Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 313
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Abdullah, Maizura Ailin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Building Networks for Delivering Integrated Product-Service Offerings (IPSOs)2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Adamsson, Niklas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Grimheden, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    The Product Developer: Education and Professional Role2007In: Proceedings of ICED 2007, the 16th International Conference on Engineering Design, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to present results from a study examining the relation between the educational background and professional roles with engineers engaged in product development. Derived from previous studies, the product development engineer ought to be a multifaceted engineer, knowledgeable and skilled in several fields. This engineer should work interdisciplinary, integrative and with the aim to be creative and innovative. By using a substantial data set consisting of 300 engineers in Swedish product development organizations, we derive some important research propositions. The data shows that there are correlations between organizational responsibilities and educational program, in particular regarding focus on design, system integration, project management and technical coordination. If we want to understand how the engineering education affects the professional role of an engineer; we believe that it is critical to further investigate the developed propositions. One example is mechanical engineers; the data shows that the studied mechanical engineers rarely work with design. Our proposition is therefore to investigate the identity and legitimacy of these programs to further clarify the professional role.

  • 3. Alfredsson, Ludvig
    et al.
    Fazl, Asade
    Lund, Katarina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Söderberg, Björn
    Product Development Management2011In: Entering the tigers cave – Perspectives on Japanese and Swedish Product Development / [ed] Bergsjö, Dag, Göteborg: Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology , 2011Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Alhifi, Haidar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Samir, Laith
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Design och konstruktion av släpvagnför tävlingsbilar2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    New markets for trailers designed to transport racing cars, tools and spare parts were opened in conjunction with the Transport Agency´s introduction of the extended B driving license. Such trailers are possible to purchase on the Swedish trailer market today. However, the ones on the market are only suitable for the BE driving license. This project is carried out on behalf of the company Fredrik Wagner AB, which is a company that designs and constructs conveyor belts. The aim of this work was to investigate and explore the possibility of implementing a new trailer model to the Swedish market. The goal of this work was to develop a trailer concept and design a CAD-model of the concept.Information about motorsports was collected to define and to improve the understanding of the problem. In order to find solutions to the defined problem, idea and concept generation phases were conducted. The solutions were then developed into CAD concepts by using the CAD-software Solid Edge.The design and construction in this project was limited to the trailer body and its components only. The trailer body´s concept is offered in two versions, one adapted for the extended B driver´s license while the other is for the BE license. The version for the extended B license got at total weight of 695 kg, while the BE version got a total weight of 1 005 kg.The trailer body was designed to transport racing cars with a weight of 1 100 kg, however, it is possible to transport other cars with the trailer body if these do not exceed the weight limit. Since the work was limited to the trailer body only, the construction of a trailer chassis was excluded. The trailer chassis can either be purchased from a retailer or designed by Frederik Wagner AB. How the trailer chassis and the trailer body should be fitted together was though omitted as further work with the trailer.

  • 5. Allvin, M.
    et al.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Zika-Viktorsson, Annika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Project Overload: A study on work situation in complex industrial organizations2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Lindström, Göran
    Uppsala University.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University.
    Dahlin, Peter
    Jönköping University.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lage Hellman, Jens
    Chalmers.
    Olofsson, Christer
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Olsson, Annika
    Lund University.
    Olsson, Magnus
    Lund University.
    Svengren Holm, Lisbeth
    Lund University.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Skapa kundnärvaro i innovationsprocessen2008In: Innovationsförmåga / [ed] Annika Olsson, Malmö: Holmbergs i Malmö AB , 2008, p. 40-59Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7. Andrén, L
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sjölander, S
    Opportunistic adaptation in start-up companies2003In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management, ISSN 1368-275X, E-ISSN 1741-5098, Vol. 3, no 5-6, p. 546-562Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, F.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Boccardelli, P.
    Predicting team collective intention to innovate: An institutional perspective2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Foss, N.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, F.
    Interaction of control systems and stakeholder networks in shaping the identities of self-managed teamsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Foss, N.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, F.
    The interplay between the pre-existing managerial control systems and stakeholder's networks in self-managed team's identities2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11. Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    Foss, Nicolai
    Brunetta, Federica
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Interaction of Control Systems and Stakeholder Networks in Shaping the Identities of Self-Managed Teams2017In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 619-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Team identity has received little research attention even though an increasing number of firms are moving to team-based organizations and there is evidence that teams form identities. We explore the extent to which team identity can be institutionalized as a central organizing principle of team-based firms. We argue that managerial and stakeholder interventions shape the self-construction of team identity as well as the team's commitment to specific work objectives. We also suggest that team identity becomes isomorphic to organizational identity because of pressures related to: (1) the presence of a dense network of managers and stakeholders, which orients teams towards a focus on certain aspects of the higher-order identity; (2) the use of team routines and regular feedback loops, which force alignment with the organizational identity; and (3) the use of coordinating roles aimed at promoting, ratifying and reinforcing the convergence of identity within the team. We analyse multiple cases from a major multinational corporation in the telecommunications industry, which we examine through the lens of a multi-level model of controls involving the micro, meso and macro organizational levels. We expand and refine the model in the process.

