-universal haplogroup d2. Thus, mtDNA data give no indication that dogs originated in SwAsia through independent domestication of wolf, but dog–wolf hybridization may have formed the local haplogroup d2 within this region. Southern East Asia remains the only region with virtually full extent of genetic variation, strongly indicating it to be the primary and probably sole center of wolf domestication. An origin of dogs in southern East Asia may have been overlooked by other studies due to a substantial lack of samples from this region.

  • 21.
    Aspeborg, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Schrader, J.
    Coutinho, P. M.
    Stam, M.
    Kallas, A.
    Djerbi, S.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Denman, S.
    Amini, B.
    Sterky, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Master, E.
    Sandberg, G.
    Mellerowicz, E.
    Sundberg, B.
    Henrissat, B.
    Teeri, Tuula T.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in the secondary cell wall biogenesis in hybrid aspen2005In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 137, no 3, p. 983-997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood formation is a fundamental biological process with significant economic interest. While lignin biosynthesis is currently relatively well understood, the pathways leading to the synthesis of the key structural carbohydrates in wood fibers remain obscure. We have used a functional genomics approach to identify enzymes involved in carbohydrate biosynthesis and remodeling during xylem development in the hybrid aspen Populus tremula x tremuloides. Microarrays containing cDNA clones from different tissue-specific libraries were hybridized with probes obtained from narrow tissue sections prepared by cryosectioning of the developing xylem. Bioinformatic analyses using the sensitive tools developed for carbohydrate-active enzymes allowed the identification of 25 xylem-specific glycosyltransferases belonging to the Carbohydrate-Active EnZYme families GT2, GT8, GT14, GT31, GT43, GT47, and GT61 and nine glycosidases (or transglycosidases) belonging to the Carbohydrate-Active EnZYme families GH9, GH10, GH16, GH17, GH19, GH28, GH35, and GH51. While no genes encoding either polysaccharide lyases or carbohydrate esterases were found among the secondary wall-specific genes, one putative O-acetyltransferase was identified. These wood-specific enzyme genes constitute a valuable resource for future development of engineered fibers with improved performance in different applications.

  • 22. Asplund, A.
    et al.
    Bjorklund, M. Gry
    Sundquist, C.
    Stromberg, S.
    Edlund, K.
    Oestman, A.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ponten, F.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Expression profiling of microdissected cell populations selected from basal cells in normal epidermis and basal cell carcinoma2008In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 158, no 3, p. 527-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are prevalent tumours with uniform histology that develop without any known precursor lesion. Alterations in the sonic hedgehog-patched1 signalling pathway are accepted as necessary events for tumorigenesis, and mutations in the patched1 gene are frequently present in tumours. Objectives To analyse transcript profiles in BCC. Methods We used laser-assisted microdissection to isolate and collect cell populations defined under the microscope. Peripheral cells from nests of BCC were selected to represent tumour cells, and normal keratinocytes from epidermis basal layer were used as control. Extracted RNA was amplified and hybridized on to a cDNA microarray. Results Our results show that BCC cells express a transcript signature that is significantly different from that of normal keratinocytes, and over 350 genes with various functions were identified as differentially expressed. The compiled data suggest an upregulation of the Wnt signalling pathway as a major event in BCC cells. Furthermore, tumour cells appear to have an increased sensitivity to oxygen radicals and dysregulated genes involved in antigen presentation. Results were validated at both the transcriptional level using real-time polymerase chain reaction and at the protein level using immunohistochemistry. Conclusions We show that microdissection in combination with robust strategies for RNA extraction, amplification and cDNA microarray analysis allow for reliable transcript profiling and that antibody-based proteomics provides an advantageous strategy for the analysis of corresponding differentially expressed proteins. We found that expression patterns were significantly altered in BCC cells compared with basal keratinocytes and that the Wnt signalling pathway was upregulated in tumour cells.

  • 23. Asplund, A.
    et al.
    Edqvist, P. -HD.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pontén, F.
    Antibodies for profiling the human proteome-The Human Protein Atlas as a resource for cancer research2012In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 12, no 13, p. 2067-2077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this review, we present an update on the progress of the Human Protein Atlas, with an emphasis on strategies for validating immunohistochemistry-based protein expression patterns and on the possibilities to extend the map of protein expression patterns for cancer research projects. The objectives underlying the Human Protein Atlas include (i) the generation of validated antibodies toward a major isoform of all proteins encoded by the human genome, (ii) creating an information database of protein expression patterns in normal human tissues, in cells, and in cancer, and (iii) utilizing generated antibodies and protein expression data as tools to identify clinically useful biomarkers. The success of such an effort is dependent on the validity of antibodies as specific binders of intended targets in applications used to map protein expression patterns. The development of strategies to support specific target binding is crucial and remains a challenge as a large fraction of proteins encoded by the human genome is poorly characterized, including the approximately one-third of all proteins lacking evidence of existence. Conceivable methods for validation include the use of paired antibodies, i.e. two independent antibodies targeting different and nonoverlapping epitopes on the same protein as well as comparative analysis of mRNA expression patterns with corresponding proteins.

