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  • 1.
    Barchéus, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    A multi-modal approach to communication in aviation2007In: Ergonomics for a future: 39th Nordic Ergonomic Society Conference / [ed] Cecilia Berlin & Lars-Ola Bligård, Lund: Ergonomic Society of Sweden , 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As data-link communication makes its way into Air Traffic Control, somecontrollers fear that their job environment may change and potentiallyreduce safety. The present paper reports on a small scale real-timesimulation that was performed to investigate whether voice and data-linkcommunication can be combined to support each other. The results indicatethat time delays are perceived more disturbing for voice than data-linkcommunication and that proper feed-back is vital, especially for voice.

  • 2.
    Barchéus, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Time analysis of ATC radio traffic in simulated free flight scenario2006In: Human factors and economic aspects on safety: proceedings of the Swedish Human Factors Network (HFN) conference, April 5-7, 2006, Linköping, Sweden / [ed] Clemens Weikert, Linköping: Swedish Network for Human Factors (HFN) , 2006, p. 1-9Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Radio communication is currently the primary mean of communication in Air TrafficControl. This is now being complemented by datalink technology to enhance capacity. Toassess the largest benefits of datalink implementation an analysis of ATC radiocommunication was made by timing speech acts from 4.5 hours of communication during asimulation. The results show that address and altitude information account for over 50% ofATC communication. The largest benefits should be gained for communication regardingsector entry or exit since this type of communication is overrepresented in en-route air traffic.

  • 3.
    Barchéus, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Who is responsible?: Communication, coordination and collaboration in the future Air Traffic Management system2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    nternational civil aviation has experienced a steady growth in the past decades that is foreseen to continue. To overcome capacity limits of the old Air Traffic Control systems, new technology is currently being developed and introduced. While the current way of conducting air traffic has evolved in a continuous manner, the new technologies are part of a new paradigm that has the potential to completely reform aviation. Under this paradigm, it is envisaged that pilots may engage in surveillance tasks, which poses new demands on coordination between controllers and pilots.

    This thesis describes basic properties of current and new technology and procedures within civil aviation and the relation to distribution of tasks and responsibilities between pilots and controllers. It is recognised that the current distribution is largely based on the development of technological tools. As new technology allows information in the aviation system to be shared to much greater extent than in the present operational environment, it implies that the basis for present task allocation between controllers and pilots may be challenged. For new technology to be viable, appropriate procedures must be developed to assure safety within the air traffic system.

    To gain wide insight into current aviation, a multitude of data-collection methods have been applied including interviews, observations, and simulations. Interviews have been performed with controllers from several European countries. Observations have been performed in operational Air Traffic Control as well as operational flight. Observations have also been performed in simulations where some applications of the new technology have been investigated. Questionnaires were distributed to both pilots and controllers in a real-time simulation investigating Free Flight issues.

    Results show that operational activity is characterised by a large degree of flexibility. In some applications of new technology, certain tools and procedures have been identified that have been regarded inflexible. It is emphasised that continued development should be performed in international cooperation and introduced into operation gradually to minimise shortfalls of training.

  • 4.
    Barchéus, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Whose sky is it?2008In: Engineering and Technology, ISSN 1750-9637, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 46-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Institutions as diverse as governmental agencies, professional interest groups, airline companies, air navigation service providers, universities, research institutes, and equipment and airframe manufacturers have all embarked on a joint venture to create and implement the new system. The thinking behind this development is that the current air traffic system too focused on reactive measures on a tactical scale and that this results in a sub-optimised flow management. To overcome this, the main thrust of the new development concentrates on Air Traffic Management (ATM), as opposed to Air Traffic Control (ATC). This requires that the future ATM be designed around the three basic pillars of aviation: Communication, Navigation and Surveillance and is called CNS/ATM.