  • 12.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    FOSS, Nicolai J.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, Federica
    The interaction of control systems and stakeholder networks in shaping the identities of selfmanaged teams.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Team identity has received little research attention even though an increasing number of firms are moving to team-based organizations and there is evidence that teams form identities. We explore the extent to which team identity can be institutionalized as a central organizing principle of team-based firms. We argue that managerial and stakeholder interventions shape the self-construction of team identity as well as the team’s commitment to specific work objectives. We also suggest that team identity becomes isomorphic to organizational identity because of pressures related to: 1) the presence of a dense network of managers and stakeholders, which orients teams towards a focus on certain aspects of the higher-order identity; 2) the use of team routines and regular feedback loops, which force alignment with the organizational identity; and 3) the use of coordinating roles aimed at promoting, ratifying, and reinforcing the convergence of identity within the team. We analyze multiple cases from a major multinational corporation in the telecommunications industry, which we examine through the lens of a multi-level model of controls involving the micro, meso, and macro organizational levels. We expand and refine the model in the process.

  • 13.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    FOSS, Nicolai J
    Martini, Antonella
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    A Multilevel Framework for Organizational Learning in Self-Managed Team Organizations: an abductive micro-foundations studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the social cognitive learning perspective, this study advances a multilevel theory of organizational learning for team-based organizations, which integrates principles of cognition and motivation through team-level self-regulation mechanisms. We highlight and unpack these mechanisms, which have long been treated as black boxes in organizational learning research. We describe them using an empirical case from a multinational company, and we reveal their potential to affect motivation and socio-cognitive functions in self-managing teams. We also clarify the complexity of their relationships through a set of propositions and provide a definition of the team-level self-regulation mechanisms constructs.

  • 14.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Investigating the impact of agile methods on learning and innovation2013Report (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Martini, Antonella
    Peonia, Laura
    The dual control systems of agile teams: exploring knowledge management issues2014In: IFKAD 2014: 9th International Forum on Knowledge Asset Dynamics, 2014, p. 1907-1931Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper aims to contribute to the exploration of micro-foundations for innovation in autonomous team-based firms. It describes how different types of management control systems influence the innovation performance of teams through an extensive field study of a large scale agile implementation. It reveals the moderating role played by different kinds of managerial control systems and by perceived time pressure on teams in the relationship between a team's absorptive capacity and its innovation performance. Design/methodology/approach - A total of 44 individual semi-structured interviews were used to collect data over three separate data collection stages conducted from August to November 2013. All data were triangulated with the qualitative content analysis results of free comments from 121 people, covering different agile roles in the same organizations as above, and embedded in a survey performed in August 2013. Due to the complexity of the topic and the lack of prior studies investigating the effect of agile implementation on team learning and innovation capabilities, an abductive research approach (Peirce, 1931) was selected as a suitable method. Originality/value - The empirical results indicate that a team's beliefs on the importance of learning strongly influence its self-regulated learning behaviours. They represent the configuration of AC meta-routines underlying the concept of absorptive capacity (Lewin et al., 2011) at the team-level, conducive to teams' exploration activities. Moreover, the antecedents for a team's exploitative and exploratory innovation activities are presented and two types of managerial controls for driving exploitative innovation activities are identified. Additionally, team-level absorptive capacity was analysed, since it is a less explored, but important construct, leading to a team's exploitative product innovation. Practical implications - This study's findings have a number of implications for practice. The results imply that autonomous team-based organizations may be better off not using one single standard control system to manage all their teams. In fact, beyond securing a team's access to knowledge, management needs to provide teams with differentiated means to develop necessary competencies and capacities for understanding, assimilating and using the knowledge they retrieve. In addition, management should influence a team's beliefs by valuing the tasks requiring innovation and transmitting sustainable values to teams through their mission and vision statements.

  • 16.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Khanagha, S.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Breaking the iron cage: A multi-level perspective towards organizational control in post-bureaucratic structure2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Khanagha, S.
    Volberda, H.
    Self-Regulated Teams, Vicarious Learning, and Innovation: The role of managerial control systems2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Khanagha, Saeed
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    A Multi-Level Study of Managerial Control Influence on Self-Managed Team Innovativeness2015In:  Academy of Management conference, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we investigate organizational control systems as the underpinnings of large organizations’ ability to perform after transition to a flattened and decentralized structure. We consider horizontal social control mechanisms on team level (concertive control induced by high team identification) and vertical bureaucratic managerial control mechanisms on organization level (interactive and diagnostic management control systems), and examine their combined influence on the innovativeness of self-managing product development teams in a large company. We utilize a rich empirical data set including a multilevel multi-source survey of the members of 97 organizational teams, their internal team managers, and their higher-level managers. In contrast to some prior research findings, we find a negative effect of team’s concertive control on team’s innovativeness . In addition, managerial interactive control systems fostering a more prestigious team’s organizational image seem to strengthen the negative effect of concertive control on team’s innovativeness, while in combination with diagnostic control systems, legitimizing current external organizational team’s image, the effect of concertive control becomes positive. Interestingly, our analysis suggests that as team’s concertive control increases, managerial control systems show a converse relationship in such a way that the diagnostic control reduces and the interactive control increases the negative influence of concertive control.