  • 24. Attems, Johannes
    et al.
    Alpar, Alan
    Spence, Lauren
    McParland, Shane
    Heikenwalder, Mathias
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tanila, Heikki
    Hökfelt, Tomas G. M.
    Harkany, Tibor
    Clusters of secretagogin-expressing neurons in the aged human olfactory tract lack terminal differentiation2012In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 109, no 16, p. 6259-6264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expanding the repertoire of molecularly diverse neurons in the human nervous system is paramount to characterizing the neuronal networks that underpin sensory processing. Defining neuronal identities is particularly timely in the human olfactory system, whose structural differences from nonprimate macrosmatic species have recently gained momentum. Here, we identify clusters of bipolar neurons in a previously unknown outer "shell" domain of the human olfactory tract, which express secretagogin, a cytosolic Ca2+ binding protein. These "shell" neurons are wired into the olfactory circuitry because they can receive mixed synaptic inputs. Unexpectedly, secretagogin is often coexpressed with polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule, beta-III-tubulin, and calretinin, suggesting that these neurons represent a cell pool that might have escaped terminal differentiation into the olfactory circuitry. We hypothesized that secretagogin-containing "shell" cells may be eliminated from the olfactory axis under neurodegenerative conditions. Indeed, the density, but not the morphological or neurochemical integrity, of secretagogin-positive neurons selectively decreases in the olfactory tract in Alzheimer's disease. In conclusion, secretagogin identifies a previously undescribed cell pool whose cytoarchitectonic arrangements and synaptic connectivity are poised to modulate olfactory processing in humans.

  • 25.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Häggmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Neiman, Maja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Igel, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Schwenk, Jochen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Systematic antibody and antigen-based proteomic profiling with microarrays2011In: EXPERT REVIEW OF MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS, ISSN 1473-7159, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 219-234Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current approaches within affinity-based proteomics are driven both by the accessibility and availability of antigens and capture reagents, and by suitable multiplexed technologies onto which these are implemented. By combining planar microarrays and other multiparallel systems with sets of reagents, possibilities to discover new and unpredicted protein disease associations, either via directed hypothesis-driven or via undirected hypothesis-generating target selection, can be created. In the following stages, the discoveries made during these screening phases have to be verified for potential clinical relevance based on both technical and biological aspects. The use of affinity tools throughout discovery and verification has the potential to streamline the introduction of new markers, as transition into clinically required assay formats appears straightforward. In this article, we summarize some of the current building blocks within array-and affinity-based proteomic profiling with a focus on body fluids, by giving a perspective on how current and upcoming developments in this bioscience could enable a path of pursuit for biomarker discovery.

  • 26.
    Barbe, Laurent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Stenius, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lewin, Erland
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Asplund, Anna
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Andersson-Svahn, Helene
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Toward a confocal subcellular atlas of the human proteome2008In: Molecular and cellular proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 499-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information on protein localization on the subcellular level is important to map and characterize the proteome and to better understand cellular functions of proteins. Here we report on a pilot study of 466 proteins in three human cell lines aimed to allow large scale confocal microscopy analysis using protein-specific antibodies. Approximately 3000 high resolution images were generated, and more than 80% of the analyzed proteins could be classified in one or multiple subcellular compartment(s). The localizations of the proteins showed, in many cases, good agreement with the Gene Ontology localization prediction model. This is the first large scale antibody-based study to localize proteins into subcellular compartments using antibodies and confocal microscopy. The results suggest that this approach might be a valuable tool in conjunction with predictive models for protein localization.

  • 27. Bashiruddin, J. B.
    et al.
    de Santis, P.
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ball, H.
    Regalla, J.
    Detection of Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides SC in bovine lung and lymph node tissues by culture, sandwich ELISA and polymerase chain reaction systems2005In: Research in Veterinary Science, ISSN 0034-5288, E-ISSN 1532-2661, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 199-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cattle from Northern Portugal, many with pulmonary lesions typical of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia, were investigated for the presence of Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides small colony (MmmSC), which is the causative agent of CBPP, with several detection tests. sandwich ELISA that included a Culture enrichment stage, and 2 different PCR diagnostic systems were used to detect MmmSC in lung and mediastinal lymph node tissues from these animals. The comparison of typical CBPP pathology with the results of detection revealed that no single one of these methods provided a perfect match to the pathological data. Best performing tests were the PCR with laser induced fluorescence and PCR with pleuroTRAP kit (Chemicon, Australia), which are diagnostic systems based on amplification of genomic MmmSC DNA Followed by sensitive detection of the amplified products. These were followed by the broth-enriched sandwich ELISA, Which uses a monoclonal antibody specific to the M. mycoides cluster, to capture the antigen.

  • 28. Bengtsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Krogh, Morten
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Schedvins, Kjell
    Silfversward, Claes
    Linder, Stig
    Auer, Gert
    Alaiya, Ayodele
    James, Peter
    Large-scale proteomics analysis of human ovarian cancer for biomarkers2007In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 1440-1450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ovarian cancer is usually found at a late stage when the prognosis is often bad. Relative survival rates decrease with tumor stage or grade, and the 5-year survival rate for women with carcinoma is only 38%. Thus, there is a great need to find biomarkers that can be used to carry out routine screening, especially in high-risk patient groups. Here, we present a large-scale study of 64 tissue samples taken from patients at all stages and show that we can identify statistically valid markers using nonsupervised methods that distinguish between normal, benign, borderline, and malignant tissue. We have identified 217 of the significantly changing protein spots. We are expressing and raising antibodies to 35 of these. Currently, we have validated 5 of these antibodies for use in immunohistochemical analysis using tissue microarrays of healthy and diseased ovarian, as well as other, human tissues.