  • 5.
    Barchéus, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Air Traffic Management and Future Technology: The Views of the Controllers2006In: Human Factors and Aerospace Safety, ISSN 1468-9456, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological innovations have the potential to resolve airspace capacity problems and improve communications, but will undoubtedly change the routines and work content of humans in the system. This study examines what the introduction of new technologies will mean to air traffic controllers in terms of their future roles and areas of responsibility. To complement earlier simulation work, exploratory interviews were conducted with 22 European air traffic controllers. Results show that most controllers have a positive view on new technology such as automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast and cockpit displays of traffic information, but emphasize the need for supporting procedures, training and a user-centered design process. Respondents also highlighted the importance of retaining voice communication because of its effortless handling.

  • 6.
    Barchéus, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Communication enablers for delegation: A relational model for the new ATM system2010In: Proceedings for Human-Computer Interaction in Aerospace HCI, New York: ACM Press, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the aviation community faces the application of new technology with possibly changing relations between pilots and controllers,there is a need for models describing the situation regarding division of tasks and responsibilities. The current paper proposes amodel for describing the distribution of roles between controller and pilot. Observations of current and simulated future scenariosgive a largely sequential order for separation tasks. A model of automation is applied to describe the relation between controllersand pilots through all scenarios from Free Flight to remote operations (UAS). Conclusions include a need for more flexiblecommunication to allow appropriate handling of emerging cognitive functions.

  • 7.
    Barchéus, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Rignér, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    In Need of a Model for Complexity Assessment of Highly Automated Human Machine Systems2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current methodologies in engineering relying on strict boundary definitions in order to be comprehensible are generally cost efficient and effective within those boundaries. However, in operational settings systems tend to operate outside those defined borders. The trend of coupling systems in greater constellations will increase the interactions between different systems and thus increase the non-defined behavior even further. Thus, there is a need to define new methods and models that to a larger extent allow the existence of non-nominal system behavior. The main goal of the present research is to improve system performance, by developing tool/model to assess important aspects of complexity which will improve design for operability (McDonald et al., 2009). The purpose of this paper is to identify relevant aspects for analysis in relation to complexity and Human Factors in an ATM future highly automated system. The present paper presents some existing models and principles in complexity theory related to socio-technical systems. The result expands on these to form a set of requirements for future model development.

  • 8. Bellini, E
    et al.
    Capalldo, G
    Edström, Anders
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Raffa, M
    Ricciardi, Max
    Zollo, G
     Strategic Paths of Academic Spin-Offs: A Comparative Analysis of Italian and Swedish Cases1999In: Proceedings from the 44th ICSB Conference, Naples June 20-23., 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9. Bellini, E
    et al.
    Edström, A
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Raffa, M
    Ricciardi, M
    Zollo, G
    Growth Patterns of Academic Spin-offs: A comparison between southern Italy and western Sweden. .2000In: Piccola Impresa – Small Business, no 1, p. 17-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Beskow, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Nya produkter och tjänster.1999In: MTO Forskningsperspektivet / [ed] Ahltin, NUTEK , 1999Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Bohgard, Mats
    et al.
    Lunds Universitet.
    Karlsson, StigLuleå tekniska universitet.Lovén, EvaLinköpings universitet.Mikaelsson, Lars-ÅkeMittuniversitetet.Mårtensson, LenaKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).Osvalder, Anna-LisaChalmers tekniska högskola.Rose, Linda M.KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701).Ulfvengren, PernillaKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Arbete och teknik på människans villkor2008Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Bohgard, Mats
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Karlsson, StigLuleå tekniska universitet.Lovén, EvaLinköpings universitet.Mikaelsson, Lars-ÅkeMittuniversitetet.Mårtensson, LenaKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).Osvalder, Anna-LisaChalmers tekniska högskola.Rose, Linda M.KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701).Ulfvengren, PernillaKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Work and technology on human terms2009Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Cahill, Joan
    et al.
    School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin.
    McDonald, Nicholas
    School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Young, Franklin
    Rockwell collins.
    Ramos, Yeray
    La Laguna-Sta Cruz de Tenerife.
    Losa, Gabriel
    IBERIA airlines.
    HILAS Flight Operations Research: Development ofRisk/Safety Management, Process Improvement and Task Support Tools2007In: Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics, Proceedings / [ed] Don Harris, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, p. 648-657Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on flight operations research, conducted as part ofthe work requirements for the Flight Operations Strand of the HumanIntegration into the Lifecycle of Aviation Systems (HILAS) project.Specifically, it presents a provisional framework for a suite of integrated FlightOperations tools developed in this research. It is anticipated that these tools willbe used by different airline personnel to gather integrate, analyze andcommunicate data in relation to risk/safety management and processimprovement. Further these tools will provide customized task support fordifferent management and operational personnel.

