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  • 1.
    Aroyo, Lora
    et al.
    Technische Universiteit Eindhoven.
    Dolog, Peter
    University of Hannover.
    Houben, Geert-Jan
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel.
    Kravcik, Milos
    OTEC, Open University, The Netherlands.
    Naeve, Ambjörn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Wild, Fridolin
    Vienna University of Economics, and Business Administration.
    Interoperability in personalized adaptive learning2006In: Educational Technology & Society, ISSN 1436-4522, Vol. 9, no 2, 4-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personalized adaptive learning requires semantic-based and context-aware systems to manage the Web knowledge efficiently as well as to achieve semantic interoperability between heterogeneous information resources and services. The technological and conceptual differences can be bridged either by means of standards or via approaches based on the Semantic Web. This article deals with the issue of semantic interoperability of educational contents on the Web by considering the integration of learning standards, Semantic Web, and adaptive technologies to meet the requirements of learners. Discussion is made on the state of the art and the main challenges in this field, including metadata access and design issues relating to adaptive learning. Additionally, a way how to integrate several original approaches is proposed.

  • 2. Baillie, L.
    et al.
    Philips, A.
    Roberts, J.
    Lindquist, Sinna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Sandor, Ovidiu-Silviu
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Ajmo Splite: Come on Split! Tell Us What You Think!2005In: Proceedings of the 4th decennial conference on Critical computing: between sense and sensibility, 2005, 182-186 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology has often been utilized to address the needs of specific communities. Understanding how technology could be incorporated into solutions for sustainable tourism is a particularly interesting design challenge. This paper describes how we tried to meet such a challenge in an effort to help the residents of Split, Croatia enter into a dialogue with their local authorities about how to develop sustainable tourism within the specific socio-political constraints of their region.

  • 3.
    Blomqvist, Ulf
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Handberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Naeve, Ambjörn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    New Methods for focusing on Students’ Learning Process and Reflection in Higher Education2003In: Proceedings of the 28th IUT (Improving University Teaching) Conference, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    Among many studies about students’ use of portfolios much focus is on assessment and the need to document learning processes in distance education, both from a teacher perspective. This paper focuses more on students’ attitudes towards learning and learning process, why  it is important, and it also introduces some methodology to support the students to bridge the responsibility gap that is experienced among new students at which students tend to neglect. Really shifting focus towards the learner, aside from proper methods and tools, is essential. We have implemented dialogue sheets as a method and tool for freshmen students, with the aim to create a positive atmosphere for peer learning where the focus is on the learning process. We encourage students to reflect upon why, what and how they learn to help them manage as life-long learners. The study has been performed at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) with the students at the Media technology program. The effect of the dialogue sheets is visible in students showing greater and better performance and participation in classes and in teamwork. Also an increased awareness and willingness to reflect is noted. The study made is important when understanding the fundamental mechanisms of the learner in relation to motivation and reflection. It can be useful when developing and implementing technological tools as support for reflection and learning process focus.

     

  • 4. Gaver, W. W.
    et al.
    Schmidt, A.
    Bowers, John M.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Steed, A.
    Boucher, A.
    Villars, N.
    Gellerson, H.
    Walker, B.
    Pennington, S.
    The Drift Table: Designing for ludic engagement2004In: Conf Hum Fact Comput Syst Proc, 2004, 885-900 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Drift Table is an electronic coffee table that displays slowly moving aerial photography controlled by the distribution of weight on its surface. It was designed to investigate our ideas about how technologies for the home could support ludic activities-that is, activities motivated by curiosity, exploration, and reflection rather than externally-defined tasks. The many design choices we made, for example to block or disguise utilitarian functionality, helped to articulate our emerging understanding of ludic design. Observations of the Drift Table being used in volunteers' homes over several weeks gave greater insight into how playful exploration is practically achieved and the issues involved in designing for ludic engagement.

  • 5.
    Lindquist, Sinna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Westerlund, Bo
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Sundblad, Yngve
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Tobiasson, Helena
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel
    Mackay, Wendy
    Co-designing Communication Technology with and for Families: Methods, Experience, Results and Impact2007In: The Disappearing Computer: Interaction Design, System Infrastructures and Applications for Smart Environments, Springer, 2007, Vol. 4500, 99-119 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In academia and in industry there have been many projects focusing on technology in domestic spaces and the Smart home (Hindus 2001; Smith 2000). The focus has been on the place, i.e. the home, and the people living there, rather than the people and the places they inhabit. In this chapter we share experience from using cooperative and novel design methods developed within the project interLiving – Designing Interactive, Intergenerational Interfaces for Living Together. The methods were intended to involve families, both as groups and individuals of all ages, as well as the multidisciplinary research group, in co-design of communication devices for families. We highlight methods, results and impact for future research and development. Research presented here aimed to develop novel and appreciated communication artefacts and to improve design methods within participatory design.

