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  • 1.
    Bendl, Regine
    et al.
    Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Höök, Pia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Meriläinen, Susan
    University of Lapland.
    Tienari, Janne
    Aalto University.
    ‘Doing’ Gender in Executive Search: A Cross-Cultural Comparison2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bendl, Regine
    et al.
    Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Meriäinen, Susan
    University of Lapland.
    Tienari, Janne
    Aalto University.
    No issue: Executive Search Consultants Reproducing White Male Dominance in Management2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Calás, Marta B.
    et al.
    University of Massachusetts Amherst.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Smircich, Linda
    University of Massachusetts Amherst.
    "Diversity Management"? Translation? Travel?2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 349-351Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4. Carvalho, Ines
    et al.
    Costa, Carlos
    Lykke, Nina
    Torres, Analia
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Women at the Top of Tourism Organizations: Views from the glass roof2018In: Journal of Human Resources in Hospitality & Tourism, ISSN 1533-2845, E-ISSN 1533-2853, p. 1-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism is a predominantly female economic activity. However, it is still men who prevail at the top. Studies on women as managers usually focus on the ‘glass ceiling’, i.e. the invisible barriers that hamper qualified women from reaching high-level positions. Hence, by leaving women who are ‘above the glass ceiling’ unanalyzed, it is implicitly assumed by researchers that these women are in a position where gender is no longer an issue. To counteract this tendency, this exploratory study focuses on women top-level managers in tourism organizations. It aims to analyze how these women perceive the influence of gendering processes and gender power relations on their own careers and on women’s careers in general in the field. It uses a feminist and qualitative methodological approach. The interviewees acknowledge how gender power relations and persisting gendering processes still affect them, even if they have reached a top position. It is concluded that there are lingering gender issues ‘above the glass ceiling’, and not only on the way to the top. Reaching a top-level management position does not remove genderedness from women’s professional lives.

  • 5.
    Cicmil, Svetlana
    et al.
    University of the West of England.
    Hodgson, Damian
    Manchester Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Project management behind the facade2009In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 78-92Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Clearing for Action: Leadership as a Relational Phenomenon2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although leadership is deemed to matter, scholars seldom pay attention to the phenomenon itself, as it is happening. Hence definitions abound, but there is a lack of vocabulary for expressing what leadership is about without ending up talking of individual leaders and/or descriptions of abstract “goodness”. Such an idealised and individualistic construct of leadership has consequences, both in theory and practice, in terms of providing a reductionist account, segregating and putting people in hierarchies, reinforcing the dominance of masculinities, and constraining how leadership is to be performed. Therefore, in order to contribute to our still limited knowledge of leadership beyond ideals and individualised conceptions, the purpose of this thesis is to add to our understanding of leadership as a social phenomenon going on at work and to contribute to developing a vocabulary for it.

    Reading the empirical material more and more closely, produced through an ethnography-inspired approach at two Swedish organisations and consisting of transcripts of interactions and interviews, the initial research question, “how is leadership shared in practice?” is subsequently modified and different strands of theories are applied: shared leadership, postheroic leadership and a radical processual view of leadership. In this way, different understandings of leadership are analysed. As a result, the theoretical concepts of organisational becoming, relational leadership and work practices are combined in an alternative approach. Two leadership practices are thus identified: constructing positions and positioning, and constructing issues. Such an analysis also leads to an alternative way of understanding leadership: leadership as clearing for action. Clearing is both a space, a bounded space, and an action. Therefore it expresses a relational perspective in which there are no stable entities, by suggesting a more dynamic view, at the same time as it also conveys the idea that we are talking about a constrained space.

    I thus define clearing for action as an emergent bounded aggregate of actions and talks that become possible, making others impossible or less probable. Actors and their worlds are constructed in certain ways that expand or contract the space of possible action. The result is a specific reading of leadership to add to the field of leadership studies. In this reading, leadership is an ordinary, repeated, social achievement at work in which possibilities for action and talk are constructed in constrained terms.