  • 14.
    Cahill, Joan
    et al.
    School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Performance management2009Report (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Palm, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Schilling, Annika
    Organising (for)service innovation: formalisation versus creativity2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present and compare two studies on challenges with organising (for) innovation in service-intensive companies. One of the studies reviews the contribution of previous studies to the understanding of managing and organising innovation in service companies. The other is an explorative interview study focusing on how people working in service-intensive organisation in Sweden reason about innovation and the role of co-workers in the innovation process. In both these studies a common and important theme is the potential tension between formalisation and room for creativity. The purpose of this paper is to problematise and discuss this tension between formalised processes and creativity in the context of service-intensive companies. We identify four aspects worth attention in further studies: 1) How can service-intensive companies find a balance between formalisation and room for creativity when organising for innovation?, 2) How does the manufacturing industry influence the service industry in terms of processes, methods and vocabulary related to organising (for) innovation?, 3) How is individual and collective creativity conceptualised and what difference does this have for the organisation (for) innovation in service-intensive firms? and 4) What happens with innovation when the service delivery process is being formalised?

  • 16.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Palm, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Sköld, David
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Utmaningar och kuskapsbehov: Om innovation, ledning och organisering i nio olika tjänsteföretag2009Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Dencker, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Fasth, Åsa
    Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Production Systems.
    Stahre, Johan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Production Systems.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Design and Management of Manufacturing Systems, DMMS.
    Lundholm, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Proactive Assembly Systems – realizing the potential of human collaboration with automation2009In: Annual Reviews in Control, ISSN 1367-5788, E-ISSN 1872-9088, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 230-237Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing competitiveness frequently relies on company ability to rapidly reconfigure their assembly systems. This paper introduces assembly system proactivity, a concept based on interrelated levels of automation, human competence, and information handling. Increased and structured human involvement contributes to increased system ability to proactively address predicted and unpredicted events. Correct involvement of human operators will utilize the combined potential of human and technical capabilities, providing cost-efficient assembly system solutions. The ProAct project is developing proactive assembly system models and evaluates proactive, feature-based solutions. Focus is on realising the potential of cost-efficient and semi-automated systems with relevant human involvement, i.e. highly skilled operators who add flexibility and functionality.

  • 18.
    Dencker, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Gröndahl, Peter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Stahre, Johan
    Chalmers University.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Lundholm, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Proactive Assembly System: High productive assembly systems supported by skillful operators and appropriate automation2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing competitiveness is highly dependant on the companies’ability to rapidly reconfigure their assembly systems. Ongoing efforts to approachself-reconfiguring and “emerging” assembly systems are promising but can besuccessfully complemented by integration of highly flexible human operators intosuch system models. This paper introduces the concept of assembly systemproactivity. The approach is based on interrelated levels of human involvement,automation, and information handling within the assembly system. Presently,assembly system developers react to the companies’ demands, thus developingsolutions, which are direct responses to existing problems, i.e. a highlyreactive approach. Assembly systems need to be more dynamic and evolvable tokeep up with the reduced product life cycles and still be cost efficient. Consequently,assembly systems with the ability to proactively meet emergent and long-termfluctuations concerning product design and volume capacity are required. Suchsystems consist of technical components efficiently integrated with human operatorsto constitute reliable resources in the production system. That way, disturbances canbe minimized and the availability of the entire production system increased.

