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  • 1. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bouvier, A.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Burnett, T. H.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, J.
    Cutini, S.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Angelis, A.
    de Palma, F.
    Digel, S. W.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Edmonds, Y.
    Farnier, C.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fortin, P.
    Frailis, M.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Gustafsson, M.
    Hadasch, D.
    Harding, A. K.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kawai, N.
    Kerr, M.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Garde, M. Llena
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Makeev, A.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Meurer, C.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Rodriguez, A. Y.
    Roth, M.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sander, A.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Scargle, J. D.
    Sellerholm, A.
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Starck, J. -L
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Torres, D. F.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vilchez, N.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Zaharijas, G.
    Ziegler, M.
    Constraints on cosmological dark matter annihilation from the Fermi-LAT isotropic diffuse gamma-ray measurement2010In: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, E-ISSN 1475-7516, Vol. 2010, no 04Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first published Fermi large area telescope (Fermi-LAT) measurement of the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray emission is in good agreement with a single power law, and is not showing any signature of a dominant contribution from dark matter sources in the energy range from 20 to 100 GeV. We use the absolute size and spectral shape of this measured flux to derive cross section limits on three types of generic dark matter candidates: annihilating into quarks, charged leptons and monochromatic photons. Predicted gamma-ray fluxes from annihilating dark matter are strongly affected by the underlying distribution of dark matter, and by using different available results of matter structure formation we assess these uncertainties. We also quantify how the dark matter constraints depend on the assumed conventional backgrounds and on the Universe's transparency to high-energy gamma-rays. In reasonable background and dark matter structure scenarios (but not in all scenarios we consider) it is possible to exclude models proposed to explain the excess of electrons and positrons measured by the Fermi-LAT and PAMELA experiments. Derived limits also start to probe cross sections expected from thermally produced relics (e. g. in minimal supersymmetry models) annihilating predominantly into quarks. For the monochromatic gamma-ray signature, the current measurement constrains only dark matter scenarios with very strong signals.

  • 2.
    Abouzayed, Ayman
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Chem, S-75183 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Tano, Hanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering.
    Nagy, Abel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Rinne, Sara S.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Chem, S-75183 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wadeea, Fadya
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Chem, S-75183 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kumar, Sharmishtaa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Westerlund, Kristina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering.
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Eriksson Karlström, Amelie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH Royal Inst Technol, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Prot Sci, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Orlova, Anna
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Chem, S-75183 Uppsala, Sweden.;Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Res Centrum Oncotheranost, Tomsk 634050, Russia.;Uppsala Univ, Sci Life Lab, S-75105 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Preclinical Evaluation of the GRPR-Targeting Antagonist RM26 Conjugated to the Albumin-Binding Domain for GRPR-Targeting Therapy of Cancer2020In: Pharmaceutics, E-ISSN 1999-4923, Vol. 12, no 10, article id 977Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The targeting of gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR) was recently proposed for targeted therapy, e.g., radiotherapy. Multiple and frequent injections of peptide-based therapeutic agents would be required due to rapid blood clearance. By conjugation of the GRPR antagonist RM26 (D-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH2) to an ABD (albumin-binding domain), we aimed to extend the blood circulation of peptides. The synthesized conjugate DOTA-ABD-RM26 was labelled with indium-111 and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The labelled conjugate was stable in PBS and retained specificity and its antagonistic function against GRPR. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of In-nat-DOTA-ABD-RM26 in the presence of human serum albumin was 49 +/- 5 nM. [In-111]In-DOTA-ABD-RM26 had a significantly longer residence time in blood and in tumors (without a significant decrease of up to 144 h pi) than the parental RM26 peptide. We conclude that the ABD-RM26 conjugate can be used for GRPR-targeted therapy and delivery of cytotoxic drugs. However, the undesirable elevated activity uptake in kidneys abolishes its use for radionuclide therapy. This proof-of-principle study justified further optimization of the molecular design of the ABD-RM26 conjugate.

  • 3. Adhikari, Subash
    et al.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Baker, Mark S.
    A high-stringency blueprint of the human proteome2020In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 5301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) launched the Human Proteome Project (HPP) in 2010, creating an international framework for global collaboration, data sharing, quality assurance and enhancing accurate annotation of the genome-encoded proteome. During the subsequent decade, the HPP established collaborations, developed guidelines and metrics, and undertook reanalysis of previously deposited community data, continuously increasing the coverage of the human proteome. On the occasion of the HPP's tenth anniversary, we here report a 90.4% complete high-stringency human proteome blueprint. This knowledge is essential for discerning molecular processes in health and disease, as we demonstrate by highlighting potential roles the human proteome plays in our understanding, diagnosis and treatment of cancers, cardiovascular and infectious diseases. The Human Proteome Project (HPP) was launched in 2010 to enhance accurate annotation of the genome-encoded proteome. Ten years later, the HPP releases its first blueprint of the human proteome, annotating 90% of all known proteins at high-stringency and discussing the implications of proteomics for precision medicine.

  • 4.
    Adori, Csaba
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Daraio, Teresa
    Karolinska Inst, Rolf Luft Res Ctr Diabet & Endocrinol, Dept Mol Med & Surg, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kuiper, Raoul
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Barde, Swapnali
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Horvathova, Lubica
    Slovak Acad Sci, Biomed Res Ctr, Inst Expt Endocrinol, Bratislava, Slovakia..
    Yoshitake, Takashi
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ihnatko, Robert
    Linköping Univ, Dept Clin Chem, S-58285 Linköping, Sweden.;Linköping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, S-58285 Linköping, Sweden.;Georg August Univ Gottingen, Univ Med Ctr, Inst Pathol, Gottingen, Germany..
    Valladolid-Acebes, Ismael
    Karolinska Inst, Rolf Luft Res Ctr Diabet & Endocrinol, Dept Mol Med & Surg, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Vercruysse, Pauline
    Karolinska Inst, Rolf Luft Res Ctr Diabet & Endocrinol, Dept Mol Med & Surg, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wellendorf, Ashley M.
    Cincinnati Childrens Hosp Med Ctr, Div Expt Hematol & Canc Biol, Cincinnati, OH 45229 USA..
    Gramignoli, Roberto
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bozoky, Bela
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Pathol Cytol, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Kehr, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping Univ, Dept Clin Chem, S-58285 Linköping, Sweden.;Linköping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, S-58285 Linköping, Sweden..
    Cancelas, Jose A.
    Cincinnati Childrens Hosp Med Ctr, Div Expt Hematol & Canc Biol, Cincinnati, OH 45229 USA.;Univ Cincinnati, Hoxworth Blood Ctr, Coll Med, Cincinnati, OH 45267 USA..
    Mravec, Boris
    Slovak Acad Sci, Biomed Res Ctr, Inst Expt Endocrinol, Bratislava, Slovakia.;Comenius Univ, Fac Med, Inst Physiol, Bratislava, Slovakia..
    Jorns, Carl
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, PO Transplantat, S-14152 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ellis, Ewa
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Transplantat Surg, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mulder, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Royal Inst Technol, Sci Life Lab, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bark, Christina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hokfelt, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Disorganization and degeneration of liver sympathetic innervations in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease revealed by 3D imaging2021In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 7, no 30, article id eabg5733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hepatic nerves have a complex role in synchronizing liver metabolism. Here, we used three-dimensional (3D) immunoimaging to explore the integrity of the hepatic nervous system in experimental and human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We demonstrate parallel signs of mild degeneration and axonal sprouting of sympathetic innervations in early stages of experimental NAFLD and a collapse of sympathetic arborization in steatohepatitis. Human fatty livers display a similar pattern of sympathetic nerve degeneration, correlating with the severity of NAFLD pathology. We show that chronic sympathetic hyperexcitation is a key factor in the axonal degeneration, here genetically phenocopied in mice deficient of the Rac-1 activator Vav3. In experimental steatohepatitis, 3D imaging reveals a severe portal vein contraction, spatially correlated with the extension of the remaining nerves around the portal vein, enlightening a potential intrahepatic neuronal mechanism of portal hypertension. These fundamental alterations in liver innervation and vasculature uncover previously unidentified neuronal components in NAFLD pathomechanisms.

  • 5.
    Adori, Monika
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bhat, Sadam
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    Gramignoli, Roberto
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Valladolid-Acebes, Ismael
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, The Rolf Luft Research Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Tore
    Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute (MBW), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Adori, Csaba
    Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute (MBW), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hepatic Innervations and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease2023In: Seminars in liver disease (Print), ISSN 0272-8087, E-ISSN 1098-8971, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 149-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abbreviations: VMN/PVN, hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus/paraventricular nucleus; VLM/VMM, ventrolateral medulla/ventromedial medulla; SMG/CG, superior mesenteric ganglion/caeliac ganglia; NTS, nucleus of the solitary tract; NG, nodose ganglion. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disorder. Increased sympathetic (noradrenergic) nerve tone has a complex role in the etiopathomechanism of NAFLD, affecting the development/progression of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, and liver hemodynamical alterations. Also, lipid sensing by vagal afferent fibers is an important player in the development of hepatic steatosis. Moreover, disorganization and progressive degeneration of liver sympathetic nerves were recently described in human and experimental NAFLD. These structural alterations likely come along with impaired liver sympathetic nerve functionality and lack of adequate hepatic noradrenergic signaling. Here, we first overview the anatomy and physiology of liver nerves. Then, we discuss the nerve impairments in NAFLD and their pathophysiological consequences in hepatic metabolism, inflammation, fibrosis, and hemodynamics. We conclude that further studies considering the spatial-temporal dynamics of structural and functional changes in the hepatic nervous system may lead to more targeted pharmacotherapeutic advances in NAFLD.

  • 6. Adriani, O.
    et al.
    Barbarino, G. C.
    Bazilevskaya, G. A.
    Bellotti, R.
    Boezio, M.
    Bogomolov, E. A.
    Bonechi, L.
    Bongi, M.
    Bonvicini, V.
    Borisov, S.
    Bottai, S.
    Bruno, A.
    Cafagna, F.
    Campana, D.
    Carbone, R.
    Carlson, Per
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Casolino, M.
    Castellini, G.
    Consiglio, L.
    De Pascale, M. P.
    De Santis, C.
    De Simone, N.
    Di Felice, V.
    Galper, A. M.
    Gillard, W.
    Grishantseva, L.
    Hofverberg, Petter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Jerse, G.
    Koldashov, S. V.
    Krutkov, S. Y.
    Kvashnin, A. N.
    Leonov, A.
    Malvezzi, V.
    Marcelli, L.
    Menn, W.
    Mikhailov, V. V.
    Mocchiutti, E.
    Monaco, A.
    Mori, N.
    Nikonov, N.
    Osteria, G.
    Papini, P.
    Pearce, Mark
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Picozza, P.
    Ricci, M.
    Ricciarini, S. B.
    Rossetto, L.
    Simon, M.
    Sparvoli, R.
    Spillantini, P.
    Stozhkov, Y. I.
    Vacchi, A.
    Vannuccini, E.
    Vasilyev, G.
    Voronov, S. A.
    Wu, Juan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Yurkin, Y. T.
    Zampa, G.
    Zampa, N.
    Zverev, V. G.
    Marinucci, D.
    A statistical procedure for the identification of positrons in the PAMELA experiment2010In: Astroparticle physics, ISSN 0927-6505, E-ISSN 1873-2852, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The PAMELA satellite experiment has measured the cosmic-ray positron fraction between 1.5 GeV and 100 GeV. The need to reliably discriminate between the positron signal and proton background has required the development of an ad hoc analysis procedure. In this paper, a method for positron identification is described and its stability and capability to yield a correct background estimate is shown. The analysis includes new experimental data, the application of three different fitting techniques for the background sample and an estimate of systematic uncertainties due to possible inaccuracies in the background selection. The new experimental results confirm both solar modulation effects on cosmic-rays with low rigidities and an anomalous positron abundance above 10 GeV. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 7. Adriani, O.
    et al.
    Barbarino, G. C.
    Bazilevskaya, G. A.
    Bellotti, R.
    Boezio, M.
    Bogomolov, E. A.
    Bongi, M.
    Bonvicini, V.
    Bottai, S.
    Bruno, A.
    Cafagna, F.
    Campana, D.
    Carlson, Per
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. ‎ AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Oskar Klein Ctr Cosmoparticle Phys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Casolino, M.
    Castellini, G.
    De Santis, C.
    Di Felice, V.
    Galper, A. M.
    Karelin, A. V.
    Koldashov, S. V.
    Koldobskiy, S.
    Krutkov, S. Y.
    Kvashnin, A. N.
    Leonov, A.
    Malakhov, V.
    Marcelli, L.
    Martucci, M.
    Mayorov, A. G.
    Menn, W.
    Merge, M.
    Mikhailov, V. V.
    Mocchiutti, E.
    Monaco, A.
    Munini, R.
    Mori, N.
    Osteria, G.
    Panico, B.
    Papini, P.
    Pearce, Mark
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. ‎ AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Oskar Klein Ctr Cosmoparticle Phys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Picozza, P.
    Ricci, M.
    Ricciarini, S. B.
    Simon, M.
    Sparvoli, R.
    Spillantini, P.
    Stozhkov, Y. I.
    Vacchi, A.
    Vannuccini, E.
    Vasilyev, G.
    Voronov, S. A.
    Yurkin, Y. T.
    Zampa, G.
    Zampa, N.
    Ten years of PAMELA in space2017In: La Rivista del nuovo cimento della Società italiana di fisica, ISSN 0393-697X, E-ISSN 1826-9850, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 473-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The PAMELA cosmic-ray detector was launched on June 15th 2006 on board the Russian Resurs-DK1 satellite, and during ten years of nearly continuous data-taking it has observed new interesting features in cosmic rays (CRs). In a decade of operation it has provided plenty of scientific data, covering different issues related to cosmic-ray physics. Its discoveries might change our basic vision of the mechanisms of production, acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. The antimatter measurements, focus of the experiment, have set strong constraints to the nature of Dark Matter. Search for signatures of more exotic processes (such as the ones involving Strange Quark Matter) was also pursued. Furthermore, the long-term operation of the instrument had allowed a constant monitoring of the solar activity during its maximum and a detailed and prolonged study of the solar modulation, improving the comprehension of the heliosphere mechanisms. PAMELA had also measured the radiation environment around the Earth, and it detected for the first time the presence of an antiproton radiation belt surrounding our planet. The operation of Resurs-DK1 was terminated in 2016. In this article we will review the main features of the PAMELA instrument and its constructing phases. The main part of the article will be dedicated to the summary of the most relevant PAMELA results over a decade of observation.

  • 8. Agnarsdottir, Margret
    et al.
    Sooman, Linda
    Bolander, Asa
    Stromberg, Sara
    Rexhepaj, Elton
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Gallagher, William
    Lennartsson, Johan
    Ekman, Simon
    Uhlen, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Hedstrand, Hakan
    SOX10 expression in superficial spreading and nodular malignant melanomas2010In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 468-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SOX10 is a transcription factor expressed in nerve cells and melanocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the protein expression pattern of SOX10 in malignant melanoma tumors and to analyze whether the results correlated with clinical parameters and the proliferation marker Ki-67. Furthermore, proliferation and migration were analyzed in three different cell lines employing SOX10 small interfering RNA-mediated silencing. Expression patterns were determined in 106 primary tumors and 39 metastases in addition to 16 normal skin samples and six benign nevi employing immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays. The immunohistochemical staining was evaluated manually and with an automated algorithm. SOX10 was strongly expressed in the benign tissues, but for the malignant tumors superficial spreading melanomas stained stronger than nodular malignant melanomas (P = 0.008). The staining intensity was also inversely correlated with T-stage (Spearman's rho = -0.261, P = 0.008). Overall survival and time to recurrence were significantly correlated with SOX10 intensity, but not in multivariate analysis including T-stage. With the automated algorithm there was an inverse correlation between the SOX10 staining intensity and the proliferation marker, Ki-67 (rho = -0.173, P = 0.02) and a significant difference in the intensity signal between the benign tissues, the primary tumors and the metastases where the metastases stained the weakest (P <= 0.001). SOX10 downregulation resulted in variable effects on proliferation and migration rates in the melanoma cell lines. In conclusion, the SOX10 intensity level differed depending on the tissue studied and SOX10 might have a role in survival. No conclusion regarding the role of SOX10 for in-vitro proliferation and migration could be drawn. Melanoma Res 20:468-478

  • 9.
    Ahrenstedt, Lage
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Olksanen, Antti
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Salmien, Kristian
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Paper dry strength improvement by xyloglucan addition: Wet-end application, spray coating and synergism with borate2008In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 8-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The polysaccharide xyloglucan as a wet-end additive improves paper properties. In the present study, paper strength improvement was analysed for dry handsheets made from chemical, mechanical and recycled pulps coated with xyloglucan in a spray application. Results are compared with sheets made from the same pulps treated with xyloglucan in the wet-end. Kraft pulp handsheets of bleached hardwood and softwood showed significant improvements of tensile, tear and Z-strength by xyloglucan spray treatment versus wet-end application, whereas handsheets of de-inked and thermomechanical pulp were improved only slightly. In both wet-end and spray applications, the effect of xyloglucan addition was intimately related to the presence of non-cellulosic components on the fibre surface. Further strength improvements were obtained for chemical pulps by addition of borax to the spray solution, which were likely to be due to the formation of borate-mediated xyloglucan cross-links. Spray coating of xyloglucan, with or without borax, thus represents a potential new application of this polysaccharide to increase paper dry strength.

  • 10.
    Akan, Rabia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Parfeniukas, Karolis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Vogt, Carmen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Vogt, Ulrich
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Investigation of Metal-Assisted Chemical Etching for Fabrication of Silicon-Based X-Ray Zone Plates2018In: Microscopy and Microanalysis, ISSN 1431-9276, E-ISSN 1435-8115Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 11. Alekou, A.
    et al.
    Baussan, E.
    Bhattacharyya, A. K.
    Kraljevic, N. B.
    Blennow, Mattias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Bogomilov, M.
    Bolling, B.
    Bouquerel, E.
    Buchan, O.
    Burgman, A.
    Carlile, C. J.
    Cederkall, J.
    Christiansen, P.
    Collins, M.
    Morales, E. C.
    Cupiał, P.
    D’Alessi, L.
    Danared, H.
    Dancila, D.
    de André, J. P. A. M.
    Delahaye, J. P.
    Dracos, M.
    Efthymiopoulos, I.
    Ekelöf, T.
    Eshraqi, M.
    Fanourakis, G.
    Farricker, A.
    Fernandez-Martinez, E.
    Folsom, B.
    Fukuda, T.
    Gazis, N.
    Gålnander, B.
    Geralis, T.
    Ghosh, M.
    Gokbulut, G.
    Halić, L.
    Jenssen, M.
    Topaksu, A. K.
    Kildetoft, B.
    Kliček, B.
    Kozioł, M.
    Krhač, K.
    Łacny, Ł.
    Lindroos, M.
    Maiano, C.
    Marrelli, C.
    Martins, C.
    Mezzetto, M.
    Milas, N.
    Oglakci, M.
    Ohlsson, Tommy
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Olvegård, M.
    Ota, T.
    Park, J.
    Patrzalek, D.
    Petkov, G.
    Poussot, P.
    Johansson, R.
    Rosauro-Alcaraz, S.
    Saiang, D.
    Szybiński, B.
    Snamina, J.
    Sosa, A. G.
    Stavropoulos, G.
    Stipčević, M.
    Tarkeshian, R.
    Terranova, F.
    Thomas, J.
    Tolba, T.
    Trachanas, E.
    Tsenov, R.
    Vankova-Kirilova, G.
    Vassilopoulos, N.
    Wildner, E.
    Wurtz, J.
    Zormpa, O.
    Zou, Y.
    The European Spallation Source neutrino super-beam conceptual design report2022In: The European Physical Journal Special Topics, ISSN 1951-6355, E-ISSN 1951-6401, Vol. 231, no 21, p. 3779-3955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A design study, named ESS νSB for European Spallation Source neutrino Super Beam, has been carried out during the years 2018–2022 of how the 5 MW proton linear accelerator of the European Spallation Source under construction in Lund, Sweden, can be used to produce the world’s most intense long-baseline neutrino beam. The high beam intensity will allow for measuring the neutrino oscillations near the second oscillation maximum at which the CP violation signal is close to three times higher than at the first maximum, where other experiments measure. This will enable CP violation discovery in the leptonic sector for a wider range of values of the CP violating phase δCP and, in particular, a higher precision measurement of δCP. The present Conceptual Design Report describes the results of the design study of the required upgrade of the ESS linac, of the accumulator ring used to compress the linac pulses from 2.86 ms to 1.2 μs, and of the target station, where the 5 MW proton beam is used to produce the intense neutrino beam. It also presents the design of the near detector, which is used to monitor the neutrino beam as well as to measure neutrino cross sections, and of the large underground far detector located 360 km from ESS, where the magnitude of the oscillation appearance of νe from νμ is measured. The physics performance of the ESS νSB research facility has been evaluated demonstrating that after 10 years of data-taking, leptonic CP violation can be detected with more than 5 standard deviation significance over 70% of the range of values that the CP violation phase angle δCP can take and that δCP can be measured with a standard error less than 8° irrespective of the measured value of δCP. These results demonstrate the uniquely high physics performance of the proposed ESS νSB research facility. 

  • 12.
    Alekou, A.
    et al.
    CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland.;Uppsala Univ, POB 256, S-75105 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Blennow, Mattias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. Oskar Klein Ctr, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    D'Alessi, L.
    Univ Strasbourg, IPHC, CNRS, IN2P3, Strasbourg, France..
    Ghosh, M.
    Rudjer Boskovic Inst, Ctr Excellence Adv Mat & Sensing Devices, Zagreb 10000, Croatia.;Univ Hyderabad, Sch Phys, Hyderabad 500046, India..
    Klicek, B.
    Rudjer Boskovic Inst, Ctr Excellence Adv Mat & Sensing Devices, Zagreb 10000, Croatia..
    Ohlsson, Tommy
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. Oskar Klein Ctr, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zou, Y.
    Uppsala Univ, POB 256, S-75105 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Updated physics performance of the ESSnuSB experiment2021In: European Physical Journal C, ISSN 1434-6044, E-ISSN 1434-6052, Vol. 81, no 12, article id 1130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present the physics performance of the ESSnuSB experiment in the standard three flavor scenario using the updated neutrino flux calculated specifically for the ESSnuSB configuration and updated migration matrices for the far detector. Taking conservative systematic uncertainties corresponding to a normalization error of 5% for signal and 10% for background, we find that there is 10 sigma (13 sigma) CP violation discovery sensitivity for the baseline option of 540 km (360 km) at delta(CP) = +/- 90 degrees. The corresponding fraction of delta(CP )for which CP violation can be discovered at more than 5 sigma is 70%. Regarding CP precision measurements, the 1 sigma error associated with delta(CP )= 0 degrees is around 5 degrees and with delta(CP )= -90 degrees is around 14 degrees (7 degrees) for the baseline option of 540 km (360 km). For hierarchy sensitivity, one can have 3 sigma sensitivity for 540 km baseline except delta(CP) = +/- 90 degrees and 5 sigma sensitivity for 360 km baseline for all values of delta(CP). The octant of theta(23) can be determined at 30 for the values of: theta(23) > 51 degrees (theta(23) < 42 degrees and theta(23) > 49 degrees) for baseline of 540 km (360 km). Regarding measurement precision of the atmospheric mixing parameters, the allowed values at 3 sigma are: 40 degrees < theta(23) < 52 degrees (42 degrees < theta(23) < 51.5 degrees) and 2.485 x 10(-3) eV(2) < Delta(2)(m31) < 2.545 x 10(-3) eV(2) (2.49x 10(-3 ) eV(2) < Delta(2)(m31) < 2.54 x 10(-3) eV(2)) for the baseline of 540 km (360 km).

  • 13.
    Al-Farsi, Hissa M.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Minist Hlth, Cent Publ Hlth Labs, Muscat, Oman..
    Al-Adwani, Salma
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Sultan Qaboos Univ, Coll Agr & Marine Sci, Dept Anim & Vet Sci, Muscat, Oman..
    Ahmed, Sultan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Vogt, Carmen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Ambikan, Anoop T.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Leber, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Al-Jardani, Amina
    Minist Hlth, Cent Publ Hlth Labs, Muscat, Oman..
    Al-Azri, Saleh
    Minist Hlth, Cent Publ Hlth Labs, Muscat, Oman..
    Al-Muharmi, Zakariya
    Sultan Qaboos Univ, Coll Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Microbiol & Immunol, Muscat, Oman..
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Giske, Christian G.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bergman, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Microbiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Immunodeficiency Unit, Infect Dis Clin, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Effects of the Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 and Innate Effector Mechanisms in Colistin-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae With mgrB Insertions2019In: Frontiers in Microbiology, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 10, article id 2632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Colistin is a polypeptide antibiotic drug that targets lipopolysaccharides in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Inactivation of the mgrB-gene is a common mechanism behind colistin-resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kpn). Since colistin is a cyclic polypeptide, it may exhibit cross-resistance with the antimicrobial peptide LL-37, and with other innate effector mechanisms, but previous results are inconclusive. Objective To study potential cross-resistance between colistin and LL-37, as well as with other innate effector mechanisms, and to compare virulence of colistin-resistant and susceptible Kpn strains. Materials/Methods Carbapenemase-producing Kpn from Oman (n = 17) were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing and whole genome sequencing. Susceptibility to colistin and LL-37 was studied. The surface charge was determined by zeta-potential measurements and the morphology of treated bacteria was analyzed with electron microscopy. Bacterial survival was assessed in human whole blood and serum, as well as in a zebrafish infection-model. Results Genome-analysis revealed insertion-sequences in the mgrB gene, as a cause of colistin resistance in 8/17 isolates. Colistin-resistant (Col-R) isolates were found to be more resistant to LL-37 compared to colistin-susceptible (Col-S) isolates, but only at concentrations >= 50 mu g/ml. There was no significant difference in surface charge between the isolates. The morphological changes were similar in both Col-R and Col-S isolates after exposure to LL-37. Finally, no survival difference between the Col-R and Col-S isolates was observed in whole blood or serum, or in zebrafish embryos. Conclusion Cross-resistance between colistin and LL-37 was observed at elevated concentrations of LL-37. However, Col-R and Col-S isolates exhibited similar survival in serum and whole blood, and in a zebrafish infection-model, suggesting that cross-resistance most likely play a limited role during physiological conditions. However, it cannot be ruled out that the observed cross-resistance could be relevant in conditions where LL-37 levels reach high concentrations, such as during infection or inflammation.

  • 14. Altai, Mohamed
    et al.
    Strand, Joanna
    Rosik, Daniel
    Selvaraju, Ram Kumar
    Eriksson Karlström, Amelie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Orlova, Anna
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Influence of Nuclides and Chelators on Imaging Using Affibody Molecules: Comparative Evaluation of Recombinant Affibody Molecules Site-Specifically Labeled with Ga-68 and In-111 via Maleimido Derivatives of DOTA and NODAGA2013In: Bioconjugate chemistry, ISSN 1043-1802, E-ISSN 1520-4812, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 1102-1109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate detection of cancer-associated molecular abnormalities in tumors could make cancer treatment more of personalized. Affibody molecules enable high contrast imaging of tumor-associated protein expression shortly after injection. The use should increase sensitivity of HER2 imaging. The chemical nature of the generator-produced positron-emitting radionuclide Ga-68 of radionuclides and chelators influences the biodistribution of Affibody molecules, providing an opportunity to further increase the imaging contrast. The aim of the study was to compare maleimido derivatives of DOTA and NODAGA for site-specific labeling of a recombinant Z(HER2:2395) HER2-binding Affibody molecule with Ga-68. DOTA and NODAGA were site-specifically conjugated to the Z(HER2:2395) Affibody molecule having a C-terminal cysteine and labeled with Ga-68 and In-111. All labeled conjugates retained specificity to HER2 in vitro. Most of the cell-associated activity was membrane-bound with a minor difference in internalization rate. All variants demonstrated specific targeting of xenografts and a high tumor uptake. The xenografts were dearly visualized using all conjugates. The influence of chelator on the biodistribution and targeting properties was much less pronounced for Ga-68 than for In-111. The tumor uptake of Ga-68-NODAGA-Z(HER2:2395) and Ga-68-NODAGA-Z(HER2:2395) and tumor-to-blood ratios at 2 h p.i. did not differ significantly. However, the tumor-to-liver ratio was significantly higher for Ga-68-NODAGA- Z(HER2:2395) (8 +/- 2 vs 5.0 +/- 0.3) offering the advantage of better liver metastases visualization. In conclusion, influence of chelators on biodistribution of Affibody molecules depends on the radionuclides and reoptimization of labeling chemistry is required when a radionuclide label is changed.

  • 15.
    Alvarado Ávila, María Isabel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Toledo-Carrillo, Esteban Alejandro
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Dutta, Joydeep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Improved chlorate production with platinum nanoparticles deposited on fluorinated activated carbon cloth electrodes2020In: Cleaner Engineering and Technology, ISSN 2666-7908, Vol. 1, article id 100016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sodium chlorate is one of the main oxidizing agents used in the wood industry due to their capability of use as an elemental chlorine-free (CEF) bleaching. A simple way to produce chlorates is by the electrolysis of an aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. In the present study activated carbon cloth electrodes (ACC) modified with fluorine and platinum nanoparticles (Pt–F/ACC and Pt/ACC) were used as one of the electrodes. Electrofluorination was used for fluorination of the anodes and polyol method was used for the synthesis of platinum nanoparticles. Chlorate production using a typical solution of 100 ​g/l of sodium chloride (NaCl) and 2 ​g/l sodium chromate (Na2Cr2O7) and an applied current of 0.540 ​A was studied. Prior to the electrolysis assays, the microstructural properties of the electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and surface modifications and bonding using infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy. Electrochemical properties were determined using cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization techniques. Interaction between fluorine (F) and platinum (Pt) on the electrode leads to an improvement of the electrocatalytic properties for chlorine evolution as observed from the increase in the current efficiency from 37.5% at 78.5% after 150 ​min of continuous electrolysis using Pt–F/ACC anodes. The results suggest that modified activated carbon material is an attractive and economical alternative as electrodes for chlorate production. 

  • 16.
    Amador, Elena S.
    et al.
    Univ Washington, Astrobiol Program, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Cable, Morgan L.
    CALTECH, NASA, Jet Prop Lab, Pasadena, CA 91109 USA..
    Chaudry, Nosheen
    Cranfield Univ, Sch Engn, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England..
    Cullen, Thomas
    Cranfield Univ, Sch Engn, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England..
    Gentry, Diana
    Stanford Univ, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Jacobsen, Malene B.
    Murukesan, Gayathri
    Univ Turku, Dept Biochem Biochem, Turun 20014, Finland..
    Schwieterman, Edward W.
    Univ Washington, Astrobiol Program, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Stevens, Adam H.
    Open Univ, Dept Phys Sci, Milton Keynes MK15 0BT, Bucks, England..
    Stockton, Amanda
    Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Chem & Biochem, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA..
    Yin, Chang
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. Royal Inst Technol, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Astrobiol Ctr, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cullen, David C.
    Cranfield Univ, Sch Engn, Cranfield MK43 0AL, Beds, England..
    Geppert, Wolf
    Stockholm university, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Astrobiol Ctr, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Synchronous in-field application of life-detection techniques in planetary analog missions2015In: Planetary and Space Science, ISSN 0032-0633, E-ISSN 1873-5088, Vol. 106, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Field expeditions that simulate the operations of robotic planetary exploration missions at analog sites on Earth can help establish best practices and are therefore a positive contribution to the planetary exploration community. There are many sites in Iceland that possess heritage as planetary exploration analog locations and whose environmental extremes make them suitable for simulating scientific sampling and robotic operations. We conducted a planetary exploration analog mission at two recent lava fields in Iceland, Fimmvorouhals (2010) and Eldfell (1973), using a specially developed field laboratory. We tested the utility of in-field site sampling down selection and tiered analysis operational capabilities with three life detection and characterization techniques: fluorescence microscopy (FM), adenine-triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence assay, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay. The study made use of multiple cycles of sample collection at multiple distance scales and field laboratory analysis using the synchronous fife-detection techniques to heuristically develop the continuing sampling and analysis strategy during the expedition. Here we report the operational lessons learned and provide brief summaries of scientific data. The full scientific data report will follow separately. We found that rapid in-field analysis to determine subsequent sampling decisions is operationally feasible, and that the chosen life detection and characterization techniques are suitable for a terrestrial life-detection field mission. In-field analysis enables the rapid obtainment of scientific data and thus facilitates the collection of the most scientifically relevant samples within a single field expedition, without the need for sample relocation to external laboratories. The operational lessons learned in this study could be applied to future terrestrial field expeditions employing other analytical techniques and to future robotic planetary exploration missions.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Johanna
    et al.
    RISE Res Inst Sweden AB, Agr & Food, Box 5401, SE-40229 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Garrido-Banuelos, Gonzalo
    RISE Res Inst Sweden AB, Agr & Food, Box 5401, SE-40229 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bergdoll, Marion
    RISE Res Inst Sweden AB, Agr & Food, Box 5401, SE-40229 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Menzel, Carolin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Mihnea, Mihaela
    RISE Res Inst Sweden AB, Mat & Prod Design, Box 5401, SE-40229 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lopez-Sanchez, Patricia
    RISE Res Inst Sweden AB, Agr & Food, Box 5401, SE-40229 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, Div Food & Nutr Sci, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Comparison of steaming and boiling of root vegetables for enhancing carbohydrate content and sensory profile2022In: Journal of Food Engineering, ISSN 0260-8774, E-ISSN 1873-5770, Vol. 312, article id 110754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Root vegetables have unique techno-functional and nutritional properties however, their use in processed foods is limited to a few species, partially due to a lack of knowledge related to the impact of thermal treatments on the sensory properties. This study investigated the effect of steaming and boiling on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and sensory profile of three model root vegetables with distinct carbohydrate composition: Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.), parsnip (Pastinaca sativa), and beetroot (Beta vulgaris). Thermally treated Jerusalem artichoke and parsnip showed higher content of cell wall polysaccharides, particularly beta-glucans (e.g. cellulose) and pectic components, compared to raw. Steaming produced more cell shrinkage and loss of cell-cell adhesion than boiling, leading to softer vegetables. Processed beetroot showed loss of cell turgor and drastic softening but not clear changes in overall carbohydrate content. The scores for several flavour and in-mouth attributes were higher for steamed vegetables compared to boiled. Our results give insights on the processability of root vegetables towards products with enhanced sensory and nutritional properties.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Bäck, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Nuclear Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Gamma-ray track reconstruction using graph neural networks2023In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 1048, article id 168000Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the advent of the new generation of germanium detector arrays for low-energy nuclear physics experiments utilizing gamma-ray tracking, the challenges associated with track-reconstruction methods have been extensively studied. In the present work an approach based on recent developments in machine learning was used to address the problem. Here, a graph neural network was constructed and trained on data simulated in Geant4 in order to attempt track reconstruction of gamma rays below 1 MeV in a spherical shell geometry of pure germanium. Using a thick-shell geometry, and simulated data without energy-and position uncertainties the network achieved a reconstruction rate above 80% for complete tracks, and a combined peak-to-total value of 85% for energy spectra with four discrete peaks. For data with added noise, i.e. finite resolution in interaction-point position and energy, the corresponding peak-to-total ratio dropped to 74%. The track reconstruction was stable across multiplicities 1-10 but showed an increased error frequency in the energy range between 50 keV and 250 keV. To specifically study the complication of gamma tracks lost by out -scattering from the detector volume, a thin-shell (9 cm thickness) geometry was used together with a modified version of the GNN framework. By letting the GNN code identify and discriminate the out-scatter events, an improvement of the P/T value from 66% to 75% was found for the packed, noisy data. For the sake of comparison the new GNN model with existing gamma-ray tracking methods, a separate instance of the network was trained on slightly higher energies (up to 1.5 MeV) and multiplicities (up to 15) to evaluate 1.332 MeV photon cascade data in terms of P/T and photo-peak efficiency. The results for this GNN data set, with P/T values at 85% for single tracks and 74% for multiplicity 15, show clear promise when compared to the existing tracking methods.

  • 19. Andrews, B.
    et al.
    Chang, J. -B
    Collinson, L.
    Li, D.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Mahamid, Julia
    Manley, S.
    Mhlanga, M.
    Nakano, A.
    Schöneberg, J.
    Van Valen, D.
    Wu, T. ‘C. -T
    Zaritsky, A.
    Imaging cell biology2022In: Nature Cell Biology, ISSN 1465-7392, E-ISSN 1476-4679, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 1180-1185Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Arzami, Anis N.
    et al.
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Food & Nutr, POB 66, Helsinki 00014, Finland..
    de Carvalho, Danila Morais
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Food & Nutr, POB 66, Helsinki 00014, Finland..
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Stoddard, Frederick L.
    Univ Helsinki, Viikki Plant Sci Ctr, Dept Agr Sci, POB 27, Helsinki 00014, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Inst Sustainabil Sci HELSUS, POB 65, Helsinki 00014, Finland..
    Mikkonen, Kirsi S.
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Food & Nutr, POB 66, Helsinki 00014, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Inst Sustainabil Sci HELSUS, POB 65, Helsinki 00014, Finland..
    Narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.): Characterization of emulsification and fibre properties2022In: FUTURE FOODS, ISSN 2666-8335, Vol. 6, article id 100191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lupin is among the most promising plant-based food protein sources due to its high protein and fibre content. The fibre fraction, especially from seed coats, is often seen as low in value (discarded as waste or as animal feed) and greater knowledge on its composition and structure are crucial to increase its usefulness. However, only one model of lupin fibre structure exists in the literature. Our sample of Finnish-grown narrow-leafed lupin seed consisted of fibre (43.3%), protein (31.3%), fat (8.1%) and starch (0.2%). According to the sugar analysis, rhamnogalacturonan-I, with branches of arabinan and galactan, constituted the main pectin population in the fibre fraction. A revised model of the overall fibre structure is proposed. At concentrations of 0.75% and 1.0%, both unrefined and defatted flour of whole lupin seeds produced stable suspensions and oil-in-water emulsions, demonstrating their application as potential emulsifiers. This study presents the knowledge and opportunity to support sustainability through the utilization of whole lupin seed for future industrial applications.

  • 21.
    Aspeborg, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Coutinho, Pedro M.
    Wang, Yang
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. Michael Smith Laboratories and Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, 2185 East Mall, Vancouver, V6T 1Z4, Canada.
    Henrissat, Bernard
    Evolution, substrate specificity and subfamily classification of glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5)2012In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 186-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The large Glycoside Hydrolase family 5 (GH5) groups together a wide range of enzymes acting on beta-linked oligo- and polysaccharides, and glycoconjugates from a large spectrum of organisms. The long and complex evolution of this family of enzymes and its broad sequence diversity limits functional prediction. With the objective of improving the differentiation of enzyme specificities in a knowledge-based context, and to obtain new evolutionary insights, we present here a new, robust subfamily classification of family GH5. Results: About 80% of the current sequences were assigned into 51 subfamilies in a global analysis of all publicly available GH5 sequences and associated biochemical data. Examination of subfamilies with catalytically-active members revealed that one third are monospecific (containing a single enzyme activity), although new functions may be discovered with biochemical characterization in the future. Furthermore, twenty subfamilies presently have no characterization whatsoever and many others have only limited structural and biochemical data. Mapping of functional knowledge onto the GH5 phylogenetic tree revealed that the sequence space of this historical and industrially important family is far from well dispersed, highlighting targets in need of further study. The analysis also uncovered a number of GH5 proteins which have lost their catalytic machinery, indicating evolution towards novel functions. Conclusion: Overall, the subfamily division of GH5 provides an actively curated resource for large-scale protein sequence annotation for glycogenomics; the subfamily assignments are openly accessible via the Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme database at http://www.cazy.org/GH5.html.

  • 22.
    Assie, M.
    et al.
    Univ Paris Saclay, Univ Paris Sud, Inst Phys Nucl, CNRS,IN2P3, F-91406 Orsay, France..
    Dasso, C. H.
    Fac Fis, Dept Fis Atom Mol & Nucl, Apartado 1065, E-41080 Seville, Spain..
    Liotta, Roberto
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Nuclear Physics.
    Macchiavelli, A. O.
    Lawrence Berkeley Natl Lab, Div Nucl Sci, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Vitturi, A.
    Univ Padua, I-35131 Padua, Italy.;INFN, I-35131 Padua, Italy..
    The Giant Pairing Vibration in heavy nuclei Present status and future studies2019In: European Physical Journal A, ISSN 1434-6001, E-ISSN 1434-601X, Vol. 55, no 12, article id 245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Giant Pairing Vibration, a two-nucleon collective mode originating from the second shell above the Fermi surface, has long been predicted and expected to be strongly populated in two-nucleon transfer reactions with cross sections similar to those of the low-lying Pairing Vibration. Recent experiments have provided evidence for this mode in C-14,C- 15 but, despite sensitive studies, it has not been definitively identified in Sn or Pb nuclei where pairing correlations are known to play a crucial role near their ground states. In this paper we review the basic theoretical concepts of this "elusive" state and the status of experimental searches in heavy nuclei. We discuss the hindrance effects due to Q-value mismatch and the use of weakly-bound projectiles as a way to overcome the limitations of the (p,t) reactions. We also discuss the role of the continuum and conclude with some possible future developments.

  • 23.
    Aurell, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Biology, CB.
    Del Ferraro, Gino
    Department of Computational Biology, AlbaNova University Center, SE-106, 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dominguez, E.
    Univ Havana, Phys Fac, Dept Theoret Phys, Grp Complex Syst & Stat Phys, Havana, Cuba..
    Mulet, R.
    Univ Havana, Phys Fac, Dept Theoret Phys, Grp Complex Syst & Stat Phys, Havana, Cuba..
    Cavity master equation for the continuous time dynamics of discrete-spin models2017In: Physical review. E, ISSN 2470-0045, E-ISSN 2470-0053, Vol. 95, no 5, article id 052119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an alternate method to close the master equation representing the continuous time dynamics of interacting Ising spins. The method makes use of the theory of random point processes to derive a master equation for local conditional probabilities. We analytically test our solution studying two known cases, the dynamics of the mean-field ferromagnet and the dynamics of the one-dimensional Ising system. We present numerical results comparing our predictions with Monte Carlo simulations in three different models on random graphs with finite connectivity: the Ising ferromagnet, the random field Ising model, and the Viana-Bray spin-glass model.

  • 24.
    Aurell, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST). KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Machado Perez, David
    Univ Havana, Phys Fac, Dept Theoret Phys, Grp Complex Syst & Stat Phys, Havana, Cuba..
    Mulet, Roberto
    Univ Havana, Phys Fac, Dept Theoret Phys, Grp Complex Syst & Stat Phys, Havana, Cuba..
    A closure for the master equation starting from the dynamic cavity method2023In: Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical, ISSN 1751-8113, E-ISSN 1751-8121, Vol. 56, no 17, article id 17LT02Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider classical spin systems evolving in continuous time with interactions given by a locally tree-like graph. Several approximate analysis methods have earlier been reported based on the idea of Belief Propagation / cavity method. We introduce a new such method which can be derived in a more systematic manner using the theory of Random Point Processes. Within this approach, the master equation governing the system's dynamics is closed via a set of differential equations for the auxiliary cavity probabilities. The numerical results improve on the earlier versions of the closure on several important classes of problems. We re-visit here the cases of the Ising ferromagnet and the Viana-Bray spin-glass model.

  • 25.
    Azizi, Tamir
    et al.
    Azizi Software, Nahariyya, Israel..
    De Araujo, Laurine Carvalho
    Polytech Clermont Ferrand, Ave Blaise Pascal, F-63178 Aubiere, France..
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Clancy, Aisha J.
    NUI Galway, Sch Biol & Chem Sci, Galway, Ireland..
    Feger, Marie L.
    Polytech Clermont Ferrand, Ave Blaise Pascal, F-63178 Aubiere, France..
    Liran, Oded
    MIGAL Galilee Res Inst, Dept Plant Sci, IL-11016 Kiryat Shemona, Upper Galilee, Israel..
    O'Byrne, Conor
    NUI Galway, Sch Biol & Chem Sci, Galway, Ireland..
    Sanka, Immanuel
    Tallinn Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Biotechnol, Akad tee 15, EE-12618 Tallinn, Estonia..
    Scheler, Ott
    Tallinn Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Biotechnol, Akad tee 15, EE-12618 Tallinn, Estonia..
    Sedlakova-Kadukova, Jana
    Univ Ss Cyril & Methodius Trnava, Dept Ecochem & Radioecol, Trnava 91701, Slovakia..
    Ziv, Carmit
    Agr Res Org, Volcani Ctr, Dept Postharvest Sci, IL-7505101 Rishon LeZiyyon, Israel..
    De Biase, Daniela
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Dept Med Surg Sci & Biotechnol, Corso Repubbl 79, I-04100 Latina, Italy..
    Lund, Peter A.
    Univ Birmingham, Inst Microbiol & Infect, Sch Biosci, Birmingham B15 2TT, England..
    A COST Action on microbial responses to low pH: Developing links and sharing resources across the academic-industrial divide2022In: New Biotechnology, ISSN 1871-6784, E-ISSN 1876-4347, Vol. 72, p. 64-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present work of our COST Action on "Understanding and exploiting the impacts of low pH on micro-or-ganisms". First, we summarise a workshop held at the European Federation of Biotechnology meeting on Mi-crobial Stress Responses (online in 2020) on "Industrial applications of low pH stress on microbial bio-based production", as an example of an initiative fostering links between pure and applied research. We report the outcomes of a small survey on the challenging topic of developing links between researchers working in academia and industry that show that, while people in different sectors strongly support such links, barriers remain that obstruct this process. We present the thoughts of an expert panel held as part of the workshop above, where people with experience of collaboration between academia and industry shared ideas on how to develop and maintain links. Access to relevant information is essential for research in all sectors, and because of this we have developed, as part of our COST Action goals, two resources for the free use of all researchers with interests in any aspects of microbial responses to low pH. These are (1) a comprehensive database of references in the literature on different aspects of acid stress responses in different bacterial and fungal species, and (2) a database of research expertise across our network. We invite the community of researchers working in this field to take advantage of these resources to identify relevant literature and opportunities for establishing collaborations.

  • 26.
    Ban, Shufang
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Meng, J
    Wyss, Ramon
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Nuclear symmetry energy for A=48 isobars in relativistic mean field theory2004In: Gaoneng wuli yu he wuli, ISSN 0254-3052, Vol. 28, p. 66-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently it was found that the nuclear symmetry energy can be directly associated with the mean level density and an iso-vector potential. In this paper, the nuclear symmetry energy is studied within the relativistic mean field (RMF) theory. The potential of the RMF theory can be separated into an isovector and isoscalar components. The nuclear binding energies in A = 48 isobaric chain calculated from RMF theory with or without the isovector terms for effective interactions PK1, NLSH, NL3, and TM1 have been used to analyze the nuclear symmetry energy in detail, i.e., mean level spacing epsilon and the effective isovector potential strength K.

  • 27.
    Banijamali, Mahsan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Höjer, Pontus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nagy, Abel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Haag, Petra
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Solna, Sweden..
    Paz Gomero, Elizabeth
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Stiller, Christiane
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Kaminskyy, Vitaliy O.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Solna, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ekman, Simon
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Solna, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Canc, Med Unit Head & Neck Lung & Skin Tumors, Thorac Oncol Ctr, Solna, Sweden..
    Lewensohn, Rolf
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Solna, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Canc, Med Unit Head & Neck Lung & Skin Tumors, Thorac Oncol Ctr, Solna, Sweden..
    Eriksson Karlström, Amelie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering.
    Viktorsson, Kristina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Solna, Sweden..
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Characterizing single extracellular vesicles by droplet barcode sequencing for protein analysis2022In: Journal of Extracellular Vesicles, E-ISSN 2001-3078, Vol. 11, no 11, article id 12277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small extracellular vesicles (sEVs) have in recent years evolved as a source of biomarkers for disease diagnosis and therapeutic follow up. sEV samples derived from multicellular organisms exhibit a high heterogeneous repertoire of vesicles which current methods based on ensemble measurements cannot capture. In this work we present droplet barcode sequencing for protein analysis (DBS-Pro) to profile surface proteins on individual sEVs, facilitating identification of sEV-subtypes within and between samples. The method allows for analysis of multiple proteins through use of DNA barcoded affinity reagents and sequencing as readout. High throughput single vesicle profiling is enabled through compartmentalization of individual sEVs in emulsion droplets followed by droplet barcoding through PCR. In this proof-of-concept study we demonstrate that DBS-Pro allows for analysis of single sEVs, with a mixing rate below 2%. A total of over 120,000 individual sEVs obtained from a NSCLC cell line and from malignant pleural effusion (MPE) fluid of NSCLC patients have been analyzed based on their surface proteins. We also show that the method enables single vesicle surface protein profiling and by extension characterization of sEV-subtypes, which is essential to identify the cellular origin of vesicles in heterogenous samples.

  • 28.
    Baryshnikov, Gleb V.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology. Tomsk State Univ, 36 Lenin Ave, Tomsk, Russia..
    Sunchugashev, Dmitry A.
    Tomsk State Univ, 36 Lenin Ave, Tomsk, Russia..
    Valiev, Rashid R.
    Tomsk State Univ, 36 Lenin Ave, Tomsk, Russia..
    Minaev, Boris F.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Ågren, Hans
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Vibronic absorption spectra of the angular fused bisindolo- and biscarbazoloanthracene blue fluorophores for OLED applications2018In: Chemical Physics, ISSN 0301-0104, E-ISSN 1873-4421, Vol. 513, p. 105-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An in-depth analysis of the vibronic absorption spectra for the recently synthesized blue-fluorescent OLED emitters bis[(1,2)(5,6)]indoloanthracene and biscarbazolo[3,4-a:3',4'-h]anthracene has been carried out computationally at the density functional theory level within the Franck-Condon approximation. These molecules are characterized by extended and rich electronic absorption spectra with most absorption bands being of vibronic origin. The first excited singlet state of bis[(1,2)(5,6)]indoloanthracene compound demonstrates a clear observable double-peak vibronic progression for two different active modes in the absorption spectrum, while the S-2 state is vibronically inactive. In contrast, for the larger biscarbazolo[3,4-a:3',4'-h]anthracene compound the S-0 -> S-2 transition demonstrates well-resolved intense vibronic bands which overlap the less intense progressions of few modes in the S-0 -> S-1 transition. We have also found, that even the higher-lying and very intense S-0 -> S-4 and S-0 -> S-5 transitions for bis[(1,2)(5,6)]indoloanthracene and biscarbazolo[3,4-a:3',4'-h]anthracene, respectively, are characterized by clear vibronic progressions in excellent agreement with experimental spectra.

  • 29.
    Batili, Hazal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Hamawandi, Bejan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Ergül, Adem Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Nanostructure Physics.
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    On the electrophoretic deposition of Bi2Te3 nanoparticles through electrolyte optimization and substrate design2022In: Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, ISSN 0927-7757, E-ISSN 1873-4359, Vol. 649, p. 129537-, article id 129537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assembly of thermoelectric nanostructures with pre-defined morphology and surface chemistry on solid sub-strates has been one of the challenges for in-plane TE devices. Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) has the potential to be used for this purpose, where the use of non-conductive substrates is required to enable a reliable evaluation of the transport property of electrically active films. Bi2Te3 nanoparticles, which were synthesized using microwave-assisted hydrothermal route, were used for the EPD of thermoelectric films on glass substrates. A special substrate was fabricated using maskless photolithography, to evaluate the electronic transport properties of the TE films without the interference of the substrate. Electrolyte composition was optimized for high mobility of the suspended nanoparticles, and Bi2Te3 EPD films were fabricated with a high deposition rate, reaching 10 mu m/min. Initial EPD films showed high resistivity, ascribed to the surface oxide layer and capping ligands. The resistance was significantly reduced by the addition of a dithiol molecular linker, capable of interconnecting the Bi2Te3 nanoparticles through ligand-exchange. Seebeck coefficient in the range-150 to-180 mu V/K was measured, revealing the transport through the deposited films. Finally, a power factor of 169 nW/K-2.m was estimated, revealing the potential for the application of this technology to large area TE films as active coatings using the developed EPD process.

  • 30.
    Beiming, Christoffer
    et al.
    KTH.
    Grönroos, Jesper
    KTH.
    Ohlsson, Tommy
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Oskar Klein Ctr Cosmoparticle Phys, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Phenomenological mass model for exotic hadrons and predictions for masses of non-strange dibaryons as hexaquarks2022In: Nuclear Physics B, ISSN 0550-3213, E-ISSN 1873-1562, Vol. 974, p. 115616-, article id 115616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the mass spectra of exotic hadrons known as hexaquarks in the form of dibaryons. We use a phenomenological model based on an extended version of the Giirsey-Radicati mass formula for hadrons to include non-charmed baryons, charmed baryons, and non-strange dibaryons to be able to predict masses of potential dibaryon states. We perform six numerical fits of this model to input data for three different sets of masses of baryons and dibaryons. We find that the model can fit some of the data sets well, especially the sets including charmed baryons and non-strange dibaryons, and observe that the predicted mass of one of the dibaryons is close to the measured mass of the observed hexaquark candidate d * (2380) reported by the WASA-at-COSY experiment. The predicted mass of the deuteron is slightly larger than its measured mass. Finally, for the data sets including charmed baryon and non-strange dibaryon masses, we find that the predicted masses of potential dibaryon states are all in the range from 1900 MeV to 3700 MeV.

  • 31.
    Belonoshko, A. B.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Theoretical Physics, Condensed Matter Theory. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Rosengren, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Theoretical Physics, Condensed Matter Theory. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Ab Initio Study of Water Interaction with a Cu Surface2010In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 26, no 21, p. 16267-16270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have performed a first principles investigation of water interaction with a Cu surface. The calculated surface energy of a Cu(100) slab is in reasonable agreement with experimental data. The energy of water dissociation is in agreement with experiment. The results of the ab initio calculations are compared to experimental data on hydrogen partial pressure. It is concluded that Cu(OH)(ads) is formed due to a reaction between Cu and anoxic water. The energy of the Cu(100) slab with OH and H adsorbed is lower than the energy of the same slab with an adsorbed water molecule.

  • 32.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berqenstråhle, Malin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    d'Ortoli, Thibault Angles
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Organ Chem, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Widmalm, Goran
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Organ Chem, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    How the flexibility properties of hemicelluloses are affected by the glycosidic bonds between different backbone sugars - A molecular dynamics study2016In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 251Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Beven, Laure
    et al.
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Charenton, Claire
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Dautant, Alain
    Univ Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France ; IBMC, CNRS, Bordeaux, France.
    Bouyssou, Guillaume
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Labroussaa, Fabien
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Sköllermo, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Blanchard, Alain
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal
    Univ Bordeaux, Villenave Dornon, France ; INRA Villenave Dornon, France .
    Specific Evolution of F-1-Like ATPases in Mycoplasmas2012In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 6, p. e38793-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    F1F0 ATPases have been identified in most bacteria, including mycoplasmas which have very small genomes associated with a host-dependent lifestyle. In addition to the typical operon of eight genes encoding genuine F1F0 ATPase (Type 1), we identified related clusters of seven genes in many mycoplasma species. Four of the encoded proteins have predicted structures similar to the alpha, beta, gamma and e subunits of F-1 ATPases and could form an F-1-like ATPase. The other three proteins display no similarity to any other known proteins. Two of these proteins are probably located in the membrane, as they have three and twelve predicted transmembrane helices. Phylogenomic studies identified two types of F-1-like ATPase clusters, Type 2 and Type 3, characterized by a rapid evolution of sequences with the conservation of structural features. Clusters encoding Type 2 and Type 3 ATPases were assumed to originate from the Hominis group of mycoplasmas. We suggest that Type 3 ATPase clusters may spread to other phylogenetic groups by horizontal gene transfer between mycoplasmas in the same host, based on phylogeny and genomic context. Functional analyses in the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides showed that the Type 3 cluster genes were organized into an operon. Proteomic analyses demonstrated that the seven encoded proteins were produced during growth in axenic media. Mutagenesis and complementation studies demonstrated an association of the Type 3 cluster with a major ATPase activity of membrane fractions. Thus, despite their tendency toward genome reduction, mycoplasmas have evolved and exchanged specific F-1-like ATPases with no known equivalent in other bacteria. We propose a model, in which the F-1-like structure is associated with a hypothetical X-0 sector located in the membrane of mycoplasma cells.

  • 34.
    Bhagwat, A.
    et al.
    UM DAE Ctr Excellence Basic Sci, Mumbai 400098, Maharashtra, India.;AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Nucl Phys, KTH Royal Inst Technol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Liotta, Roberto
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Nuclear Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Cluster emission from superheavy nuclei2018In: European Physical Journal A, ISSN 1434-6001, E-ISSN 1434-601X, Vol. 54, no 11, article id 200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The process leading to cluster emission from superheavy nuclei in the range 100 122 has been systematically investigated. This topic is of importance because it opens up the possibility of identifying superheavy elements through deposition of clusters in the detection system. In this paper we evaluate the cluster decay half lives by considering the cluster as a particle. The motion of this particle in the field induced by the daughter nucleus is determined by solving the corresponding Schrodinger equation imposing outgoing boundary conditions (Gamow state). The corresponding Wood-Saxon potential is fitted to obtain the energies provided by a mass formula that has been established recently to have a very high degree of precision. The resulting expression for the decay width is exact, i.e. no approximation besides the assumption of a preformed cluster is introduced. It is found that the heavy cluster emission probability in the superheavy region is much smaller than the corresponding a emission probability.

  • 35.
    Bjorling, Alexander
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Max IV Lab, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Kalbfleisch, Sebastian
    Lund Univ, Max IV Lab, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Kahnt, Maik
    Lund Univ, Max IV Lab, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Sala, Simone
    Lund Univ, Max IV Lab, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Parfeniukas, Karolis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Vogt, Ulrich
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Carbone, Gerardina
    Lund Univ, Max IV Lab, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Johansson, Ulf
    Lund Univ, Max IV Lab, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Ptychographic characterization of a coherent nanofocused X-ray beam2020In: Optics Express, E-ISSN 1094-4087, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 5069-5076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The NanoMAX hard X-ray nanoprobe is the first beamline to take full advantage of the diffraction-limited storage ring at the MAX IV synchrotron and delivers a high coherent photon flux for applications in diffraction and imaging. Here, we characterize its coherent and focused beam using ptychographic analysis. We derive beam profiles in the energy range 6-22 keV and estimate the coherent flux based on a probe mode decomposition approach.

  • 36.
    Blennow, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. UAM, CSIC, Inst Fis Teor, Calle Nicolas Cabrera 13-15, Madrid 28049, Spain..
    Clementz, Stefan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Herrero-Garcia, Juan
    Univ Adelaide, ARC Ctr Excellence Particle Phys Terascale CoEPP, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia..
    The distribution of inelastic dark matter in the Sun (vol 78, 386, 2018)2019In: European Physical Journal C, ISSN 1434-6044, E-ISSN 1434-6052, Vol. 79, no 5, article id 407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The annihilation rates in Fig.9 of the original article were incorrectly calculated

  • 37.
    Blennow, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Coloma, Pilar
    UAM, CSIC, Inst Fis Teor, Calle Nicolas Cabrera 13-15, E-28049 Madrid, Spain..
    Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique
    UAM, CSIC, Inst Fis Teor, Calle Nicolas Cabrera 13-15, E-28049 Madrid, Spain.;Univ Autonoma Madrid, Dept Fis Teor, E-28049 Madrid, Spain..
    Gonzalez-Lopez, Manuel
    UAM, CSIC, Inst Fis Teor, Calle Nicolas Cabrera 13-15, E-28049 Madrid, Spain.;Univ Autonoma Madrid, Dept Fis Teor, E-28049 Madrid, Spain..
    Right-handed neutrinos and the CDF II anomaly2022In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 106, no 7, article id 073005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We point out that right-handed neutrinos can resolve the tension between the latest CDF II measurement of MW and the SM. Integrating out the new states yields a single d 1/4 6 operator, which translates into a nonunitary leptonic mixing matrix. This alters the extraction of GF from muon decay and increases the prediction for MW, in line with the CDF II result. We find that this explanation worsens the so-called Cabibbo anomaly, which could still be explained through the same d 1/4 6 operator if it is not generated by right-handed neutrinos. Exploiting the flavor dependence, a common explanation of both anomalies would a priori be possible, but is ruled out by weak universality constraints.

  • 38.
    Blennow, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Dept Fis Teor, Madrid 28049, Spain.;Univ Autonoma Madrid, Inst Fis Teor, CSIC, Madrid 28049, Spain..
    Hernandez-Garcia, Josu
    Eotvos Lorand Univ, Inst Theoret Phys, Pazmany Peter Setany 1-A, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary..
    Lopez-Pavon, Jacobo
    Univ Valencia, Inst Fis Corpuscular, Edificio Inst Invest,Catedratico Jose Beltran 2, Paterna 46980, Valencia, Spain.;CSIC, Edificio Inst Invest,Catedratico Jose Beltran 2, Paterna 46980, Valencia, Spain..
    Marcano, Xabier
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Dept Fis Teor, Madrid 28049, Spain.;Univ Autonoma Madrid, Inst Fis Teor, CSIC, Madrid 28049, Spain..
    Naredo-Tuero, Daniel
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Dept Fis Teor, Madrid 28049, Spain.;Univ Autonoma Madrid, Inst Fis Teor, CSIC, Madrid 28049, Spain..
    Bounds on lepton non-unitarity and heavy neutrino mixing2023In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, Vol. 2023, no 8, article id 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an updated and improved global fit analysis of current flavour and electroweak precision observables to derive bounds on unitarity deviations of the leptonic mixing matrix and on the mixing of heavy neutrinos with the active flavours. This new analysis is motivated by new and updated experimental results on key observables such as V-ud, the invisible decay width of the Z boson and the W boson mass. It also improves upon previous studies by considering the full correlations among the different observables and explicitly calibrating the test statistic, which may present significant deviations from a & chi;(2) distribution. The results are provided for three different Type-I seesaw scenarios: the minimal scenario with only two additional right-handed neutrinos, the next to minimal one with three extra neutrinos, and the most general one with an arbitrary number of heavy neutrinos that we parametrise via a generic deviation from a unitary leptonic mixing matrix. Additionally, we also analyze the case of generic deviations from unitarity of the leptonic mixing matrix, not necessarily induced by the presence of additional neutrinos. This last case relaxes some correlations among the parameters and is able to provide a better fit to the data. Nevertheless, inducing only leptonic unitarity deviations avoiding both the correlations implied by the right-handed neutrino extension as well as more strongly constrained operators is challenging and would imply significantly more complex UV completions.

  • 39.
    Blennow, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Theoretical Physics, Theoretical Particle Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Herrero Garcia, Juan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Theoretical Physics, Theoretical Particle Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Schwetz, Thomas
    A halo-independent lower bound on the dark matter capture rate in the Sun from a direct detection signal2015In: Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, E-ISSN 1475-7516, no 05, article id 036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that a positive signal in a dark matter (DM) direct detection experiment can be used to place a lower bound on the DM capture rate in the Sun, independent of the DM halo. For a given particle physics model and DM mass we obtain a lower bound on the capture rate independent of the local DM density, velocity distribution, galactic escape velocity, as well as the scattering cross section. We illustrate this lower bound on the capture rate by assuming that upcoming direct detection experiments will soon obtain a significant signal. When comparing the lower bound on the capture rate with limits on the high-energy neutrino flux from the Sun from neutrino telescopes, we can place upper limits on the branching fraction of DM annihilation channels leading to neutrinos. With current data from IceCube and Super-Kamiokande non-trivial limits can be obtained for spin-dependent interactions and direct annihilations into neutrinos. In some cases also annihilations into tau tau or bb start getting constrained. For spin-independent interactions current constraints are weak, but they may become interesting for data from future neutrino telescopes.

  • 40.
    Bojorges, Hylenne
    et al.
    Inst Agrochem & Food Technol IATA CSIC, Food Safety & Preservat Dept, Ave Agustin Escardino 7, Paterna 46980, Valencia, Spain..
    Martinez-Abad, Antonio
    Inst Agrochem & Food Technol IATA CSIC, Food Safety & Preservat Dept, Ave Agustin Escardino 7, Paterna 46980, Valencia, Spain.;Interdisciplinary Platform Sustainable Plast Circu, Madrid, Spain..
    Martinez-Sanz, Marta
    Inst Invest Ciencias Alimentac, CIAL CS UAM, CEI UAM CSIC, Nicolas Cabrera 9, Madrid 28049, Spain.;Interdisciplinary Platform Sustainable Plast Circu, Madrid, Spain..
    Rodrigo, Maria Dolores
    Inst Agrochem & Food Technol IATA CSIC, Food Safety & Preservat Dept, Ave Agustin Escardino 7, Paterna 46980, Valencia, Spain..
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Lopez-Rubio, Amparo
    Inst Agrochem & Food Technol IATA CSIC, Food Safety & Preservat Dept, Ave Agustin Escardino 7, Paterna 46980, Valencia, Spain.;Interdisciplinary Platform Sustainable Plast Circu, Madrid, Spain..
    Fabra, Maria Jose
    Inst Agrochem & Food Technol IATA CSIC, Food Safety & Preservat Dept, Ave Agustin Escardino 7, Paterna 46980, Valencia, Spain.;Interdisciplinary Platform Sustainable Plast Circu, Madrid, Spain..
    Structural and functional properties of alginate obtained by means of high hydrostatic pressure-assisted extraction2023In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 299, article id 120175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of the high hydrostatic pressure (HPP) pre-treatment on the alginate extraction were seen to greatly depend on the recalcitrant nature of two algae species. Alginates were deeply characterized in terms of composition, structure (HPAEC-PAD, FTIR, NMR, SEC-MALS), functional and technological properties.The pre-treatment significantly increased the alginate yield in the less recalcitrant A. nodosum (AHP) also favoring the extraction of sulphated fucoidan/fucan structures and polyphenols. Although the molecular weight was significantly lower in AHP samples, neither the M/G ratio nor the M and G sequences were modified. In contrast, a lower increase in alginate extraction yield was observed for the more recalcitrant S. latissima after the HPP pre-treatment (SHP), but it significantly affected the M/G values of the resulting extract. The gelling properties of the alginate extracts were also explored by external gelation in CaCl2 solutions. The mechanical strength and nanostructure of the hydrogel beads prepared were determined using compression tests, synchro-tron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and cryo-scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM). Interestingly, the application of HPP significantly improved the gel strength of SHP, in agreement with the lower M/G values and the stiffer rod-like conformation obtained for these samples.

  • 41.
    Borisov, Vladislav
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Xu, Qichen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre.
    Ntallis, Nikolaos
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Clulow, Rebecca
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Box 538, SE-75121 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Shtender, Vitalii
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Box 538, SE-75121 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Cedervall, Johan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sahlberg, Martin
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Box 538, SE-75121 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wikfeldt, Kjartan Thor
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for High Performance Computing, PDC.
    Thonig, Danny
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.;Örebro Univ, Sch Sci & Technol, SE-70182 Örebro, Sweden..
    Pereiro, Manuel
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bergman, Anders
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Delin, Anna
    KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.;Örebro Univ, Sch Sci & Technol, SE-70182 Örebro, Sweden..
    Tuning skyrmions in B20 compounds by 4d and 5d doping2022In: Physical Review Materials, E-ISSN 2475-9953, Vol. 6, no 8, article id 084401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skyrmion stabilization in novel magnetic systems with the B20 crystal structure is reported here, primarily based on theoretical results. The focus is on the effect of alloying on the 3d sublattice of the B20 structure by substitution of heavier 4d and 5d elements, with the ambition to tune the spin-orbit coupling and its influence on magnetic interactions. State-of-the-art methods based on density functional theory are used to calculate both isotropic and anisotropic exchange interactions. Significant enhancement of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction is reported for 5d-doped FeSi and CoSi, accompanied by a large modification of the spin stiffness and spiralization. Micromagnetic simulations coupled to atomistic spin-dynamics and ab initio magnetic interactions reveal the spin-spiral nature of the magnetic ground state and field-induced skyrmions for all these systems. Especially small skyrmions similar to 50 nm are predicted for Co0.75Os0.25Si, compared to similar to 148 nm for Fe0.75Co0.25Si. Convex-hull analysis suggests that all B20 compounds considered here are structurally stable at elevated temperatures and should be possible to synthesize. This prediction is confirmed experimentally by synthesis and structural analysis of the Ru-doped CoSi systems discussed here, both in powder and in single-crystal forms.

  • 42. Borsics, Tamas
    et al.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Geerts, Dirk
    Koomoa, Dana-Lynn T.
    Koster, Jan
    Wester, Kenneth
    Bachmann, Andres S.
    Subcellular distribution and expression of prenylated Rab acceptor 1 domain family, member 2 (PRAF2) in malignant glioma: Influence on cell survival and migration2010In: Cancer Science, ISSN 1347-9032, E-ISSN 1349-7006, Vol. 101, no 7, p. 1624-1631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our previous studies revealed that the expression of the 19-kDa protein prenylated Rab acceptor 1 domain family, member 2 (PRAF2) is elevated in cancer tissues of the breast, colon, lung, and ovary, when compared to noncancerous tissues of paired samples. PRAF2 mRNA expression also correlated with several genetic and clinical features and is a candidate prognostic marker in the pediatric cancer neuroblastoma. The PRAF2-related proteins, PRAF1 and PRAF3, play multiple roles in cellular processes, including endo/exocytic vesicle trafficking and glutamate uptake. PRAF2 shares a high sequence homology with these family members, but its function remains unknown. In this study, we examined PRAF2 mRNA and protein expression in 20 different human cancer types using Affymetrix microarray and human tissue microarray (TMA) analyses, respectively. In addition, we investigated the subcellular distribution of PRAF2 by immunofluorescence microscopy and cell fractionation studies. PRAF2 mRNA and protein expression was elevated in several cancer tissues with highest levels in malignant glioma. At the molecular level, we detected native PRAF2 in small, vesicle-like structures throughout the cytoplasm as well as in and around cell nuclei of U-87 malignant glioma cells. We further found that monomeric and dimeric forms of PRAF2 are associated with different cell compartments, suggesting possible functional differences. Importantly, PRAF2 down-regulation by RNA interference significantly reduced the cell viability, migration, and invasiveness of U-87 cells. This study shows that PRAF2 expression is elevated in various tumors with exceptionally high expression in malignant gliomas, and PRAF2 therefore presents a candidate molecular target for therapeutic intervention. (Cancer Sci 2010).

  • 43. Boström, Johan
    et al.
    Sramkova, Zuzana
    Salasova, Alena
    Johard, Helena
    Mahdessian, Diana
    Fedr, Radek
    Marks, Carolyn
    Medalova, Jirina
    Soucek, Karel
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Linnarsson, Sten
    Bryja, Vitezslav
    Sekyrova, Petra
    Altun, Mikael
    Andang, Michael
    Comparative cell cycle transcriptomics reveals synchronization of developmental transcription factor networks in cancer cells2017In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e0188772Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cell cycle coordinates core functions such as replication and cell division. However, cell-cycle-regulated transcription in the control of non-core functions, such as cell identity maintenance through specific transcription factors (TFs) and signalling pathways remains unclear. Here, we provide a resource consisting of mapped transcriptomes in unsynchro-nized HeLa and U2OS cancer cells sorted for cell cycle phase by Fucci reporter expression. We developed a novel algorithm for data analysis that enables efficient visualization and data comparisons and identified cell cycle synchronization of Notch signalling and TFs associated with development. Furthermore, the cell cycle synchronizes with the circadian clock, providing a possible link between developmental transcriptional networks and the cell cycle. In conclusion we find that cell cycle synchronized transcriptional patterns are temporally compartmentalized and more complex than previously anticipated, involving genes, which control cell identity and development.

  • 44. Bourbeillon, Julie
    et al.
    Orchard, Sandra
    Benhar, Itai
    Borrebaeck, Carl
    de Daruvar, Antoine
    Duebel, Stefan
    Frank, Ronald
    Gibson, Frank
    Gloriam, David
    Haslam, Niall
    Hiltker, Tara
    Humphrey-Smith, Ian
    Hust, Michael
    Juncker, David
    Koegl, Manfred
    Konthur, Zoltan
    Korn, Bernhard
    Krobitsch, Sylvia
    Muyldermans, Serge
    Nygren, Per-Åke
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Palcy, Sandrine
    Polic, Bojan
    Rodriguez, Henry
    Sawyer, Alan
    Schlapshy, Martin
    Snyder, Michael
    Stoevesandt, Oda
    Taussig, Michael J.
    Templin, Markus
    Uhlén, Matthias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    van der Maarel, Silvere
    Wingren, Christer
    Hermjakob, Henning
    Sherman, David
    Minimum information about a protein affinity reagent (MIAPAR)2010In: Nature Biotechnology, ISSN 1087-0156, E-ISSN 1546-1696, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 650-653Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Bragina, Olga
    et al.
    Russian Acad Sci, Tomsk Natl Res Med Ctr, Canc Res Inst, Dept Nucl Med, Tomsk, Russia.;Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Tomsk, Russia..
    von Witting, Emma
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Garousi, Javad
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, SE-75181 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Zelchan, Roman
    Russian Acad Sci, Tomsk Natl Res Med Ctr, Canc Res Inst, Dept Nucl Med, Tomsk, Russia.;Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Tomsk, Russia..
    Sandstrom, Mattias
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Surg Sci, Radiol & Nucl Med, Uppsala, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ Hosp, Med Phys, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Orlova, Anna
    Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Tomsk, Russia.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Chem, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Medvedeva, Anna
    Russian Acad Sci, Tomsk Natl Res Med Ctr, Canc Res Inst, Dept Nucl Med, Tomsk, Russia..
    Doroshenko, Artem
    Russian Acad Sci, Tomsk Natl Res Med Ctr, Canc Res Inst, Dept Gen Oncol, Tomsk, Russia..
    Vorobyeva, Anzhelika
    Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Tomsk, Russia.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, SE-75181 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Lindbo, Sarah
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Borin, Jesper
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Tarabanovskaya, Natalya
    Russian Acad Sci, Tomsk Natl Res Med Ctr, Canc Res Inst, Dept Gen Oncol, Tomsk, Russia..
    Sorensen, Jens
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Surg Sci, Radiol & Nucl Med, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Centre for Bioprocess Technology, CBioPT. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Chernov, Vladimir
    Russian Acad Sci, Tomsk Natl Res Med Ctr, Canc Res Inst, Dept Nucl Med, Tomsk, Russia.;Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Tomsk, Russia..
    Tolmachev, Vladimir
    Tomsk Polytech Univ, Res Ctr Oncotheranost, Res Sch Chem & Appl Biomed Sci, Tomsk, Russia.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, SE-75181 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Phase I Study of Tc-99(m)-ADAPT6, a Scaffold Protein-Based Probe for Visualization of HER2 Expression in Breast Cancer2021In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 493-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radionuclide molecular imaging of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression may help to stratify breast and gastroesophageal cancer patients for HER2-targeting therapies. Albumin-binding domain-derived affinity proteins (ADAPTs) are a new type of small (46-59 amino acids) protein useful as probes for molecular imaging. The aim of this first-in-humans study was to evaluate the biodistribution, dosimetry, and safety of the HER2-specific Tc-99(m)-ADAPT6. Methods: Twenty-nine patients with primary breast cancer were included. In 22 patients with HER2-positive (n = 11) or HER2-negative (n = 11) histopathology, an intravenous injection of 385 +/- 125 MBq of Tc-99(m)-ADAPT6 was performed, randomized to an injected protein mass of either 500 mu g (n = 11) or 1,000 mu g (n = 11). Planar scintigraphy followed by SPECT imaging was performed after 2, 4, 6, and 24 h. An additional cohort (n = 7) was injected with 165 +/- 29 MBq (injected protein mass, 250 mu g), and imaging was performed after 2 h only. Results: Injections of Tc-99(m)-ADAPT6 were well tolerated at all mass levels and not associated with adverse effects. Tc-99(m)-ADAPT6 cleared rapidly from the blood and most other tissues. The normal organs with the highest accumulation were the kidney, liver, and lung. Effective doses were 0.009 +/- 0.002 and 0.010 +/- 0.003 mSv/MBq for injected protein masses of 500 and 1,000 mu g, respectively. Injection of 500 mu g resulted in excellent discrimination between HER2-positive and HER2-negative tumors as early as 2 h after injection (tumor-to-contralateral breast ratio, 37 +/- 19 vs. 5 +/- 2; P < 0.01). The tumor-to-contralateral breast ratios for HER2-positive tumors were significantly (P < 0.05) higher for an injected mass of 500 mu g than for either 250 or 1,000 mu g. Conclusion: Injections of Tc-99(m)-ADAPT6 are safe and associated with low absorbed and effective doses. A protein dose of 500 mu g is preferable for discrimination between tumors with high and low expression of HER2. Further studies are justified to evaluate whether Tc-99(m)-ADAPT6 can be used as an imaging probe to stratify patients for HER2-targeting therapy in areas where PET imaging is not readily available.

  • 46.
    Brown, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Leijon, Felicia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Radiometric and spectrophotometric in vitro assays of glycosyltransferases involved in plant cell wall carbohydrate biosynthesis2012In: Nature Protocols, ISSN 1754-2189, E-ISSN 1750-2799, Vol. 7, no 9, p. 1634-1650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the glycosyltransferases (GTs) that catalyze the formation of plant cell wall carbohydrates remain to be biochemically characterized. This can be achieved only if specific assays are available for these enzymes. Here we present a protocol for in vitro assays of processive and nonprocessive membrane-bound GTs. The assays are either based on the use of radioactive nucleotide sugars (NDP sugars; e.g., UDP-[U-C-14] glucose) and the quantification of the radiolabeled monosaccharides incorporated into soluble or insoluble carbohydrates, or on the coupling of the GT reaction with that of pyruvate kinase (PK) and the oxidation of NADH by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The radiometric assays are more suitable for exploratory work on poorly characterized enzymes, whereas the spectrophotometric assays require the availability of highly enriched GTs. Both assays can be performed within 1 d, depending on the number of fractions to be assayed or reaction mixtures to be tested.

  • 47. Bucinskas, Audrius
    et al.
    Ivaniuk, Khrystyna
    Baryshnikov, Gleb V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Bezvikonnyi, Oleksandr
    Stakhira, Pavlo
    Volyniuk, Dmytro
    Minaev, Boris F.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Ågren, Hans
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Zhydachevskyy, Yaroslav
    Grazulevicius, Juozas, V
    Can attachment of tert-butyl substituents to methoxycarbazole moiety induce efficient TADF in diphenylsulfone-based blue OLED emitters?2020In: Organic electronics, ISSN 1566-1199, E-ISSN 1878-5530, Vol. 86, article id 105894Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new series of TADF emitters with donor-acceptor or donor-acceptor-donor structure containing 2,7-dimethoxycarbazole donor moiety and diphenylsulfone acceptor unit were synthesized and employed in non-doped sky-blue organic light emitting diodes with the external quantum efficiency reaching 9.0%. Thermal, optical and photophysical properties of for D-A and D-A-D compounds containing one or two tert-butyl groups attached to C-3 and C-6 positions of 2,7-dimethoxycarbazole moiety were studied and compared with those of the corresponding compounds containing no tert-butyl groups. Studies of photophysical properties of the compounds confirmed TADF nature of their emission. Computational studies revealed that small modification of the donor moiety could have a significant impact on the TADF mechanism turning it from vibronically induced TADF mediated by the T-2 state to the common TADF which occurs through the direct reverse intersystem crossing between the S-1 and T-1 states. New principle of purposeful of molecular design of TADF emitters with controlled efficiency of reverse intersystem crossing by only small functionalization of donor fragments is proposed.

  • 48.
    Burgess, J. Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics. Oskar Klein Ctr Cosmoparticle Phys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Yu, Hoi-Fung
    Max Planck Inst Extraterr Phys, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Greiner, Jochen
    Max Planck Inst Extraterr Phys, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Mortlock, Daniel J.
    Imperial Coll London, Stat Sect, Dept Math, London SW7 2AZ, England.;Imperial Coll London, Blackett Lab, Astrophys Grp, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7 2AZ, England.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Astron, AlbaNova, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Awakening the BALROG: BAyesian Location Reconstruction Of GRBs2018In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 476, no 2, p. 1427-1444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The accurate spatial location of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is crucial for both accurately characterizing their spectra and follow-up observations by other instruments. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has the largest field of view for detecting GRBs as it views the entire unocculted sky, but as a non-imaging instrument it relies on the relative count rates observed in each of its 14 detectors to localize transients. Improving its ability to accurately locate GRBs and other transients is vital to the paradigm of multimessenger astronomy, including the electromagnetic follow-up of gravitational wave signals. Here we present the BAyesian Location Reconstruction Of GRBs (BALROG) method for localizing and characterizing GBM transients. Our approach eliminates the systematics of previous approaches by simultaneously fitting for the location and spectrum of a source. It also correctly incorporates the uncertainties in the location of a transient into the spectral parameters and produces reliable positional uncertainties for both well-localized sources and those for which the GBM data cannot effectively constrain the position. While computationally expensive, BALROG can be implemented to enable quick follow-up of all GBM transient signals. Also, we identify possible response problems that require attention and caution when using standard, public GBM detector response matrices. Finally, we examine the effects of including the uncertainty in location on the spectral parameters of GRB080916C. We find that spectral parameters change and no extra components are required when these effects are included in contrast to when we use a fixed location. This finding has the potential to alter both the GRB spectral catalogues and the reported spectral composition of some well-known GRBs.

  • 49.
    Burvall, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Lundström, Ulf
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Takman, Per
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Larsson, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Hertz, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    X-ray in-line phase retrieval for tomography2012In: Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2012, Vol. 8313, p. 83136A-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phase contrast in X-ray imaging offers imaging of fine features at lower doses than absorption. Of the phasecontrast methods in use in-line phase contrast is interesting due to its experimental simplicity, but to extract information on absorption and phase distributions from the resulting images, phase retrieval is needed. Many phase-retrieval methods suitable for different situations have been developed, but few comparisons of those methods done. We consider a sub-group of phase-retrieval methods that are suitable for tomography, i.e., that use only one exposure (for practical experimental reasons) and are non-iterative (for speed). In total we have found seven suitable methods in the literature. All, though derived in different ways under different assumptions, follow the same pattern and can be outlined as a single method where each specific version is marked by variations in particular steps. We summarize this unified approach, and give the variations of the individual methods. In addition, we outline approximations and assumptions of each method. Using this approach it is possible to conclude which specific algorithms are most suitable in specific situations and to test this based on simulated and experimental data. Ultimately, this leads to conclusions on which methods are the most suitable in different situations.

  • 50.
    Bäckström, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Kugel, Laura
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Gnann, Christian
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Xu, Hao
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Aslan, Joseph E.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Knight Cardiovasc Inst, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Stadler, Charlotte
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    A Sample Preparation Protocol for High Throughput Immunofluorescence of Suspension Cells on an Adherent Surface2020In: Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, ISSN 0022-1554, E-ISSN 1551-5044, Vol. 68, no 7, p. 473-489, article id 0022155420935403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Imaging is a powerful approach for studying protein expression and has the advantage over other methodologies in providing spatial informationin situat single cell level. Using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, detailed information of subcellular distribution of proteins can be obtained. While adherent cells of different tissue origin are relatively easy to prepare for imaging applications, non-adherent cells from hematopoietic origin, present a challenge due to their poor attachment to surfaces and subsequent loss of a substantial fraction of the cells. Still, these cell types represent an important part of the human proteome and express genes that are not expressed in adherent cell types. In the era of cell mapping efforts, overcoming the challenge with suspension cells for imaging applications would enable systematic profiling of hematopoietic cells. In this work, we successfully established an immunofluorescence protocol for preparation of suspension cell lines, peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC) and human platelets on an adherent surface. The protocol is based on a multi-well plate format with automated sample preparation, allowing for robust high throughput imaging applications. In combination with confocal microscopy, the protocol enables systematic exploration of protein localization to all major subcellular structures.

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