  • 29.
    Berglund, Lisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Selection of antigens for antibody-based proteomics2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The human genome is predicted to contain ~20,500 protein-coding genes. The encoded proteins are the key players in the body, but the functions and localizations of most proteins are still unknown. Antibody-based proteomics has great potential for exploration of the protein complement of the human genome, but there are antibodies only to a very limited set of proteins. The Human Proteome Resource (HPR) project was launched in August 2003, with the aim to generate high-quality specific antibodies towards the human proteome, and to use these antibodies for large-scale protein profiling in human tissues and cells.

    The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to evaluate if antigens can be selected, in a high-throughput manner, to enable generation of specific antibodies towards one protein from every human gene. A computationally intensive analysis of potential epitopes in the human proteome was performed and showed that it should be possible to find unique epitopes for most human proteins. The result from this analysis was implemented in a new web-based visualization tool for antigen selection. Predicted protein features important for antigen selection, such as transmembrane regions and signal peptides, are also displayed in the tool. The antigens used in HPR are named protein epitope signature tags (PrESTs). A genome-wide analysis combining different protein features revealed that it should be possible to select unique, 50 amino acids long PrESTs for ~80% of the human protein-coding genes.

    The PrESTs are transferred from the computer to the laboratory by design of PrEST-specific PCR primers. A study of the success rate in PCR cloning of the selected fragments demonstrated the importance of controlled GC-content in the primers for specific amplification. The PrEST protein is produced in bacteria and used for immunization and subsequent affinity purification of the resulting sera to generate mono-specific antibodies. The antibodies are tested for specificity and approved antibodies are used for tissue profiling in normal and cancer tissues. A large-scale analysis of the success rates for different PrESTs in the experimental pipeline of the HPR project showed that the total success rate from PrEST selection to an approved antibody is 31%, and that this rate is dependent on PrEST length. A second PrEST on a target protein is somewhat less likely to succeed in the HPR pipeline if the first PrEST is unsuccessful, but the analysis shows that it is valuable to select several PrESTs for each protein, to enable generation of at least two antibodies, which can be used to validate each other.

  • 30.
    Berglund, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ottosson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Wernérus, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    et al.,
    A genecentric human protein atlas for expression profiles based on antibodies2008In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, Vol. 7, no 10, p. 2019-2027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An attractive path forward in proteomics is to experimentally annotate the human protein complement of the genome in a genecentric manner. Using antibodies, it might be possible to design protein-specific probes for a representative protein from every protein-coding gene and to subsequently use the antibodies for systematical analysis of cellular distribution and subcellular localization of proteins in normal and disease tissues. A new version (4.0) of the Human Protein Atlas has been developed in a genecentric manner with the inclusion of all human genes and splice variants predicted from genome efforts together with a visualization of each protein with characteristics such as predicted membrane regions, signal peptide, and protein domains and new plots showing the uniqueness (sequence similarity) of every fraction of each protein toward all other human proteins. The new version is based on tissue profiles generated from 6120 antibodies with more than five million immunohistochemistry-based images covering 5067 human genes, corresponding to similar to 25% of the human genome. Version 4.0 includes a putative list of members in various protein classes, both functional classes, such as kinases, transcription factors, G-protein-coupled receptors, etc., and project-related classes, such as candidate genes for cancer or cardiovascular diseases. The exact antigen sequence for the internally generated antibodies has also been released together with a visualization of the application-specific validation performed for each antibody, including a protein array assay, Western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and, for a large fraction, immunofluorescence-based confocal microscopy. New search functionalities have been added to allow complex queries regarding protein expression profiles, protein classes, and chromosome location. The new version of the protein atlas thus is a resource for many areas of biomedical research, including protein science and biomarker discovery.

  • 31. Bergström, Jonas P.
    et al.
    Gry, Marcus
    Lengqvist, Johan
    Lindberg, Johan
    Schwenk, Jochen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Drobin, Kimi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Watkins, Paul B.
    Schuppe Koistinen, Ina
    Novel DILI biomarkers for prediction of acetaminophen-induced human hepatotoxicity2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 211, p. S76-S76Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Beven, Laure
    et al.
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Charenton, Claire
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Dautant, Alain
    Univ Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France ; IBMC, CNRS, Bordeaux, France.
    Bouyssou, Guillaume
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Labroussaa, Fabien
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Sköllermo, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Blanchard, Alain
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Specific Evolution of F-1-Like ATPases in Mycoplasmas2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 6, p. e38793-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    F1F0 ATPases have been identified in most bacteria, including mycoplasmas which have very small genomes associated with a host-dependent lifestyle. In addition to the typical operon of eight genes encoding genuine F1F0 ATPase (Type 1), we identified related clusters of seven genes in many mycoplasma species. Four of the encoded proteins have predicted structures similar to the alpha, beta, gamma and e subunits of F-1 ATPases and could form an F-1-like ATPase. The other three proteins display no similarity to any other known proteins. Two of these proteins are probably located in the membrane, as they have three and twelve predicted transmembrane helices. Phylogenomic studies identified two types of F-1-like ATPase clusters, Type 2 and Type 3, characterized by a rapid evolution of sequences with the conservation of structural features. Clusters encoding Type 2 and Type 3 ATPases were assumed to originate from the Hominis group of mycoplasmas. We suggest that Type 3 ATPase clusters may spread to other phylogenetic groups by horizontal gene transfer between mycoplasmas in the same host, based on phylogeny and genomic context. Functional analyses in the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides showed that the Type 3 cluster genes were organized into an operon. Proteomic analyses demonstrated that the seven encoded proteins were produced during growth in axenic media. Mutagenesis and complementation studies demonstrated an association of the Type 3 cluster with a major ATPase activity of membrane fractions. Thus, despite their tendency toward genome reduction, mycoplasmas have evolved and exchanged specific F-1-like ATPases with no known equivalent in other bacteria. We propose a model, in which the F-1-like structure is associated with a hypothetical X-0 sector located in the membrane of mycoplasma cells.