     

  • 7.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Is there leadership in a fluid world?: The idea of ”Clearing for action” as a possible way of conceptualizing the ongoing production of direction in organizing2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Leadership, not leaders: Abstract of a study trying a process perspective on leadership2007In: Nordic Academy of Management, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Leadership or organizing?: Leadership practices in processes of organizational becoming2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Naming it as leadership: A relational construction of leadership as an alternative to heroic masculinity in an empirical study of two Swedish companies2008In: Engendering Leadership conference, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Hallin, Anette
    Discourses of gender and inclusion: Using women to make peace sustainable2011In: Nordic Academy of Management conference 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Narcissistic organization: or business as usual?2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Entrepreneurship, gender and profession: A research agenda2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Leadership, not leaders: On the study of leadership as practices and interactions2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 77-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we suggest a perspective within leadership research that has an analytical focus on leadership as it is practiced in daily interaction, rather than on individual leaders. We draw upon recent developments in leadership research that emphasize leadership as processes, practices and interactions in formulating basic scientific assumptions of such a perspective. The suggested perspective will enable us to gain new understandings of how leadership activities emerge in social interaction and of how institutionalized notions of leadership are brought into and re-constructed in these same activities. Given this reasoning, we would suggest that the empirical study of leadership should be based in a process ontology, focused on leadership practices as constructed in interactions.

  • 15.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Leadership virtues and management knowledge: Questioning the unitary command perspective in leadership research2007In: Moral foundations of management knowledge / [ed] M-L. Djelic & R. Vranceanu, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2007, p. 159-177Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Sustainable Leadership and Management Knowledge:: On collective constructions of leadership2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    We don’t need another hero: Towards the study of leadership as everyday practices2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In all theories of management and organization, leadership has a given central place in enforcing principles, motivating employees and communicating future goals and visions to strive for. Leadership is assumed to make a special, significant and positive contribution to action processes in most organizations, and leadership studies as an academic field has thus been preoccupied with the task of identifying the most successful leadership practices. At the same time, the field of leadership studies has traditionally been leader-centered, i.e. focused on the individual leader and his/hers traits, abilities and actions. Leadership practices have been equated with leaders’ practices, dichotomously separated from those of the ‘others’ in this tradition, the ‘followers’. The aim of this paper is to put forward an alternative perspective, based on the idea that leadership is a natural part of what most people do on an everyday basis in organisations. From this perspective, leadership is a set of social practices organised by people in interaction, practices related to intentional processes of organisational change and development. Empirical data from recent case studies will be used to illustrate the tenets of this alternative perspective

  • 18.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Palm, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Applied Mechanical Engineering (KTH Södertälje).
    Schilling, Annika
    Innovation management in service firms: a research agenda2011In: Service Business, ISSN 1862-8516, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 177-193Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article suggests an agenda for further research on innovation management in service firms. It investigates differences and similarities between issues identified by previous academic research and issues brought up by practitioners within the area of innovation management in service firms. The results show that there are some major differences; for instance, researchers stress a need for formalized processes for development work, while practitioners focus on facilitating innovation in everyday operations. The main conclusion is that in order to bridge the gap between research and practice we would encourage further research on innovation in service firms to (1) conduct micro studies of innovation work, (2) view innovation in the context of everyday operations and (3) focus on co-workers' innovative potential.

  • 19.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Palm, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Schilling, Annika
    Organising (for)service innovation: formalisation versus creativity2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present and compare two studies on challenges with organising (for) innovation in service-intensive companies. One of the studies reviews the contribution of previous studies to the understanding of managing and organising innovation in service companies. The other is an explorative interview study focusing on how people working in service-intensive organisation in Sweden reason about innovation and the role of co-workers in the innovation process. In both these studies a common and important theme is the potential tension between formalisation and room for creativity. The purpose of this paper is to problematise and discuss this tension between formalised processes and creativity in the context of service-intensive companies. We identify four aspects worth attention in further studies: 1) How can service-intensive companies find a balance between formalisation and room for creativity when organising for innovation?, 2) How does the manufacturing industry influence the service industry in terms of processes, methods and vocabulary related to organising (for) innovation?, 3) How is individual and collective creativity conceptualised and what difference does this have for the organisation (for) innovation in service-intensive firms? and 4) What happens with innovation when the service delivery process is being formalised?

