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  • 1. Acciaro, Roberta
    et al.
    Aulin, Christian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Varga, Imre
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Investigation of the formation, structure and release characteristics of self-assembled composite films of cellulose nanofibrils and temperature responsive microgels2011In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 1369-1377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility of forming self-organized films using charge-stabilized dispersions of cellulose I nanofibrils and microgel beads of poly-(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) copolymer is presented. The build-up behavior and the properties of the layer-by-layer (LbL)-constructed films were studied using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and ellipsometry. The morphology of the formed films was also characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. The applied methods clearly demonstrated the successful LbL-assembly of the monodisperse microgels and nanofibrils. The in situ QCM-D measurements also revealed that contrary to the polyelectrolyte bound microgel particles, the nanofibrils-bound gel beads preserve their highly swollen state and do not suffer a partial collapse due to the lack of interdigitation of the oppositely charged components. To probe the accessibility of the gel beads in the formed films, the room temperature (similar to 25 degrees C) loading and release of a fluorescent dye (FITC) was also investigated. The incorporation of the cellulose nanofibrils into the multilayer resulted in an open structure that was found easily penetrable for the dye molecules even at constant room temperature, which is in sharp contrast with previously reported systems based on synthetic polyelectrolytes. The amount of dye released from the multilayer films could be fine-tuned with the number of bilayers. Finally, the thermoresponsivity of the films was also shown by triggering the burst release of the loaded dye when the film was collapsed.

  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Karin H.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Xie, L.
    Hassanzadeh, Salman
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Zero-Dimensional and Highly Oxygenated Graphene Oxide for Multifunctional Poly(lactic acid) Bionanocomposites2016In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 4, no 10, p. 5618-5631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The unique strengths of 2D graphene oxide nanosheets (GONSs) in polymer composites are thwarted by nanosheet agglomeration due to strong intersheet attractions. Here, we reveal that shrinking the planar size to 0D graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs), together with the intercalation of rich oxygen functional groups, reduces filler aggregation and enhances interfacial interactions with the host polymer. With poly(lactic acid) (PLA) as a model matrix, atomic force microscopy colloidal probe measurements illustrated that a triple increase in adhesion force to PLA was achieved for GOQDs (234.8 nN) compared to GONSs (80.4 nN), accounting for the excellent exfoliation and dispersion of GOQDs in PLA, in contrast to the notable agglomeration of GONSs. Although present at trace amount (0.05 wt %), GOQDs made a significant contribution to nucleation activity, mechanical strength and ductility, and gas barrier properties of PLA, which contrasted the inferior efficacy of GONSs, accompanied by clear distinction in film transparency (91% and 50%, respectively). Moreover, the GOQDs with higher hydrophilicity accelerated the degradation of PLA by enhancing water erosion, while the GONSs with large sheet surfaces gave a higher hydrolytic resistance. Our findings provide conceptual insights into the importance of the dimensionality and surface chemistry of GO nanostructures in the promising field of bionanocomposites integrating high strength and multifunction (e.g., enhanced transparency, degradation and gas barrier).

  • 3. Andersson, L.
    et al.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bergström, Lennart
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University.
    Evaluating pore space in macroporous ceramics with water-based porosimetry2013In: Journal of The American Ceramic Society, ISSN 0002-7820, E-ISSN 1551-2916, Vol. 96, no 6, p. 1916-1922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that water-based porosimetry (WBP), a facile, simple, and nondestructive porosimetry technique, accurately evaluates both the pore size distribution and throat size distribution of sacrificially templated macroporous alumina. The pore size distribution and throat size distribution derived from the WBP evaluation in uptake (imbibition) and release (drainage) mode, respectively, were corroborated by mercury porosimetry and X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT). In contrast with mercury porosimetry, the WBP also provided information on the presence of "dead-end pores" in the macroporous alumina.

  • 4.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Polyelectrolyte complexes: Preparation, characterization, and use for control of wet and dry adhesion between surfaces2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) preparation, adsorption behaviour, and potential use for control of wet and dry adhesion between surfaces.

    PEC formation was studied using a jet-mixing method not previously used for mixing polyelectrolytes. The PECs were formed using various mixing times, and the results were compared with those for PECs formed using the conventional polyelectrolyte titration method. The results indicated that using the jet mixer allowed the size of the formed PECs to be controlled, which was not the case with the polyelectrolyte titration method, and a two-step mechanism for PEC formation was suggested.

    Adsorption experiments comparing two types of PECs, both produced from PAA and PAH, but with different molecular weights, demonstrated that surface-induced aggregation occurred in the high-molecular-weight PECs, whereas the adsorption stopped at a low level in the low-molecular-weight PECs. It was suggested that the latter PECs consisted of two fractions of complexes and that the fraction with lower polymer density exerted a site-blocking effect, hindering further adsorption.

    It was also demonstrated that particle-PECs (PPECs), in which one polyion was replaced with a silica nanoparticle, could be prepared. The purpose of preparing PPECs was to create a PEC structure that could create a joint with a special failure pattern referred to as disentanglement behaviour. Using the colloidal probe AFM technique, the expected disentanglement could be detected in PPECs, though the joint strength was low. Adhesion experiments demonstrated significantly higher pull-off values with polymer–polymer complexes than with PPECs. However, there was large spread in the data, possibly due to the surface inhomogeneity.

    Experiments using low-molecular-weight PECs as a paper strength agent demonstrated that PECs can indeed increase paper strength. Comparing the PEC results with those for polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) prepared from the same polyelectrolytes indicated that, since the PEM strategy enables higher adsorption levels than does the PEC strategy, greater absolute strength improvements could be achieved using PEMs. However, PEC treatment resulted in the greatest effect per adsorbed amount of polymer.

  • 5.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Polyelectrolyte complexes: their preparation, adsorption behaviour and effect on paper properties2008Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, the formation of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) has been studied using a jet mixing method not previously used for mixing polyelectrolytes. The PECs were formed from two weak polyelectrolytes, i.e., polyacrylic acid (PAA) and polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH), with different mixing times, and the results were compared with those for PECs formed using the conventional polyelectrolyte titration method.

     

    The adsorption behaviour of the formed PECs on silicon oxide substrates and pulp fibres was analysed, and the results were compared with those for polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) prepared from the same two polyelectrolytes.

     

    The results indicated that by using the jet mixer, the size of the formed PECs could be controlled, which was not the case with the polyelectrolyte titration method. The PECs produced by jet mixing were also found to be smaller than those produced by polyelectrolyte titration. From these results, a two-step mechanism for the formation of PECs was suggested: initial precomplex formation, which is a fast and diffusion-controlled process, followed by a reconformation process, during which the vigorous mixing in the jet mixer can partially limit secondary aggregation.

     

    When the complexes were adsorbed to silicon oxide or pulp fibre surfaces, adsorption studies indicated that it was impossible to reach the same adsorption levels for PECs as for PEMs. This was explained in terms of free energy, entropical, reasons rather than to any geometric limitation of the surface. Despite the smaller amount of polyelectrolyte adsorbed from the PEC treatment than from the PEM treatment of pulp fibres, the PEC treatment had the greatest effect on paper strength per adsorbed amount of polymer. This was thought to be because the three-dimensional structure of the PECs, versus the smoother structure of PEMs, allows for the formation of multiple contact points between the macroscopically rough fibres and increased molecular contact area.