  • 19.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Khanagha, Saeed
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    A Multi-Level Study of Managerial Control Influence on Self-Managed Team Innovativeness2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we investigate organizational control systems as the underpinnings of large organizations’ ability to perform after transition to a flattened and decentralized structure. We consider control mechanisms on team level (structure and peer control) and on organization level (interactive and diagnostic management control systems), and examine their combined influence on the innovativeness and effectiveness of product development teams in a large company. We utilize a rich empirical data set including a multilevel multi-source survey of the members of 97 organizational teams, their internal team managers, and their higher-level managers. In contrast to some prior research findings, we find a positive direct effect of team’s structure on team’s effectiveness, while we find a negative effect of team’s concertive control on team’s innovativeness and effectiveness. In addition, interactive management controls on the firm level seem to strengthen the negative effect of concertive control on team’s innovativeness and effectiveness, while in combination with diagnostic control systems, the effect of concertive control becomes positive. Interestingly, our analysis suggests that as team’s concertive control increases, managerial control systems show a converse relationship in such a way that the diagnostic control reduces and the interactive control increases the negative influence of concertive control.

  • 20.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Learning and innovation issues in agile teams: A case study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to contribute to a more nuanced understanding of thebarriers that an agile/lean research and development (R&D) organization hasto overcome in order to be able to manage and apply knowledge effectively tobalance exploration and exploitation activities. It explores how people working in agile teams create, retain and transfer knowledge through theimplementation of a so-called Agile Scrum methodology. Our main findings arein the form of recommendations about the different innovation strategies firms should pursue. The links to the firm’s environmental conditions (such asorganizational culture, maturity, management practices) should allow thoseresults to be applied to other organizational contexts.We build on our understanding of the effects of agile/lean characteristics onorganizational learning and knowledge creation to propose ways to achievealignment within the firm at the operational level in order to facilitateambidextrous organizational learning through a case study of a software R&Dorganization. Data were collected from a questionnaire and interviews in aniterative process.

  • 21.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, F.
    Self-organizing coordination and control approaches: The impact of social interaction processes on self-regulated innovation activities in self-managing teams2016In: Innovation Management and Computing (VOL I) / [ed] Cyrus F. Nourcan, Apple Academic Press, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, Federica
    Self-organizing coordination and control approaches: the impact of social interaction processes on self-regulated innovation activities in self-managing teams2016In: Innovation Management and Computing: Ecosystems and TechnologyIdea Generation and Content Model Processing / [ed] Cyrus Nourcan, Apple Academic Press, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of social norms, as well as how and under which conditions social norms impact behavior, are determined by the social influence process. By leveraging the influence process we can create and handle change in self-managing teams in order to foster growth and steer team members in a positive direction, away from negative habits. At the same time, if poorly managed the developed social norms can inhibit change, and in the worst case result in conflict and resentment within the team.

    If team members feel part of a group and consider that group membership is relevant for them, they will adapt their behavior to align to the group's norms and standards, which in turn will dictate context-specific attitudes and behaviors that are appropriate for the team.

    This chapter focuses on teams’ social norms, distinguishing between descriptive- (what most others do) and injunctive (what most others approve or disapprove of) norms, investigating important moderators in the relationships between descriptive norms and behaviors, discussing the role of the social environment on the changes to and inculcation of injunctive social norms, and describing how individual team members' attributes refine the susceptibility of individuals to normative influences.

  • 23.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Martini, A.
    Peonia, L.
    Agile implementation and organizational knowledge: Is there a problem?: An abductive framework2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Martini, A.
    Peonia, L.
    Investigating the impact of agile control mechanisms on learning in scrum teams2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Martini, Antonella
    Appio, F. P.
    Social conduct, learning and innovation: An abductive study of the dark side of agile software development2015In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agile methodologies have been adopted by an increasing number of organizations to improve their responsiveness. However, few studies have empirically analysed the effect of Agile on long-term organizational goals such as learning and innovation. Using an abductive approach, this study examines the relationships between self-regulated teams’ social conduct and their resulting learning and innovation. Results indicate that the perceived time pressure to get the job done greatly impedes team engagement in learning and innovation activities. Time pressure is affected by the various control strategies deriving from the implementation of Agile, which constitute its dark side: concertive, belief, diagnostic and boundary controls.

