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  • 1. Aagaard, A.
    et al.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    The critical aspects of co-creating and co-capturing sustainable value in service business models2019In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous researchers and practitioners emphasize the potential to create value through sustainable business models (SBMs). However, little attention has been paid to how sustainable value is proposed, created, delivered, and captured in the organization, and how customers perceive sustainable value in service. The aim of this paper is to explore this research gap empirically through a case study of sustainable value (co-)creation through SBMs of sustainable service innovations as experienced among two hotels' managers, employees and customers. The contributions of the study relate to the development of SBMs in service, where the value processes happen simultaneously and where the element value perception has to be added to the extant SBM literature, which is closely related to the creation and delivery of physical goods as in product-oriented industries. The study also contributes through the dual perspective (providers and customers) on sustainable value proposition, value creation and value capture. The findings reveal different key aspects in creating and capturing sustainable value through SBMs and sustainable service innovation. The managerial implications for creating and implementing SBM in service stress the need for employee engagement, customer involvement and targeted and personal communication educating internal and external sustainability ambassadors.

  • 2.
    Aagaard, Annabeth
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Dept. Business Development & Technology.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Creating and capturing sustainable value through business model and service innovation2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of researchers and practitioners emphasize the potentials of creating value through sustainable business models. However, little attention has been paid as to how sustainable value is created and implemented into the organization and how sustainable value is perceived by the customers. This research gap is explored empirically through a case study of active facilitation and implementation of sustainable business models as experience internally and externally among two hotels’ employees and customers. The findings reveal different key control mechanisms in sustainable value creation and value capture through sustainable business models and sustainable service innovation. The managerial implications of creating and implementing sustainable business models in ways that are perceived sustainable by customer, stress the need for employee engagement, customer involvement, and targeted and personal communication educating internal and external sustainability ambassadors.

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  • 3.
    Abdullah, Maizura Ailin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Building Networks for Delivering Integrated Product-Service Offerings (IPSOs)2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Adamsson, Niklas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Grimheden, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    The Product Developer: Education and Professional Role2007In: Proceedings of ICED 2007, the 16th International Conference on Engineering Design, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to present results from a study examining the relation between the educational background and professional roles with engineers engaged in product development. Derived from previous studies, the product development engineer ought to be a multifaceted engineer, knowledgeable and skilled in several fields. This engineer should work interdisciplinary, integrative and with the aim to be creative and innovative. By using a substantial data set consisting of 300 engineers in Swedish product development organizations, we derive some important research propositions. The data shows that there are correlations between organizational responsibilities and educational program, in particular regarding focus on design, system integration, project management and technical coordination. If we want to understand how the engineering education affects the professional role of an engineer; we believe that it is critical to further investigate the developed propositions. One example is mechanical engineers; the data shows that the studied mechanical engineers rarely work with design. Our proposition is therefore to investigate the identity and legitimacy of these programs to further clarify the professional role.

  • 5.
    Adler, Gustav Adolf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Design and system integration of a rim jet solution utilizing DFMA2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Moving a new innovative idea from the drawing board to production is no easy feat. The Swedish sea rescue society (SSRS) has for the past years fostered a new design solution for their jet skis, a alternative water jet that removes the centre hub and utilises rim drive technology. The "Rim Jet" would help solve problems during rescue operations while at the same time be a starting point for SSRS zero-emission vision. To make this idea reality a first prototype is necessary for a proof of concept. Previous work on this project, conducted by three master students, resulted in a design that lacked feasibility. Through the implementation of Design for manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) on the rim jet a new itteration of the design is proposed. A practical and case based analysis of the DFMA method on a novel, non mass produced prototype was preformed discussing its advantages and disadvantages to generate a feasible, lighter, simpler and more cost efficient design. Complementing the redesign of the rim jet is a complete systems analysis of the jet ski including battery evaluation, systems integration and initial testing procedures. The final rim jet design illustrates the benefits of utilising DFMA within small, single product, projects. Implementing core elements of DFMA has proven to generate similar positive effects as intended for serial mass produced products normally associated with method.

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  • 6.
    Agarwal, Girish
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Piab.
    Revising Business Model Innovation: Towards a value process framework for AI-based Offerings2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances over the last few decades in digital technologies in general and artificial intelligence (AI) technology in particular have transformed many industries. There are many successful AI use cases in industry. However, the adoption rate of AI technology by incumbent traditional industrial manufacturing firms in their offerings remains far too low compared with the big claims made about the contribution of AI to the world economy. Incumbents’ current view of AI as merely a technology resource with which to increase automation and efficiency is far too narrow and needs to be changed. Instead, AI can be a dynamic capability giving competitive advantage to incumbents if they explore AI’s value implications in their business models (BMs). Furthermore, current value discussions both generally and within BMs are too individualistic, transactional, and operational and lack the process orientation required for a more comprehensive understanding of the value potential of AI, leading to business model innovation (BMI) for incumbents.

    With the overall ambition to support AI incorporation into incumbents’ offerings, this thesis proposes a process-based value framework for AI-driven BMs. For this purpose, this thesis research has produced five studies, including various methods, to understand the value processes within BMs in light of digitalization. Owing to the complex nature of the phenomenon under study, the methods used in the studies include quasi-experiments, case studies, semi-structured interviews, in-depth interviews, card sorting, longitudinal research, quantitative survey analysis, literature review, and literature mapping as required and relevant for the different studies.