  • 19.
    Dencker, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Stahre, Johan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Production Systems.
    Fasth, Åsa
    Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Production System.
    Gröndahl, Peter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Lundholm, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Characteristic of a proactive assembly system2008In: MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE NEW FRONTIER, NEW YORK: SPRINGER , 2008, p. 123-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Competitive assembly systems must cope with frequent demand changes, requiring drastically shortened resetting and ramp-up times. Characteristics of assembly systems capable of rapid change are e.g. Flexibility; Robustness, Agility, and ability to handle frequent changes and disturbances. This paper proposes proactivity as a vital factor of semi-automated assembly systems to increase speed of change. Proactive systems utilize the full potential of human operators and technical systems. Such systems have ability to dynamically change system automation levels, resulting in decrease of time consumed for assembly tasks. Proactivity criteria for assembly systems are reviewed based on theory and industrial case studies

  • 20.
    Dencker, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Stahre, Johan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Production Systems.
    Gröndahl, Peter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Lundholm, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Johansson, Christer
    An approach to proactive assembly systems - Towards competitive assembly systems2007In: 2007 IEEE International Symposium on Assembly and Manufacturing, NEW YORK: IEEE , 2007, p. 294-299Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing competitiveness is highly dependant on companies' ability to rapidly reconfigure their manufacturing and assembly systems. Efforts to approach emerging and self-reconfigurable systems could be successfully complemented by efficient integration of highly flexible human operators into the system. The concept of system proactivity is introduced which is based on the interrelated levels of automation, information, and competence in the assembly system. An ongoing project to develop proactive assembly systems, ProAct, is described.

  • 21.
    Ekman, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Gustavsen, BjörnAsheim, Björn TPålshaugen, Öyvind
    Learning Regional Innovation: Scandinavian Models2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While the distinction between science driven and experience driven innovation is well known and much commented on, the point that experience driven innovation demands broad participation, not only within the individual enterprise but across the whole labour market, is less well recognized. When innovation first started to attract attention, the focus was on how to create innovation. In the light of the current crisis, a new question has entered the agenda: how to create socially responsible innovation?Participation and social responsibility in innovation are the core themes of this book. The main argument is that both are issues of organization and not of, say, ethics, or the enforcement of other forms of obligations on individual actors. The need is for a democratization of innovation that can make innovation open to broad participation, scrutiny from many positions, and influence from different interest groups without, however, losing the forward momentum.The organization of processes that can carry forward socially responsible innovation is, in turn, dependent upon public-private co-operation. This needs, however, to be a co-operation that expresses itself in terms of joint development processes, not traditional regulation.Combining experience driven innovation, broad participation and development oriented public-private co-operation, this book demonstrates that Scandinavia offers a unique arena of experience. It is a further argument that insofar as there is a 'systems response' to the present crisis, it lies in the direction of broader diffusion of this kind of pattern.Since the arguments of this book are built on practical experience, it does not seek to establish a set of abstract 'musts' without views on implementation, but rather points at the processes that can be initiated to create movement in the right direction.

  • 22.
    Ekman, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Maina Ahlberg, Beth
    Incremental Innovations in Organizational Performance in Health Care2011In: Learning Regional Innovation: Scandinavian Models / [ed] Ekman, M., Gustavsen B.,Asheim, B.T. and Pålshaugen, Ö., Palgrave Macmillan, 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Ekman, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Maina Ahlberg, Beth
    Huzzard, Tony
    Ek, Elisabeth
    Innovationer i vårdens vardag: De små stegens väg till förändring2007Book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Ekman, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Vänje, Annika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Doing Gender Equality at Technical Universities2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Ekman Philips, Marianne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Action Research and development coalitions in health care2004In: Action Research, ISSN 1476-7503, E-ISSN 1741-2617, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 349-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Action research within the field of work and organization has, for several decades, struggled with the problem of concentrating its efforts on a few workplaces versus distributing them on many. The Swedish programme ‘Work environment in health care’ was an effort to reach out broadly in this sector of working life, although with limited resources. The article presents and discusses an approach based on using dialogically structured encounters to support a number of local developments at the same time as an effort was made to turn these encounters into a permanent infrastructure for development.