  • 6.
    Naeve, Ambjörn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Palmér, Matthias
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Paulsson, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Contributions to a public e-learning platform: infrastructure, architecture, frameworks, tools2005In: International Journal of Learning Technology, ISSN 1477-8386, E-ISSN 1741-8119, Vol. 1, no 3, 352-381 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Life long, flexible, collaborative, and personalised learning are words that are being increasingly used, whenever education is discussed and designed. They express new and important demands on learning architectures, both with regard to pedagogy, organisation and technology. Traditional learning architectures are based on teacher-centric and curriculum-oriented "knowledge-push". In this paper, we present an infrastructure, an architecture and a number of frameworks and tools that support learner-centric and interest-oriented "knowledge-pull". We see them as a contribution to a Public e-Learning Platform, which can achieve true interoperability based on open source and open international ICT standards.

  • 7.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    The Edutella P2P Network: supporting Democratic E-learning and Communities of Practice2004In: Online education using learning objects / [ed] Rory McGreal, New York: Falmer Press , 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The infrastructures we use for developing, finding and combining learning objectsinfluence the usage of the material - inflexible frameworks will not support flexiblelearning. For this reason, it is essential to consider the pedagogical consequences of thedesign of the technical frameworks that are used in e-learning systems. Much of thecurrent work in e-learning technology targets learning objects stored in LMS (LearningManagement System) applications and/or in other centralized servers, often of verylarge scale. Even though standards such as IEEE LOM increase the interoperability ofsuch systems, they are still mostly information islands. Cross-searching of repositoriesis not a reality. It has even been said that the Web is still in the "hunter-gatherer phase"with respect to searching. This is certainly true for learning objects. We have not yetreached the goal of a global e-learning society. In addition, many institutions arereluctant to give up control over their learning resources. This is problematic for manycentral-server based methods of learning resource sharing, (e. g., e-learning "portals".)Such portals are costly and difficult to maintain.Edutella takes a different approach. It is one piece in an e-learning infrastructure with adecentralized vision. By encouraging sharing among small-scale content repositories,anyone can participate in the exchange and annotation of e-learning resources. Byallowing anyone to participate, the learner is given more control over their learningprocess, leading us one step closer to the dream of a learner-centric educationalarchitecture.Edutella is a peer-to-peer (P2P) network for exchanging information about learningobjects (and not for exchanging content). It is built with semantic web technologyapplying the latest P2P research. This chapter will discuss the technologies that makeEdutella possible, explaining the vision and importance of the project, and howapplications can use it.The Edutella project is being developed by a number of institutions - among others: theLearning Lab Lower Saxony, the KMR Group at KTH, the Uppsala DatabaseLaboratory, Stanford Infolab, AIFB at University of Karlsruhe, and the UNIVERSALproject - and it is still expanding. The latest developments can be found athttp://edutella.jxta.org.

  • 8.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Palmér, Matthias
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Semantic Web Meta-data for e-Learning: Some Architectural Guidelines2002In: Proceedings of the 11th World Wide Web Conference (WWW2002), Hawaii, USA, 2002, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meta-data is the fundamental building block of the Semantic Web. However, the meta-data concept is too loosely defined to provide architectural guidelines for its use. This paper analyzes important uses of meta-data in the e-learning domain, from a pedagogical and philosophical point of view, and abstracts from them a set of fundamental architectural requirements for Semantic Web meta-data. It also describes some flexible generic techniques for working with meta-data, following these requirements. Finally, the paper describes a Semantic Web-based e-learning architecture based in these requirements and techniques currently under development at the Knowledge Management Research Group at CID (Centre for user oriented IT Design) at KTH, the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. This architecture builds on Edutella, a peer-to-peer meta-data exchange network, and a technique called conceptual modeling using the Conzilla concept browser, a new kind of knowledge management tool for conceptual navigation and exploration. The architecture provides an inquiry-based e-learning system that fits into the Semantic Web philosophy, and is based on a pedagogical framework called the knowledge manifold.

  • 9.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Palmér, Matthias
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Brase, Jan
    Information System Institute, University of Hannover, Germany.
    The LOM RDF Binding: principles and Implementation2003In: Proceedings of the Third Annual ARIADNE conference, Leuven Belgium, 2003, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will discuss some of the advantages andcomplexities in using the Resource Description Framework, RDF, toexpress learning object metadata following the IEEE LOM standard. Wewill describe some details of the current draft for a complete RDF bindingfor LOM and discuss some of the constructs used in that binding.We will then present a so-called SHAME Query Model of this bindingthat can be used to specify and visualize application profileconstraints when using this binding. A metadata editor for RDF-basedLOM metadata, which was built with the help of this Query model, willbe briefly introduced.

  • 10. Olmedilla, D.
    et al.
    Palmér, Matthias
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Interoperability for Peer-to-Peer networks: Opening P2P to the rest of the World2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the information growth, distributed environments are offered as a feasible and scalable solution where Peer-to-Peer networks have become more relevant. They bring many advantages as high flexibility for peers to join or leave the network dynamically, scalability, autonomy and high resilience against peer failures. However, the use of proprietary interfaces within the network and the requirement that peers must implement them to join makes P2P networks unable to interact with other systems and environments, isolating the network as a whole. In this paper, we report on a solution based on a proxy-based architecture and semantic mappings in order to allow the sharing of content between peers within a P2P network with content from other systems outside the network.

  • 11.
    Palmér, Matthias
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    The SCAM framework: Helping semantic web applications to store and access metadata2004In: SEMANTIC WEB: RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS / [ed] Bussler, C; Davies, J; Fensel, D; Studer, R, BERLIN: SPRINGER , 2004, Vol. 3053, 167-181 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss the design of the SCAM framework, which aims to simplify the storage and access of metadata for a variety of different applications that can be built on top of it. A basic design principle of SCAM is the aggregation of metadata into two kinds of sets of different granularity (SCAM records and SCAM contexts). These sets correspond to the typical access needs of an application with regard to metadata, and they constitute the foundation upon which access control is provided.

  • 12.
    Walldius, Åke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Sundblad, Yngve
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Univ Gavle, Dept Ind Engn & Management, Gavle.
    Sandblad, Bengt
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Human Comp Interact, Uppsala.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    Uppsala Universitet.
    User certification of workplace software: assessing both artefact and usage2009In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 28, no 2, 101-120 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article summarises activities and results from the quality assessment project 'Quality Assurance of IT Support at Work' (ITQ) which has been performed by Swedish researchers in close cooperation with trade unions 1999-2005. The ITQ project is part of a network, UsersAward, which works for the goal to develop and implement a strategy for good software products on the work floor. A main result of the ITQ project is the first version of a software certification programme, User Certified 2002, which is described in some detail. The underlying theoretical arguments for its design and the performed pilot projects which have informed its implementation are also presented. The outcome of performed certifications is discussed in terms of stakeholder response; in terms of whether to certify artefact, processes, or both; and in terms of the relationship between software certification, standardisation, and public procurement agreements. One conclusion from the project is that a viable software certification programme has to cover the software's built-in features, its deployment process, and its actual situated usage. A second conclusion is that the buying organisation has to implement integrative processes in which its organisational development and its implementation of IT systems are coordinated. Conclusions are also drawn with respect to the set of organisational patterns underlying the UsersAward initiative-certifications, user panels, user surveys, user conferences and a yearly IT Prize contest. Finally, implications and plans for the future, especially international research and union cooperation activities, and further development of the certification process are described.

  • 13.
    Walldius, Åke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Sundblad, Yngve
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Borning, Alan
    University of Washington.
    A first analysis of the UsersAward programme from a value sensitive design perspective2005In: Proceedings of the 4th decennial conference on Critical computing: between sense and sensibility / [ed] Olav W. Bertelsen, Niels Olof Bouvin, Peter G. Krogh, Morten Kyng, New York, USA: ACM , 2005, 199-202 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of the UsersAward programme is to develop and maintain a strategy for better workplace software through user-driven quality assessment. One of its key activities is the user-driven certification of workplace software using the USER CERTIFIED 2002 instrument. In this paper we present a preliminary analysis of the values that inform the criteria and procedure making up the USER CERTIFIED 2002 instrument, using the Value Sensitive Design methodology. We then propose a set of empirical investigations with the different UsersAward stakeholders, which should yield a deeper understanding of some of the critical issues concerning user-driven software assessment programmes.

  • 14.
    Winberg, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Bowers, John
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Assembling the Senses: Towards the Design of Cooperative Interfaces for Visually Impaired Users2004In: Proceedings of the 2004 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work (CSCW 2004), 2004, 332-341 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The needs of blind and visually impaired users are seriously under-investigated in CSCW. We review work on assistive interfaces especially concerning how collaboration between sighted and blind users across different modalities might be supported. To examine commonly expressed design principles, we present a study where blind and sighted persons play a game to which the former has an auditory interface, the latter a visual one. Interaction analyses are presented highlighting features of interface design, talk and gesture which are important to the participants’ abilities to collaborate. Informed by these analyses, we reconsider design principles for cooperative interfaces for the blind.

  • 15.
    Winberg, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Hellström, Sten-Olof
    Department of Music, City University, London.
    Qualitative Aspects of Auditory Direct Manipulation: A Case Study of the Towers of Hanoi2001In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD 2001), 2001, 16-20 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results from a qualitative case study of an auditory version of the game Towers of Hanoi. The goal of this study was to explore qualitative aspects of auditory direct manipulation and the subjective experience from playing the game. The results show that it is important to provide a way of focusing in the auditory space. Articulatory directness was also an important issue and feedback should support the movement of the objects in the auditory space.

  • 16.
    Winberg, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Hellström, Sten-Olof
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    The quest for auditory direct manipulation: the sonified Towers of Hanoi2000In: Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies (ICDVRAT 2000) / [ed] P. Sharkey, A. Cesarani, L. Pugnetti, & A. Rizzo, 2000, 75-81 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study of an auditory version of the game Towers of Hanoi. The goal of this study was to investigate the nature of continuos presentation and what this could mean when implementing auditory direct manipulation. We also wanted to find out if it was possible to make an auditory interface that met the requirements of a direct manipulation interface. The results showed that it was indeed possible to implement auditory direct manipulation, but using Towers of Hanoi as the underlying model restricted the possibilities of scaling the auditory space. The results also showed that having a limited set of objects, the nature of continuos presentation was not as important as how to interact with the auditory space.

1 - 16 of 16
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