  • 26.
    Baid, Vishal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Seres, Irén
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Tjänstedesign för hållbar interntransport: Design av hållbara interntransportlösningar för anställda på ett svenskt bilindustriföretag2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 27.
    Bejefalk, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Att konstruera för tillverkning: En arbetsmodell för ett enstyckskonstruerande företag2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    DynaMate AB, the owner of DynaMate Industrial Services AB (DIS), is a free-standing whollyownedaffiliate company of Scania CV AB. The company started its business in 1993 initially as asupport and maintenance department within and for Scania solely. During the first six-months of2001 DynaMate’s business was re-formed to also offer its service and production support to otherclients besides Scania. Therefore, in 2009 DynaMate Industrial Services AB was established. Thiscompany offer complete industrial solutions with special skills in the automation, electrical andmechanical areas.In the management of Scania, DynaMates missions has often depended on single designers, playingthe role as both project leader and project member as well as project performer and finisher. As aeffect of this working procedure many crucial decisions have been only verbal and informal, whereimportant task documentation and possible drawings rectifications has been inadequate. The factthat DIS now, continuously increasing in extent, is aiming to other clients than just Scania, a morestandardized working procedure is required. This is important to be able to decrease time from ideato complete solution, and still provide customers with high quality products.The primary task with this project was therefore to develop a working model proposal forimproving designers’ every-day work at DIS, concerning reduced lead time for one-productmanufacturing.This Master Thesis was performed with the support from litterature within associated research area,followed by the formation of a interview questionnaire. All interviews were performed within DISdepartment of mechanical design and with external manufacturing companies.The compiled result indicated several areas that a designer must be aware of when designing formanufacturing. Manufacturers pointed out that the most common defects with constructiondelivered drawings are missing measurements, as well as superflously tolerances, radius’ andchamfers. These factors are all contributing to increased lead time and product complexity.The proposed new working model presented in this Master Thesis is a phase-divided sequentialprocess, where both the customer and manufacturer will be more involved than today. This toensure that the manufacturer will be given complete data from the designer, and that the finalproduct will obtain customer satisfaction.

  • 28.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Collaboration and competition in firm-internal ideation management: Two alternatives – and a third way out2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The passive reliance on ideas to spontaneously emerge within companies is today replaced with more active and continuous ideation management that embraces employees from different functions and knowledge-domains within the company to create and develop ideas. A frequently observed feature in the active management of ideation is the reliance on collaboration and competition mechanisms. These mechanisms use the strength of enabling people to working together towards a shared interest (collaboration) and the power of enabling people to outperform each other in submitting the best idea (competition). The existing research on collaboration and competition in ideation is found inconclusive about their effects as collaboration is stated to both enhance and hamper performance, and as competition is claimed to both drive and reduce performance in ideation. This constitutes a limitation to the management of ideation as it reduces the ability to actively and purposefully guide ideation through a deliberate use of the two mechanisms.

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate collaboration and competition mechanisms in firm-internal ideation.

    A multi-methodological approach has been deployed using three different studies: a multiple case study, a survey, and an experiment. This has allowed for the phenomenon of ideation to be studied using different perspectives and for the individual results to be triangulated. The empirical data has been acquired from both industry and experiments with university students.

    The conducted research has revealed that the inconsistencies on the effects from the two mechanisms are possible to understand and resolve by applying a more detailed level of analysis. When competition is decomposed into components of individual- and group competition, it is found that individual competition drives idea quantity and that it hampers collaboration, whereas group competition instead is found to induce collaboration and to nurture idea quality. This indicates that competition can be used to manage levels of collaboration in ideation, thereby bridging the two mechanisms.

    This thesis further presents that the individual effects from each of the mechanisms are complementary to each other. This implies that the effect from each mechanism is retained when combined with the other mechanisms, and that the combined effect is equal to, or even greater than, the sum of the individual effects. This combined use is found to drive both ideation efficiency and motivation, and is offering management an interesting third alternative, out of the two mechanisms, of how firm-internal ideation can be managed in a more effective and efficient manner.

    An analytical framework is included, presenting the interrelationships between the mechanisms, motivation, ideation behavior and the ideation performance. 