  • 33. Bjarnadottir, Olof
    et al.
    Romero, Quinci
    Bendahl, Pär-Ola
    Jirström, Karin
    Rydén, Lisa
    Loman, Niklas
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Johannesson, Henrik
    Atlas Antibodies AB, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rose, Carsten
    Grabau, Dorthe
    Borgquist, Signe
    Targeting HMG-CoA reductase with statins in a window-of-opportunity breast cancer trial2013In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 138, no 2, p. 499-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipophilic statins purportedly exert anti-tumoral effects on breast cancer by decreasing proliferation and increasing apoptosis. HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR), the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway, is the target of statins. However, data on statin-induced effects on HMGCR activity in cancer are limited. Thus, this pre-operative study investigated statin-induced effects on tumor proliferation and HMGCR expression while analyzing HMGCR as a predictive marker for statin response in breast cancer treatment. The study was designed as a window-of-opportunity trial and included 50 patients with primary invasive breast cancer. High-dose atorvastatin (i.e., 80 mg/day) was prescribed to patients for 2 weeks before surgery. Pre- and post-statin paired tumor samples were analyzed for Ki67 and HMGCR immunohistochemical expression. Changes in the Ki67 expression and HMGCR activity following statin treatment were the primary and secondary endpoints, respectively. Up-regulation of HMGCR following atorvastatin treatment was observed in 68 % of the paired samples with evaluable HMGCR expression (P = 0.0005). The average relative decrease in Ki67 expression following atorvastatin treatment was 7.6 % (P = 0.39) in all paired samples, whereas the corresponding decrease in Ki67 expression in tumors expressing HMGCR in the pre-treatment sample was 24 % (P = 0.02). Furthermore, post-treatment Ki67 expression was inversely correlated to post-treatment HMGCR expression (rs = -0.42; P = 0.03). Findings from this study suggest that HMGCR is targeted by statins in breast cancer cells in vivo, and that statins may have an anti-proliferative effect in HMGCR-positive tumors. Future studies are needed to evaluate HMGCR as a predictive marker for the selection of breast cancer patients who may benefit from statin treatment.

  • 34.
    Björling, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Lindskog, Cecilia
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab.
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Linné, Jerker
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab.
    A web-based tool for in silico biomarker discovery based on tissue-specific protein profiles in normal and cancer tissues2008In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 825-844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we report the development of a publicly available Web-based analysis tool for exploring proteins expressed in a tissue- or cancer-specific manner. The search queries are based on the human tissue profiles in normal and cancer cells in the Human Protein Atlas portal and rely on the individual annotation performed by pathologists of images representing immunohistochemically stained tissue sections. Approximately 1.8 million images representing more than 3000 antibodies directed toward human proteins were used in the study. The search tool allows for the systematic exploration of the protein atlas to discover potential protein biomarkers. Such biomarkers include tissue-specific markers, cell type-specific markers, tumor type-specific markers, markers of malignancy, and prognostic or predictive markers of cancers. Here we show examples of database queries to generate sets of candidate biomarker proteins for several of these different categories. Expression profiles of candidate proteins can then subsequently be validated by examination of the underlying high resolution images. The present study shows examples of search strategies revealing several potential protein biomarkers, including proteins specifically expressed in normal cells and in cancer cells from specified tumor types. The lists of candidate proteins can be used as a starting point for further validation in larger patient cohorts using both immunological approaches and technologies utilizing more classical proteomics tools.

  • 35.
    Björling, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Antibodypedia: a portal for sharing antibody and antigen validation data2008In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, Vol. 7, no 10, p. 2028-2037Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibodies are useful tools to characterize the components of the human proteome and to validate potential protein biomarkers discovered through various clinical proteomics efforts. The lack of validation results across various applications for most antibodies often makes it necessary to perform cumbersome investigations to ensure specificity of a particular antibody in a certain application. A need therefore exists for a standardized system for sharing validation data about publicly available antibodies and to allow antibody providers as well as users to contribute and edit experimental evidence data, including data also on the antigen. Here we describe a new publicly available portal called Antibodypedia, which has been developed to allow sharing of information regarding validation of antibodies in which providers can submit their own validation results and reliability scores. We report standardized validation criteria and submission rules for applications such as Western blots, protein arrays, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. The contributor is expected to provide experimental evidence and a validation score for each antibody, and the users can subsequently provide feedback and comments on the use of the antibody. The database thus provides a virtual resource of publicly available antibodies toward human proteins with accompanying experimental evidence supporting an individual validation score for each antibody in an application-specific manner.