    The studies highlight that digital and AI technologies could potentially create new values (e.g., self-learning and intelligent offerings) for different stakeholders, provide new mechanisms for value delivery through digital servitization, and enable previously impossible value-capture techniques such as value-based dynamic pricing within BMs. It can be observed that value in digital BMI is constantly changing and hence needs to be focused on explicitly within BMs and introduced as a value-identification process. Furthermore, AI entails new value process relationships in which value creation and delivery are much more integrated, dynamic, and personalized per customer, highlighting the required emphasis on hyper-personalization.

    This thesis analyzes the challenges and opportunities AI has provided within BMI in order to propose a modified value process framework for AI-enabled BMs, including value identification, value manifestation, and value capture, compared with the commonly proposed BM value processes of value creation, value delivery, and value capture. The proposed view consolidates value processes, including the individual, relational, and transactional values required by AI-based BMs, rather than just the transactional view of value covered through standard BM value processes, a view that highlights only the operational aspect of value within BMs.

    Furthermore, this thesis discusses how the current approach to AI within BMI is more from a resource perspective and therefore cannot realize the full potential of AI technology. The thesis elaborates on how incumbents can utilize AI technology within BMI to create a competitive advantage by concentrating on the process view of value through the proposed new framework for handling highlighted opportunities and challenges. The new role of ecosystem stakeholders as innovation partners within BMI utilizing data/AI-driven capabilities and organizational value changes is discussed. Finally, this thesis highlights implications for BMI theory in terms of new value processes and implications for practice in terms of the BMI framework, concluding by presenting challenges and opportunities arising from the usage of AI within BMI by incumbents.

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  • 7.
    Agarwal, Girish Kumar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Johansson, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Edge AI Driven Technology Advancements Paving Way towards New Capabilities2020In: International Journal of Innovation and Technology Management (IJITM), ISSN 0219-8770, article id 2040005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As industries hold the opportunity to embrace artificial intelligence (AI) driven innovation, their success to a significant extent will depend on the value the new technology generates for different business stakeholder groups. This is in turn dependent upon how management can embrace these techniques and change as companies will frequently need to transform both internal processes and offerings to customers in order to reap the benefits of AI. AI is a growing research area currently concentrated around technology and modeling of techniques and yet only few examples and limited research are available, on how AI technology enables new capabilities that can impact the value delivered as well as radically transform it. We thus need to understand what new capabilities these technologies bring about and how they are used. Based on three concrete empirical quasi-experiments, interviews conducted with start-ups and a Swedish industrial manufacturing firm dealing with outdoor power products (like grass-cutters, chain-saws, concrete-saws, etc.) for professional and consumer use and using an analytical framework derived from the Resource Based View, this paper explores capabilities enabled through Edge AI and the competitive advantage these may offer. Specific capabilities (self-calibration, enhanced-sensing, selective-capture and reputation) are identified and implications for theory are discussed, pointing out the importance to consider this type of technology not only as a resource, but rather as a dynamic capability in itself.

  • 8.
    Agarwal, Girish Kumar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Simonsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hald, Kim Sundtoft
    Johanson, Anders
    KTH.
    Value-capture in digital servitization2022In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 986-1004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper intends to explore the perception of value delivered in digital servitization in a business-to-business context of incumbent manufacturing firms. We investigate how individual entrepreneurial orientation (IEO) influence and affect the adoption of such digital servitization strategies. The observations are made through a survey and empirical assessment across a couple of large industrial organizations interested in servitization and digitalization. Findings contribute to the existing literature on digital servitization and business model innovation by suggesting that IEO influence perceived value in delivering digital service offers, whereas functional affiliation does not. Further observations suggest that digital capabilities can become a crucial enabler for the perception of value delivered in digital business models by providing swift access to data for affected stakeholders.

  • 9.
    Agarwal, Girish Kumar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Swan, Erik
    Axelsson Lejon, Ulf
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Johansson, Anders
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Value Changes during Service Delivery2021In: 2021 IEEE International Conference on Engineering, Technology and Innovation (ICE/ITMC), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) , 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most industries are shifting from product-orientedbusiness models towards services to step up the value chain andengage in long-term relationships with their customersthroughout the service lifecycle. Digital technologies arecontributing to servitization in many ways by creating andenabling capabilities like connectivity, IoT, data generation andassessment, etc., for new value generation, distribution, andcapture. Because value is subjective, dynamic, and changes duringthe service lifecycle, service providers need to examine closely thevalue perceptions of customers to constantly provide better valueand remain relevant with the competition. Through a consumersurvey and a longitudinal study of thirteen customers, this paperuses qualitative and quantitative assessment to identify the valuedimensions that play a major role for customers being onboardedon a digital enabled service, and also highlights how customervalue dimensions change over the course of the service lifecycle.One important finding is that change in customer value perceptiondoes not follow a pattern and is highly individual and personal.This opens a discussion regarding the need for hyperpersonalizationin successful servitization, and the role of digitaltechnologies towards the same.