  • 29. Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sapucci, Mirco
    Making collaborative ideation work: Challenges and success factors for the use of collaborative ideation tools2012In: IAMOT 2012, Taiwan, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Dagnino, Giovanni Battista
    Ferrigno, Giulio
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Coopetition and ideation performance: Observations from two complementary experimentsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Combining collaboration and competition: a key to improved idea management?2014In: European Journal of International Management, ISSN 1751-6757, E-ISSN 1751-6765, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 528-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier research in the field of idea management has highlighted both collaboration and competition driving ideation. While these two are normally considered opposing and excluding, recent work proposes them to be complements. Previous studies have primarily focused on firm-external communities, and little is known about the joint use of collaboration and competition inside firms. This paper addresses collaborative and competitive mechanisms used in firm-internal idea management. Case studies of three multinational firms active in idea management have been performed. The firms' use of collaboration and competition in firm-internal idea management is analysed, revealing that the two approaches can be combined, and explores how their paradoxical coexistence can be managed. This study underlines the importance of addressing intrinsic motivation and facilitating sharing of knowledge in order to bridge and align collaboration and competition mechanisms. It also highlights issues of rewards and company culture, requiring informed attention from human resources management.

  • 32.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. SCA Hygiene Products, Sweden .
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Creating Ideas for Innovation: Effects of Organizational Distance on Knowledge Creation Processes2015In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 87-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is to a large extent considered a social and communicative process, and input from other individuals potentially improves the generation of novel and valuable ideas also in the early stages of idea creation and development. Both colleagues inside organizations and external parties have frequently been proposed as important sources of information and knowledge within this part of the innovation process. Other contributions addressing social networks and innovation bring into focus the potentially negative effects that certain network structures may have on innovation, pointing to inconsistencies in received theory. In order to address these inconsistencies, an empirical study of ideation in a Swedish multinational firm was performed, taking into account two different knowledge creation processes - combination and in-depth analysis - and their inter-relationships with organizational distance between contributing individuals. Data was collected using a survey and was analysed using regression models. It was found that different levels of organizational distance correlate with different knowledge creation processes. In-depth analysis occurred more often with employees' close colleagues, whereas the combination of existing ideas and information was more frequent in interaction with employees' close colleagues and with external parties. Both these interaction patterns were also found to be positive for the generation of patents, whereas no such relationship could be seen when individuals interacted with colleagues in other departments in the same firm. The findings have implications for theory on cognitive distance, and also suggest that management needs to facilitate different types of collaboration and networking when aiming to facilitate and support ideation, taking into consideration the type of innovation aimed for, as well as its supporting knowledge creation processes.

  • 33.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ideation High Performers: A Study of Motivational Factors2015In: Creativity Research Journal, ISSN 1040-0419, E-ISSN 1532-6934, Vol. 27, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As innovation today is one of the keys to success for firms, creativity among its employees becomes a key asset and the understanding about what motivates employees in ideation is consequently of high interest. This article addresses differences in motivation among high- and low performers in ideation and contributes to existing theory by enhancing the understanding about what characterizes motivation among ideation high performers. The quantitative analysis used is based on a study performed at a multinational consumer goods company based in Sweden, surveying employees’ performance, motivation and their preferences towards collaboration and competition. Among key findings is the possible combination of collaboration and competition mechanisms as motivating means in firms’ ideation management. 

  • 34.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Inducing ideation collaboration through competition?2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Combining collaboration and competition in firm-internal ideation management2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Compose or decompose - Resource allocation in engineering design projects2013In: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013, 2013, p. 362-367Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a paper that reviews the planning, execution and reflection of the collaborative writing efforts made by students when composing their final design project reports. Past research has indicated collaborative writing (CW) as one of the most challenging task that could be assigned to student groups [1]. CW is a process that involves project management, including resource allocation and essentially a great portion of writing skill. Whereas numerous engineering design projects highlight the uniqueness and creative aspects brought forward and the process in which this was created - the final piece of the puzzle how the final report was established is a phenomenon that get dimmed. There is dualistic propagation of parallel processes where the 'artifact' constitutes the main design work and where the efforts made to produce a written report relates to the other. A tradition that maybe is obsolete in some places but that has a life of its' own in other domains. The more administrative work involved with compiling a report of 'good enough' character whilst motivating and supporting each other should be balanced against the activities involved in producing the final output/design/prototype. This study is based on interviews and written 'pros and cons' reflections with project participants, project documentation and lecturer's reflections. Early indications show that communication and iterative work processes, allowing cross-checking, validation and confirmation is crucial for engaging greater commitment to the collaborative writing process. Independently of project management style and delegations made; labour intensity and work distribution of activities seem to propagate a skew execution of work. This is especially noticeable when administrative functions are weak amongst project members, which can be a consequence when putting students from various programs/disciplines/schools in a joint exercise of this type. Based on the findings, the paper stipulates a set of preventive coaching tips to guideline collaborative writing efforts and endorsing increased rigor to the final report and its process. Establishing this set of awareness among students would ultimately minimize uncertainties and dilemmas prior to 'entering the boat' - when the ship has sailed so has also its crew and based on how well they master to serve and execute their skills - so will also the trip be remembered - pleasant or horrific - taking them to paradise or hell.