  • 26.
    Ekman Rising, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Vänje, Annika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Hur vill vi ha det?: Varje dag2011In: Universitetsläraren, ISSN 0282-4973, no 10-11, p. 27-30Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Engwall, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Forslin, Jan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Engineering Management for Integration2003In: Proceedings of the ICED´03 International Conference on Engineering Design, Stockholm, Sweden August 19-21, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Ericsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Om organisering av det regenerativa arbetet: samtal om roll, process och interaktivt meningsskapande2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The focal point of this thesis is an interest in the phenomena of regenerative work, which is a work that has the potential of recreating and developing human resources and energy. The aim is to make a contribution, by presenting a supplementary perspective, to this area of research by considering regenerative work through a process perspective where the centre of interest is transferred from being a question of what to a question of how? The guiding research question is as follows: How could the organizing processes of regenerative work be understood? - more specifically - through an interactive approach the purpose is to describe, analyze and understand those everyday processes that have implications for regenerative work.

    This general inquiry took place at a number of wards/departments at a hospital in southern Sweden. Above all, the empirical focus concentrated on two specific occurrences: (1) an implementation of a new work model at the various wards/departments and (2) the function of the ward managers and their work situation. Empirical material was collected in collaboration with assistant nurses, registered nurses and ward managers through forum dialogues, interviews and observations. Narratives as formation of knowledge are a significant tool that constitutes an important foundation of this thesis. The chain of events and actions of complex processes are thus interpreted and understood by means of using narratives as a research device. The narrative form was also a source of inspiration for a large portion of the results presentation.

    The comprehension of the construction of experiences that may be related to regenerative work must be interpreted and understood beyond an individualistic perspective. Overconfidence in rules and routines, and a predetermined execution of the work proved also to be problematic in a complex and symbolically charged reality. Consequently, regenerative work must be understood in the light of a reality/world that consists of regularities and irregularities as well as predictability and unpredictability. It is in the complexity of such worlds, actors are required to interpret what their work/assignment is about and to carry it out satisfactory and to the best of their ability. Hence, two crucial questions are derived: How is the work/assignment interpreted? Are their prerequisites in the organization enabling and supporting good performances? In conclusion, these two questions are interconnected and discussed further in view of local basic conditions for conversation and action as well as leadership in terms of organizing for sensemaking.

  • 29.
    Fasth, Åsa
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Production System.
    Lundholm, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Dencker, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Stahre, Johan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Production Systems.
    Designig proactive assembly systems: criteria and interaction between automation, information and competence2009In: CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, University of Grenoble, France, 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing customisation of products results in decreasing production batch sizes, especially in the final assembly. Industry must therefore increase their capability to handle smaller batches as well as radically decrease set up time between different product groups and new products. This paper suggests the need for further development, primarily addressing time parameters in dynamically changing assembly systems. We propose proactivity as a vital characteristic of semi-automated assembly systems, to increase fulfilment of customer demands and decrease non value-adding tasks. In proactive assembly systems, the full and complementary potential of human operators and technical systems is utilised. Criteria for proactivity in assembly systems are reviewed from automation, information, and competence perspectives.