  • 10.
    Ahmed, Asik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Simonovic, Milan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Integrering av medarbetarperspektiv vid utveckling av digitala vårdtjänster inom primärvården2021Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    New technological innovations are constantly emerging that have the potential to reform entire industries. For companies to maintain market position they must be attentive to new technological solutions. In recent years development of new technical solutions for patient contact and management of patients have begun to be implemented and adopted by the Swedish primary healthcare organizations due to incentives from the government. This adoption has then become accelerated because of the covid-19 pandemic. This trend of digital transformation is expected to continue well into the future. The purpose of this study is to provide an insight into how healthcare professionals are involved and considered in the product development process of digital support tools in primary healthcare, where they can share their knowledge and experience of working in the industry. The work focuses on technical solutions for triage, anamnesis and counselling in non-acute healthcare and how these affect the healthcare professionals’ working methods and everyday routines. This is a qualitative study based on interviews with people who work within primary healthcare and at health technology companies. The interviews propose how to use the technical solutions in healthcare and how health technology companies work to tailor technical solutions and then implement it. The study makes an attempt to answer three questions. Why healthcare professionals' perspectives and work situation should be considered in the product development of digital services in primary health care? Healthcare professionals' experience of digital tools and how these affect their work processes? And lastly, what difficulties in daily work they experience with the implementation of these digital tools and what is important for the future digital transformation. The study shows that inclusion of the healthcare professionals’ perspective and work situation contributes to an increased probability for the product to meet customer needs and to remain competitive. Furthermore, the study displays that the organizations that have implemented adigital transformation tools have streamlined their work. The healthcare professionals can handle more patients and are more accessible to patients. However, they feel that the change in routines and working methods after the implementation can lead to an unbalance in workload within the health centre, but with good leadership it can be solved at an organizational level. There are also other consequences of the implementation, including that accessibility can lead to patients contacting health centres for non-acute things that are just a disruption to care. This can then adversely affect productivity. 

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  • 11.
    AIDANPÄÄ, MATHILDA
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    SJÖBERG, MATHILDA
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    De etiska konsekvenserna av produktutveckling: Oönskade konsekvenser av strävan efter zero-labourfactories2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s development of automation happens at an increasing rate driven by innovation and product development. Companies have to keep up with this progress to stay competitive. The question has risen whether we are now facing a new industrial revolution or not. The ethical perspective has now become a concern.

    The purpose of this report is to investigate the following questions:

    • How big of a role has the ethical perspective in decision-making processes with regards to automation?

    • Who is responsible for ethical issues within product development?

    • To what extent should ethics be a part of engineering education?

    The chosen method during the study was extensive literature studies and semi structured interviews with employees and managers from the affected area.

    The result of the report is that the ethical perspective has a smaller impact in the decisionmaking processes compared to other factors. The responsibility of the ethical consequences lies in both product development companies and producing companies. Finally, ethical perspectives should be integrated into engineering education.

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  • 12.
    Aktas, Stefanos
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Wennhall, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    AI - an Untapped Opportunity for Innovation Developing a Screening Tool for AI and Innovation2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    It is known that innovation enables companies to penetrate new markets and achieve higher margins and that technology can contribute to achieving a competitive ad-vantage and growth for organizations. A technology that has as of recently grown to become relevant for organizations is Artificial Intelligence (AI). Even so, previous studies have expressed the difficulty of implementing AI, which motivated this study.

    The main purpose of this study was to develop and test a screening tool that will work as a support in increasing an organization’s utilization of AI and innovation capability. During the course of the study, a great amount of focus was also put into conducting a preliminary analysis in preparation for a larger study that will be dependent on gathering large amounts of quantitative data.

    The research took on a three-phase-process. The first phase focused on gaining basic knowledge in regards to AI, innovation, technology management and model development. The findings in the first phase helped to formulate proper research questions that were applicable to the study.

    After that, the study moved on to the second phase which focused on a more in-depth literature study. This then led on to the development of an appropriate questionnaire for investigating factors that are relevant for AI and innovation, and an assessment model that would be connected to the questionnaire. The questionnaire was used for gathering responses that would be beneficial for the preliminary analysis in the form of a pilot study. The questionnaire and the assessment model together form a screening tool that gives a visual output of an organization’s position in regards to AI and innovation.

    The third and final phase included testing of the created screening tool, analyzing the findings from the pilot study and drawing conclusions from both the developed screening tool, and the results from the pilot study.

    The result from the literature study was the screening tool which takes five di-mensions into consideration that shows relevance to AI and innovation. These di-mensions are Structures, Resources, Methods, Action and Business,eachcontaining areas that exist in organizations that can be adjusted for the sake of the implemen-tation of AI and improvement of innovation management. The screening tool was tested on two separate organizations and managed to reflect these organizations’ AI progress through the assessment model. The screening tool was also applied to the pilot study which resulted in giving indications of what to expect when conducting a larger quantitative study.

    Despite the results gained from this study, it showed that further tests and studies need to be made in order to obtain more viable results. This study will act as a guideline for future studies to attain those results.

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  • 13. Alfredsson, Ludvig
    et al.
    Fazl, Asade
    Lund, Katarina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Söderberg, Björn
    Product Development Management2011In: Entering the tigers cave – Perspectives on Japanese and Swedish Product Development / [ed] Bergsjö, Dag, Göteborg: Department of Product and Production Development, Chalmers University of Technology , 2011Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Algkvist Nordfors, Dante
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Andersson, Jakob
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Utvecklingsprocessen för projekt med olika innovationsgrad2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Companies all over the world are dependent on innovation in order to continuously keep their position on their specific market. Innovation exists within different grades whereas low innovation, or incremental innovation, can be seen as a further development of an already existing product or service. High innovation, or radical innovation, can instead be seen as a development of a completely new product or service, which is not already on the market. All companies use projects of different sizes and with different goals. The projects might differ between themself with respect to the grade of innovation. This report examines and discusses how different grades of innovation affect the development process within the project. The study has taken place on a company within the semiconductor industry where they specialize in highly technological products. It is a rather small company who is singularly responsible for the manufacturing and distribution of the products in the Nordic. Before the study, a preliminary investigation was made, followed by interviews with four respondents on the company in question. The results show that there is no actual difference between projects of different grades of innovation when it comes to the planning phase of the project. During the whole development phase the projects differ with respect to time, handling of resources, the impact of external parties, the importance of an effective project and the importance of the project to the company. The results from this study are not absolute due to the fact that it is a small company with only about 50 employees. It is also a company within a fairly niche industry. To have the result being applicable within all industries and companies, continuous research and further development of this study is needed where different companies of different sizes in different industries are analyzed and compared to each other. The experience and knowledge that this report brings might be a source for further research within the subject. 

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  • 15.
    Alhifi, Haidar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Samir, Laith
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Design och konstruktion av släpvagnför tävlingsbilar2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    New markets for trailers designed to transport racing cars, tools and spare parts were opened in conjunction with the Transport Agency´s introduction of the extended B driving license. Such trailers are possible to purchase on the Swedish trailer market today. However, the ones on the market are only suitable for the BE driving license. This project is carried out on behalf of the company Fredrik Wagner AB, which is a company that designs and constructs conveyor belts. The aim of this work was to investigate and explore the possibility of implementing a new trailer model to the Swedish market. The goal of this work was to develop a trailer concept and design a CAD-model of the concept.Information about motorsports was collected to define and to improve the understanding of the problem. In order to find solutions to the defined problem, idea and concept generation phases were conducted. The solutions were then developed into CAD concepts by using the CAD-software Solid Edge.The design and construction in this project was limited to the trailer body and its components only. The trailer body´s concept is offered in two versions, one adapted for the extended B driver´s license while the other is for the BE license. The version for the extended B license got at total weight of 695 kg, while the BE version got a total weight of 1 005 kg.The trailer body was designed to transport racing cars with a weight of 1 100 kg, however, it is possible to transport other cars with the trailer body if these do not exceed the weight limit. Since the work was limited to the trailer body only, the construction of a trailer chassis was excluded. The trailer chassis can either be purchased from a retailer or designed by Frederik Wagner AB. How the trailer chassis and the trailer body should be fitted together was though omitted as further work with the trailer.

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    Design and construction of a trailer for racing cars
  • 16. Allvin, M.
    et al.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Zika-Viktorsson, Annika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Project Overload: A study on work situation in complex industrial organizations2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Amann, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Changing Path and Curbing Cost Escalation: Lessons Learnt from the Gripen Case2021In: Defence and Peace Economics, ISSN 1024-2694, E-ISSN 1476-8267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extant theory suggests that paths of development, although identified as being unsustainable, might be difficult to depart from. The aim of this study has therefore been to explore and understand how a path change can be facilitated in a setting of complex product systems. A unique single case of product development that managed to curb an unsustainable intergenerational cost escalation for complex defence equipment has been studied. The study shows a relation between a path change and a challenging opportunity, and also indicates how this relation can be moderated by the company management and the customers. The study provides both theoretical and practical implications, supporting understanding and facilitation of path changes. 

  • 18.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Department of Military Studies, Swedish Defence University.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Affordability aspects in the concept generation of defence systems2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cost escalation for fighter aircraft is arguably not sustainable. Pushing frontiers of technology by incremental improvements of traditional platforms has led to an exponential increase in cost. This paper addresses the process of concept generation with the purpose to explore how affordability is managed in that process, in order to identify possible measures to improve the likelihood of generating affordable concepts. This is done by studying two cases of concept generation of future combat air systems. The concepts generated in these two cases are however not curbing the cost escalation and are, with only one notable exception, based on incremental innovation. Nevertheless, the empirical observations offer leads to potentially foster a more innovative and cost conscious concept generation process, indicating avenues for future research.

  • 19.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Affordability Aspects in the Development of Defence Equipment: Case Studies of Concept Generation in the Defence Industry2020In: Defence and Peace Economics, ISSN 1024-2694, E-ISSN 1476-8267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cost escalation for many complex defence equipment is arguably not sustainable. Customer driven requirements have led to an exponential increase in costs by pushing frontiers of technology to support primarily incremental improvements of traditional equipment concepts. Accordingly, affordability has become a more discussed subject in defence acquisition. This paper addresses the process of generating complex defence equipment concepts. The purpose is to explore how affordability is managed in that process and to identify possible leads to how an unsustainable cost escalation for this type of equipment can be curbed. This is done by studying two cases of concept generation of future combat air equipment systems from a company process perspective. This applied micro perspective on cost escalation showed that none of the concepts generated in these two cases were assessed to curb the cost escalation. Further, the innovation model for the generated concepts, with only one notable exception, was incremental. Nevertheless, the empirical observations from these two cases offer leads on how to potentially foster a more innovative and affordability-oriented concept generation process for future defence equipment, as well as indicating avenues for future research.

  • 20.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Department of Military Studies, Swedish Defence University.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Affordability Management And Its Influence On Concept Development2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    DISRUPTIVE INNOVATION BARRIERS: EXPLORING VALUE NETWORK INERTIA IN COMPLEX LOW-VOLUME PRODUCTS2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    DISRUPTIVE INNOVATION IN COMPLEX PRODUCT SYSTEMS (COPS): INFLUENCING CHARACTERISTICS AND CONDITIONSManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Complex product systems (CoPS) tend to get more complex for every new productgeneration, which for some product categories imply cumbersome escalating costs. Forthese products, promises of lowered costs by disruptive innovation certainly areappealing, but frequently deluding. Therefore, this paper aims at exploring specific CoPScharacteristics and conditions influencing companies’ propensity to develop disruptiveproducts, and to derive related managerial implications. This is performed by analysingfour case studies of CoPS product development in four different industrial sectors. Thestudy suggests that specific characteristics and conditions in the CoPS setting influenceproduct development management to aim at incremental improvements of earlier productconcepts, whereby disruptive innovations in reality rarely get a chance. Moreover, it isfound that barriers for disruptive innovation in CoPS classified as tournament goods areconsidered even higher, because this product category generally do not offer anyperformance oversupply.

  • 23.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Swedish Defence University, Sweden.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    FACILITATING PATH CHANGE: A HISTORICAL SUCCESS STORY OF PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Swedish Defence University.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Inducing Affordability?: Observations From An Experimental Study Of Concept Generation2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early preliminary concepts are claimed to have a profound impact on the final product. Since these concepts often are based on intuitive judgements, it is important that these judgements are appropriate for the desired outcome. Intuition is derived from what one brings to mind, and consequently, the access to information is important for making relevant judgements. Therefore, when a departure from a present path of development is sought for, access to new information is likely to be required. Results from an experimental study, addressing affordability and concept generation, indicated that individuals were influenced, by the provision of selective information, to make more cost considerations and even to change approach when generating new concepts. It was further recognized that weak abilities to estimate costs in a lifecycle and capability perspective likely hampered low-cost ambitions. The findings from this study are suggested to contribute to theory on product development, and to support affordability when new products are developed.

  • 25.
    Amann, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Department of Military Studies, Swedish Defence University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Managing affordability in concept development of complex product systems (CoPS)2021In: Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, ISSN 0953-7325, E-ISSN 1465-3990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study originates in a recognised unsustainable cost escalation for complex defence equipment. In order to understand how such cost escalation for complex product systems (CoPS) can be avoided, this study comparatively explores four different industrial sectors – energy, transportation, healthcare and defence – with and without intergenerational increasing costs, represented by four international companies. The results, collected from studying the development of one of each company’s products, reveal some characteristic differences in market factors between those sectors and companies having problems with intergenerational escalating costs and customer affordability, as compared to other sectors and companies. It is suggested that dependent on market characteristics, it might be necessary to actively manage affordability when CoPS are developed. Efforts made by the companies to make products more affordable were identified, and several factors enabling and disabling the development of less costly products without compromising customer needs were explored. Further, the implications of affordability management in a CoPS setting are elaborated on.

  • 26.
    Amezcua Hidalgo, Ramon Andres
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Towards Understanding the “User of the Future”2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A fast-moving technological landscape is driving companies of today to constantly search for the solutions of tomorrow. As a result, companies are constantly searching for the next big thing and speculating on possible futures. Across multiple industries, it is easy to find concepts, workshops, hackathons, and marketing campaigns that address the concept of the future. With themes titled as "The future of ..."(be it medicine, food, manufacturing, sports, etc.) or "... of the future" (be it cars interiors, homes, transportation, nutrition, etc.), companies try to reimagine products and services for a speculative future. Design practice plays a large role in this movement. However, a specific contemporary global phenomenon, the Aging Populations, is surfacing important limitations to user-centred design. These limitations are resulting in unsustainable practices and negative connotations in design solutions that lead to Ageism. Furthermore, user-centred design processes are faced with the challenge of creating proposals that are limited by what could be misconceptions and prejudices based on personal knowledge. Since these proposals are conceived by present factors, needs and users, design is hence fringed by temporal positioning. The combination of these factors can lead to ideas of the future that may not be adequate or accurate for both an uncertain future, and the people that might participate in it.

    One may ask then, when identifying new opportunities, or when designing new products, what characteristics should be considered in the product development process that will remain stable and continuous in the future? This thesis explores this challenge. Resulting in a theoretically developed framework that helps design practitioners to understand the context that people may interact with in the future. Based on a Practice-Oriented Design approach, this thesis proposes a Transgenerational Practice Distillation Process that results in a Transgenerational Practice Unit, which aims at understanding the context in which the “Users of the Future” will interact with products and services. Then, by studying the practice of eating in a Quick Service Restaurant (QSR) in Tokyo with people with ages 60 to 80, the proposed framework explores how long-lasting contextual elements can be found through participatory design techniques. The output of the proposed framework consisted of stimulating material for creative processes that helped product innovation professionals in reimagining the way restaurants can be designed.

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  • 27. Andersen, T. C. K.
    et al.
    Aagaard, A.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring business model innovation in SMEs in a digital context: Organizing search behaviours, experimentation and decision-making2022In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 19-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today's business environment, digitalization plays a key role in establishing competitive advantage and developing new business models. However, little is known about business model innovation (BMI) processes and practices of small and medium-sized enterprise (SMEs) in their digital venturing. Thus, the aim of this paper is to address this research gap by investigating the process activities of SMEs in effectively building new business models through digitalization. Through a case study of 18 SMEs, document studies and 36 interviews, we explore the BMI processes during the case companies' digital transformation. The research results identify four critical BMI process activities: (1) assessing the environment in search of new opportunities, (2) conveying a sense of urgency, (3) exploring and testing new opportunities through experimentation and (4) handling decision-making with a combination of intuition and data. Finally, our study reveals managerial implications related to data-driven decision-making during BMI, constituting four managerial dilemmas: (1) prognosis and scenario-driven search myopia, (2) timing and sustainability, (3) radical shift from traditional experimentation to data-based methods and (4) using intuition versus data-driven decision-making. 

  • 28.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Lindström, Göran
    Uppsala University.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University.
    Dahlin, Peter
    Jönköping University.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lage Hellman, Jens
    Chalmers.
    Olofsson, Christer
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Olsson, Annika
    Lund University.
    Olsson, Magnus
    Lund University.
    Svengren Holm, Lisbeth
    Lund University.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Skapa kundnärvaro i innovationsprocessen2008In: Innovationsförmåga / [ed] Annika Olsson, Malmö: Holmbergs i Malmö AB , 2008, p. 40-59Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29. Andrén, L
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sjölander, S
    Opportunistic adaptation in start-up companies2003In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Innovation Management, ISSN 1368-275X, E-ISSN 1741-5098, Vol. 3, no 5-6, p. 546-562Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Aneflouss, Zineb
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    A new business model strategy to improve shared mobility services: A case study on Sweden2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    It is widely recognized that the world’s over-reliance on transportation contributes to many environmental problems, especially in urban areas. Sustainable  mobility is a solution and an important dimension of a Smart City. Shared mobility services are part of sustainable mobility and they are widening its portfolio especially in the past decade. However, the number of users is still low compared to its high potential, and innovative solutions can only succeed with the combination  of increasing the awareness of citizens, incentivizing them, and promoting their behavioural change.

    This paper is dedicated to the shared mobility business models as part of the collaborative consumption, and finding out the challenges and opportunities of this emerging market in a Swedish context and comparing it to a Moroccan one. 

    The goal is to explore the key features of the main market players and the possible ways of improvements that could possibly take carpooling and car-sharing to a next level. It explores the high potential of gamification and other mechanisms to incentivize voluntary behavioural changes towards shared  mobility solutions.

    In a first place the theoretical part provide an overview of the shared mobility in general with its different aspects highlighting the role of new technologies and internet in the development of this concept. An online survey aimed at testing the knowledge of the respondents on the concept, discover which elements affect  their involvement and find out how things can be improved by analysing the feedbacks.

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  • 31.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, F.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Boccardelli, P.
    Predicting team collective intention to innovate: An institutional perspective2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, Federica
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Self-organizing coordination and control approaches: the impact of social interaction processes on self-regulated innovation activities in self-managing teams2017In: Innovation Management and Computing: Ecosystems and TechnologyIdea Generation and Content Model Processing / [ed] Cyrus Nourcan, Apple Academic Press, 2017, p. 37-75Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of social norms, as well as how and under which conditions social norms impact behavior, are determined by the social influence process. By leveraging the influence process we can create and handle change in self-managing teams in order to foster growth and steer team members in a positive direction, away from negative habits. At the same time, if poorly managed the developed social norms can inhibit change, and in the worst case result in conflict and resentment within the team.

    If team members feel part of a group and consider that group membership is relevant for them, they will adapt their behavior to align to the group's norms and standards, which in turn will dictate context-specific attitudes and behaviors that are appropriate for the team.

    This chapter focuses on teams’ social norms, distinguishing between descriptive- (what most others do) and injunctive (what most others approve or disapprove of) norms, investigating important moderators in the relationships between descriptive norms and behaviors, discussing the role of the social environment on the changes to and inculcation of injunctive social norms, and describing how individual team members' attributes refine the susceptibility of individuals to normative influences.

  • 33.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Foss, N.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, F.
    Interaction of control systems and stakeholder networks in shaping the identities of self-managed teamsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Foss, N.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, F.
    The interplay between the pre-existing managerial control systems and stakeholder's networks in self-managed team's identities2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35. Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    Foss, Nicolai
    Brunetta, Federica
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Interaction of Control Systems and Stakeholder Networks in Shaping the Identities of Self-Managed Teams2017In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 619-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Team identity has received little research attention even though an increasing number of firms are moving to team-based organizations and there is evidence that teams form identities. We explore the extent to which team identity can be institutionalized as a central organizing principle of team-based firms. We argue that managerial and stakeholder interventions shape the self-construction of team identity as well as the team's commitment to specific work objectives. We also suggest that team identity becomes isomorphic to organizational identity because of pressures related to: (1) the presence of a dense network of managers and stakeholders, which orients teams towards a focus on certain aspects of the higher-order identity; (2) the use of team routines and regular feedback loops, which force alignment with the organizational identity; and (3) the use of coordinating roles aimed at promoting, ratifying and reinforcing the convergence of identity within the team. We analyse multiple cases from a major multinational corporation in the telecommunications industry, which we examine through the lens of a multi-level model of controls involving the micro, meso and macro organizational levels. We expand and refine the model in the process.

  • 36.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    FOSS, Nicolai J.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Brunetta, Federica
    The interaction of control systems and stakeholder networks in shaping the identities of selfmanaged teams.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Team identity has received little research attention even though an increasing number of firms are moving to team-based organizations and there is evidence that teams form identities. We explore the extent to which team identity can be institutionalized as a central organizing principle of team-based firms. We argue that managerial and stakeholder interventions shape the self-construction of team identity as well as the team’s commitment to specific work objectives. We also suggest that team identity becomes isomorphic to organizational identity because of pressures related to: 1) the presence of a dense network of managers and stakeholders, which orients teams towards a focus on certain aspects of the higher-order identity; 2) the use of team routines and regular feedback loops, which force alignment with the organizational identity; and 3) the use of coordinating roles aimed at promoting, ratifying, and reinforcing the convergence of identity within the team. We analyze multiple cases from a major multinational corporation in the telecommunications industry, which we examine through the lens of a multi-level model of controls involving the micro, meso, and macro organizational levels. We expand and refine the model in the process.

  • 37.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    FOSS, Nicolai J
    Martini, Antonella
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    A Multilevel Framework for Organizational Learning in Self-Managed Team Organizations: an abductive micro-foundations studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the social cognitive learning perspective, this study advances a multilevel theory of organizational learning for team-based organizations, which integrates principles of cognition and motivation through team-level self-regulation mechanisms. We highlight and unpack these mechanisms, which have long been treated as black boxes in organizational learning research. We describe them using an empirical case from a multinational company, and we reveal their potential to affect motivation and socio-cognitive functions in self-managing teams. We also clarify the complexity of their relationships through a set of propositions and provide a definition of the team-level self-regulation mechanisms constructs.

  • 38.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Investigating the impact of agile methods on learning and innovation2013Report (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Martini, Antonella
    Peonia, Laura
    The dual control systems of agile teams: exploring knowledge management issues2014In: IFKAD 2014: 9th International Forum on Knowledge Asset Dynamics, 2014, p. 1907-1931Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper aims to contribute to the exploration of micro-foundations for innovation in autonomous team-based firms. It describes how different types of management control systems influence the innovation performance of teams through an extensive field study of a large scale agile implementation. It reveals the moderating role played by different kinds of managerial control systems and by perceived time pressure on teams in the relationship between a team's absorptive capacity and its innovation performance. Design/methodology/approach - A total of 44 individual semi-structured interviews were used to collect data over three separate data collection stages conducted from August to November 2013. All data were triangulated with the qualitative content analysis results of free comments from 121 people, covering different agile roles in the same organizations as above, and embedded in a survey performed in August 2013. Due to the complexity of the topic and the lack of prior studies investigating the effect of agile implementation on team learning and innovation capabilities, an abductive research approach (Peirce, 1931) was selected as a suitable method. Originality/value - The empirical results indicate that a team's beliefs on the importance of learning strongly influence its self-regulated learning behaviours. They represent the configuration of AC meta-routines underlying the concept of absorptive capacity (Lewin et al., 2011) at the team-level, conducive to teams' exploration activities. Moreover, the antecedents for a team's exploitative and exploratory innovation activities are presented and two types of managerial controls for driving exploitative innovation activities are identified. Additionally, team-level absorptive capacity was analysed, since it is a less explored, but important construct, leading to a team's exploitative product innovation. Practical implications - This study's findings have a number of implications for practice. The results imply that autonomous team-based organizations may be better off not using one single standard control system to manage all their teams. In fact, beyond securing a team's access to knowledge, management needs to provide teams with differentiated means to develop necessary competencies and capacities for understanding, assimilating and using the knowledge they retrieve. In addition, management should influence a team's beliefs by valuing the tasks requiring innovation and transmitting sustainable values to teams through their mission and vision statements.

  • 40.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Khanagha, S.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Breaking the iron cage: A multi-level perspective towards organizational control in post-bureaucratic structure2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Khanagha, S.
    Volberda, H.
    Self-Regulated Teams, Vicarious Learning, and Innovation: The role of managerial control systems2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Khanagha, Saeed
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    A Multi-Level Study of Managerial Control Influence on Self-Managed Team Innovativeness2015In:  Academy of Management conference, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we investigate organizational control systems as the underpinnings of large organizations’ ability to perform after transition to a flattened and decentralized structure. We consider horizontal social control mechanisms on team level (concertive control induced by high team identification) and vertical bureaucratic managerial control mechanisms on organization level (interactive and diagnostic management control systems), and examine their combined influence on the innovativeness of self-managing product development teams in a large company. We utilize a rich empirical data set including a multilevel multi-source survey of the members of 97 organizational teams, their internal team managers, and their higher-level managers. In contrast to some prior research findings, we find a negative effect of team’s concertive control on team’s innovativeness . In addition, managerial interactive control systems fostering a more prestigious team’s organizational image seem to strengthen the negative effect of concertive control on team’s innovativeness, while in combination with diagnostic control systems, legitimizing current external organizational team’s image, the effect of concertive control becomes positive. Interestingly, our analysis suggests that as team’s concertive control increases, managerial control systems show a converse relationship in such a way that the diagnostic control reduces and the interactive control increases the negative influence of concertive control.

  • 43.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Learning and innovation issues in agile teams: A case study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to contribute to a more nuanced understanding of thebarriers that an agile/lean research and development (R&D) organization hasto overcome in order to be able to manage and apply knowledge effectively tobalance exploration and exploitation activities. It explores how people working in agile teams create, retain and transfer knowledge through theimplementation of a so-called Agile Scrum methodology. Our main findings arein the form of recommendations about the different innovation strategies firms should pursue. The links to the firm’s environmental conditions (such asorganizational culture, maturity, management practices) should allow thoseresults to be applied to other organizational contexts.We build on our understanding of the effects of agile/lean characteristics onorganizational learning and knowledge creation to propose ways to achievealignment within the firm at the operational level in order to facilitateambidextrous organizational learning through a case study of a software R&Dorganization. Data were collected from a questionnaire and interviews in aniterative process.

  • 44.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Martini, A.
    Peonia, L.
    Agile implementation and organizational knowledge: Is there a problem?: An abductive framework2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Martini, A.
    Peonia, L.
    Investigating the impact of agile control mechanisms on learning in scrum teams2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Martini, Antonella
    Appio, F. P.
    Social conduct, learning and innovation: An abductive study of the dark side of agile software development2015In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agile methodologies have been adopted by an increasing number of organizations to improve their responsiveness. However, few studies have empirically analysed the effect of Agile on long-term organizational goals such as learning and innovation. Using an abductive approach, this study examines the relationships between self-regulated teams’ social conduct and their resulting learning and innovation. Results indicate that the perceived time pressure to get the job done greatly impedes team engagement in learning and innovation activities. Time pressure is affected by the various control strategies deriving from the implementation of Agile, which constitute its dark side: concertive, belief, diagnostic and boundary controls.

  • 47.
    Arekrans, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Laurenti, Rafael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Circular Economy Transitions: The Maturity of Incumbents2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A circular economy (CE) transition poses new challenges and opportunities for industrial incumbents. When implementing CE, the existing processes, routines, and behaviors are questioned. As such, practitioners must consider the required changes related directly to CE and contextual factors in managing the transition. For this purpose, this study conceptualizes a maturity model, highlighting critical elements to consider to facilitate the transition. The model builds on both state-of-the-art literature in CE and empirical findings from three large industrial firms.

    The proposed model consists of the CE practices:

    • (1) design of product-service systems,
    • (2) processes and logistics in manufacturing and supply,
    • (3) circular business model innovation,
    • (4) circular innovation in the ecosystem,

    and the management practices:

    • (1) strategic sustainability integration and
    • (2) management controls.

    The model is intended to help practitioners define a CE roadmap to facilitate the transition towards a more circular business.

  • 48.
    Arekrans, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Laurenti, Rafael
    Tecnologico de Monterrey, School of Engineering and Science, Ave. Eugenio Garza Sada 2501, Monterrey, N.L., México, 64849.
    The role of radical innovation in circular strategy deployment2022In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circular economy (CE) is gaining interest among industrial firms in light of sustainability concerns, and several incumbent firms are integrating it into their strategy. In this study, we scrutinize learnings from three large established industrial firms with a clear CE agenda and that are front-runners in CE strategy deployment. We analyze exploitation and exploration approaches to CE and problematize how these approaches relate to radical innovation, which we argue is critical for achieving CE. Semi-structured interviews (n = 30) were used to collect data. We found several issues referring to

    • (1) challenges and approaches to normative management,
    • (2) how the innovation ecosystem is engaged,
    • (3) how goals and metrics relate to CE, and
    • (4) resources and coordination regarding the CE initiative.

    Overall, current exploitative approaches are favored over explorative, mirroring an undesired imbalance between the two. We suggest several ways to counteract this. For example,

    • (1) addressing existing norms so that they align with the ambitions in CE,
    • (2) actively managing collaboration in the innovation ecosystem, including radically new setups of different actors, and
    • (3) that managers need to carefully consider when and how to use goals and measurements in a circular strategy deployment, to foster both radical and incremental innovation.
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    fulltext
  • 49.
    Arekrans, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Laurenti, Rafael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sopjani, Liridona
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Analysis of Innovation Management Issues in Barriers to Circular Economy2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current linear system of extract-produce-consume-dispose poses considerable challenges for achieving sustainability goals and will eventually lead to the depletion of non-renewable natural resources. Circular Economy (CE) is promoted as a possible sustainable way forward. The suggested transition questions society at large and the business-as-usual of existing firms in particular.

    Barriers to CE implementation have become a growing stream of literature across several sectors and relating to different levels of society. However, this emerging stream of research and how it handles issues of management appears not to be helpful to managers and organizations. This study is, therefore, a systematic review of the current state-of art of circular economy barriers where we scrutinize issues related to management. Attention is brought to matters concerning innovation in management, in particular, business model innovation and innovation ecosystems. 

    Our findings suggest that these topics are indeed indicated as important in the CE literature, yet in very diverse ways depending on the studied case. Implications for future studies within CE are drawn, with suggested point of departure in innovation management topics.

  • 50.
    Arekrans, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sopjani, Liridona
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Laurenti, Rafael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Tecnologico de Monterrey, School of Engineering and Science, Ave. Eugenio Garza Sada 2501, Monterrey, N.L., México, 64849.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Barriers to access-based consumption in the circular transition: A systematic review2022In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 184, article id 106364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Barriers to access-based consumption (ABC) have been extensively studied in different strands of literature. However, cumulative knowledge is not organized to date, and a comprehensive overview of barriers identified by empirical studies in diverse strands is lacking. Such a picture is essential for laying the ground for further change-oriented research and actual changes in practice. This article reports on the results of a systematic review on barriers to transitioning from ownership- to access-based consumption. The review focuses on the literature strands product-service systems, circular economy, sharing economy, and collaborative consumption. Through open and axial coding of 289 barriers reported in 45 empirical studies, we found 17 themes of barriers concerning consumers, business, and society. The analysis of the barriers reveals four significant insights important for the research and practitioner community:

    1. the overall experience of ABC and trust mechanisms need to be better understood;
    2. organizational aspects in traditional business need a system change;
    3. regulation plays a fundamental role in making ABC work for business, society, and sustainability; and
    4. sharing risks and experimentation for new learnings are necessary.

    These four major insights suggest that consumers need business and government to offer enabling conditions for ABC – spanning from raising awareness and understanding to improving user experience. Furthermore, businesses need governments to create the necessary structures to support ABC offerings – from decreasing risks to increasing incentives. How and which mechanisms can further facilitate circular behaviors is a salient topic for future investigations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    arekrans-et-al-2022-ABC-barriers
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