  • 37.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Do we facilitate an innovative learning environment?: Student efficacy in two engineering design projects2012In: Global Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 1328-3154, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 27-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates student efficacy and motivation to work in relation to three distinct elements of interaction. Rather than rediscovering evaluation, student perceptions determine a project's overall efficiency by individual reflection on the effort made, and form circles of influence and impact on interacting elements. Based on previous research on student efficacy, this study takes a student-centric point of view, where the self-efficacy is grounded in stud ents' intr insic mo tiva tio n for work [1]. The article's principal ide a is to inve stiga te how differe nt elements of interaction cause students' beliefs to shift individually and in groups. A qualitative approach has been used, where the results have been collected through structured questionnaires, with respondents from an extensive engineering design project course. Results show that the internal proximity and joint motivation to work have positive influence together with lecturer/coach presence, informative clarity and valuable input. Reported differences clearly separated the teams with several useful features of course analysis to consider for future work.

  • 38.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innovation in Engineering Design Teams! Opening Pandora’s Box by Enabling Autonomous LearnersIn: European Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 0304-3797, E-ISSN 1469-5898Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates student prerequisites for innovation in education. Engineering design teams have been studied extensively over the last few decades, providing insights in a wide variety of areas. Building on how new knowledge is interpreted and disseminated as part of a design challenge in relatively large design teams involves a process perspective with a concern for project management, collaborative design, creativity and resource allocation. To clarify these issues, two student teams engaged in year-long engineering design Masters level project courses were studied. The case studies highlight activities that contributed to radical new outputs and a total of three patent applications. The importance of outcome-based project learning is frequently cited, but there is little understanding of the factors that spur early-phase innovation. This paper shows that early-phase innovation is strongly encouraged by active learning and forms of testing in the autonomous product development cycle. To increase student autonomy, it will be necessary to increase the extent to which the functionality of existing knowledge is put into practice.

  • 39.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Moving Beyond Traditions: Bachelor Thesis Redesign2012In: International Journal of Quality Assurance in Engineering and Technology Education, ISSN 2155-496X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 31-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Student learning is built on native ability, prior preparation and experiences but also by the compatibility of his or her learning style and the instructor’s teaching style. Past research (Kolb, 1984; Felder & Silverman, 1988; Baillie & Moore, 2004; Biggs & Tang, 2007; Crawley, Malmqvist, Ostlund, & Brodeur, 2007) indicate mismatches between engineering students’ common learning styles and traditional teaching styles. This paper addresses a transition from a teacher centered approach to a collaborative student centered approach. A longitudinal study of bachelor thesis redesign is described by following the progression in three parallel courses over four consecutive years. Moving beyond the traditional practices of individual thesis writing, a strict individual assignment has been transformed where roughly 50% now originates from collective work efforts. Findings show support to a collective approach when working with bachelor thesis writing as work groups become self-governed, attached with a creative disposition, pursuing functioning knowledge, key generic skills of industrial relevance, and collectively supporting deep level learning.

  • 40.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Moving Beyond Traditions: Bachelor Thesis Redesign2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Proactive Student Learning: Towards Innovation in Engineering EducationArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates student prerequisites for innovation in education. It looks at the level of proactivity and autonomy in students taking two full-year engineering design masters-level project courses. This research is rooted in what traditionally is categorized as a problem-based learning course. The paper presents strategies to improve the quality of student learning by shaping learning activities to encourage strong self-discipline and motivation to perform. The case studies address activities that contributed to radical new outputs and a total of three patent applications. Outcome-based project learning is frequently cited across a multitude of studies in the field, but evidence is scarce regarding the characteristics that drive early-phase innovation efforts and maximize students’ level of autonomy. This paper shows that early-phase innovation excels through deep-level learning, where embedded knowledge is applied in and stimulated by peer interactions. Proactive characteristics are apparent in work motivation, time on task and overall performance. Clearly stated learning objectives are critical in curricula design, in combination with open and flexible coaching that nurtures the intrinsic motivation to learn, participate and understand future work roles and processes.

  • 42.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Experiences of an Engineering Design Education Project: The Case of Prototyping the Next Generation Dishwasher Door2008In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT & ORGANISATIONAL LEARNING / [ed] OSullivan, K, NR READING: ACADEMIC CONFERENCES LTD , 2008, p. 61-69Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is not a skill that belongs to a single individual that cannot be improved. Instead innovation should be addressed as a social event where the unified working knowledge stands the chance of leveraging regular work activities, enhancing the status quo. The purpose of this paper is to describe how an engineering student project can produce radical new output working in a highly self-regulated project team. The paper investigates how learning objectives, creative activities and team performance is centralized around committed individuals working as one. Using a full year academic graduate course, observational data and participant's reflections has been directed to better understand the relationship between functional knowledge, problem-based learning and creative activities. The findings emphasize that clear stated learning objectives in combination with an open and flexible coaching could have a positive affect on students' motivation to learn, participate and understand future work roles and processes.