     

  • 30.
    Fasth, Åsa
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Production Systems.
    Lundholm, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Dencker, Kerstin
    Stahre, Johan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Division of Production Systems.
    Designing proactive assembly systems – Criteria and interaction between Automation, Information, and Competence2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing customisation of products results in decreasing production batch sizes, especially in the final assembly. Industry must therefore increase their capability to handle smaller batches as well as radically decrease set up time between different product groups and new products. This paper suggests the need for further development, primarily addressing time parameters in dynamically changing assembly systems. We propose proactivity as a vital characteristic of semi-automated assembly systems, to increase fulfilment of customer demands and decrease non value-adding tasks. In proactive assembly systems, the full and complementary potential of human operators and technical systems is utilised. Criteria for proactivity in assembly systems are reviewed from automation, information, and competence perspectives.

  • 31. Huzzard, Tony
    et al.
    Ahlberg, Beth Maina
    Ekman, Marianne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Constructing interorganizational collaboration The action researcher as boundary subject2010In: Action Research, ISSN 1476-7503, E-ISSN 1741-2617, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 293-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to explore critically the role of an action research team in the social construction of interorganizational collaboration aimed at transgressing organizational and professional boundaries. We argue that the new relationships, actor conceptions and in some cases forms of work organization arising from the change process have been socially constructed through the discursive interventions of the researchers. This has largely occurred through informal interaction with and between the actors engaged in the development process. The action researcher, rather than being a neutral discursive gatekeeper in collaborative development projects, is an active constructor of the discourse shaping the collaboration. A case is presented showing how the researcher role is thus better seen as being an active boundary subject mediating across various professional and organizational perspectives rather than a passive boundary object. Accordingly, by focusing on the discursive role of active researchers as boundary subjects, we can reflect more critically on the roles we adopt in our intervention endeavours and their inevitably political nature.

  • 32.
    Karlsson, MariAnne
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Improving capabilities in new product development. Experiences from an action research project2003In: In EIASM, Proc. from the 10th International Product Development Management Conference, June 10-11,, 2003, p. 503-515Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Karlsson, MariAnne
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Hampf, Jan
    Sperling, Lena
    Chalmers.
    Eliciting Customer Requirements: Product Representations as Mediating Objects in Focus Group Interviews1998In: Proceedings from The 5th International Product Development Conference, Como, Italy, May 26-27, 1998, p. 571-583Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    A Psychological Contract Perspective on the R&D Alliance Process: Learning from a Close-to-Failure Case2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Att coacha grupper med hjälp av kritiska händelsemetodiken2010In: Bonniers Coachinghandbok / [ed] Max Rapp Ricciardi, 010 Publishers, 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Customer, Consumer and User Involvement: A Framework and a Review of Selected Approaches1998In: Total quality management (Print), ISSN 0954-4127, E-ISSN 1360-0613, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 144-149Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    On the Challenges of Managing Innovation in Alliances2009In: Organizing work for innovation and growth: Experiences and efforts in ten companies / [ed] Döös, M. and Wilhelmsson, L., VINNOVA –Verket för Innovationssystem , 2009, p. 145-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s competitive landscape, the importance of collaborative arrangements is increasing. Some researchers have even argued that it is supply chains or supply constellations, rather than individual companies that struggle against each other. This chapter describes the process of development of the partnership as well as the learning achieved by two companies in a complex alliance, in which the competence from one company should leverage the development of a new product and where significant learning took place between the partners.

  • 38.
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Project Leadership in Multi-Project Settings: Findings from a Critical Incident Study2008In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 338-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper identifies and analyzes critical incidents that project leaders – working in multi-project settings – encounter in their daily work. The empirical base for the paper is data on 48 critical incidents collected using a version of the critical incident technique. Results show that the most frequent issues with which project leaders deal are: technical difficulties, dyadic leadership and group dynamics, followed by consultant, client, and peer relations. Moreover, on the basis of a categorisation of project leader roles, in terms of management/leadership and external/internal roles, a framework that is referred to as the Overall-Project-Leader-Role framework, has been developed and related to the empirical findings.