  • 20.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Palm, Kristina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Sköld, David
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Utmaningar och kuskapsbehov: Om innovation, ledning och organisering i nio olika tjänsteföretag2009Report (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Shinozaki Lennerfors, Thomas
    Pull yourselves together, old men!: A gendered critique of project managers’ professional ethics in a public sector context2009In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 113-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Project management is omnipresent, but the growth of project management practices and discourses has suffered – and is still suffering – from a lack of ethical reflection. Moreover, most of the existing literature on project management ethics aims at universality and generalised frameworks. We take a critical stance to such ambitions and draw upon a tradition of thought that relates ethics intrinsically to community practices. We therefore present a rich account of an empirical case, that of the Swedish Road Administration (SRA), where the context –the public sector, the construction industry, the project managers relying on external suppliers – is extremely important in order to understand how ethics is constructed. Drawing on critical perspectives on projects and gender, as well as on feminist ethics, we read the empirical material and show how ethics is constructed in complex and sometimes contradictory and surprising ways. We show how being (or seeming to be) in control becomes a central issue, at the same time as the traditional dichotomy of a masculine ethics versus a feminine ‘ethics of caring’ is problematic as such constructs are fluid and intertwined.

  • 22.
    Ford, Jackie
    et al.
    Bradford University School of Management.
    Cunliffe, Ann L
    Anderson School of Management, University of New Mexico.
    Raelin, Joseph A
    Northeastern University .
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Harding, Nancy
    Bradford University School of Management.
    Critical approaches to leadership learning and development2012In: CMS Division Showcase Symposion, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Countless managers in the USA, UK and other countries are embarking on leadership learning and development activities to support their roles and identities as leaders (Day, 2011; Storey, 2011).  There is a belief that the deluge of publications and the investment in leadership development will create managers with the skills and characters of leaders, capable of guiding organizations through the crises of the 21st century global market. Such learning and development programs frequently espouse the value of dominant discourses such as transformational leadership, with its ‘heroic’ assumptions that romanticize individual leaders and underestimate the significance of context and relationships. Furthermore, they often neglect critical engagement with the complex conditions, processes and consequences of leadership dynamics in contemporary organizations. Recently, critical (and especially poststructural) approaches to researching and conceptualizing leadership have emerged, which although still being outnumbered by mainstream accounts (Ford, 2006; Ford, Harding and Learmonth, 2008; Jackson and Parry, 2011), are increasingly influential. However, discourses emerging from the more critical approaches have not yet had time to be absorbed into leadership learning and development activities. This symposium brings together critical leadership theorists who will explore ways of changing leadership pedagogy.

  • 23.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Sergi, Viviane
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Hot stuff: gendering the academic2010In: ASCOS, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Damage control and tempered change: Reflections on working with gender issues in the business school classroom2008In: Teaching and Learning at Business Schools - : transforming business education / [ed] Mårtensson, Pär, Bild, Magnus & Nilsson, Kristina, Aldershot: Gower Publishing Ltd., 2008, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Det säkra kortet: så väljs höga chefer2008In: Loop : tidskriften om ledarskap, organisation och personal, ISSN 1653-073XArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Företagsledare och chefer2003In: Utredningen om kvinnor på ledande poster i näringslivet, Mansdominans i förändring: om ledningsgrupper och styrelser, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2003Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Homosocialitet som könsordnande process2006In: Norma, Nordic journal for masculinity studies, ISSN 1890-2138, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 24-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on the concept of homosociality and how it can be used in order to understand how gender is (re)produced in organisations and society. Within the field of organisation and gender, the concept of homosociality has been used to explain the gender segregation and male dominance on management levels in organisations. The concept describes processes in which men orient and identify themselves with other men. Studies show that men’s position and identity are affirmed through homosocial processes, which are often infused by desire and seduction. These processes reduce and somewhat paradoxically also generate uncertainty. Furthermore, studies show that the jargon among men is centred on distancing the group from women and men who do not conform with the ideal the group has collectively created, thus confirming the group’s superiority. Homosocial processes are therefore seen as contributing to the creation of certain groups that include some men and exclude women and other men, resulting in gender segregated organisations and the creation of dominant groups of men. In light of this research, the article discusses homosociality as a gendered process and argues for contextualized analyses that take other social power relations in organisations and society into account.

  • 28.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Jeff Hearn and Wendy Parkin: On organization sexuality2011In: On The Shoulders of Giants / [ed] Jensen, Tommy & Timothy L. Wilson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2011, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Making Inclusion Work. Experiences from Academia Around the World2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 151-152Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Responding to growing international political interest in the potential of carbon capture and storage (CCS) to contribute to climate change mitigation, multiple CCS demonstration projects of various scales are emerging globally. A fully integrated power-plant with CCS has not yet been demonstrated at scale, and acknowledgement of the scale of learning that still must occur for the technology to advance toward deployment has resulted in calls from multiple constituents for more CCS demonstration projects. Among these demonstration projects, expectations for learning and knowledge-sharing structures vary considerably and attention to different approaches to facilitate learning has been minimal. Through a comparison of the structure, framing and socio-political context of three different CCS demonstration projects, this paper explores the complexity of social learning associated with demonstration projects. Variety in expectations of the demonstration projects’ objectives, learning processes, information sharing mechanisms, public engagement initiatives, financing and collaborative partnerships are highlighted. The comparison shows that multiple factors influence the learning in CCS demonstration projects, including the process of building support for the project, the governance context and the framing of the project justification. This comparative analysis highlights the importance of integrating careful consideration of framing and social learning into CCS demonstration project planning.

  • 30.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Man får välja: Om rekrytering, ledarskap och kön2008In: Bonnier Ledarskapshandbok: Projektledning / [ed] Johnny Tedenfors, Stockholm: Bonnier Ledarskapshandböcker , 2008Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    On Codes of Conduct and Commercial Sex2011In: Gender Renewals, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Recruiting Managing Directors: Doing Homosociality2013In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 454-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines homosociality in the context of top management recruitment in Sweden, drawing on interviews with chairmen of the board and three recruitments of managing directors. The analysis suggests that homosociality is done through two main practices: (re)defining competence and doing hierarchy, resulting in a preference for certain men and the exclusion of women. It is argued that the preference of men can be understood as an unreflexive practice, which can explain why many Swedish male managers are aware of the adverse conditions women face and claim to be pro-equality but continue to recruit men for management positions. In light of this, it is also argued that homosociality and gender discrimination can be seen as two sides of the same coin.

  • 33.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Strippklubbar och bordeller i arbetssammanhang2010In: Tvärsnitt, ISSN 0348-7997Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    “When in Rome…”?: On Multinational Corporations, Codes of Conduct and Commercial Sex2011In: Men and Masculinities Moving On Again! Transnationalising Flows, Technologies, Institutions, Theory, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Höök, Pia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Bakåt- och framåtblickande dialoger: Betydelsen av ett reflekterande förhållningssätt i jämställdhetsarbete2006In: Vad hände sedan?: Långsiktiga effekter av jämställdhetssatsningar under 1980- och 90-talen / [ed] Ulla Göransson and Elisabeth Sundin, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Höök, Pia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    KTH Forskarblogg: Pia Höök, Genus- och Organisationsforsknin.  http://piahook.wordpress.com: http://piahook.wordpress.com2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Höök, Pia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    ”Kunde det lika gärna ha varit killar som röstades ut?”: Om homosociala och heterosociala processer i SVTs Expedition Robinson2007In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Höök, Pia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Review of: Ifrågasatta företagare. Konkursförvaltares syn på kvinnor och män som företagsgäldenärer under 1900-talet2007In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 299-300Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Höök, Pia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Women as a Power Resource: Putting Theory into Practice2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Höök, Pia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Women as Power Resources: Putting Theory into Practice2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Issues, responsibilities and identities: A distributed leadership perspective on biotechnology R&D management2011In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 157-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the research reported here is to contribute to the ongoing development of R&D project leadership studies by applying a distributed leadership perspective in the analysis of a product development project in a small biotechnology venture. A distributed leadership perspective implies that leadership is studied as a process of social interaction, involving several individuals who continuously construct leadership activities together. From a case study of a bio-tech venture, we conclude that leadership work in R&D projects implies construction of issues, responsibilities and identities. That is, what people do - seen from this perspective - when performing leadership activities in this project is that they gradually move the project and the organization forward by processing issues, resolving ambiguities concerning responsibility, and develop their understandings on the identity bases involved.

  • 42.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    On the temporary organizing of entrepreneurial processes: Applying a project metaphor to the study of entrepreneurship2011In: Revue de l'entrepreneuriat, ISSN 1766-2524, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 45-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Performing arts and the art of performing: On co-construction of project work and professional identities in theatres2007In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 354-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While working by projects and re-constructing organisational and institutional norms on how projects should be, individuals also successively construct an image of themselves in relation to these norms. In this article, we will thus analyse how people in project-based operations simultaneously construct projects and individual identities. The analysis of interviews from two theatres indicates that project work and professional identities are co-constructed by means of mutual confirmation, simultaneous confirmation/disconfirmation, and mutual disconfirmation. The individual projects become arenas and critical incidents for such co-construction. These discourses are not always consistent with each other, but they are important for what the individuals expect from projects and what project managers expect from individuals.

  • 44.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Project leadership revisited: Towards distributed leadership perspectives in project research2009In: International Journal of Project Organisation and Management, ISSN 1740-2891, E-ISSN 1740-2905, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 285-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While project management research in general has become a rapidly expanding field during past decades, scientific inquiry into project leadership has not been a major issue. The extant literature on project leadership also does not make much use of the current developments in leadership research in general – not even those appearing as suitable, such as distributed leadership perspectives. The aim of the paper is threefold: (1) to review the existing research literature on project leadership, (2) to summarise and discuss this research and (3) to make some notes towards a new research agenda built on the current debate in leadership studies on distributed leadership perspectives. Current project leadership research is found to focus exclusively on individuals and their leadership competencies rather than the leadership practices in project settings and does not fully use the perspectives in current leadership research. We then outline a distributed leadership perspective on project leadership research, including the practical consequences of such an ideal and the basic assumptions for future research.

  • 45.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Social constructionism and entrepreneurship: Basic assumptions and consequences for theory and research2009In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, ISSN 1355-2554, E-ISSN 1758-6534, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 25-47Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this article is to develop a social constructionist approach to entrepreneurship and to discuss its consequences for entrepreneurship research. Design/methodology/approach - Based on a review of current methodological debates in the entrepreneurship field concerning the need and implications of explicit references to basic scientific assumptions in research texts, a social constructionist perspective is outlined and its theoretical and methodological consequences are discussed. Findings - A social constructionist perspective may contribute to the development of entrepreneurship research both through opening up possibilities for the inclusion of new theoretical fields, and through the demands on new methodological approaches following such theoretical inclusions. Originality/value - Based on an identified lack of research literature discussing underlying scientific assumptions within entrepreneurship, the paper provides a thorough discussion and summary of existing and future social constructionist developments.

  • 46.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    What's new in new forms of organizing? On the construction of gender in project-based work2006In: Journal of Management Studies, ISSN 0022-2380, E-ISSN 1467-6486, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 841-866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In several industries, projects are now the normal form of work for individuals. The consequences of project work have not so far been subject to critical inquiry, however. This implies inquiry not only on how people handle project work at work, it also means inquiring into how they live their lives when working by projects. In this paper, we study this from a constructionist gender perspective, in which project work is seen as an ongoing construction of patterns of femininity and masculinity in society. The aim of the paper is to contribute to an understanding of how project work is related to the ongoing construction of femininity and masculinity in the work and lives of human beings. From a narrative study of individuals in the same project team in an IT-consultancy company, we discuss masculinization and femininization in project-based work. It appears that current project work practices imply reproduction of masculinities such as rationality, efficiency, control, devotion to work etc, while femininization is instead found in the rhetoric of the organizational context and the expectations on newly recruited women. The organization was in the process of femininization through rhetoric on 'family friendliness', but everyday life for consultants was not spent at the organization but in project teams in the customers' offices. Projects are special in the sense that they are clearly delimited episodes of work in which it is possible to apply entirely different norms than 'outside' the project - which makes the tendency to reproduce traditional masculinities even stronger.

  • 47.
    Lindgren, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Tham, Henrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Relational dysfunctionality: leadership interactions in a Sarbanes-Oxley Act implementation project2011In: European Journal of International Management, ISSN 1751-6757, E-ISSN 1751-6765, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 13-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extant leadership literatures tend to favour the positive and the normative over the negative and descriptive, and context-free individuals over situated organisational interaction. Dysfunctional leadership thus usually becomes a matter of evil individuals deviating from established norms, rather than how leadership interaction processes unfold. In this paper, we view leadership interaction processes in terms of construction of direction, coorientation and action space. We apply this perspective to an empirical study of an organisational change project in a sub-unit of a multinational corporation. Conceptual consequences of the proposed perspective are discussed in terms of confused direction, deteriorating coorientation and delimited action space.

  • 48.
    Linghag, Sophie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Från medarbetare till chef: Kön och makt i chefsförsörjning och karriär2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     

    The younger generation is often expected to be part of changes in management gender distribution, concepts of leadership and gender power relations. Parallel with this, there are ongoing gender segregation processes within the organisations resulting in the dominance of men among managers. The aim of this thesis is to describe and understand the transition from staff to management, and in particular how gender is done in this process. The perspective on organisation and gender adopted is social constructionist. Thestudy was carried out in a large Swedish banking company between 2000 and 2005. Analysis was drawn up in order to successively answer four research questions: 1) in what way is the management sourcing process designed and how are candidates for management evaluated?, 2) how do management candidates look upon their career opportunities?, 3) how is gender done in the sourcing of new managers?, and 4) how is gender done in the careers of future managers? The empirical material consists of observations of a management development programme for potential managers, statements on management sourcing and careers, and document material. The statements come from interviews with 11 staff members, six women and five men, identified as potential managers, as well as seven people working with HR at the bank. The 11 management candidates were interviewed three times during a two-year period.

    The thesis develops knowledge on how gender and management are done in situations characterised by a balanced gender distribution and simultaneous male dominance. The management development programme serves as a hub for those working with sourcing new managers through its importance in identifying, developing and evaluating candidates for management. The evaluation of women and men among management candidates shows that potential is linked to women and men in different ways and that women and men are evaluated on the basis of different expectations on them as managers. Career is almost exclusively conceived as linear hierarchical movements. Nevertheless, the hierarchical view of career is confirmed almost entirely in the way men orient themselves. The career themes of the men express expectations on having a career. The experiences of the women are diverse. But even among those who have experienced encouragement to develop, this is not reflected in expectations on the future. Instead, the hope expressed is one of being allowed to continue a career. The different empowerment of the women and men express the gender power relations in the organisation and the norm of men as managers, which both men and women relate to.

    Two aspects are involved in the doing of gender in management sourcing and careers: construction of gender and gender ordering. Firstly, gender is constructed and ordered in the sourcing of new managers through the gendering of potential, resulting in different opportunities for women and men in organisations. Secondly, gender is constructed and ordered in careers, where careers may be understood as gendered, i.e. where expectations are created in men and hopes in women. The result is different empowerment in women and men. And thirdly, the results point to a complexity in relation to change. Gender equality initiatives and radical practices in combination with individualism and gender neutrality both put gender hierarchy into question and preserve it. Management sourcing involves several practices where the doing of gender is integrated in different ways, both conscious through gender equality initiatives, and sub-conscious through individualised and gender-neutral ideology. Thus, change requires greater consciousness and new practice.

     

     

  • 49.
    Linghag, Sophie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Gendered Practices in the Training of Potential Managers2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Linghag, Sophie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Gästkrönikan: Sophie Linghag om varför könet spelar roll i företagens chefsförsörjning2009In: Civilekonomen, ISSN 1400-0997, no 2009-11-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
12 1 - 50 of 84
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