  • 43.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Knowledge Map, A Lubricant for the Firm's Machinery2005In: ECKM 05' Limerick, Ireland., 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Two facets of Innovation in Engineering Education: The interplay of Student Learning and Curricula Design2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis covers two main perspectives ofinnovation; first, innovation is regarded as an outcome-related mechanism wherelearning is expressed through artefact presentations at the end of adevelopment process; second, innovation comprises a change mechanism in theprocess of student learning, influencing educators to reconsider new methods andpractices. Building on qualitative data from engineering design courses, theaim has been to explore how learning elements in engineering educationinfluence students during early-phase innovation. By implementing andpracticing learning elements, early-phase innovation could strengthen both currentand future engineering curricula, courses, and programmes.This thesis put attention to authentic experiences in which learning elementsis acted upon by students and targeted, defined, and refined by educators.Introducing learning elements need educators to manifest learning efforts moreexplicitly to match students’ capability to interpret new knowledge. Adoptinglearning elements that challenge existing paths of action are characterized by diversity, proactivity, opennessand motivation. For students to excel in the exploration of early-phaseinnovation, it is important to identify when, how and to what extent leaningelements can be reinforced. Thestrengthened understanding by students is mirrored in improved ability to takeaction and apply relevant knowledge in distinct learning situations. Theopportunity to influence student learning provides the design and redesign of curricula,courses and programmes as a prime feature to leaning elements relevant to early-phaseinnovation. To successfully pursue innovation in engineering education abalance is necessary between responsible actors integrating learning elementsand by those determined to learn.

  • 45.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Understanding Innovativeness by Encapsulating Creativity in Higher Engineering Education2009In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education EPDE09 / [ed] Clarke, A, Ion, W, McMahon, C and Hogarth, P, 2009, p. 376-381Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovativeness implies willingness of individuals to support new ideas, creativity and experimentation with impact to change traditional practices. From past studies innovativeness has been brought forward in several dimensions (e.g. market, strategic and technological) [1]. This paper endeavor innovativeness from an academic perspective, viable in a context of product development driven courses (i.e. industry related project). Innovativeness is scarcely if all addressed in higher engineering education. In specific course elements it is difficult to find a red thread between creativity input and output. Perhaps, this is precisely the dilemma with creativity as it follows no given rule and thus not easily followed. Project output, the way things turns out, is often taken for granted as something part of a development process rather than something that need guidance and systematic support like most other elements involved. From academia a more systematic approach to perceive ideation phases is welcomed so that engineers are: 1) more acquainted with supporting methods for creativity, and 2) by integrate the use of such methods improve students' innovativeness, their individual innovation capability. The study covers a literature review of a dozen of the most cited and practiced idea generation (IG) methods. In addition, three case studies involving approximately 50 students in equally divided project groups is used to better understand and propose suitable IG methods to be used in higher engineering education. The author work with a large capstone design course Integrated Product Development (IPD), which have been used to retrieve useful data through interviews, archival records and observations. The IPD constitutes a way of working, an integrated perspective that is attained during the full year academic course. In the course plan, one of the objectives is to establish an increase in students' creative abilities. Research has shown that systematic approaches to creative thinking improve output quality, in terms of producing better final design projects [2][3]. To meet demands of a systematic approach idea generation methods is today considered essential in product development processes. In this paper several idea generating methods are presented together with their usefulness in engineering design projects conducted in close relation with industry. A comparison between several idea generation IG cases is looked upon to withdraw insights in how and what to look for when applying IG methods in project classes. Thus, the overall purpose of the paper is to investigate whether innovativeness by students can be derived from students' ways of using IG methods.

  • 46.
    Berglund, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    What influences student innovation?2012In: Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education for Future Wellbeing, EPDE 2012, 2012, p. 167-172Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how elements of the learning environment influence student innovation. In detail, the paper addresses students' perceived efficacy and their motivation to work in two parallel engineering design projects. Rather than rediscovering evaluation, student perceptions determine a project's overall efficiency by individual reflection on the effort made. Based on previous research on student efficacy [1], this study takes a student-centric point of view where the self-efficacy is grounded in students' intrinsic motivation for work. The paper's principal idea is to investigate how different elements of interaction cause students' beliefs to shift individually and in groups. A qualitative approach has been used where the results have been collected through structured questionnaires with project participants. Results show that the internal proximity and joint motivation to work have positive influence together with lecturer/coach presence, informative clarity and valuable input. Reported differences clearly separated the teams with several useful features of course analysis to consider for future work.