  • 39.
    Kaulio, Matti A.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101). KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Industrial Economics and Management. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Customer, Consumer and User Involvement: A Framework and a Review of Selected Approaches1998In: Total quality management (Print), ISSN 0954-4127, E-ISSN 1360-0613, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 141-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Customer focus is a key component in a total quality management approach. This paper presents a review of seven different methods for customer involvement in product development, of which quality function deployment is one. Results from the review indicate that different methods support the involvement of customers at different phases of the design process, particularly in three phases: the specification phase, concept development and the prototyping. Moreover, different methods support the involvement of customers in different ways. Three types of involvement are identified: design for customers, design with customers and design by customers. The overall conclusion is that there exists a potential for improvements for practitioners who would like to further customer focus in the design process

  • 40.
    Kaulio, Matti
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Karlsson, Marianne
    Chalmers.
    Triangulation Strategies in Customer Requirements Investigations: A Case Study on the Development of an IT-Mediated Service1998In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 103-112Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Kaulio, Matti
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Karlsson, MariAnne
    Chalmers.
    Grubb, Helena
    IVF.
    Mellby, Claes
    IVF.
    PRE - Product Requirements Engineering. Kundförståelse i produktutvecklingen1999Book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Kaulio, Matti
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Rapp Ricciardi, Max
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Colleagues Coaching Colleagues: Coaching Groups Using the Critical Incident Technique2011Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Kaulio, Matti
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Rapp Ricciardi, Max
    Psykologiska Institutionen, GU.
    Ledarskapsutmaningar i det Öppna Innovationsparadigment: Från R&D management till Inter-organisatoriskt entreprenörskap2008Report (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Kaulio, Matti
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Rapp Ricciardi, Max
    Department of Psychology, Gothenburg University.
    What researchers really do: Implications for the creation of the entrepreneurial university2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Lagergren, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH.
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Infra-Services: A Definition and Research Agenda2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Leva, Chiara
    et al.
    School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin.
    McDonald, Nicholas
    School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin.
    Corrigan, Siobhan
    School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    The challenge of system Change in aviation: The MASCA project2012In: Advances in Safety, Reliability and Risk Management -: Proceedings of the European Safety and Reliability Conference, ESREL 2011, Taylor & Francis Group, 2012, p. 1825-1832Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the aviation industry the need for sustainable change is becoming more and more impera-tive. Change is in fact something being imposed on the industry from a number of sources (e.g Upcoming Regulations, increasing commercial pressure and the introduction of new technologies) and the need for change management skills and capability within organisations is increasing.

    The paper presents the initial needs and case study upon which a research project sponsored by European Union to deliver a structure to manage the acquisition and retention of skills and knowledge, through training on organisational processes for managing change. The Project called MASCA takes an action research approach with a primary focus on the transfer of change management capability into the organisations that are responsible for and involved in change initiatives.

  • 47.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Guve, Bertil
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Pineiro, Erik
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Clinical Innovation Fellowship: an innovation / education initiative for medtech2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new initiative of advanced multidisciplinary training in innovation, highly based on collaboration betweenstakeholders in health care, medical device industry and universities. Key areas of development are; overallprinciples of teaching innovation, accelerated problem based learning, the innovation process as educationand practice, needs in healthcare & medtech industry.This paper presents a Swedish initiative of advanced multidisciplinary training in innovation, which is highly based oncollaboration between stakeholders in health care, medical device industry and universities. The goal of this post-graduate education in clinic-centered innovation is to contribute to the development of a regional medical device cluster, toeducate the health care and medical device innovators and leaders for the future and to develop technical and organizational tools and solutions for the participating clinics.A few years ago some individuals at the Center for Technology, Medicine and Health, CTMH, got in contact with theStanford Biodesign Innovation program. Since the need for collaboration across boundaries and silos had been identified there was almost an instant initiative to try this model in Sweden. A dedicated effort to get funding and buildingresearch capacity started in parallel. A joint project for designing and developing a Swedish variation of the programwas set up.The paper presents examples of an existing innovation research education program at Stanford University and thenthe Swedish initiative that starts in the fall of 2010. Then issues and key areas of interest that have been identified indevelopment of the Swedish initiative are presented.These are; overall principles of teaching innovation, accelerated problem based learning, the innovation processas education and practive, and finally particular needs in Swedish health care and medical technology industry. Animportant difference between the programs at Stanford and Stockholm is the inclusion in the Swedish initiative of theorganizational issues faced by the clinics. These issues are exemplified with leadership and management theoriesidentifying health care as a technology intensive and safety critical socio-technical system. Finally these key areas of interest are then consolidated in designing the overall approach to the Swedish initiative and the curriculum in the fellowsspecialized training.The paper reports findings from an ongoing research project whose aim is to identify obstacles and success factorsfor initiating such an initiative within Swedish university and healthcare structures. The research project also aims toevaluate at least three cycles of the program.