  • 36. Bock, Thomas
    et al.
    Moest, Hansjoerg
    Omasits, Ulrich
    Dolski, Silvia
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Frei, Andreas
    Hofmann, Andreas
    Bausch-Fluck, Damaris
    Jacobs, Andrea
    Krayenbuehl, Niklaus
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Aebersold, Ruedi
    Frei, Karl
    Wollscheid, Bernd
    Proteomic Analysis Reveals Drug Accessible Cell Surface N-Glycoproteins of Primary and Established Glioblastoma Cell Lines2012In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 11, no 10, p. 4885-4893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary Glioblastoma Cell Surface Capturing brain tumor in adults with low average survival time after diagnosis. In order to improve glioblastoma treatment, new drug-accessible targets need to be identified. Cell surface glycoproteins are prime drug targets due to their accessibility at the surface of cancer cells. To overcome the limited availability of suitable antibodies for cell surface protein detection, we performed a comprehensive mass spectrometric investigation of the glioblastoma surfaceome. Our combined cell surface capturing analysis of primary ex vivo glioblastoma cell lines in combination with established glioblastoma cell lines revealed 633 N-glycoproteins, which vastly extends the known data of surfaceome drug targets at subcellular resolution. We provide direct evidence of common glioblastoma cell surface glycoproteins and an approximate estimate of their abundances, information that could not be derived from genomic and/or transcriptomic glioblastoma studies. Apart from our pharmaceutically valuable repertoire of already and potentially drug-accessible cell surface glycoproteins, we built a mass-spectrometry-based toolbox enabling directed, sensitive, and repetitive glycoprotein measurements for clinical follow-up studies. The included Skyline Glioblastoma SRM assay library provides an elevated starting point for parallel testing of the abundance level of the detected glioblastoma surfaceome members in future drug perturbation experiments.

  • 37. Bolander, Å.
    et al.
    Agnarsdóttir, M.
    Strömberg, S.
    Ponten, F.
    Hesselius, P.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Bergqvist, M.
    The protein expression of TRP-1 and galectin-1 in cutaneous malignant melanomas2008In: Cancer Genomics & Proteomics, ISSN 1109-6535, E-ISSN 1790-6245, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 293-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with metastazing malignant melanoma have a poor outcome and determination of thickness of the primary tumor remains as the most important prognostic predictor. The aim of this study was to use an antibody-based proteomics strategy to search for new molecular markers associated with melanoma progression. Two proteins, TRP-1 and galectin-1, were identified as proteins with enhanced expression in cells from the melanocytic lineage. Patients and Methods: Protein profiling of TRP-1 and galectin-1 together with proliferation marker Ki-67 and melanocyte marker Melan-A was performed in normal tissues from 144 individuals and in 216 different tumors using tissue microarrays and immunohistochemistry. The protein expression pattern was further analyzed in a defined cohort of 157 patients diagnosed with invasive cutaneous malignant melanoma. Results: Both TRP-1 and galectin-1 were highly expressed in normal melanocytes and melanoma. The expression of TRP-1 was inversely correlated with tumor stage (p=0.002, (R=-0.28)). Neither TRP-1 or galectin-1 was associated with overall or disease free survival (p>0.14, p>0.46 respectively). Ki-67 was associated with tumor stage and survival (p<0.001). Conclusion: TRP-1 and galectin-1 protein expression patterns were determined in normal and cancer tissues and both proteins were expressed in the majority of the malignant melanomas. There was no correlation between TRP-1 or galectin-1 expression and survival.

  • 38. Boman, Karolina
    et al.
    Segersten, Ulrika
    Ahlgren, Göran
    Eberhard, Jakob
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jirström, Karin
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Decreased expression of RNA-binding motif protein 3 correlates with tumour progression and poor prognosis in urothelial bladder cancer2013In: BMC Urology, ISSN 1471-2490, E-ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 13, p. 17-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Low nuclear expression of the RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) has previously been found to be associated with poor prognosis in several cancer forms e. g. breast, ovarian, colorectal, prostate cancer and malignant melanoma. The aim of this study was to examine the prognostic impact of RBM3 expression in urinary bladder cancer. Methods: Immunohistochemical RBM3 expression was examined in tumours from 343 patients with urothelial bladder cancer. Chi-square and Spearman's correlation tests were applied to explore associations between RBM3 expression and clinicopathological characteristics. The impact of RBM3 expression on disease-specific survival (DSS), 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling. Results: Reduced nuclear RBM3 expression was significantly associated with more advanced tumour (T) stage (p < 0.001) and high grade tumours (p= 0.004). Negative RBM3 expression was associated with a significantly shorter DSS (HR= 2.55; 95% CI 1.68-3.86)) and 5-year OS (HR= 2.10; 95% CI 1.56-2.82), also in multivariable analysis (HR= 1.65; 95% CI 1.07-2.53 for DSS and HR= 1.54; 95% CI 1.13-2.10 for 5-year OS). In patients with Ta and T1 tumours expressing reduced RBM3 levels, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a significantly shorter PFS (p= 0.048) and 5-year OS (p= 0.006). Conclusion: Loss of RBM3 expression is associated with clinically more aggressive tumours and an independent factor of poor prognosis in patients with urothelial bladder cancer and a potentially useful biomarker for treatment stratification and surveillance of disease progression.

  • 39.
    Boström, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Markland, Katrin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Centre for Bioprocess Technology, CBioPT.
    Sandén, Anna Maria
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Centre for Bioprocess Technology, CBioPT.
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Centre for Bioprocess Technology, CBioPT.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Centre for Bioprocess Technology, CBioPT.
    Larsson, Gen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Centre for Bioprocess Technology, CBioPT.
    Effect of substrate feed rate on recombinant protein secretion, degradation and invlusion body formation in Escherichia coli2005In: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, ISSN 0175-7598, E-ISSN 1432-0614, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 82-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of changes in substrate feed rate during fedbatch cultivation was investigated with respect to soluble protein formation and transport of product to the periplasm in Escherichia coli. Production was transcribed from the P-malK promoter; and the cytoplasmic part of the production was compared with production from the P-lacUV5 promoter. The fusion protein product, Zb-MalE, was at all times accumulated in the soluble protein fraction except during high-feed-rate production in the cytoplasm. This was due to a substantial degree of proteolysis in all production systems, as shown by the degradation pattern of the product. The product was also further subjected to inclusion body fori-nation. Production in the periplasm resulted in accumulation of the full-length protein; and this production system led to a cellular physiology where the stringent response could be avoided. Furthermore, the secretion could be used to abort the diauxic growth phase resulting from use of the P-malK promoter. At high feed rate, the accumulation of acetic acid, due to overflow metabolism, could furthermore be completely avoided.