     

    In the adsorption experiments, it was also found that net cationic complexes can adsorb to both anionic and cationic substrates. This phenomenon was explained by the occurrence of anionic patches on the surface of the net cationic PECs and the ability of the PECs, formed from weak polyelectrolytes, to partially change charge upon exposure to a surface of the same charge as the complex itself, due to a change of the degree of dissociation of the polyelectrolytes constituting the complex.

  • 6.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Johansson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lars, Wågberg
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Use of PECs and PEMs from polymers and nanoparticles to create sacrificial bonds between surfacesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ondaral, Sedat
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ödberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Using jet mixing to prepare polyelectrolyte complexes: Complex properties and their interaction with silicon oxide surfaces2010In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 351, no 1, p. 88-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of mixing procedure on the properties of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) was investigated using two complexation techniques, polyelectrolyte titration and jet mixing, the latter being a new method for PEC preparation. For the low-molecular-weight polyelectrolytes polyacrylic acid (PAA) and polyallyl amine hydrochloride (PAH), shorter mixing times produced smaller PECs, whereas for higher molecular weights of the same polyelectrolytes, PEC size first decreased with decreasing mixing time to a certain level, after which it started increasing again. This pattern was likely due to the diffusion-controlled formation of "pre-complexes", which, in the case of low-molecular-weight polymers, occurs sufficiently quickly to form stable complexes; when polyelectrolytes are larger, however, non-equilibrium pre-complexes, more prone to aggregation, are formed. Comparing the techniques revealed that jet mixing produced smaller complexes, allowing PEC size to be controlled by mixing time, which was not the case with polyelectrolyte titration. Higher polyelectrolyte concentration during jet mixing led to the formation of larger PECs. It was also demonstrated that PEC size could be changed after preparation: increasing the pH of the PEC dispersion led to an irreversible increase in PEC size, whereas lowering the pH did not influence PEC size. The adsorption behavior of PECs formed from weak polyelectrolytes on model substrates was studied using QCM-D, SPAR, and AFM imaging; the results indicated that increasing the pH increased the amount of PECs adsorbed to model surfaces. However, the amount of PECs adsorbed to the model surfaces was low compared with other systems in all studied cases.

  • 8.
    Ankerfors, Caroline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    AFM adhesion imaging for comparison of polyelectrolyte complexes and polyelectrolyte multilayers2012Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9. Ankerfors, Caroline
    et al.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Polyelectrolyte Complexes for Tailoring of Wood Fibre Surfaces2014In: Polyelectrolyte Complexes In The Dispersed And Solid State II: Application Aspects, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014, p. 1-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) provides new opportunities for surface engineering of solid particles in aqueous environments to functionalize the solids either for use in interactive products or to tailor their adhesive interactions in the dry and/or wet state. This chapter describes the use of PECs in paper-making applications where the PECs are used for tailoring the surfaces of wood-based fibres. Initially a detailed description of the adsorption process is given, in more general terms, and in this respect both in situ formed and pre-formed complexes are considered. When using in situ formed complexes, which were intentionally formed by the addition of oppositely charged polymers, it was established that the order of addition of the two polyelectrolytes was important, and by adding the polycation first a more extensive fibre flocculation was found. PECs can also form in situ by the interaction between polyelectrolytes added and polyelectrolytes already present in the fibre suspension originating from the wood material, e. g. lignosulphonates or hemicelluloses. In this respect the complexation can be detrimental for process efficiency and/or product quality depending on the charge balance between the components, and when using the PECs for fibre engineering it is not recommended to rely on in situ PEC formation. Instead the PECs should be pre-formed before addition to the fibres. The use of pre-formed PECs in the paper-making process is described as three sub-processes: PEC formation, adsorption onto surfaces, and the effect on the adhesion between surfaces. The addition of PECs, and adsorption to the fibres, prior to formation of the paper network structure has shown to result in a significant increase in joint strength between the fibres and to an increased strength of the paper made from the fibres. The increased joint strength between the fibres is due to both an increased molecular contact area between the fibres and an increased molecular adhesion. The increased paper strength is also a result of an increased number of fibre/fibre contacts/unit volume of the paper network.

  • 10.
    Ankerfors, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Microfibrillated cellulose: Energy-efficient preparation techniques and applications in paper2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes three alternative processes for producing microfibrillated cellulose (MFC; also referred to as cellulose nanofibrils, CNF) in which bleached pulp fibres are first pretreated and then homogenized using a high-pressure homogenizer. In one process, fibre cell wall delamination was facilitated by a combined enzymatic and mechanical pretreatment. In the two other processes, cell wall delamination was facilitated by pretreatments that introduced anionically charged groups into the fibre wall, by means of either a carboxymethylation reaction or irreversibly attaching carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) to the fibres. All three processes are industrially feasible and enable energy-efficient production of MFC. Using these processes, MFC can be produced with an energy consumption of 500–2300 kWh/tonne. These materials have been characterized in various ways and it has been demonstrated that the produced MFCs are approximately 5–30 nm wide and up to several microns long.

    The MFCs were also evaluated in a number of applications in paper. The carboxymethylated MFC was used to prepare strong free-standing barrier films and to coat wood-containing papers to improve the surface strength and reduce the linting propensity of the papers. MFC, produced with an enzymatic pretreatment, was also produced at pilot scale and was studied in a pilot-scale paper making trial as a strength agent added at the wet-end for highly filled papers.

  • 11.
    Ankerfors, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Microfibrillated cellulose: Energy-efficient preparation techniques and key properties2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes three alternative processes for producing microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) in which pulp fibres are first pre-treated and then homogenized using a high-pressure homogenizer. In one process, fibre cell wall delamination was facilitated with a combined enzymatic and mechanical pre-treatment. In the two other processes, cell wall delamination was facilitated by pre-treatments that introduced anionically charged groups into the fibre wall, by means of either a carboxymethylation reaction or irreversibly attaching carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) onto the fibres. All three processes are industrially feasible and enable production with low energy consumption. Using these methods, MFC can be produced with an energy consumption of 500–2300 kWh/tonne, which corresponds to a 91–98% reduction in energy consumption from that presented in earlier studies. These materials have been characterized in various ways and it has been demonstrated that the produced MFCs are approximately 5–30 nm wide and up to several microns long.

  • 12.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Granda, L. A.
    Joffe, R.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Vilaseca, Fabiola
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Experimental evaluation of anisotropy in injection molded polypropylene/wood fiber biocomposites2017In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 96, p. 147-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the anisotropy of wood fibers is reasonably well established, the anisotropy of injection molded wood fiber composites is not well understood. This work focuses on chemo-thermomechanical pulp (CTMP) reinforced polypropylene (PP) composites. A kinetic mixer (Gelimat) is used for compounding CTMP/PP composites, followed by injection molding. Effects from processing induced orientation on mechanical properties are investigated. For this purpose, a film gate mold was designed to inject composites in the shape of plates so that specimens in different directions to the flow could be evaluated. Observations from tensile tests were complemented by performing flexural tests (in different directions) on discs cut from the injected plates. SEM was used to qualitatively observe the fiber orientation in the composites. At high fiber content, both modulus and tensile strength could differ by as much as 40% along the flow and transverse to the flow. The fiber orientation was strongly increased at the highest fiber content, as concluded from theoretical analysis.

  • 13.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Sjöstedt, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Biocomposites based on nanostructured chemical wood pulp fibres in epoxy matrixManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Arias, Veluska
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Odelius, Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Höglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Albertsson, Ann-Christine
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Homocomposites of Polylactide (PLA) with Induced Interfacial Stereocomplex Crystallites2015In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 2220-2231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The demand for “green” degradable composite materials increases with growing environmental awareness. The key challenge is achieving the preferred physical properties and maintaining their eco-attributes in terms of the degradability of the matrix and the filler. Herein, we have designed a series of “green” homocomposites materials based purely on polylactide (PLA) polymers with different structures. Film-extruded homocomposites were prepared by melt-blending PLA matrixes (which had different degrees of crystallinity) with PLLA and PLA stereocomplex (SC) particles. The PLLA and SC particles were spherical and with 300–500 nm size. Interfacial crystalline structures in the form of stereocomplexes were obtained for certain particulate-homocomposite formulations. These SC crystallites were found at the particle/matrix interface when adding PLLA particles to a PLA matrix with d-lactide units, as confirmed by XRD and DSC data analyses. For all homocomposites, the PLLA and SC particles acted as nucleating agents and enhanced the crystallization of the PLA matrixes. The SC particles were more rigid and had a higher Young’s modulus compared with the PLLA particles. The mechanical properties of the homocomposites varied with particle size, rigidity, and the interfacial adhesion between the particles and the matrix. An improved tensile strength in the homocomposites was achieved from the interfacial stereocomplex formation. Hereafter, homocomposites with tunable crystalline arrangements and subsequently physical properties, are promising alternatives in strive for eco-composites and by this, creating materials that are completely degradable and sustainable.

  • 15.
    Ariza, David
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Becerra, Marley
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Hollertz, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Second Mode Positive Streamers Propagating Along Mineral-oil/solid InterfacesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an experimental study on second mode positive streamers propagating along mineral-oil/solid interfaces. The inception and propagation of these streamers is investigated with different impregnated solids (low density polyethylene (LDPE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), two papers referred to as kraft paper and a kraft fibril paper, made from cellulosic micro and nano fibrils, a lignin-free paper and a paper with high lignin content referred to as k107 kraft paper). Streamers are initiated in a point-plane configuration under step voltages with 35 ns rise time. The radius of the tip is 2.9 μm and the solid is installed in an inclined position in close contact to the point electrode. Shadowgraphs, charge and light recording of the streamers are reported for each case. Furthermore, estimations of the streamer stopping length, velocity, current and average charge are reported. It is found that the streamer inception is influenced by the solid interface indicating that the inception process is not only conditioned by the field at the tip but also by the interface. A time delay is observed before the initiation of the streamer and probably correlated with the initiation process and formation of the gaseous phase. Additionally, the threshold propagation voltage of the second mode streamers at mineral-oil/solid interfaces is shown to be independent of the interface. It is also shown that the different characteristics of streamers propagating along the tested interfaces cannot be fully explained by the capacitive coupling effect due to permittivity mismatch. Thus, it is suggested that the characteristics of streamers propagating near interfaces is affected by other properties of the solid such as chemical composition, wettability and surface roughness.

  • 16.
    Ariza, David
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Becerra, Marley
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Hollertz, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Pitois, Claire
    ABB AB Corporate Research.
    First Mode Negative Streamers along Mineral Oil-solid Interfaces2017In: IEEE transactions on dielectrics and electrical insulation, ISSN 1070-9878, E-ISSN 1558-4135, Vol. 24, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This document presents an experimental study on the propagation of first mode negative streamers along mineral oil-solid interfaces. Samples made of an oil impregnated kraft paper and a low-porosity paper made from cellulosic micro and nano fibrils, as well as different polymeric films (low density polyethylene (LDPE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)) are used as the solid. A comparison of the length, charge and velocity of streamers for all different mineral oil-solid interfaces is reported. It is shown that streamers propagate longer and faster along mineral oil-solid interfaces with low surface roughness, low porosity and higher electrical permittivity than mineral oil. Those streamers show a quasi-continuous injection of charge in the early stage of their propagation. This quasi-continuous charge injection consists of a sequence of small charge steps separated by few tens of nanoseconds in between. In comparison, the streamers that propagate along surfaces with similar permittivity to the mineral oil have lower injection of charge and higher stopping voltage conditions than streamers propagating free in the liquid without any solid barrier.

  • 17.
    Ariza, David
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Becerra, Marley
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Methling, Ralf
    INP - Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology.
    Gortchakow, Sergey
    INP Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology.
    Hollertz, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Influence of Paper Properties on Streamers Creepingin Mineral Oil2017In: Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Dielectric Liquids, ISSN 2153-3725, E-ISSN 2153-3733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents an experimental study ofsecond mode positive streamers propagating along mineral oilpaperinterfaces. A point-plane arrangement immersed inmineral oil with the paper inclined 60 degrees to the planeelectrode is used to create the liquid-solid interface. Kraft paperand a kraft fibril paper, made from cellulosic micro and nanofibrils, with higher density and lower surface roughness are usedas the solid materials. High speed shadowgraphy and chargerecordings are used to compare the propagation of second modepositive streamers along the mineral oil-kraft paper and mineraloil-kraft fibril paper. Streamers creeping along the mineral oilkraftpaper interface propagate mainly into the liquid, with oneor two main filaments. In comparison, the streamers propagatingalong the kraft fibril paper show a strong reduction of thebranching; these streamers consist of a single filament thatpropagates exactly on the solid surface. Streamers along the kraftfibril paper also have longer propagation time than for the casewith kraft paper. Mutual electrostatic shielding betweenfilaments is observed for the streamers creeping on the kraftpaper. An electrostatic analysis of the influence of permittivity,density and surface roughness of the solid in the electricalproperties of the streamer filaments is also performed.

  • 18.
    Aulin, Christian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Novel oil resistant cellulosic materials2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study has been to prepare and characterise oil resistant cellulosic materials, ranging from model surfaces to papers and aerogels. The cellulosic materials were made oil resistant by chemical and topographic modifications, based on surface energy, surface roughness and barrier approaches. Detailed wetting studies of the prepared cellulosic materials were made using contact angle measurements and standardised penetration tests with different alkanes and oil mixtures.

    A significant part of the activities were devoted to the development of model cellulosic surfaces with different degrees of crystalline ordering for the wetting studies. Crystalline cellulose I, II and amorphous cellulose surfaces were prepared by spin-coating of cellulose nanocrystal or microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) dispersions, with Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) films or by a layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition technique. The formation of multilayers consisting of polyethyleneimine (PEI)/anionic MFC or cationic MFC/anionic MFC was further studied and optimized in terms of total layer thickness and adsorbed amount by combining Dual Polarization Interferometry (DPI) or Stagnation Point Adsorption Reflectrometry (SPAR) with a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D).

    The smooth cellulosic surfaces prepared had different molecular and mesostructure properties and different surface energies as shown by X-ray diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging, ellipsometry measurements and contact angle measurements.

    The cellulose model surfaces were found to be ideal for detailed wetting studies, and after the surface has been coated or covalently modified with various amounts of fluorosurfactants, the fluorinated cellulose films were used to follow the spreading mechanisms of different oil mixtures. The viscosity and surface tension of the oil mixtures, as well as the dispersive surface energy of the cellulose surfaces, were found to be essential parameters governing the spreading kinetics. A strong correlation was found between the surface concentration of fluorine, the dispersive surface energy and the measured contact angle of the oil mixtures.

    Silicon surfaces possessing structural porous characteristics were fabricated by a plasma etching process. The structured silicon surfaces were coated with sulfate-stabilized cellulose I nanocrystals using the LbL technique. These artificial intrinsically oleophilic cellulose surfaces were made highly oleophobic when coated with a thin layer of fluorinated silanes. By comparison with flat cellulose surfaces, which are oleophilic, it is demonstrated that the surface energy and the surface texture are essential factors preventing oil from spreading on the surface and, thus, inducing the observed macroscopic oleophobic properties.

    The use of the MFC for surface coating on base papers demonstrated very promising characteristics as packaging materials. Environmental-Scanning Electron Microscopy (E-SEM) micrographs indicated that the MFC layer reduced the sheet porosity, i.e. the dense structure formed by the nanofibers resulted in superior oil barrier properties. Attempts were made to link the procedure for preparation of the MFC dispersions to the resulting microstructure of the coatings, and film porosity and the film moisture content to the resulting permeability properties.

    Finally, MFC aerogels were successfully prepared by freeze-drying. The surface texture of the porous aerogels was carefully controlled by adjusting the concentration of the MFC dispersion used for the freeze-drying. The different scales of roughness of the MFC aerogels were utilised, together with the very low surface energy created by fluorination of the aerogel, to induce highly oleophobic properties.

  • 19.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Gallstedt, Mikael
    Lindström, Tom
    Oxygen and oil barrier properties of microfibrillated cellulose films and coatings2010In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 559-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preparation of carboxymethylated microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) films by dispersion-casting from aqueous dispersions and by surface coating on base papers is described. The oxygen permeability of MFC films were studied at different relative humidity (RH). At low RH (0%), the MFC films showed very low oxygen permeability as compared with films prepared from plasticized starch, whey protein and arabinoxylan and values in the same range as that of conventional synthetic films, e.g., ethylene vinyl alcohol. At higher RH's, the oxygen permeability increased exponentially, presumably due to the plasticizing and swelling of the carboxymethylated nanofibers by water molecules. The effect of moisture on the barrier and mechanical properties of the films was further studied using water vapor sorption isotherms and by humidity scans in dynamic mechanical analysis. The influences of the degree of nanofibrillation/dispersion on the microstructure and optical properties of the films were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and light transmittance measurements, respectively. FE-SEM micrographs showed that the MFC films consisted of randomly assembled nanofibers with a thickness of 5-10 nm, although some larger aggregates were also formed. The use of MFC as surface coating on various base papers considerably reduced the air permeability. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (E-SEM) micrographs indicated that the MFC layer reduced sheet porosity, i.e., the dense structure formed by the nanofibers resulted in superior oil barrier properties.

  • 20.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Johansson, E.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, T.
    Adsorption behaviour, structural and adhesive properties of microfibrillated cellulose-based multilayersArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Johansson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    Self-Organized Films from Cellulose I Nanofibrils Using the Layer-by-Layer Technique2010In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 872-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility of forming self-organized films using only charge-stabilized dispersions of cellulose I nanofibrils with opposite charges is presented, that is, the multilayers were composed solely of anionically and cationically modified microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) with a low degree of substitution. The build-up behavior and the properties of the layer-by-layer (LbL)-constructed films were studied using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and stagnation point adsorption reflectometry (SPAR). The adsorption behavior of cationic/anionic MFC was compared with that of polyethyleneimine (PEI)/anionic MFC. The water contents of five bilayers of cationic/anionic MFC and PEI/anionic MFC were approximately 70 and 50%, respectively. The MFC surface coverage was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, which clearly showed a more dense fibrillar structure in the five bilayer PEI/anionic MFC than in the five bilayer cationic/anionic MFC. The forces between the cellulose-based multilayers were examined using the AFM colloidal probe technique. The forces on approach were characterized by a combination of electrostatic and steric repulsion. The wet adhesive forces were very long-range and were characterized by multiple adhesive events. Surfaces covered by PEU/anionic MFC multilayers required more energy to be separated than surfaces covered by cationic/anionic MFC multilayers.

  • 22.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Josefsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nanoscale Cellulose Films with Different Crystallinities and Mesostructures: Their Surface Properties and Interaction with Water2009In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 25, no 13, p. 7675-7685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A systematic study of the degree of molecular ordering and swelling of different nanocellulose model films has been conducted. Crystalline cellulose II surfaces were prepared by spin-coating of the precursor cellulose solutions onto oxidized silicon wafers before regeneration in water or by using the Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) technique. Amorphous cellulose films were also prepared by spin-coating of a precursor cellulose solution onto oxidized silicon wafers. Crystalline cellulose I surfaces were prepared by spin-coating wafers with aqueous suspensions of sulfate-stabilized cellulose nanocrystals and low-charged microfibrillated cellulose (LC-MFC). In addition, a dispersion of high-charged MFC was used for the buildup of polyelectrolyte multilayers with polyetheyleneimine on silica with the aid of the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. These preparation methods produced smooth thin films on the nanometer scale Suitable for X-ray diffraction and swelling measurements. The surface morphology and thickness of the cellulose films were characterized in detail by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ellipsometry measurements, respectively. To determine the surface energy of the cellulose surfaces, that Is, their ability to engage in different interactions with different materials, they were characterized through contact angle measurements against water, glycerol, and methylene iodide. Small incidence angle X-ray diffraction revealed that the nanocrystal and MFC films exhibited a cellulose I crystal structure and that the films prepared from N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO), LiCl/DMAc solutions, using the LS technique, possessed a cellulose II structure. The degree of crystalline ordering was highest in the nanocrystal films (similar to 87%), whereas the MFC, NMMO, and LS films exhibited a degree of crystallinity of about 60%. The N,N-dimethylacetamide(DMAc)/LiCl film possessed very low crystalline ordering (<15%). It was also established that the films ha different mesostructures, that is, structures around 10 nm, depending on the preparation conditions. The LS and LiCl/DMAc films are smooth without any clear mesostructure, whereas the other films have a clear mesostructure in which the dimensions are dependent oil the size of the nanocrystals, fibrillar cellulose, and electrostatic charge of the MFC. The swelling of the films was studied using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. To understand the swelling properties of the films, it was necessary to consider both the difference in crystalline ordering and the difference in mesostructure of the films.

  • 23.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Netrval, Julia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    Aerogels from nanofibrillated cellulose with tunable oleophobicity2010In: SOFT MATTER, ISSN 1744-683X, Vol. 6, no 14, p. 3298-3305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of structured porous aerogels of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) by freeze-drying has been demonstrated. The aerogels have a high porosity, as shown by FE-SEM and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements, and a very low density ( < 0.03 g cm(-3)). The density and surface texture of the aerogels can be tuned by selecting the concentration of the NFC dispersions before freeze-drying. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (PFOTS) was used to uniformly coat the aerogel to tune their wetting properties towards non-polar liquids. An XPS analysis of the chemical composition of the PFOTS-modified aerogels demonstrated the reproducibility of the PFOTS-coating and the high atomic fluorine concentration (ca. 51%) in the surfaces. The modified aerogels formed a robust composite interface with high apparent contact angles (theta* >> 90 degrees) for castor oil (gamma(1v) = 35.8 mN m(-1)) and hexadecane (gamma(1v) = 27.5 mN m(-1)).

  • 24.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Netrval, Julia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    Ultra light-weight microfibrillated cellulose aerogels with tunable oleophobicityArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Varga, Imre
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    STFI-Packforsk AB.
    Buildup of Polyelectrolyte Multilayers of Polyethyleneimine and Microfibrillated Cellulose Studied by in situ Dual Polarization Interferometry and Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation2008In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 2509-2518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) and Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) have been used to buildup polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) on silicone oxide and silicone oxynitride surfaces at different pH values and with different electrolyte and polyelectrolyte/colloid concns. of the components.  Consecutive adsorption on these surfaces was studied by in situ dual-polarization interferometry (DPI) and quartz crystal microbalance measurements.  The adsorption data obtained from both the techniques showed a steady buildup of multilayers.  High pH and electrolyte concn. of the PEI soln. was found to be beneficial for achieving a high adsorbed amt. of PEI, and hence of MFC, during the buildup of the multilayer.  On the other hand, an increase in the electrolyte concn. of the MFC dispersion was found to inhibit the adsorption of MFC onto PEI.  The adsorbed amt. of MFC was independent of the bulk MFC concn. in the investigated concn. range (15-250 mg/L).  At. force microscopy measurements were used to image a MFC-treated silicone oxynitride chip from DPI measurements.  The surface was found to be almost fully covered by randomly oriented microfibrils after the adsorption of only one bilayer of PEI/MFC.  The surface roughness expressed as the rms-roughness over 1 μm2 was calcd. to be 4.6 nm (1 bilayer).  The adsorbed amt. of PEI and MFC and the amt. of water entrapped by the individual layers in the multilayer structures were estd. by combining results from the two anal. techniques using the de Feijter formula.  These results indicate a total water content of ca. 41% in the PEM.

  • 26.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Yun, Sang Ho
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Microelectronics and Applied Physics, MAP.
    Lindström, Tom
    Design of Highly Oleophobic Cellulose Surfaces from Structured Silicon Templates2009In: Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, Vol. 1, no 11, p. 2443-2452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Structured silicon surfaces, possessing hierarchical porous characteristics consisting of micrometer-sized cavities superimposed upon a network of nanometer-sized pillars or wires, have been fabricated by a plasma-etching process. These surfaces have superoleophobic properties, after being coated with fluorinated organic trichlorosilanes, on intrinsically oleophilic surfaces. By comparison with flat silicon surfaces, which are oleophilic, it has been demonstrated that a combination of low surface energy and the structured features of the plasma-etched surface is essential to prevent oil from penetrating the surface cavities and thus induce the observed macroscopic superoleophobic phenomena with very low contact-angle hysteresis and low roll-off angles. The structured silicon surfaces were coated with cellulose nanocrystals using the polyelectrolyte multilayer technique. The cellulose surfaces prepared in this way were then coated with a monolayer of fluorinated trichlorosilanes. These porous cellulose films displayed highly nonwetting properties against a number of liquids with low surface tension, including alkanes such as hexadecane and decane. The wettability and chemical composition of the cellulose/silicon surfaces were characterized with contact-angle goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The nano/microtexture features of the cellulose/silicon surfaces were also studied with field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The highly oleophobic structured cellulose surfaces are very interesting model surfaces for the development of biomimetic self-cleaning surfaces in a vast array of products, including green constructions, packaging materials, protection against environmental fouling, sports, and outdoor clothing, and microfluidic systems.

  • 27.
    Banerjee, Indradumna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Salih, Tagrid
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Chemistry.
    Araújo, A. C.
    Karlsson, M.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Slipdisc: A versatile sample preparation platform for point of care diagnostics2017In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 7, no 56, p. 35048-35054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a microfluidic sample preparation platform called "Slipdisc" based on slipchip technology. Slipdisc is a rotational slipchip that uses a unique hand-wound clockwork mechanism for precise movement of specially fabricated polycarbonate discs. In operation, the microchannels and microchambers carved on the closely aligned microfluidic discs convert from continuous filled paths to defined compartments using the slip movement. The clockwork mechanism introduced here is characterised by a food dye experiment and a conventional HRP TMB reaction before measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme levels, which is a crucial biomarker for neonatal diagnostics. The colorimetry based detection of LDH was performed with an unmodified camera and an image analysis procedure based on normalising images and observing changes in red channel intensity. The analysis showed a close to unity coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.96) in detecting the LDH concentration when compared with a standard Chemical Analyser, demonstrating the excellent performance of the slipdisc platform with colorimetric detection. The versatile point of care sample preparation platform should ideally be suited for a multitude of applications at resource-limited settings.

  • 28.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cranston, Emily D.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, McMaster University.
    Ondaral, Sedat
    Department of Pulp and Paper Technology, Karadeniz Technical University.
    Johansson, Erik
    Cellutech AB.
    Brumer, Harry
    The Michael Smith Laboratories and the Department of Chemistry, The University of British Columbia.
    Rutland, Mark W.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Adsorption of Xyloglucan onto Cellulose Surfaces of Different Morphologies: An Entropy-Driven Process2016In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 2801-2811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The temperature-dependence of xyloglucan (XG) adsorption onto smooth cellulose model films regenerated from N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO) was investigated using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, and it was found that the adsorbed amount increased with increasing temperature. This implies that the adsorption of XG to NMMO-regenerated cellulose is endothermic and supports the hypothesis that the adsorption of XG onto cellulose is an entropy-driven process. We suggest that XG adsorption is mainly driven by the release of water molecules from the highly hydrated cellulose surfaces and from the XG molecules, rather than through hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces as previously suggested. To test this hypothesis, the adsorption of XG onto cellulose was studied using cellulose films with different morphologies prepared from cellulose nanocrystals (CNC), semicrystalline NMMO-regenerated cellulose, and amorphous cellulose regenerated from lithium chloride/dimethylacetamide. The total amount of high molecular weight xyloglucan (XGHMW) adsorbed was studied by quartz crystal microbalance and reflectometry measurements, and it was found that the adsorption was greatest on the amorphous cellulose followed by the CNC and NMMO-regenerated cellulose films. There was a significant correlation between the cellulose dry film thickness and the adsorbed XG amount, indicating that XG penetrated into the films. There was also a correlation between the swelling of the films and the adsorbed amounts and conformation of XG, which further strengthened the conclusion that the water content and the subsequent release of the water upon adsorption are important components of the adsorption process.

  • 29.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Influence of Surface Charge Density and Morphology on the Formation of Polyelectrolyte Multilayers on Smooth Charged Cellulose Surfaces2017In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 968-979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To clarify the importance of the surface charge for the formation of polyelectrolyte multilayers, layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies of polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (pDADMAC) and polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) have been investigated on cellulose films with different carboxylic acid contents (20, 350, 870, and 1200 μmol/g) regenerated from oxidized cellulose. The wet cellulose films were thoroughly characterized prior to multilayer deposition using quantitative nanomechanical mapping (QNM), which showed that the mechanical properties were greatly affected by the degree of oxidation of the cellulose. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements were used to determine the surface potential of the cellulose films by fitting the force data to the DLVO theory. With the exception of the 1200 μmol/g film, the force measurements showed a second-order polynomial increase in surface potential with increasing degree of oxidation. The low surface potential for the 1200 μmol/g film was attributed to the low degree of regeneration of the cellulose film in aqueous media due to increasing solubility with increasing charge. The multilayer formation was characterized using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and stagnation-point adsorption reflectometry (SPAR). Extensive deswelling was observed for the charged films when pDADMAC was adsorbed due to the reduced osmotic pressure when ions inside the film were released, and the 1:1 charge compensation showed that all the charges in the films were reached by the pDADMAC. The multilayer formation was not significantly affected by the charge density above 350 μmol/g due to interlayer repulsions, but it was strongly affected by the salt concentration during the layer build-up.

  • 30. Bosmans, Toon J.
    et al.
    Stepan, Agnes M.
    Toriz, Guillermo
    Renneckar, Scott
    Karabulut, Erdem
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Gatenholm, Paul
    Assembly of Debranched Xylan from Solution and on Nanocellulosic Surfaces2014In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 924-930Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focused on the assembly characteristics of debranched xylan onto cellulose surfaces. A rye arabinoxylan polymer with an initial arabinose/xylose ratio of 0.53 was debranched with an oxalic acid treatment as a function of time. The resulting samples contained reduced arabinose/xylose ratios significantly affecting the molecular architecture and solution behavior of the biopolymer. With this treatment, an almost linear xylan with arabinose DS of only 0.04 was obtained. The removal of arabinose units resulted in the self-assembly of the debranched polymer in water into stable nanoparticle aggregates with a size around 300 nm with a gradual increase in crystallinity of the isolated xylan. Using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, the adsorption of xylan onto model cellulose surfaces was quantified. Compared to the nonmodified xylan, the adsorption of debranched xylan increased from 0.6 to 5.5 mg m(-2). Additionally, adsorption kinetics suggest that the nanoparticles rapidly adsorbed to the cellulose surfaces compared to the arabinoxylan. In summary, a control of the molecular structure of xylan influences its ability to form a new class of polysaccharide nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions and its interaction with nanocellulose surfaces.

  • 31.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Javakhishvili, Irakli
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Hvilsted, Søren
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Preparation and evaluation of well-defined di- and triblock copolymers based on poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] and poly(ε-caprolactone)2014In: ACS National Meeting, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, di- and triblock copolymers based on poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) have been prepared. The PDMAEMA length was kept constant for both di- and triblock copolymers, while in the diblock copolymers the PCL length was varied in three different lengths, yielding three separate block copolymers. For the triblock blockcopolymers, on the other hand, also the PCL blocks were of the same length yielding one ABA- and one BAB-type block copolymer. In the next step, the PDMAEMA-part was quaternized to yield polyelectrolytes with either one or two charged block(s). In the final step, difference in adsorption behavior onto a negatively charged cellulose surface and subsequent alteration of surface properties was investigated. Overall, the polymers were evaluated in solid state, in solution, in water dispersion, and on cellulose surfaces with techniques including differential scanning calorimetry, size exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering and quartz crystal microbalance.

  • 32.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Larsson, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    A comparative study of covalent grafting and physical adsorption of PCL onto cellulose2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing concern for the environment has, in the past years, directed the research towards a bigger focus on new “greener” materials, such as cellulose-reinforced options. Cellulose is the most abundant organic raw material in the world and it is a versatile material. However, to be able to use it in applications where it is not inherently compatible, a modification is often necessary.1-3 One common method to achieve this modification is to graft polymers onto/from the cellulose chain. This can change the inherent properties of cellulose to attain new properties, such as dimensional stability and water repellency.3 In addition to this, it has been shown that polyectrolytes can be physiosorbed onto charged surfaces.4 Due to this, it is possible to physically modify cellulose by adsorbing a polymer through electrostatic interactions instead of attaching it with a covalent bond.5

    However, a more detailed investigation concerning differences of covalent and physical attachment of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) onto cellulose, has to the author’s best knowledge not been performed. Therefore, this project aims to compare these two techniques. Covalently bonded PCL was grafted by surface-initiated ring opening polymerization (SI-ROP) from the cellulose. For the adsorption approach, a block copolymer consisting of PCL and a shorter segment of poly(di(methylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) was made combining ROP and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The PDMAEMA-part was then quaternized, which resulted in a cationically charged chain – a polyelectrolyte. This can then be used as an electrostatic linker allowing the PDMAEMA-PCL copolymer to be adsorbed onto the negatively charged cellulose model surface. Finally, differences between the two approaches are evaluated regarding for example surface coverage and grafting/physiosorption efficiency investigated with techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  • 33.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Larsson, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Preparation and evaluation of a block copolymer compatibilizer for biocomposite applications2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, a comparison between covalent grafting and physical adsorption of PCL onto a nanocellulose model surface was conducted. For the covalent attachment, surface-initiated ring-opening polymerization (SI-ROP) was performed. For the physical attachment, a charged block copolymer consisting of PCL and quaternized PDMAEMA was synthesized by ROP and ATRP, and adsorbed to the cellulose. Finally, differences in between the two substrates were investigated with techniques such as AFM.

  • 34.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Larsson, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Comparative study of covalent grafting and physical adsorption of PCL onto cellulose2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, an investigation concerning differences between covalent and physical attachment of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) to a nanocellulose modell surface was conducted. For the covalent attachment, ring-opening polymerization (ROP) was performed using the “grafting-from” approach, building the polymer from the surface. For the physical attachment, a block copolymer consisting of PCL and poly(di(methylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) was made combining ROP and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The PDMAEMA-part was then quaternized, which resulted in a charged chain – a polyelectrolyte. The charges allow for the PDMAEMA-PCL copolymer to be adsorbed onto the nanocellulose modell surface. The length of the PDMAEMA-part was kept constant (DP=20), and the length of PCL was varied (DP=150, 300, 600) for both the covalently attached polymer and for the copolymer. Finally, differences between the two approaches were evaluated regarding for example surface coverage and grafting/physiosorption efficiency investigated with techniques such as atomic force microscopy.

  • 35.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Larsson, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Malmström Jonsson, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Comparative study of covalent grafting and physical adsorption of PCL onto cellulose2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Physical Tuning of Cellulose-Polymer Interactions Utilizing Cationic Block Copolymers Based on PCL and Quaternized PDMAEMA2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the aim was to prepare and evaluate a block copolymer that can be used as a compatibilizer in cellulose fiber-reinforced biocomposites. It is an amphiphilic block copolymer consisting of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), prepared with  ring-opening polymerization (ROP)1, and a shorter segment of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) synthesized with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP)2. The PDMAEMA-part was prepared in one single length, while the PCL-part was varied in three different lengths. In the last synthesis step the PDMAEMA-part was quaternized, turning it into a cationically charged chain – a polyelectrolyte. The block copolymers were then able to form cationic micelles in water, from where they can adsorb, under mild conditions, to anionic surfaces such as silicon oxide and cellulose-model surfaces. A similar concept has been investigated earlier in a system fully prepared with ATRP3. Additionally, physical adsorption of micelles is a milder approach of attaching a polymer to a cellulose surface compared to more traditional covalent attachment4, making it an interesting option to use in industry. After adsorption, the surface had a more hydrophobic character shown with contact angle measurements, and with AFM force measurements, it was demonstrated that there is a clear entanglement behavior obtained between the block copolymers and a PCL surface at about 60 °C, which is of importance for the information regarding the adhesive interface in a future biocomposite.

  • 37.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Physical Tuning of Cellulose-Polymer Interactions Utilizing Cationic Block Copolymers Based on PCL and Quaternized PDMAEMA2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the aim was to prepare and evaluate a block copolymer that can be used as a compatabilizer in cellulose fiber-reinforced biocomposites. It as an amphiphilic block copolymer consisting of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), made with  ring-opening polymerization (ROP), and a shorter segment of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) that was synthesized with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The PDMAEMA-part was made in one single length, while the PCL-part was varied in three different lengths; in total were three block copolymers prepared. In the last step of the synthesis, the PDMAEMA-part was quaternized that turns it into a cationically charged chain – a polyelectrolyte. The block copolymers were then able to form cationic micelles in water, from where they can adsorb, under mild conditions, to anionic surfaces such as silicon oxide and cellulose-model surfaces. This provides the surface with a more hydrophobic character shown with contact angle measurements. Finally, with atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements, it was demonstrated that there is a clear entanglement behavior obtained between the block copolymers and a PCL surface at about 60 °C, which is of importance for the information regarding the adhesive interface in a future biocomposite.

  • 38.
    Bruce, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Larsson, Emma
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Preparation and evaluation of a block copolymer compatibilizer for biocomposite applications2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the concept of using a free polymer as a compatibilzer in biocomposite applications has been evaluated with focus on the polymer poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), commonly used in conventional grafting onto/from cellulose. A block copolymer consisting of PCL and a shorter segment of poly(di(methylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) was made combining ring-opening polymerization (ROP) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The length of the PDMAEMA-part was kept constant, and the PCL-part was varied in three different lengths, yielding three separate block copolymers. As a final step, the PDMAEMA-part was quaternized, which resulted in cationically charged chains –polyelectrolytes. The charged part could then be used as an electrostatic linker allowing the PDMAEMA-PCL copolymer to be adsorbed onto negatively charged cellulose model surfaces. Finally, these cellulose model surfaces were evaluated regarding for example amount of polymer adsorbed and hydrophobic character, investigated with techniques such as quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and contact angle measurements.

  • 39.
    Carlsson, Linn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Fall, Andreas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Chaduc, Isabelle
    Charleux, Bernadette
    D'Agosto, Franck
    Lansalot, Muriel
    Modification of cellulose surfaces by cationic latex prepared by RAFT-mediated surfactant-free emulsion polymerizationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Carrick, Christopher
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Macro-, Micro- and Nanospheres from Cellulose: Their Preparation, Characterization and Utilization2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of a polymeric material has a great influence in many fundamental scientific areas as well as in more applied science, since it affects the diffusion, permeability, mechanical strength, elasticity, and colloidal properties of the materials. The results in this thesis demonstrate that it is possible to fabricate solid and hollow cellulose spheres with a cellulose shell and encapsulated gas, liquid or solid particles and with a sphere size ranging from a few hundreds of nanometres to several millimetres, all with a tailored design and purpose.

    The sizes of the different spheres have been controlled by three different preparation methods: large cellulose macrospheres by a solution solidification procedure, hollow micrometre-sized cellulose spheres by a liquid flow-focusing technique in microchannels, and nanometre-sized cellulose spheres by a membrane emulsification technique. 

    The spheres were then modified in different ways in order to functionalize them into more advanced materials. This thesis demonstrates how to control the cellulose sphere dimensions and the wall-to-void volume ratio, the elasticity and the functionality of the spheres as such, where they were prepared to be pH-responsive, surface specific and X-ray active. These modifications are interesting in several different types of final materials such as packaging materials, drug release devices or advanced in vivo diagnostic applications.

    In the more fundamental science approach, surface-smooth solid cellulose spheres were prepared for characterization of the macroscopic work of adhesion when a cellulose surface is separated from another material. Using these ultra-smooth macroscopic cellulose probes, it is possible to measure the compatibility and the surface interactions between cellulose and other materials which provide an important tool for incorporating cellulose into different composite materials. 

  • 41.
    Carrick, Christopher
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Aidun, Cyrus
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Native and functionalized micrometre-sized cellulose capsules prepared by microfluidic flow focusing2014In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 37, p. 19061-19067Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose capsules with average outer and inner radii of approximately 44 mu m and 29 mm respectively were prepared from cellulose dissolved in a mixture of lithium chloride and dimethylacetamide using a microfluidic flow focusing device (MFFD). The MFFD had three inlets where octane oil in a cellulose solution in silicone oil was used to produce a double emulsion containing a cellulose capsule. This technique enables the formation of capsules with a narrow size distribution which can be beneficial for drug delivery or controlled release capsules. In this respect, cellulose is a highly interesting material since it is known to cause no autoimmune reactions when used in contact with human tissue. Furthermore, by controlling the chemical properties of the cellulose, it is possible to trigger a swelling of the capsules and consequentially the release of an encapsulated substance, e. g. a model drug, when the capsule becomes exposed to an external stimulus. To demonstrate this, capsules were functionalized by carboxymethylation to be pH- responsive and to expand approximately 10% when subjected to a change in pH from 3 to 10. The diffusion constant of a model drug, a 4 kDa fluorescently labelled dextran, through the native capsule wall was estimated to be 6.5 X 10(-14) m(2) s(-1) by fitting fluorescence intensity data to Fick's second law.

  • 42.
    Carrick, Christopher
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindström, Stefan B.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lightweight, Highly Compressible, Noncrystalline Cellulose Capsules2014In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 30, no 26, p. 7635-7644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate how to prepare extraordinarily deformable, gas-filled, spherical capsules from nonmodified cellulose. These capsules have a low nominal density, ranging from 7.6 to 14.2 kg/m(3), and can be deformed elastically to 70% deformation at 50% relative humidity. No compressive strain-at-break could be detected for these dry cellulose capsules, since they did not rupture even when compressed into a disk with pockets of highly compressed air. A quantitative constitutive model for the large deformation compression of these capsules is derived, including their high-frequency mechanical response and their low-frequency force relaxation, where the latter is governed by the gas barrier properties of the dry capsule. Mechanical testing corroborated these models with good accuracy. Force relaxation measurements at a constant compression rendered an estimate for the gas permeability of air through the capsule wall, calculated to 0.4 mL mu m/m(2) days kPa at 50% relative humidity. These properties taken together open up a large application area for the capsules, and they could most likely be used for applications in compressible, lightweight materials and also constitute excellent model materials for adsorption and adhesion studies.

  • 43.
    Carrick, Christopher
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pendergraph, Samuel A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanometer Smmoth, Macroscopic Spherical Cellulose Probes for Contact Adhesion MeasurementsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Carrick, Christopher
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pendergraph, Samuel A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanometer Smooth, Macroscopic Spherical Cellulose Probes for Contact Adhesion Measurements2014In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 6, no 23, p. 20928-20935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose spheres were prepared by dissolving cellulose fibers and subsequently solidifying the solution in a nonsolvent. Three different solution concentrations were tested and several nonsolvents were evaluated for their effect on the formation of spheres. Conditions were highlighted to create cellulose spheres with a diameter of similar to 1 mm and a root-mean-square surface roughness of similar to 1 nm. These solid spheres were shown to be easily chemically modified without changing the mechanical properties significantly. Contact adhesion measurements were then implemented with these spheres against a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer in order to quantify the adhesion. Using Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) theory, we quantified the adhesion for unmodified cellulose and hydrophobic cellulose spheres. We highlight the ability of these spheres to report more accurate adhesion information, compared to spin-coated thin films. The application of these new cellulose probes also opens up new possibilities for direct, accurate measurement of adhesion between cellulose and other materials instead of using uncertain surface energy determinations to calculate the theoretical work of adhesion between cellulose and different solid materials.

  • 45.
    Carrick, Christopher
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Ruda, Marcus
    Pettersson, Bert
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hollow cellulose capsules from CO2 saturated cellulose solutions - Their preparation and characterization2013In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 3, no 7, p. 2462-2469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new material consisting of mm-sized hollow cellulose spheres, for biomedical applications or for the preparation of low weight porous materials has been prepared by a unique solution precipitation (SP) method. The technique is based on three separate steps. In the first step, high molecular mass, non-modified cellulose is dissolved in a suitable solvent. This cellulose solution is then saturated with a suitable gas (CO2 or N2 in the present work) and finally this gas-saturated solution is drop-wise added to a water reservoir. In this step, the cellulose is precipitated and a gas bubble is nucleated in the center of the cellulose sphere. When stored in water, the hollow center is filled with water, indicating that the capsule wall is porous in nature. This was also supported by BET-area measurements as well as by high resolution SEM-images of broken capsule walls. The internal void volume of a capsule was about 5 μl and the wall volume was about 8 μl. It was also established that the properties of the cellulose capsules, i.e. wall and void volume, the specific surface area, the average pore size of the capsule wall, the wall density, and the compressive load capacity could be tuned by the choice of cellulose concentration in the solution before precipitation. The capsule wall volume and void volume were also affected by the choice of gas, the gas pressure and the gas dissolution time during the gas saturation step. The response of the cellulose wall of the prepared capsules to changes in pH and ion concentration in the surrounding solution was also investigated. The swelling-shrinking behavior was further investigated by introducing more charges to the capsule wall, via carboxymethylation of the cellulose. This was achieved by using carboxymethylated cellulose which increased the swelling-shrinking effect. The results show a typical polyelectrolyte gel behavior of the capsule wall and the wet modulus of the cellulose wall was determined to be between 0.09-0.2 MPa depending on the charge of the cellulose in the capsule wall. Furthermore, the freeze dried cellulose spheres had a modulus of 1.9-7.4 MPa, depending on the cellulose concentration during the preparation of the spheres. These cellulose capsules are suitable both for the preparation of porous materials, where these larger spheres are joined together in 3D-shaped materials, and for controlled release where the interior of the capsules is filled with active substances and these substances are released by controlling the pores in the capsule walls.

  • 46.
    Carrick, Christopher
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Aidun, Cyrus
    Preparation of cellulose capsule: New renewable material based on regenerated cellulose from the LiCl/DMAc solvent system2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Carrick, Christopher
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Immunoselective cellulose nanospheres: a versatile platform for nanotheranostics2014In: ACS Macro Letters, E-ISSN 2161-1653, Vol. 3, no 11, p. 1117-1120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a novel route for the preparation and functionalization of perfectly spherical cellulose nanospheres (CNSs), ranging from 100 to 400 nrn with a typical diameter of 160-170 nrn,for use in theranostics. The method of preparation enables both surface and interior bulk functionalization, and this presumably also makes the CNSs suitable for use in end-use applications other than theranostics. Surface functionalization was here demonstrated by antibody conjugation with an antibody specific toward the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein, i.e., facilitating interaction with cancer cells having the EGFR. Besides showing specificity, the CNS-antibody conjugates showed a very low nonspecific binding. The CNSs could easily be bulk functionalized by embedding gold nanoparticles in the cellulose sphere matrix during CNS preparation to provide imaging contrast for diagnostic purposes.

  • 48.
    Cervin, Nicholas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Porous Cellulose Materials from Nano Fibrillated Cellulose2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the first part of this work a novel type of low-density, sponge-like material for the separation of mixtures of oil and water has been prepared by vapour deposition of hydrophobic silanes on ultra-porous nanocellulose aerogels. To achieve this, a highly porous (> 99 %) nanocellulose aerogel with high structural flexibility and robustness is first formed by freeze-drying an aqueous dispersion of the nanocellulose. The density, pore size distribution and wetting properties of the aerogel can be tuned by selecting the concentration of the nanocellulose dispersion before freeze-drying. The hydrophobic light-weight aerogels are almost instantly filled with the oil phase when they selectively absorb oil from water, with a capacity to absorb up to 45 times their own weight. The oil can also be drained from the aerogel and the aerogel can then be subjected to a second absorption cycle.In the second part of the work a novel, lightweight and strong porous cellulose material has been prepared by drying aqueous foams stabilized with surface-modified NanoFibrillated Cellulose (NFC). Confocal microscopy and high-speed video imaging show that the long-term stability of the wet foams can be attributed to the octylamine-coated, rod-shaped NFC nanoparticles residing at the air-liquid interface which prevent the air bubbles from collapsing or coalescing. Careful removal of the water yields a porous cellulose-based material with a porosity of 98 % and a density of 30 mg cm-3. These porous cellulose materials have a higher Young’s modulus than other cellulose materials made by freeze drying and a compressive energy absorption of 56 kJ m-3 at 80 % strain. Measurements with an autoporosimeter reveal that most pores are in the range of 300 to 500 μm.

  • 49.
    Cervin, Nicholas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Andersson, Linnéa
    Sing, Jovice Ng Boon
    Olin, Pontus
    Bergström, Lennart
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lightweight and strong cellulose materials made from aqueous foams stabilized by NanoFibrillated Cellulose (NFC)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     A novel, lightweight and strong porous cellulose material has been prepared by drying aqueous foams stabilized with surface-modified NanoFibrillated Cellulose (NFC). This material differs from other particle stabilized foams in that we use renewable cellulose as stabilizing particle. Confocal microscopy and high speed video imaging show that the long-term stability of the wet foams can be attributed to the octylamine-coated, rod-shaped NFC nanoparticles residing at the air-liquid interface which prevent the air bubbles from collapsing or coalescing. This can be achieved at solids content around 1 % by weight. Careful removal of the water results in a cellulose-based material with a porosity of 98 % and a density of 30 mg cm-3. These porous cellulose materials have a higher Young’s modulus than other cellulose materials made by freeze drying and a compressive energy absorption of 56 kJ m-3 at 80 % strain. Measurement with the aid of an autoporosimeter revealed that most pores are in the range of 300 to 500 μm.

  • 50.
    Cervin, Nicholas Tchang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Aulin, Christian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ultra porous nanocellulose aerogels as separation medium for mixtures of oil/water liquids2012In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 401-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel type of sponge-like material for the separation of mixed oil and water liquids has been prepared by the vapour deposition of hydrophobic silanes on ultra-porous nanocellulose aerogels. To achieve this, a highly porous (> 99%) nanocellulose aerogel with high structural flexibility and robustness is first formed by freeze-drying an aqueous dispersion of the nanocellulose. The density, pore size distribution and wetting properties of the aerogel can be tuned by selecting the concentration of the nanocellulose dispersion before freeze-drying. The hydrophobic light- weight aerogels are almost instantly filled with the oil phase when selectively absorbing oil from water, with a capacity to absorb up to 45 times their own weight in oil. The oil can also be drained from the aerogel and the aerogel can then be reused for a second absorption cycle.

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