  • 48.
    Maslenkova, Maria
    et al.
    Gubkin University.
    Zazovskaya, Natalia
    Gubkin University.
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Strategic Human Resource Management in Russia: Exploring Contextual Preconditions and Middle-managers Perception of Human Capital Investments2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    McDonald, Nicholas
    et al.
    School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin.
    Leva, Chiara
    School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin.
    Corrigan, Siobhan
    School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Baranzini, Daniele
    School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin.
    The Challenges of Organizational Change: what has Human Factors to offer?2011In: Proceedings of the IES annual conference 2011 / [ed] Leonard W. O’Sullivan and Chiara Leva, 2011, p. 48-57Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the aviation industry the need for sustainable change is becoming more and more unavoidable. Change is in fact something being imposed on the industry from a number of sources (e.g. Upcoming Regulations, in-creasing commercial pressure and the introduction of new technologies) and the need for change management skills and capability within organisations is increasing. The paper presents the initial approach to answer those needs in a research project called MASCA (MAnaging System Change in Aviation. The project is sponsored by European Union to deliver a structure to manage the acquisition and retention of skills and knowledge, through training on organisational processes for managing change. MASCA takes an action research approach with a primary focus on the transfer of change management capability into the organisations that are responsible for and involved in change initiatives; especially in the area of performance management in safety. 

  • 50.
    Monasor Jorro, Jessica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Current Crisis: how has it affected in Spain?2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is practice that is followed with the controversy of whether is a real management tool or rather is a fad. A good context in order to study this polemic is the current crisis that has affected worldwide, because if CSR practices are kept in this context means that it is not a fad. Spain is the country chosen for focused this report, due to it is one of European countries most affected by economic crisis. So, this thesis seeks to check which polemic part is right as well as observes CSR situation in Spanish companies so far.

    CSR situation of large companies and SMEs are the main points investigated, in order to do this, it uses a quantitative and qualitative methods. Firstly, using surveys it is examined large companies’ situation, more specifically IBEX 35 companies that are Spanish enterprises that list at the stock market. Secondly, SMEs situation is analyzed qualitatively using gatherings, interviews and the documentary that are conducted by a Spanish awareness camping called “El valor de ser grande”. Moreover, it is reviewed and analyzed the existing literature creating a theoretical framework built on the pillars of CSR.

    The research allowed us to obtain the main features about Spanish companies both large companies and SMEs regarding CSR. In large companies CSR is root and is perform for years to gain momentum over time, i.e., it is performed as fundamental element in the company. Instead, in SMEs CSR is beginning to gain further strength and is increasingly performed but it still has a long way to go. Therefore, it is said that CSR is in the second phase, the first one was in big companies and now it is up to SMEs. Moreover, it is confirm that the crisis has increased CSR value to society and business provoking a clean effect over bad CSR policies.

    In conclusion, this research proves that companies have increased CSR actions in the crisis context so far. Therefore CSR is not a fad, although this will not be final result until the crisis is over and then its final effect will be rechecked.

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