  • 40.
    Boström, Tove
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Nilvebrant, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Purification systems based of bacterial surface proteins2012In: Protein Purification / [ed] Rizwan Ahmad, InTech, 2012, Vol. 1, p. 89-136Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41. Bourbeillon, Julie
    et al.
    Orchard, Sandra
    Benhar, Itai
    Borrebaeck, Carl
    de Daruvar, Antoine
    Duebel, Stefan
    Frank, Ronald
    Gibson, Frank
    Gloriam, David
    Haslam, Niall
    Hiltker, Tara
    Humphrey-Smith, Ian
    Hust, Michael
    Juncker, David
    Koegl, Manfred
    Konthur, Zoltan
    Korn, Bernhard
    Krobitsch, Sylvia
    Muyldermans, Serge
    Nygren, Per-Åke
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Palcy, Sandrine
    Polic, Bojan
    Rodriguez, Henry
    Sawyer, Alan
    Schlapshy, Martin
    Snyder, Michael
    Stoevesandt, Oda
    Taussig, Michael J.
    Templin, Markus
    Uhlén, Matthias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    van der Maarel, Silvere
    Wingren, Christer
    Hermjakob, Henning
    Sherman, David
    Minimum information about a protein affinity reagent (MIAPAR)2010In: Nature Biotechnology, ISSN 1087-0156, E-ISSN 1546-1696, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 650-653Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42. Brennan, Donal J.
    et al.
    Brändstedt, Jenny
    Rexhepaj, Elton
    Foley, Michael
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Gallagher, William M.
    O'Connor, Darran P.
    O'Herlihy, Colm
    Jirstrom, Karin
    Tumour-specific HMG-CoAR is an independent predictor of recurrence free survival in epithelial ovarian cancer2010In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 10, p. 125-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Our group previously reported that tumour-specific expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) is associated with more favourable tumour parameters and a good prognosis in breast cancer. In the present study, the prognostic value of HMG-CoAR expression was examined in tumours from a cohort of patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods: HMG-CoAR expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) on tissue microarrays (TMA) consisting of 76 ovarian cancer cases, analysed using automated algorithms to develop a quantitative scoring model. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to estimate the risk of recurrence free survival (RFS). Results: Seventy-two tumours were suitable for analysis. Cytoplasmic HMG-CoAR expression was present in 65% (n = 46) of tumours. No relationship was seen between HMG-CoAR and age, histological subtype, grade, disease stage, estrogen receptor or Ki-67 status. Patients with tumours expressing HMG-CoAR had a significantly prolonged RFS (p = 0.012). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that HMG-CoAR expression was an independent predictor of improved RFS (RR = 0.49, 95% CI (0.25-0.93); p = 0.03) when adjusted for established prognostic factors such as residual disease, tumour stage and grade. Conclusion: HMG-CoAR expression is an independent predictor of prolonged RFS in primary ovarian cancer. As HMG-CoAR inhibitors, also known as statins, have demonstrated anti-neoplastic effects in vitro, further studies are required to evaluate HMG-CoAR expression as a surrogate marker of response to statin treatment, especially in conjunction with current chemotherapeutic regimens.

  • 43. Brennan, Donal J.
    et al.
    Laursen, Henriette
    O'Connor, Darran P.
    Borgquist, Signe
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Gallagher, William M.
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Millikan, Robert C.
    Ryden, Lisa
    Jirström, Karin
    Tumor-specific HMG-CoA reductase expression in primary premenopausal breast cancer predicts response to tamoxifen2011In: Breast Cancer Research, ISSN 1465-5411, E-ISSN 1465-542X, Vol. 13, no 1, p. R12-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: We previously reported an association between tumor-specific 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) expression and a good prognosis in breast cancer. Here, the predictive value of HMG-CoAR expression in relation to tamoxifen response was examined. Methods: HMG-CoAR protein and RNA expression was analyzed in a cell line model of tamoxifen resistance using western blotting and PCR. HMG-CoAR mRNA expression was examined in 155 tamoxifen-treated breast tumors obtained from a previously published gene expression study (Cohort I). HMG-CoAR protein expression was examined in 422 stage II premenopausal breast cancer patients, who had previously participated in a randomized control trial comparing 2 years of tamoxifen with no systemic adjuvant treatment (Cohort II). Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to estimate the risk of recurrence-free survival (RFS) and the effect of HMG-CoAR expression on tamoxifen response. Results: HMG-CoAR protein and RNA expression were decreased in tamoxifen-resistant MCF7-LCC9 cells compared with their tamoxifen-sensitive parental cell line. HMG-CoAR mRNA expression was decreased in tumors that recurred following tamoxifen treatment (P < 0.001) and was an independent predictor of RFS in Cohort I (hazard ratio = 0.63, P = 0.009). In Cohort II, adjuvant tamoxifen increased RFS in HMG-CoAR-positive tumors (P = 0.008). Multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that HMG-CoAR was an independent predictor of improved RFS in Cohort II (hazard ratio = 0.67, P = 0.010), and subset analysis revealed that this was maintained in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive patients (hazard ratio = 0.65, P = 0.029). Multivariate interaction analysis demonstrated a difference in tamoxifen efficacy relative to HMG-CoAR expression (P = 0.05). Analysis of tamoxifen response revealed that patients with ER-positive/HMG-CoAR tumors had a significant response to tamoxifen (P = 0.010) as well as patients with ER-positive or HMG-CoAR-positive tumors (P = 0.035). Stratification according to ER and HMG-CoAR status demonstrated that ER-positive/HMG-CoAR-positive tumors had an improved RFS compared with ER-positive/HMG-CoAR-negative tumors in the treatment arm (P = 0.033); this effect was lost in the control arm (P = 0.138), however, suggesting that HMG-CoAR predicts tamoxifen response. Conclusions: HMG CoAR expression is a predictor of response to tamoxifen in both ER-positive and ER-negative disease. Premenopausal patients with tumors that express ER or HMG-CoAR respond to adjuvant tamoxifen.

  • 44. Brouns, Stan J. J.
    et al.
    Walther, Jasper
    Snijders, Ambrosius P. L.
    de Werken, Harmen J. G. van
    Willemen, Hanneke L. D. M.
    Worm, Petra
    de Vos, Marjon G. J.
    Andersson, Anders
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Mazon, Hortense F. M.
    van den Heuvel, Robert H. H.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Salmon, Laurent
    de Vos, Willem M.
    Wright, Phillip C.
    Bernander, Rolf
    van der Oost, John
    Identification of the missing links in prokaryotic pentose oxidation pathways - Evidence for enzyme recruitment2006In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 281, no 37, p. 27378-27388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pentose metabolism of Archaea is largely unknown. Here, we have employed an integrated genomics approach including DNA microarray and proteomics analyses to elucidate the catabolic pathway for D-arabinose in Sulfolobus solfataricus. During growth on this sugar, a small set of genes appeared to be differentially expressed compared with growth on D-glucose. These genes were heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant proteins were purified and biochemically studied. This showed that D-arabinose is oxidized to 2-oxoglutarate by the consecutive action of a number of previously uncharacterized enzymes, including a D-arabinose dehydrogenase, a D-arabinonate dehydratase, a novel 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-arabinonate dehydratase, and a 2,5-dioxopentanoate dehydrogenase. Promoter analysis of these genes revealed a palindromic sequence upstream of the TATA box, which is likely to be involved in their concerted transcriptional control. Integration of the obtained biochemical data with genomic context analysis strongly suggests the occurrence of pentose oxidation pathways in both Archaea and Bacteria, and predicts the involvement of additional enzyme components. Moreover, it revealed striking genetic similarities between the catabolic pathways for pentoses, hexaric acids, and hydroxyproline degradation, which support the theory of metabolic pathway genesis by enzyme recruitment.

  • 45. Buus, S.
    et al.
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Forsström, Björn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schafer-Nielsen, C.
    High-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes using ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays2012In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 11, no 12, p. 1790-1800Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibodies empower numerous important scientific, clinical, diagnostic, and industrial applications. Ideally, the epitope(s) targeted by an antibody should be identified and characterized, thereby establishing antibody reactivity, highlighting possible cross-reactivities, and perhaps even warning against unwanted (e.g. autoimmune) reactivities. Antibodies target proteins as either conformational or linear epitopes. The latter are typically probed with peptides, but the cost of peptide screening programs tends to prohibit comprehensive specificity analysis. To perform high-throughput, high-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes, we have used ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays generating several hundred thousand different peptides per array. Using exhaustive length and substitution analysis, we have successfully examined the specificity of a panel of polyclonal antibodies raised against linear epitopes of the human proteome and obtained very detailed descriptions of the involved specificities. The epitopes identified ranged from 4 to 12 amino acids in size. In general, the antibodies were of exquisite specificity, frequently disallowing even single conservative substitutions. In several cases, multiple distinct epitopes could be identified for the same target protein, suggesting an efficient approach to the generation of paired antibodies. Two alternative epitope mapping approaches identified similar, although not necessarily identical, epitopes. These results show that ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays can be used for linear epitope mapping. With an upper theoretical limit of 2,000,000 individual peptides per array, these peptide microarrays may even be used for a systematic validation of antibodies at the proteomic level.

  • 46. Colwill, Karen
    et al.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Schwenk, Jochen M
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ottosson Takanen, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Gräslund, Susanne
    et, al.
    A roadmap to generate renewable protein binders to the human proteome2011In: Nature Methods, ISSN 1548-7091, E-ISSN 1548-7105, Vol. 8, no 7, p. 551-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the wealth of commercially available antibodies to human proteins, research is often hindered by their inconsistent validation, their poor performance and the inadequate coverage of the proteome. These issues could be addressed by systematic, genome-wide efforts to generate and validate renewable protein binders. We report a multicenter study to assess the potential of hybridoma and phage-display technologies in a coordinated large-scale antibody generation and validation effort. We produced over 1,000 antibodies targeting 20 SH2 domain proteins and evaluated them for potency and specificity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), protein microarray and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). We also tested selected antibodies in immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. Our results show that high-affinity, high-specificity renewable antibodies generated by different technologies can be produced quickly and efficiently. We believe that this work serves as a foundation and template for future larger-scale studies to create renewable protein binders.

  • 47.
    Danielsson, Frida
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fasterius, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Sullivan, Devin
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hases, Linnea
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sanli, Kemal
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhang, Cheng
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Huss, M.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Technical University of Denmark, Hørsholm, Denmark.
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Transcriptome profiling of the interconnection of pathways involved in malignant transformation and response to hypoxia2018In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 9, no 28, p. 19730-19744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In tumor tissues, hypoxia is a commonly observed feature resulting from rapidly proliferating cancer cells outgrowing their surrounding vasculature network. Transformed cancer cells are known to exhibit phenotypic alterations, enabling continuous proliferation despite a limited oxygen supply. The four-step isogenic BJ cell model enables studies of defined steps of tumorigenesis: the normal, immortalized, transformed, and metastasizing stages. By transcriptome profiling under atmospheric and moderate hypoxic (3% O2) conditions, we observed that despite being highly similar, the four cell lines of the BJ model responded strikingly different to hypoxia. Besides corroborating many of the known responses to hypoxia, we demonstrate that the transcriptome adaptation to moderate hypoxia resembles the process of malignant transformation. The transformed cells displayed a distinct capability of metabolic switching, reflected in reversed gene expression patterns for several genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation and glycolytic pathways. By profiling the stage-specific responses to hypoxia, we identified ASS1 as a potential prognostic marker in hypoxic tumors. This study demonstrates the usefulness of the BJ cell model for highlighting the interconnection of pathways involved in malignant transformation and hypoxic response.

  • 48.
    Danielsson, Frida
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Skogs, Marie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Huss, Mikael
    Rexhepaj, Elton
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    O'Hurley, Gillian
    Klevebring, Daniel
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Gad, Annica K. B.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Majority of differentially expressed genes are down-regulated during malignant transformation in a four-stage model2013In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 110, no 17, p. 6853-6858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transformation of normal cells to malignant, metastatic tumor cells is a multistep process caused by the sequential acquirement of genetic changes. To identify these changes, we compared the transcriptomes and levels and distribution of proteins in a four-stage cell model of isogenically matched normal, immortalized, transformed, and metastatic human cells, using deep transcriptome sequencing and immunofluorescence microscopy. The data show that similar to 6% (n = 1,357) of the human protein-coding genes are differentially expressed across the stages in the model. Interestingly, the majority of these genes are down-regulated, linking malignant transformation to dedifferentiation. The up-regulated genes are mainly components that control cellular proliferation, whereas the down-regulated genes consist of proteins exposed on or secreted from the cell surface. As many of the identified gene products control basic cellular functions that are defective in cancers, the data provide candidates for follow-up studies to investigate their functional roles in tumor formation. When we further compared the expression levels of four of the identified proteins in clinical cancer cohorts, similar differences were observed between benign and cancer cells, as in the cell model. This shows that this comprehensive demonstration of the molecular changes underlying malignant transformation is a relevant model to study the process of tumor formation.

  • 49.
    Danielsson, Frida
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wiking, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mahdessian, Diana
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Skogs, Marie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ait Blal, Hammou
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hjelmare, Martin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stadler, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    RNA Deep Sequencing as a Tool for Selection of Cell Lines for Systematic Subcellular Localization of All Human Proteins2013In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the major challenges of a chromosome-centric proteome project is to explore in a systematic manner the potential proteins identified from the chromosomal genome sequence, but not yet characterized on a protein level. Here, we describe the use of RNA deep sequencing to screen human cell lines for RNA profiles and to use this information to select cell lines suitable for characterization of the corresponding gene product. In this manner, the subcellular localization of proteins can be analyzed systematically using antibody-based confocal microscopy. We demonstrate the usefulness of selecting cell lines with high expression levels of RNA transcripts to increase the likelihood of high quality immunofluorescence staining and subsequent successful subcellular localization of the corresponding protein. The results show a path to combine transcriptomics with affinity proteomics to characterize the proteins in a gene- or chromosome-centric manner.

  • 50. Dengjel, Joern
    et al.
    Hoyer-Hansen, Maria
    Nielsen, Maria O.
    Eisenberg, Tobias
    Harder, Lea M.
    Schandorff, Soren
    Farkas, Thomas
    Kirkegaard, Thomas
    Becker, Andrea C.
    Schroeder, Sabrina
    Vanselow, Katja
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nielsen, Mogens M.
    Kristensen, Anders R.
    Akimov, Vyacheslav
    Bunkenborg, Jakob
    Madeo, Frank
    Jaattela, Marja
    Andersen, Jens S.
    Identification of Autophagosome-associated Proteins and Regulators by Quantitative Proteomic Analysis and Genetic Screens2012In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 11, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autophagy is one of the major intracellular catabolic pathways, but little is known about the composition of autophagosomes. To study the associated proteins, we isolated autophagosomes from human breast cancer cells using two different biochemical methods and three stimulus types: amino acid deprivation or rapamycin or concanamycin A treatment. The autophagosome- associated proteins were dependent on stimulus, but a core set of proteins was stimulus- independent. Remarkably, proteasomal proteins were abundant among the stimulus- independent common autophagosome- associated proteins, and the activation of autophagy significantly decreased the cellular proteasome level and activity supporting interplay between the two degradation pathways. A screen of yeast strains defective in the orthologs of the human genes encoding for a common set of autophagosome- associated proteins revealed several regulators of autophagy, including subunits of the retromer complex. The combined spatiotemporal proteomic and genetic data sets presented here provide a basis for further characterization of autophagosome biogenesis and cargo selection.

1234567 1 - 50 of 317
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf