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  • 1.
    Bagge, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Analysis of process parameters during press quenching of bevel gear parts2012In: The 5th International Swedish Production Symposium: 6th-8th of November 2012 Linköping, Sweden / [ed] Mats Björkman, 2012, 251-259 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Defining manufacturing tolerances is an important task for a process planner before starting production of a new product or introducing new processes. One of the more complex processes to handle is the heat treatment of gears. Press quenching is a heat treatment method where the gear is mechanically forced to keep or attain the desired geometry, with less geometrical distortions in comparison to oil bath quenching. The objective of this paper is to discover how design of experiments can be used to scrutinize press quenching of bevel gears. The first part of this investigation shows how different process parameter settings influence geometry of the bevel gear. Based on the results of the experiments, predictions and statistical simulations, the outcome of the press quenching process can be estimated. Estimations for the number of defect parts then form the basis for evaluating whether the proposed tolerances meet the quality requirements. The work is based on an industrial case where 55 bevel gear crown wheels for heavy trucks are carburized and then case hardened in a Gleason press quenching machine.

  • 2.
    Chen, Danfang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Schudeleit, Timo
    Institute of Machine Tools and Production Technology, Technische Universität Braunschweig.
    Posselt, Gerrit
    Institute of Machine Tools and Production Technology, Technische Universität Braunschweig.
    Thiede, Sebastian
    Institute of Machine Tools and Production Technology, Technische Universität Braunschweig.
    A state-of-the-art review and evaluation of tools for factory sustainability assessment2013In: 2nd CIRP Global Web Conference - Beyond modern manufacturing: Technology for the factories of the future (CIRPE2013), 2013, 85-90 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The type of tools for sustainability assessment is manifold and is growing consistently to meet more and more of society's needs. This paper presents a review and evaluation study of existing assessment tools collected from a variety of sources. The aim is to clarify the difference between those sustainability assessments tools and increase factory planner's awareness towards the different tool properties. In this work representative assessment tools are evaluated and described with respect to their specific focus and benefits as well as drawbacks. Based on that a research gap is identified and further research directions can be derived. (C) 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. Selection and peer-review under responsibility of International Scientific Committee of the 2nd CIRP Global Web Conference in the person of the Conference Chair Dr. Sotiris Makris

  • 3.
    Chen, Danfang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Thiede, Sebastian
    Institute of Machine Tools and Production Technology, Technische Universität Braunschweig.
    Schudeleit, Timo
    Inspire AG/Institute of Machine Tools and Manufacturing (IWF), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich.
    Herrmann, Christoph
    Institute of Machine Tools and Production Technology, Technische Universität Braunschweig.
    A holistic and rapid sustainability assessment tool for manufacturing SMEs2014In: CIRP annals, ISSN 0007-8506, E-ISSN 1726-0604, Vol. 63, no 1, 437-440 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development is a broad term and is complex in nature because it has three dimensions. While continuous management is necessary, especially for SMEs, there is a lack of easily applicable tools that assess the status of sustainability based on key performance indicators and that derive priorities for systematic improvement. Based on this information, this paper presents a holistic sustainability assessment tool for manufacturing SMEs. The tool is applicable on a factory level with reasonable effort, provides decision support for improvements and enables a cross-industry comparison. A case study at a Swedish company has been performed to verify the usability.

  • 4. Falkman, Petter
    et al.
    Nielsen, Johan
    Lennartson, Bengt
    von Euler-Chelpin, Astrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Generation of STEP AP214 models from discrete event systems for process planning and control2008In: IEEE Transactions on Automation Science and Engineering, ISSN 1545-5955, E-ISSN 1558-3783, Vol. 5, no 1, 113-126 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to show how the international standard STEP-AP214 can be used for communication and storing of process specifications. Even though there are several software tools available for the generation of both product and resource information systems, there is still a lack of tools related to the STEP standard for producing process information, e.g., sequence of operations and system capabilities for resource allocation. Therefore, such a tool is suggested, which makes use of a high-level language for discrete-event systems based on process algebra and Petri nets. This language, called process algebra Petri net), has been developed in accordance with the process relations defined in STEP-AP214. More specifically, it is shown how process specifications created with the PPN tool can be mapped to the STEP AP-214 format. Note to Practioners-Rapidly changing market needs is making demands on flexibility and ability to shorten lead times. Standards for exchanging information, as well as formal methods for automatic development of programmable controller code have been important research topics for many years. There are a lot of software tools available for the generation of both product- and resource information, but there is still a lack of tools for producing process information. Moreover, the connection between information exchange standards and such tools is absent, which makes the development of programmable controller code an isolated activity. This activity is often time consuming and performed in an ad hoc manner resulting in unnecessary production delay. The aim of this paper is to show how the international standard STEP-AP214 (a standard for exchange of product-, process-, and resource related information) can be used for communicating and storing process specifications. In order to achieve this, a tool which makes use of a formal high-level language is suggested. This tool can be used for automatic control generation and has been developed in accordance with the process relations defined in STEP-AP214. A further aim is to shown how the mentioned tool can be used to specify complex systems in a compact, yet highly readable manner, which is a crucial incentive for industry to use formal methods. The presented method will guarantee-that expected information is delivered quickly and without errors caused by the human factor, something that is very important in our ambition to achieve shortened lead times. The quick information exchange also makes it possible to perform simulation, supervisor synthesis, and verification early in the development phase. This is a first attempt at using a formal language for creating a tool that can automatically generate specifications in accordance with the international STEP-standard.

  • 5.
    Hardwick, Martin
    et al.
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
    Loffredo, David
    Fritz, Joe
    Hedlind, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Enabling the Crowd Sourcing of Very Large Product Models2013In: Digital Product and Process Development Systems: IFIP TC 5 International Conference, NEW PROLAMAT 2013, Dresden, Germany, October 10-11, 2013. Proceedings / [ed] George L. Kovács, Detlef Kochan, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, 254-272 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Part 21 is a public domain file format for the geometry of assemblies and is widely used by industry to describe design and manufacturing specifications for airplanes, automobiles, ships, buildings and other products. We describe a proposed new edition of Part 21 that includes URI’s and JavaScript to enable the crowd sourcing of very large product models.

  • 6.
    Hardwick, Martin
    et al.
    Department of Computer Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic.
    Zhao, Yaoyao Fiona
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University.
    Proctor, Frederick M.
    Intelligent Systems Division, The National Institute of Standards and Technology NIST.
    Nassehi, Aydin
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath.
    Xu, Xun
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Auckland.
    Venkatesh, Sid
    Boeing Company.
    Odendahl, David
    Boeing Company.
    Xu, Liangji
    Boeing Company.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Maggiano, Larry
    Mitutoyo America Corporation.
    Loffredo, David
    STEP Tools Inc..
    Fritz, Jochim
    STEP Tools Inc..
    Olsson, Bengt
    Sandvik Coromant.
    Garrido, Julio
    Vigo University.
    Brail, Alain
    Airbus.
    A roadmap for STEP-NC-enabled interoperable manufacturing2013In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 68, no 5-8, 1023-1037 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The STEP-NC-AP 238 and ISO 14649 standard is the result of a 10-year international effort to replace the RS274D (ISO 6983) G and M code standard with a modern associative language that connects the CAD design data used to determine the machining requirements for an operation with the CAM process data that is used in creating a machining solution to satisfy these requirements. STEP-NC builds on the previous 10 years effort to develop the STEP neutral data standard for CAD data, and uses the modern geometric constructs in that standard to specify device independent tool paths, and CAM independent volume removal features. STEP-Manufacturing, Team 24 in Working Group 3 (WG3) of ISO TC184/SC4, is developing and validating the STEP-NC standard in liaison with Working Group (WG7) of ISO TC184/SC1 who provides the domain-specific input (ISO 14649) used within the standard. This paper reviews the demonstrations carried out by STEP-Manufacturing over the past 10 years. These demonstrations have been international collaborations between industry, academia, and research agencies. Each demonstration focused on extending the STEP-NC data model for a different application.

  • 7.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Model driven process planning for machining: Theory, application and improved information standards for efficient product realization2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Model driven process planning is a methodology that emphasizes the application of models to create, represent and use information of products, processes and resources. Industry today stores information in a fragmented manner, mainly document centered with the consequence of data duplication requiring comprehensive data management and maintenance. This thesis contributes to the understanding of information representation of product and machining system specification and characteristics to support process planning and operation.

    The ISO 10303 standard for industrial data has been applied as a key utility in this research, as it enables full control and understanding of information representation in diverse engineering domains. Research collaboration with participants of the International Organization for Standardization ISO has taken place, with contributions to standards development and implementation.

    The basics of process planning are to achieve the unambiguous and complete information required for producing a product. The machining process plan, as a coherent model, represents relationships between manufacturing features, machined faces, tolerances and used cutting tools. It is essential for the representation of information to relate data to its valid interpretation context. Of importance is also that models and model schemas are decoupled from where, how and when the models are created, manipulated and finalized. Based on this principle, achieved coherent process plans supports efficient production engineering work processes.

    Unambiguous and efficient modeling of manufacturing resources and their characteristics requires definitions of its specific domain concepts combined with generic data representation structures. This combination provides a stable and standardized data model, also capable of representing manufacturing resources developed in the future. The proposed modeling approach for manufacturing resource characterisation is valid for any product mechanism.

    For implementation of the proposed increased integration, a modeling specification will be required. With the application of model driven process planning, new industrial benefits have been explored. The main principle of relating data to its valid context, applied to model driven process planning for machining, gives new possibilities for increased productivity.

  • 8. Hedlind, Mikael
    et al.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Design specifications with engineering terminology in a geometric context for CADCAM2015In: CIRP annals, ISSN 0007-8506, E-ISSN 1726-0604, Vol. 64, no 1, 169-172 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industry needs integration of product specific terminology and product generic data schemas for man-model interaction and data exchange in next generation of CADCAM systems to improve product realization. The use of engineering terminology in a geometric context to represent design parameters as functional features, kinematic requirements, and GD&T, is presented. This will give new possibilities for increased productivity in design and manufacturing. The main principle of relating data to its valid context is applied to reduce information fragmentation causing data duplication and comprehensive data management and maintenance. The solution is illustrated for modelling truck chassis and cutting tools.

  • 9. Hedlind, Mikael
    et al.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kinematical product specifications in engineering design2014In: CIRP annals, ISSN 0007-8506, E-ISSN 1726-0604, Vol. 63, no 1, 197-200 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The basics of kinematic modelling in CAD applications are to define motion constraints for components relative to other components for the purpose of motion studies. The main concepts are links and joints with information about degree of freedom, actuation and motion range which combined build the topology and geometry to characterise a mechanism. For translating design intent into motion requirements more accurate modelling of the mechanism is needed, including tolerances on error motion in addition to tolerances on functional surfaces. This paper identifies existing limitations and new possibilities for model based kinematical product specification and verification.

  • 10.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Klein, Lothar
    Li, Yujiang
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kinematic structure representation of products and manufacturing resources2011In: 7th CIRP Sponsored Conference on Digital Enterprise Technology (DET), Athens, Greece, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The basics of kinematic modelling in majority of CAE applications are about to define motion constraints for components relative to other components. The main concepts are links and joints which combined build the topology and geometry of the mechanism. With the additional information about joint type, actuation and motion range, the model provides useful information for motion study. The kinematic structure schema of the standard ISO 10303-105 provides proven capability to represent this information. In the second edition of this standard, currently under development, the granularity and functionality of the model will be increased and further integrated with other parts of the standard ISO 10303. Case studies are presented on utilization of the added capabilities in different applications within product and manufacturing resource representation to illustrate the importance of these features. This paper reports on the author’s contribution to this standard.

  • 11.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Archenti, Andreas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Nicolescu, Cornel Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Manufacturing resource modelling for model driven operation planning2010In: Process Machine Interactions (PMI): Vancouver, Canada, June 10-11, 2010 / [ed] Prof. Y. Altintas, University of British Columbia, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Models of manufacturing resources as machine tools, fixtures and cutting tools contribute to efficient and simplified operation planning. With operation planning domain concept, defined in ontology and used during modelling of coherent ISO 10303-214 conforming data models of manufacturing resources, stable implementation solutions are ensured while capable of representing current manufacturing resources and resources developed in the future. Using similarities between different types of resources, a unified modelling approach may be applied independent of the type of object. Information classes as interfaces, kinematics, performance and behavior are identified and related to corresponding construct of the standardized product generic schema. With the common representation of shared information between applications domains as operation planning, maintenance and factory layout design, presented result contributes to set the basis for a digital factory used in virtual manufacturing to continuously improve the production system.

     

  • 12.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Lundholm, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Machining description as a view of STEP-NC data2008In: Proceedings of 2nd Swedish Production Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Machining description for a CNC machining process has the purpose to give information about the machining process and relations between, product, process and resources. Currently used information model requires time consuming and expensive procedures during the manufacturing preparation process to create this documentation. This paper presents how machining descriptions can be generated more efficient. We have studied how ISO 10303 standard for product data representation and exchange, known as STEP, can be utilized in the manufacturing preparation process. We present how information requirements for machining descriptions containing a relationship between a machined face, its tolerances and used cutting tool can be met. To demonstrate our research result we have developed a prototype system where STEP data models of the machiningprocess, workpiece with tolerances, fixture and cutting tools are used and integrated. We have proven that information separation of data, to create machining descriptions for CNC machining, is currently done unnecessarily early in the manufacturing preparation process.

  • 13.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Lundholm, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Model based machining descriptions2010In: CIRP ICME ’10 - 7th CIRP International Conference on INTELLIGENT  COMPUTATION  IN MANUFACTURING  ENGINEERING: Innovative and Cognitive Production Technology and Systems / [ed] R. Teti, University of Naples, Italy, Capri, Italy, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s CAD/CAM systems make it possible to manage features, dimensions and tolerances from design through process and operations planning in their internal proprietary data model. For manufacturing purposes information is then split into different documents for setup and machining operation besides NC code. A demonstrator has been developed based on a case study and the ISO 10303 standard as a coherent data model for representing relationships between manufacturing features, machined faces, tolerances and used cutting tools. When the information model is fully exploited, the fragmentation of data as well as manufacturing preparation time and administration cost are significantly reduced.

  • 14. Karlsson, T.
    et al.
    Rogstrand, Victoria
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    De Vin, L. J.
    Verifying manufacturing requirements using tools for digital plant technology2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    von Euler-Chelpin, Astrid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Sivard, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Chen, Danfang
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    The machine tool model-A core part of the digital factory2009In: CIRP annals, ISSN 0007-8506, E-ISSN 1726-0604, Vol. 58, no 1, 425-428 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Machine tool models - the core parts of manufacturing systems - are important for many purposes during development of new or existing systems, from investment, through process planning, NC, layout design, usage, to end of life. Today a lot of important machine tool information is not managed and stored for easy reuse. A machine tool modelling approach is presented and structured in line with principles for generic standards utilizing a manufacturing system ontology for modelling machine tool concepts. It forms a contribution to management of information and knowledge in manufacturing.

  • 16.
    Li, Yujiang
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Architecting model driven system integration in production engineering2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    System integration is a key enabler to maximize information value in an engineering context. The valuable information is normally represented by information models which play a decisive role in the implementation of system integration. The information models are designed to efficiently and effectively capture, process and communicate information among different functional and business units. However, use of the information models in implementing system integration is challenged by insufficient support from current settings of modeling architectures. This situation calls for new strategies to ease the use of information models.

    To address this challenge, this study presents a new twofold solution: Model driven system integration. It includes 1) a modeling architecture to guide the development of information models and 2) an integrated implementation process to guide the use of information models. Thus, this work improves practical applicability of an information model in its entire modeling lifecycle.

    The results contribute not only to the performance of modeling practices but also to improved understanding of information modeling in system integration. Implementation contexts and implementation models are introduced to develop an implementation-oriented modeling architecture. Further, the potential of information models as a knowledge base to sup-port implementation practices is identified.

    To concretely discuss behaviors and structures of information models, this study adopts ISO 10303 and the related standards as major references of existing information models.

    Case studies on model driven system integration validate this research in scenarios concerning kinematic modeling, kinematic error modeling, cutting tools classification and product catalogue modeling. Model driven system integration exhibits high efficiency in implementation, enhanced interoperability and increased value of information models.

  • 17.
    Li, Yujiang
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Development architecture for industrial data management2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Standardized information modeling is important for interoperability of CAx systems. Existing information standards such as ISO 10303 STEP have been proposed and developed for decades for this purpose. Comprehensive data structure and various implementation methodologies make such standards strong in support of different industry domains, information types, and technical requirements. However, this fact also leads to increased implementation complexity and workloads for CAx system developers.

    This licentiate proposes the development architecture, STEP Toolbox, to help users implement standards with a simplified development process and minimal knowledge requirements on standards. Implementation difficulties for individuals are identified with analysis on implementation of the information standards in three aspects: tasks, users, and technology. Then the toolbox is introduced with an illustration of design of behavior and structure. Case studies are performed to validate the toolbox with prototypes. Internal and external observation has shown the around two-month learning process skipped and a great amount of workload reduction in implementation with the utilization of this architecture.

  • 18.
    Li, Yujiang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Chen, Danfang
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Gunilla, Sivard
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    User friendly development architecture for standardised modelling: STEP Toolbox2014In: International Journal of Manufacturing Research, ISSN 1750-0591, Vol. 9, no 4, 429-447 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Standardised information modelling is currently an important solution of enhancing the interoperability of computer-aided technology (CAx) systems in the manufacturing industry. The success of this solution is critically dependent on the complexity of data structure and implementation methodology. This study presents development architecture, STEP toolbox, which enables users to implement information standards via a simplified process with minimised knowledge requirements. This study starts with an analysis of relevant user groups for different types of tasks and knowledge requirements. Then STEP toolbox is presented as the simplified development architecture that consists of conceptual modelling and an object-oriented application programming interface (API). It is more convenient for typical developers than the conventional implementation methodology. Based on results from test cases for implementing three prototypes, a two-month learning process required for average developers of the information standards is expected to be eliminated.

  • 19.
    Li, Yujiang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Implementation of kinematic mechanism data exchangebased on step2011In: 7th DET 2011, International Conference on Digital Enterprise Technology: 28-30 September 2011 – Athens Greece / [ed] George Chryssolouris, Athens Greece: University of Patras , 2011, 152-159 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the first known valid implementation of kinematic mechanism based on STEP(ISO 10303, STandard for the Exchange of Product data) is presented. The result includes a generalconceptual framework and two developed prototype applications. The framework is designed forintegration of the STEP-based kinematic mechanism modeling with existing commercial CAxsystems. The two applications are implemented for kinematic data exchange between Siemens NXand STEP-NC Machine via STEP AP214 (ISO 10303-214) files. Experiences of design anddevelopment of the applications are presented in this paper, and a valid example of data exchangeusing the developed applications is shown. As the first valid STEP implementation on kinematics, itdemonstrates the feasibility of STEP-based data exchange for kinematic mechanism. The researchresult can also motivate deeper understanding and wider application of the STEP standard in thefield of digital factory.

  • 20.
    Li, Yujiang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kinematic error modelling based on STEP AP2422012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kinematic error is one of the major sources affecting geometric accuracy of machine tools motion. Component error and location error are common concepts to characterise kinematic error for both linear and rotation axes. With the second edition of STEP p105 currently under development, kinematic error can be associated directly to corresponding kinematic pairs. Based on the conceptual ontology model, a practical approach is introduced for standardized kinematic error modelling and implementation. Through integration with geometry, assembly, kinematics and classification, a developed application demonstrates and evaluates data representation and exchange for kinematic error. As STEP AP242 is a generic model for any product or manufacturing resource, additional modeling constraints are applied to achieve unambiguous data representation.

  • 21.
    Li, Yujiang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Usability Evaluation of CADCAM: State of the Art2015In: Procedia CIRP / [ed] Moshe Shpitalni, Anath Fischer and Gila Molcho, Elsevier, 2015, Vol. 36, 205-210 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, for development of product and production, computer-aided design and manufacturing (CADCAM) maintain a significant role in interaction activities between human and computers. The major objective of computer-aided technology is to simplify engineer's work in collecting, using, and sharing information so that human can maximize the usage of their unique abilities, e.g. creativity and innovation. User experiences (UX) will substantially determine outcomes of such intellectual engineering activities during human computer interaction (HCI) with the CADCAM systems. Usability is a key feature of software ergonomic, and has been standardized as an important property of software quality. Concerns for usability of all kinds of ordinary software interface have been expressed by a lot of studies. Evaluation is always a central activity when practicing usability in an iterative product development process. It can be expected that employment of usability evaluation for CADCAM will be highly valued towards a better level of Human Computer Interaction (HCI). Nevertheless, researches involving usability in this particular domain are very rare. This paper reviews a limited number of publications with such concerns and investigates the current context of use of CADCAM software. Then existing evaluation techniques are introduced and discussed for their feasibility in manufacturing industry based on previous studies.

  • 22.
    Li, Yujiang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Sivard, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Cutting Tool Data Representation and Implementation Based on STEP AP2422013In: Smart Product Engineering: Proceedings of the 23rd CIRP Design Conference, Bochum, Germany, March 11th - 13th, 2013 / [ed] Michael Abramovici and Rainer Stark, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, 483-492 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For cutting tool data exchange in manufacturing CAx (Computer-Aided technologies), standardized representation and classification of items and properties is important. ISO 13399 (Cutting tool data representation and exchange) provides a solution to represent cutting tool data classified with an ISO 13584 (Parts Library, PLib) based dictionary. However, ISO 13399 does not support classification of shape geometry directly, which limits its use. Another limitation is representing GD&T (Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing) as simplified general properties, which does not fulfill high semantic precision and validation rules. This research provides a unified solution to represent cutting tool parameters integrated with geometry and dedicated properties based on STEP AP242 (ISO 10303-242 Managed model-based 3D engineering). Standardized libraries such as the ISO 13399 dictionary can be reused with the modeling approach for AP242 cutting tool representation. Software is developed to validate and demonstrate how this solution facilitates the data integration process to support CAx applications.

  • 23.
    Li, Yujiang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Sivard, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    System integration for kinematic data exchange2014In: International journal of computer integrated manufacturing (Print), ISSN 0951-192X, E-ISSN 1362-3052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industry needs a system neutral solution for exchange of kinematic models. In this article, the first known valid implementation of kinematic mechanisms based on ISO 10303 Standard for the Exchange of Product (STEP) is presented. The result includes an implementation framework and two developed prototypes. Two major challenges of standard-based development are identified and generalised: data integration and system integration, which are solved by the framework. The two prototypes are implemented to establish kinematic data exchange between Siemens NX® and STEP-NC MachineTM via STEP AP214 files. Experiences of design and development of the applications are presented, and a validated case study of data exchange using the developed applications is shown. There are other attempts of using STEP as basis for modelling, but as the first valid STEP implementation on kinematics, this approach demonstrates the feasibility of pure STEP-based data exchange for kinematic mechanisms. The prototypes also show potential of utilising the framework for general standard implementations. The research is expected to motivate deeper understanding and extensive applications of the STEP standard in industry and academia.

  • 24.
    Li, Yujiang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Huang, Qiuling
    Hedlind, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Sivard, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    Scania CV AB, Södertälje.
    Representation and exchange of digital catalogues of cutting tools2014In: ASME 2014 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2014 Collocated with the JSME 2014 International Conference on Materials and Processing and the 42nd North American Manufacturing Research Conference, 2014, V001T04A027- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information management for manufacturing resources such as cutting tools is an important research topic in the context of cloud manufacturing. Vendors and customers usually use catalogues to communicate information for such manufacturing resource. Incompatibilities of information in syntax, semantics, and structure among supply chains often result in inefficient manual sharing and management of the catalogue information. It is difficult for cloud based applications to pool information from various sources. This communication failure calls for a system neutral solution for data modeling and exchange to enhance interoperability of the cutting tool catalogue information. Previous studies has present solutions for representation of the cutting tool information with STEP AP242 (ISO/DIS 10303-242) with semantic classification referring to a PLib (ISO 13584, Part Library) based dictionary. This approach can be extended for the catalogue modeling, due to functionalities for specification and configuration control of general product variants in the same standard. With a modeling approach with standardized information schemas, system architecture to guide implementation is proposed to enhance the communication in practice. Relative elements to represent vendors' catalogues and customers' requirements are modeled. Associations to the PLib-based dictionary complete semantics and enable information mapping between vendors and customers. Principles of the mapping are identified to facilitate implementation of related software systems. Prototypes are developed to verify the proposed system architecture. The proposed solution is promising to migrate to other types of products than cutting tools, because the data models are based on the general product models defined in AP242.

  • 25.
    Li, Yujiang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Su, Rong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Metrology and Optics.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Ekberg, Peter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Metrology and Optics.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Mattsson, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Metrology and Optics.
    Model based in-process monitoring with optical coherence tomography2012In: Procedia CIRP: 1st CIRP Global Web Conference: Interdisciplinary Research in Production Engineering (CIRPE2012),, Elsevier, 2012, 70-73 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The demands on in-process 3D monitoring in ceramic micromanufacturing industry require a high-precision, non-destructive, rapid and automated inspection technique for measuring the thickness of component layer, determining the shape and dimensions of the embedded 3D structures, and detecting the de-bonding, cracks, warping and deformation. One of the promising metrology techniques is optical coherence tomography (OCT). With the dedicated image processing algorithm and the industrial product data exchange standard, the model-based integration of OCT as a new metrology tool is demonstrated. As a generic standard for any product or manufacturing information, ISO 10303 STEP AP242 is employed for the measured data model. Unambiguous data representation is achieved by integrating additional modelling constraints. The proposed framework allows fully using the technical advantages of OCT to in-process 3D monitoring.

  • 26.
    Lindberg, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Sivard, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    The K3P Knowledge Protection Model: To Separate Know-Why from Know-How in Engineering Contexts2013In: Section I - Privacy Modelling and System Engineering / [ed] Irene Portela, Patrícia Gonçalves, Manuela Cunha, Vitor Carvalho, Barcelos, Portugal: Polytechnic Institute of Cávado and Ave , 2013, 28-35 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, much emphasis is put on globalization, collaboration, integration, and standardization in the engineering world. While this generally is both necessary and desirable, it does raise one important question: How does a company protect its key competence against imitators, copycats, and plagiarisms? In a project we have studied this question from a product data perspective, i.e., we leave out legal-, commercial-, and IT-aspects. The traditional approach has been to rely on the physical protection of the drawing archive combined with simple security classification on the documents themselves. We found this to be too simplistic, and instead we have developed a more elaborate, but still tentative model to identify the data to be protected. This model starts with product characteristics, e.g., product type, product concept maturity, expected life, and degree of customization. Further, the business strategy, e.g., customer focus vs. technical leadership vs. operational excellence is described. These product and business properties are mapped to the relevant processes and methods within the company, e.g., product development or order handling, as well as to the supporting systems and information structures. Finally, mapping is made to the individual data elements which are to be protected. In this model we do not only identify the data elements themselves, but also the context within which they need protection. This context can thus be a customer order, a development project, or a certain time frame. We illustrate the use of our model with industrial test cases and conclude with a proposal for future work.

  • 27.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    MODEL-BASED INTERACTIVE LEARNING OF PROCESS PLANNING2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process planning is a central, knowledge extensive and important activityin a manufacturing company. During process planning, countless decisions are made,many times based upon the process planner´s tacit knowledge, based on years ofexperience. The knowledge gap between the expert and the novice is wide.Narrowing this gap, taking the novice towards becoming expert, is an objective ofeducation. This paper presents a solution for model-based interactive learning ofprocess planning, validated through application in master level productionengineering courses.

  • 28.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Model-driven Process Planning and Quality Assurance2015In: 9TH CIRP CONFERENCE ON INTELLIGENT COMPUTATION IN MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING - CIRP ICME '14, 2015, 209-214 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systematic process planning is a key enabler for robust product realization from design through manufacturing. Every process and operation must be designed in the best possible way to ensure that the overall process chain leads to the right product quality. During the last two decades a shift from inspection of manufactured products to a more holistic approach with quality assurance as an integrated activity throughout the product realization process has emerged in manufacturing industry. The importance of the principles addressed in the methods and tools used in automotive industry for quality management is indisputable. However, the tasks of creating and managing documents for Process Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (PFMEA), Control plans, Initial process studies and Measurement System Analysis (MSA) results in high workload. Also, lack of interoperability between different computer applications used in process planning and quality assurance results in information fragmentation, data duplication and potential data inconsistency. This paper proposes a novel, model driven approach for process planning integrating quality assurance which emphasizes the application of digital models to create, represent and use information of products, processes and resources. By reducing the amount of data and document duplication, the presented model driven approach has potential to radically increase the direct value adding part of manufacturing engineer's daily work also contributing to achieve a more holistic view in interdisciplinary work between different experts in product realization.

  • 29.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    von Axelson, Jens
    Hedlind, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    A systematic approach for product realization instructions in a model drivenenvironment: towards a three level instruction system development process2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Instructions and instruction systems are considered as important pillars in the productrealization process. However, often the activities to create, layout and use instructions arebased on tradition rather than a strategic thought in the industry today. In a model drivenengineering context there is a risk to focus on the information system at the sacrifice of theimportant operator interface. A three level instruction system development process isintroduced as a solution to establish a holistic instruction system: 1) Instruction systemdesign, 2) design framework for instructions, and 3) realize instruction. Studies indicatethat there is a great potential in how instruction systems are used due to both theeffectiveness in the creation of the instruction and the probability of non-conformities dueto the instruction formulation and layout.

  • 30.
    Mikler, Jerzy
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Shariat Zadeh, Navid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Design and Development of Maintenance Knowledge Base System Using Common KADS Methodology2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31. Munkhammar, Joakim
    et al.
    Mattsson, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Ryden, Jesper
    Polynomial probability distribution estimation using the method of moments2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 4, e0174573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We suggest a procedure for estimating Nth degree polynomial approximations to unknown (or known) probability density functions (PDFs) based on N statistical moments from each distribution. The procedure is based on the method of moments and is setup algorithmically to aid applicability and to ensure rigor in use. In order to show applicability, polynomial PDF approximations are obtained for the distribution families Normal, Log-Normal, Weibull as well as for a bimodal Weibull distribution and a data set of anonymized household electricity use. The results are compared with results for traditional PDF series expansion methods of Gram-Charlier type. It is concluded that this procedure is a comparatively simple procedure that could be used when traditional distribution families are not applicable or when polynomial expansions of probability distributions might be considered useful approximations. In particular this approach is practical for calculating convolutions of distributions, since such operations become integrals of polynomial expressions. Finally, in order to show an advanced applicability of the method, it is shown to be useful for approximating solutions to the Smoluchowski equation.

  • 32.
    Rogstrand, Vicctoria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Nilsen, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Integrated Information as an Enabler for Change Impact Evaluation in Manufacturing Life-cycle Management2008In: MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE NEW FRONTIER   / [ed] Mitsuishi, M; Ueda, K; Kimura, F, 2008, 57-60 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To be able to completely evaluate and make a reliable cost analysis, all aspects of a planned change must be known. A study of change impact evaluation in Manufacturing Life-cycle Management (MLM) has been performed. This article discusses the need for an integrated information representation of the product, process, and resource domains to enable this. It also proposes the use of manufacturing requirements in order to completely evaluate the impact. Process planning was studied to identify manufacturing requirements, which have been represented in the information standard STEP 10303-239 to demonstrate the possibilities.

  • 33.
    Rogstrand, Victoria
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Information Representation of Production Requirements2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Rogstrand, Victoria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Interaction of requirements in manufacturing system development: a case study2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Rogstrand, Victoria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Representation of requirements in Collaborative Environments2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Rogstrand, Victoria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    The representation of manufacturing requirements in model-driven parts manufacturing2009In: International journal of computer integrated manufacturing (Print), ISSN 0951-192X, E-ISSN 1362-3052, Vol. 22, no 11, 1065-1072 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today there is a need to make process and production planning more cost-effective while not compromising the quality of the product. Manufacturing requirements are used to ensure producibility in early development phases and also as a source for continuous improvement of the manufacturing system. To make this possible it is essential to have correct, updated information available and to be able to trace the relations between requirements and their origin and subjects. To trace requirements' origin in resources or processes is today very difficult owing to system integration problems. This article discusses the relations that need to be represented and proposes the use of model-based methods to enable traceability of requirements. Because requirements are a collaborative effort a standard for information exchange is needed. The ISO10303 STEP application protocol AP233 System Engineering is proposed for this purpose.

  • 37.
    Rogstrand, Victoria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    The Use of Production Requirement in Model-Driven Parts Manufacturing2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Rosén, Jonas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Development of Industrial Information Systems based on Standards2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis has studied how ISO STEP application protocols can be used as a base for development of enterprise information systems that provides information sharing capabilities in a collaborative environment.

    In this thesis, five papers have been selected and are presented in the context of four themes that characterize the whole research body. The four themes are:

    - Standard models as a base for development of IT systems

    - Applications operating on integrated (standard) models

    - Sharing of information

    - Sharing of collaborative processes

    The research have been performed in both an academic and industrial context, where the researcher have taken an active role in how to shape the solutions that became the result of the research project. Initially the projects were limited to virtual manufacturing with a focus on the management of manufacturing information. However, gradually the scope grew to include management of product information across the lifecycle. Also the organizational context was widened to include management of information that is shared between companies across their company borders.

    The growing scope made the research to take on new aspects for each new area of issues that surfaced. One overall issue that surfaced was how to be able to exchange product data between companies over a long time and at the same time be able to impose configuration control of the shared information. One of the major conclusions is that sharing of information over time and across the lifecycle in a virtual enterprise is a task that involves more efforts than the task of exchanging product data of the same type (e.g. design data, CAD files) between two companies.

    The results of the research show that the ISO 10303 application protocols are qualified for use in an enterprise product data management environment. However, the result also shows that there are a number of issues to deal with when developing a product data sharing environment based on standards. For example, how to efficiently transform and use the data structures of ISO 10303 application protocols in the different layers of a software system, the data layer, the business object and services layer and the user interfaces. Other issues are on how to deal with the neutral representation such that companies can integrate their contextual information with the neutral product data representation.

    Future research is recommended to look more close into how the new evolving software architectures that becomes more mainstream today, such as Enterprise Service Bus technology (ESB) and Cloud Computing, amongst others, can utilize the ISO 10303 application protocols as their canonical format. Another important area is to further elaborate, and integrate ISO 10303 with existing technologies for Reference Data and unstructured data that today get more and more traction

  • 39.
    Shariatzadeh, Navid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Sivard, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Chen, Danfang
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Software Evaluation Criteria for Rapid Factory Layout Planning, Design and Simulation2012In: 45th CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems 2012, Elsevier, 2012, Vol. 3, no 12, 299-304 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to specify functional requirements on software for rapid factory planning and design in a digital factory context. In comparison with other studies that focus on particular aspects of layout development, this work deploys a comprehensive approach, based on industrial needs, to determine main functionalities for factory layout software. The research considers integration of different layouts where original equipment manufacturer and other stakeholders involved in factory layout design collaborate with each other to develop, or extend a factory. Therefore; engineering change management and data exchange in a system neutral format are taken into account as main pillars.

  • 40.
    Shariatzadeh, Navid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Sivard, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Wickman, Christer
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Material flow data representation and integration based on STEP2012In: Proceedings of 2012 IEEE Conference on Control, Systems and Industrial Informatics, ICCSII 2012, IEEE , 2012, 30-35 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fundamental requirement for executing Discrete Event Simulation (DES) is incorporating a data structure that represents process, product and resource information, their interrelations. Further, the capability of integrating this data structure with other types of information such as geometry, e.g. for sizes of products or distances of transports, is of vital interest.

  • 41.
    Shariatzadeh, Navid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Sivard, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Lindberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Rapid Production Changes through the Coordination of Factory Layout Models and Activities2013In: Journal of Applied Mechanical Engineering, ISSN 2168-9873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changing the design of a factory in practice involves the change of a number of parallel and interdependent systems such as the machining resources and robot cells, the supply systems for electricity, water, air, heat and cooling, pneumatics and hydraulics, the systems for chip and waste handling, process fluid, communication networks, sprinkler systems, as well as the building construction. Thus the coordination of information and models, as well as of the design work activities, is of utmost importance to achieve a fast and flexible development process. This paper presents the results from a research project focusing on computer aided work processes and the communication of models between various stake holders in layout design. The primary objective was to provide methods for a coordinated factory development process with a facilitated information exchange and reuse of knowledge and models. Results concerning required layout and PLM (Product Lifecycle Management) functionalities, as well as modelling and communication principles, tested in an industrial case, are presented.

     

  • 42.
    Sivard, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Lindberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Agerman, Erik
    Customer-Based Design with Constraint Reasoning1993In: CIRP annals, ISSN 0007-8506, E-ISSN 1726-0604, Vol. 42, no 1, 425-428 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper identifies some principles for computer aided customer based design. In this type of design. technical prerequisites and the range of customer requirements are typically the same over time. From time to time there are larger changes in manufacturing methods and customer needs though. Thus the degree of aiutomation in a design support system can be fairly large, but it still needs to be interactive and flexible for changes. The testcase presented is based on an industrial application, implemented using a commercial CAD system and a CLP (Constraint Logic Programming) system. Special emphasis is put on interactivity - the collaboration between a designer and automated design system.

  • 43.
    Sivard, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    A methodology for manufacturing system development2008In: Proceedings of the Swedish Production Symposium 2008, Stockholm, Sweden, Stockholm, 2008, 2008, 31-35 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a model driven development scenario, the models of parts, processes and resources themselves are the carriers of information which is used and refined throughout the work processes. In this article, some basic concepts concerning model driven development are put forward, and a generic model driven work process is described, which covers the manufacturing development activities on a comprehensive level. Further, a case study of the development of a new motor line at the truck company Scania is presented to exemplify the concepts. The model driven approach is described on a more detailed level in the context of process planning.

  • 44.
    Sivard, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Shariatzadeh, Navid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Modules Information Modelling in Evolvable Production Systems2012In: / [ed] Prof. Mats Björkman, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to study the modeling of information concerning modules of highly adaptable reconfigurable production systems used by various stakeholders in a supply chain. Evolvable Production Systems (EPS) are taken as underlying paradigm for this study. EPS targets highly adaptable mechanical and control solutions that can enhance reusability and interoperability of modules, enabling lifetime extension of the modules and short deployment times at the shop floor level. Implementation of such a system requires suitable methods to capture structure and to represent information for easy access and sharing of information. Therefore this paper aims to analyze and discuss the possibility to represent the required information in module modeling based on generic information standards together with the ontology of the modules.

  • 45. Ssemakula, H.
    et al.
    Jacobsson, A.
    Magnusson, A.
    Ståhlberg, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Improving the grain size in the forging of large copper lids2006In: Journal of Materials Processing Technology, ISSN 0924-0136, E-ISSN 1873-4774, Vol. 172, no 2, 264-270 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forging of large copper lids for cylindrical canisters meant for nuclear waste is treated. Based on recent full-scale experiments, an alternative way of forming is proposed. In the experiments, a press offering just a low force, 20 MN, was available. Two-step hot forging was used: upsetting of an ingot between flat and parallel tools followed by cogging for filling a die cavity. The initial ingot measured diameter 350 min and 1400 mm in height buckled and made repeated straightening during the upsetting necessary. This forming procedure showed a poor material yield and resulted in a coarse-grained microstructure in the lids close to the final midpoint contact surfaces. From a 2D FE-analysis it became clear that this structure is associated with the formation of dead metal regions. Coarse grains are not acceptable from mechanical and corrosion point of view and make ultrasonic testing unreliable. Thus, the present work is mainly focussed on improving the structure by presenting an alternative way of manufacturing, which at the same time is faster. The flat dies used in upsetting were furnished with a central protruding part of spherical shape and the cavity filling by cogging was replaced by ordinary closed-die forging. In this way large strains were obtained in the critical, low-strained regions. The modified two-step forging was simulated for different radii of the spheres, keeping their penetration depth constant. The tools designed for the closed-die forging should, according to the FE-analysis, fill the cavity with a moderate force and an acceptable material yield. According to an earlier investigation by the authors the here proposed way of forming should ensure a fine microstructure throughout the whole volume of the lids.

  • 46.
    von Euler-Chelpin, Astrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Sivard, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Lundholm, Thomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    A multi-viewpoint machine model for efficient production development2007In: Proceedings of 1st Swedish Production Symposium, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a model for describing machine tools based on the STEP standard AP239 as a neutral format for communicating information throughout production development and operation. The machine model is further defined at a reference data level, where concepts regarding machine tools are defined from four main viewpoints: process planning, investment process, factory planning and operation/improvement. The concept models extend the standard and define the specific machine tool information. The utilization of the machine model is exemplified in a use case.

  • 47.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, School of Innovation Design and Engineering.
    Sivard, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Kjellberg, Torsten
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Life Cycle Approaches on Product Realization: meeting the challenges of future production research2010In: 43rd CIRP International Conference on Manufacturing Systems / [ed] Wilfried Sien, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
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