  • 47.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Bernhard, J.
    Co-creation beyond the expected: LAB environments as mean to enhance learning2015In: Proceedings of the 43rd SEFI Annual Conference 2015 - Diversity in Engineering Education: An Opportunity to Face the New Trends of Engineering, SEFI 2015, European Society for Engineering Education (SEFI) , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Co-creation is a term that has been used to emphasize collaborative learning in design education. Allowing students to develop both hard and soft skills has been demonstrated important to facilitate effective learning [1]. Mixing disciplines with each other is an important catalyzer to gain new insights and also grow applicability on societal challenges and innovation. This paper proposes a curricula design that matches student interdisciplinary learning, design challenges and societal benefit. With an aims to create innovation in the meeting between e.g., medicine, social sciences and engineers it is a process that involves empathy and capability to define, ideate, prototype and test. Creation allows prototypes to be made, which are by default presented and interpreted differently by people according to their understanding and frame of reference[2]. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to present the curriculum for a master level course that emphasis and support the creations performed by problem-solving interdisciplinary teams. The subsequent purpose is to position the course design in relation existing best practices that has presented similar challenges of merging the specific methods presented, e.g. Scrum and Design thinking. Design/Methodology: Observational notes and more than 100 student reflections, notes and remarks from more than 30 peer-to-peer faculty internal meetings, international workshops and faculty-student ?review screenings? sessions have been used to evaluate the pros and cons of the presented curriculum. Findings: Open lab has arisen as a new course offering targeting societal challenges and an unique opportunity for students to take part in. To allow divergent and radical thought patterns to arise design thinking and scrum are put together as key elements to support a dynamic learning environment already from start. Moreover, initial team building and checkpoints, pre-checks and cultural differences have been reported to be affected in a positive way resulting deepen student project understanding and appreciation. Conclusions: From initial course design and analysis the learning environment provides a catalyzer for learning to be appreciated and acted upon. The design of activities should build on a shared perspective from faculty and motivate students and convincing them to deepen their need for interdisciplinary design. By working interdisciplinary and collaborative it has been possible for students to co-create new knowledge beyond the expected from the stakeholders? perspective.

  • 48.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Bernhard, Jonte
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Reforming Engineering Education: Proposing a Change Model for Sustained ImpactManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities must take swift, targeted, and efficient action to overcome future challenges in engineering education. In particular, good decision-making is required to strengthen the educational efforts that influence students’ learning. Engineering education research has not yet produced a robust framework capable of supporting a systematic approach to implementing change initiatives. In addition, existing pedagogical research provides little guidance on how best to ensure the spread of good practice, and the available evidence indicates that the diffusion of such practices tends to be limited, which reduces their long-term impact. Striving for effective teaching provides a systems change at many universities, still universities seem unable to fully transmit or properly support the adoption of new practices, approaches and methods needed by faculty. This paper presents a model that can be used to guide change efforts and support good practices at times when careful decision-making can have profound long-term consequences.

  • 49.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Blackne, Johannes
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Jansson, Niklas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Proposing a Feedback System to Enhance Learning Based on Key Performance Indicators2014In: International Journal of Quality Assurance in Engineering and Technology Education, ISSN 2155-496X, Vol. 3, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a feedback system that is based on the self-evaluation of perceived productivity as a mechanism for detecting deviations in an engineering design student project. By monitoring key performance indicators, project members used feedback loops to recognize alarming patterns and act accordingly. The study is based on descriptive survey data that addressed three factors of influence: perceived productivity, perception of stage completion, and work-activity distribution. The productivity data was analysed by detecting patterns in the form of peaks and lows and by combining the patterns with qualitative data from observations and documented work activities. Measurements were taken every time the project team got together; 33 occasions during the course of the project, resulting in a total of 280 student responses for productivity (P) and completion (C) and 115 student replies for work activity distribution. The findings provide an extraction of peak values and low values that enables tracking of critical incidents. Through an in-depth activity log, each value was enriched with lessons learned about what took place and the consequences for the project, thus enhancing learning from past activities through systematic feedback sessions. The accumulated set of data provided distinguishable patterns for the project team to interpret. Over time this made student actions more proactive, activity execution more distinct and purposeful, and resource allocation in combination with feedback reflections more refined.

  • 50.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Blackne, Johannes
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Jansson, Niklas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Tracking productivity patterns in an engineering design project2013In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED: Volume 8, 2013, Vol. 8 DS75-08, p. 125-134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to analyze if self-evaluation of perceived productivity could help detect alarming patterns in time and stop projects from failing. The study is based on descriptive quantitative data that has been gathered continuously throughout a student engineering design project, highlighting three factors of influence; perceived productivity, perception of stage completion and work activity distribution. The productivity data was analyzed by detecting patterns in form of peaks or lows and combining the patterns with qualitative data from observations and documented work activities. Measurements were done on 33 occasions during the project where 280 individual answers for productivity (P) and completion (C) and 115 individual answers for work activity distribution were collected. The findings provide extraction of peak values and low values that enable tracking of critical incidents. Through an in-depth activity back-log each value was enriched with an understanding of what took place and its project consequences. Over time the recognized pattern helped the design team to become more proactive in activity precision and execution, resource allocation and process reflections.

1234567 1 - 50 of 313
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf