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  • 1.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Roci, Malvina
    KTH.
    Lieder, Michael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Štimulak, M.
    Halvordsson, E.
    De Bruijckere, R.
    A practical ICT framework for transition to circular manufacturing systems2018In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier, 2018, p. 598-602Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition towards a circular economy has become important. Manufacturing industry being a major stakeholder in this transition has started exploring the potential of this transition and challenges in implementation. Ambitious companies such as Gorenje d.d. has taken the circular economy transition seriously and aims to become a pioneer in implementing circular manufacturing systems. One vital step in this transition is the business model shift from the linear (sales model) to a circular model such as 'product as a service'. This brings new challenges to Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) that have never been experienced in their conventional businesses. One of the challenges is to establish an information communication and technology (ICT) infrastructure that enables information management and sharing as well as establishes a real-time communication between relevant stakeholders. Outlining such an ICT infrastructure is the objective of this paper.

  • 2.
    Aboufazeli, N.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Semere, D.T.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Ease of Reconfigurability Index: For Evaluation of the Reconfigurable Machine Tools2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the latest developments in manufacturing systems is reconfigurable manufacturing systems in which reconfigurable machine tools are the heart of such systems. The aim of application of this type of machine tool is having rapid cost-effective responsiveness to changes in new product variants or volume in manufacturing companies because of different interests, needs and desires of customers in global competitive market. The important tools to implement this kind of systems are systematic methodologies and enablers like open architecture controllers, Interface standard and comprehensive and integrated software to make the couple of limited optimized configurations of the machine tool. To choose the best configuration among proposed configuration by the software we need some evaluation methods based on smart chosen criteria to choose the best modular machine tool structure. One of the important points to choose the best configuration is ease of reconfigurability. The aim of this paper is to introduce a flexible and practical index for different products in reconfigurable manufacturing systems. This Index is defined based on two important factors: number of the changeable modules and the complexity of the interfaces including mechanical, informational and power (hydraulic, pneumatic or electrical).Generally the more number of the modules and the more complex interfaces means the more difficult to reconfigure the machine tool structure.

  • 3.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Demand Responsive Planning: A dynamic and responsive planning framework based on workload control theory for cyber-physical production systems2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent developments in the area of Cyber-Physical Production Systems prove that high technology readiness level is already achieved and industrialization of such technologies is not far from today. Although these technologies seem to be convenient in providing solutions to environmental uncertainties, their application provides adaptability only at shop floor level. Needless to say, an enterprise cannot reach true adaptability without ensuring adaptation skills at every level in its hierarchy. Commonly used production planning and control approaches in industry today inherit from planning solutions which are developed in response to historical market characteristics. However, market tendency in recent years is towards making personalized products a norm. The emerging complexity out of this trend obliges planning systems to a transition from non-recurring, static planning into continuous re-planning and re-configuration of systems. Therefore, there is a need of responsive planning solutions which are integrated to highly adaptable production system characteristics.

    In this dissertation, Demand Responsive Planning, DRP, is presented which is a planning framework aiming to respond to planning needs of shifting trends in both production system technologies and market conditions. The DRP is based on three main constructs such as dynamicity, responsiveness and use of precise data. These features set up the foundation of accomplishing a high degree of adaptability in planning activities. By this means, problems from an extensive scope can be handled with a responsive behavior (i.e. frequent re-planning) by the use of precise data. The use of precise data implies to execute planning activities subject to actual demand information and real-time shop floor data. Within the context of the DRP, both a continuous workload control method and a dynamic capacity adjustment approach are developed. A test-bed is coded in order to simulate proposed method based on a system emulation reflecting the characteristics of cyber-physical production systems at shop floor level.

    Continuous Precise Workload Control, CPWLC, method is a novel approach aiming at precise control of workload levels with the use of direct load graphs. Supported by a multi-agent platform, it generates dynamic non-periodic release decisions exploiting real time shop floor information. As a result, improved shop floor performances are achieved through controlling workload levels precisely by the release of appropriate job types at the right time.

    Presented dynamic capacity adjustment approach utilizes rapid re-configuration capability of cyber-physical systems in achieving more frequent capacity adjustments. Its implementation architecture is integrated to the CPWLC structure. By this means, a holistic approach is realized whereby improved due date performance is accomplished with minimized shop floor congestion. Hence, sensitivity to changing demand patterns and urgent job completions is improved.

  • 4.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Evolvable Production Systems: Demand Responsive Planning2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic and unforeseeable characteristic of the current market and production environment is not feasible to be met through pre-set parameters being dependent on the predictions. Handling this matter requires to keep focus on production system adaptability. Evolvable Production System has achieved fully system reconfigurability through process oriented modularity and multi agent based distributed control system architecture. One of the essential enhancements provided by EPS on the shop floor is achieving minimized/eliminated system setup time in response to changing product requirements.

    Manufacturing planning and control system, on the other hand, follows hierarchical principles which are quite much reliant on the predicted information so to structure production and planning environment on it. Production system limitations, such as lack of adaptability in response to changing conditions, are in fact influencing the planning system to be structured on the predictions. The enhancements which are ensured by the architecture of EPS enable to relax the constraints on planning system which are imposed by the limitations of production system. These enhancements have an effect at different levels in the planning hierarchy. On the light of these improvements, the planning framework as it is used so far in the industry becomes invalid and this arise a requirement for planning system structure to be designed according to a fully reconfigurable system to be able to benefit such a production system by all means.

    This thesis targets to enlighten the relation between the production system characteristics and planning system structure by emphasizing the planning problems and proposing a planning reference architecture solution to be able achieve a responsive planning framework.

  • 5.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Dias-Ferreira, Joao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Characterization of continuous precise workload control and analysis of idleness penalty2016In: COMPUTERS & INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING, ISSN 0360-8352, Vol. 102, p. 351-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The variability in the market conditions is growing in terms of its frequency of change and range of diversity. In response to this new industrial panorama, research on production systems is aiming to achieve highly reconfigurable shop floors. Frequent changes in such systems require also frequent re-planning with updated information. In this regard the Continuous Precise Workload Control method, is a recent approach aiming at precise control of workload in shop floor with the use of direct load graphs. Supported by a multi-agent platform, it generates dynamic non-periodic release decisions exploiting real time shop floor information, The study in this paper is two folded; (1) the presented workload approach is defined in terms of eight dimensions of the workload control concept in order to highlight its distinctive characteristics and (2) the impact of idleness penalty factor is analyzed by an experiment design in order to investigate its effect on the job release decision. The results show that the idleness penalty factor decreases the idleness of the resources up to a point where the adverse effect is initiated.

  • 6.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Dias-Ferreira, Joao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Characterization of Continuous Precise Workload Control and Analysis of Idleness Penalty2014In: CIE 44 and IMSS14 proceedings, 2014, p. 1998-2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The variability in the market conditions is growing in terms of its frequency of change and range of diversity. In response to this new industrial panorama, research on production systems is aiming to achieve truly reconfigurable shop floors. Frequent changes in such systems require also frequent re-planning with updated information. In this regard the Continuous Precise Workload Control method, is a recent approach aiming at precise control of workload in the shop floor with the use of direct load graphs. Supported by a multi-agent platform, it generates dynamic non-periodic release decisions exploiting real time shop floor information. The study in this paper is two folded; (1) in order to highlight its distinctive characteristics, the presented workload approach is defined in terms of eight dimensions of the workload control concept and (2) the penalty of idleness which affects the decision of release is analyzed by an experiment design in order to investigate its correlation with two critical parameters, norm value and assessment range. The results show that the idleness penalty factor decreases the idleness of the resources up to a point where the adverse effect is initiated. Besides there are strong indications towards the correlation of idleness penalty factor with the norm value.

  • 7.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Ferreira, Joao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Demand responsive planning: workload control implementation2013In: Assembly Automation, ISSN 0144-5154, E-ISSN 1758-4078, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 247-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Evolvable production systems enable fully reconfiguration capabilities on the shop floor through process-oriented modularity and multiagent-based distributed control. To be able to benefit architectural and operational characteristics of evolvable systems, there is a need of a newplanning approach which links shop floor characteristics and planning operations. This paper seeks to address these issues.

    Design/methodology/approach – Evolvable production system has a structured methodology in itself. Consistent to this, a reference planningarchitecture is developed aiming to achieve agility on planning activities. Besides a workload control method is proposed and implemented as a part ofthe planning architecture.

    Findings – First applications of evolvable systems have been implemented through European research projects. Shop floor working principles andarchitectural characteristics are consistent to facilitate more agility on planning activities which are framed at a planning reference architecture calleddemand responsive planning. As an implementation case, an agent-based workload control method is proposed and implemented. The characteristicsof EPS and proposed planning architecture enable continuous and dynamic workload control of the shop floor to be implemented.

    Originality/value – This paper presents a new planning model compatible with evolvable production systems targeting to agility to demand onplanning and control activities benefiting shop floor enhancements of a fully reconfigurable system which enables to relax constraints imposed fromproduction systems to planning. In addition, a continuous and dynamic workload control method is proposed and implemented.

  • 8.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Ferreira, Joao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Operational characterization of evolvable productionsystems2012In: 4th CIRP Conference on Assembly Technologies and Systems – CATS 2012, 2012, p. 85-90Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the way to achieve mass customization production systems have to obtain the capability of rapid reconfiguration of not only physical components but also from control point of view. Evolvable Production System targets highly adaptable mechanical and control solutions that can enhance reusability and interoperability of modules, enabling lifetime extension of the modules. The focus of EPS paradigm is to achieve overall system adaptability by autonomous modules which are dedicated to specific processes with the capability of short deployment time at shop floor without reprogramming effort. From the operational point of view EPS brings significant enhancements considering shop floor dynamics and performances therefore positioning of EPS principles and approaches in production system typology from different perspectives is essential. This has been done by two means which are process flow structure and customer order decoupling point location.

  • 9.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Evolvable Assembly Systems: Mechatronic Architecture Implications and Future Research2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The balance between assembly process optimality and their system’s ability to adapt to new requirements is a key to success for assembly companies. To increase SME’s survivability, an effective methodology is needed to handle the requirements of both agility and mass customization. Evolvable Assembly Systems (EAS) paradigm is a next generation assembly systems focused on these issues. Three key issues are here in focus: process-oriented approach, fine modular granularity, and module intelligence through lighter multi-agent technology at the shop floor level. These issues

  • 10.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Evolvable production systems and impacts on production planning2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Production planning and control strategies have been changing in line with the constant change on product and customer requirements, under the light of technological and scientific advancements. Production systems which are based on mass production became obsolete in time hence companies, being profit oriented, are in need of new solutions towards mass customization to handle rapidly changing market conditions. To deal with this issue, production systems and production planning strategies have to be complementing each other. In this paper Evolvable Production Systems and its compatibility to Just in Time (JIT) Production compared to Material Requirement Planning (MRP) will be discussed.

  • 11.
    Archenti, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Maffei, AntonioKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Proceedings of the International Conference on Advanced Manufacturing Engineering and Technologies2013Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    The Effects of Limits to Human Abilities on System of Systems Properties2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Handling complexity in Evolvable Production Systems2010In: IEEE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS (ISIE 2010), 2010, p. 2664-2668Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current demand for agile and sustainable production systems increases the needs of strategies to cope with the arising complexity of product transformation. In the EPS framework these strategies include a process-oriented modularization as well as distributed control solutions based on Multi-Agent technology. Reference Architecture and ontological representation of the logical and physical links in the system are at the basis of developing and running a production system in an EPS environment. This paper provides a review of EPS features and their effects on the complexity and the ability to handle it.

  • 14.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Evolvable Production Systems: A Coalition-Based Production Approach2011In: Handbook of Research on Mobility and Computing: Evolving Technologies and Ubiquitous Impacts / [ed] Maria Manuela Cruz-Cunha and Fernando Moreira, IGI Global, 2011, p. 821-835Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Evolutionary Theories in Manufacturing: Inspiration from Biology, Society, and Evolutionary Computing2010In: 10th IFAC Workshop on Intelligent Manufacturing Systems, IMS'10, 2010, p. 210-215Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Darwin's evolutionary theory of natural selection has had a strong impact on both science and culture, and has over the last decades become a popular inspiration in engineering sciences. Both the wide range of scientific areas where evolutionary theory is applied, and the simplistic metaphors used to explain evolution in schools and non-scientific situations have caused confusion of how key evolutionary concepts should be understood. In this paper, the cornerstones in biological and social evolutionary theory are identified and addressed from an engineering point of view. Previous efforts to apply evolutionary theories within engineering are then addressed and related to the needs and opportunities within manufacturing and assembly.

  • 16.
    Boyang, M.
    et al.
    China.
    Maoyue, L.
    China.
    Xianli, L.
    China.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Liang, S. Y.
    United States.
    Open architecture CNC system based on soft-integrated communication2018In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier, 2018, p. 671-676Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The open architecture computer numerical control (OACNC) system meets the individualized demand of modern industry for its characteristics of flexibility, adaptability, versatility, and expansibility. Existing OACNC systems depend on specialized software which reduces the openness of the OACNC system. This paper introduces a new OACNC system based on a soft-integrated communication module. The module improves the data exchange principle in communication shared memory and is built by open API. Therefore the OACNC system can be compatible with different communication protocols between periodic and aperiodic. Then a case is proposed to test the compatibility and extensibility of the system. Finally, the prospect of the OACNC system and future research is discussed.

  • 17.
    Chen, De Jiu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Control Systems.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    De Sousa Dias Ferreira, João
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Khabazzi, Mahmood Reza
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Zhang, Xinhai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Control Systems.
    A Virtual Environment for the Management and Development of Cyber-Physical Manufacturing Systems2015In: IFAC DCDS15, IFAC Papers Online, 2015, Vol. 48, p. 29-36Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern machineries are often cyber-physical system-of-systems controlled by intelligent controllersfor collaborative operations on the productions of complex products. To assure theefficiency and effectiveness, a consolidation of concerns across managerial levels, product lifecyclestages, and product lines or families becomes necessary. This calls for a common informationinfrastructure in terms of ontology, models, methods and tools. For industrial manufacturerssubjected to increased cost pressure and market volatility, the availability of such an informationinfrastructure would promote their abilities of making optimized and proactive decisions andthereby their competitiveness and survivability. This paper presents a virtual environment thatconstitutes an information infrastructure for the management and development of evolvableproduction systems (EPS) in manufacturing. It adopts mature modeling frameworks throughEAST-ADL for an effective model-based approach. The contribution is centered on a meta-modelthat offers a common data specification and semantic basis for information management acrossproduct lifecycle, models and tools, both for resource planning and for anomaly treatment. Aprototype tool implementation of this virtual environment for validation is also presented.

  • 18. Cui, Y.
    et al.
    Liu, Y.
    Wang, Xi Vincent
    KTH, Centres, XPRES, Excellence in production research. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Ding, W.
    Liu, Q.
    Research on measurement of cutting area temperature and its prediction model2018In: International Journal of Manufacturing Research, ISSN 1750-0591, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 209-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the temperature measuring tool based on NiCr/NiSi thin film thermocouple is developed. 6,061 aluminium alloys is selected as the experiment object. Based on the cutting area temperature result during field test, the central composite design is utilised, which contains the parameters of cutting speed, feed rate and cutting depth. Regarding each parameter, three levels are selected and then the second-order regression equation between cutting area temperature and three cutting parameters is established. The data of experimental measurement corresponds well with the mathematical prediction, which confirms that the experimental and mathematical methods are valid in the research on cutting area temperature.

  • 19. Danielsson, O.
    et al.
    Syberfeldt, A.
    Brewster, R.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Assessing Instructions in Augmented Reality for Human-robot Collaborative Assembly by Using Demonstrators2017In: Manufacturing Systems 4.0 – Proceedings of the 50th CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 63, p. 89-94Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robots are becoming more adaptive and aware of their surroundings. This has opened up the research area of tight human-robot collaboration, where humans and robots work directly interconnected rather than in separate cells. The manufacturing industry is in constant need of developing new products. This means that operators are in constant need of learning new ways of manufacturing. If instructions to operators and interaction between operators and robots can be virtualized this has the potential of being more modifiable and available to the operators. Augmented Reality has previously shown to be effective in giving operators instructions in assembly, but there are still knowledge gaps regarding evaluation and general design guidelines. This paper has two aims. Firstly it aims to assess if demonstrators can be used to simulate human-robot collaboration. Secondly it aims to assess if Augmented Reality-based interfaces can be used to guide test-persons through a previously unknown assembly procedure. The long-term goal of the demonstrator is to function as a test-module for how to efficiently instruct operators collaborating with a robot. Pilot-tests have shown that Augmented Reality instructions can give enough information for untrained workers to perform simple assembly-tasks where parts of the steps are done with direct collaboration with a robot. Misunderstandings of the instructions from the test-persons led to multiple errors during assembly so future research is needed in how to efficiently design instructions.

  • 20.
    Dias Ferreira, Joao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Ribeiro, Luis
    Linkoping University.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Barata, Jose
    Universidade nova de lisboa.
    Challenges and properties for bio-inspiration in manufacturing2014In: Technological Innovation for Collective Awareness Systems / [ed] L. Camarinha-Matos, 2014, p. 139-148Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing market fluctuations and customized products demand have dramatically changed the focus of industry towards organizational sustainability and supply chain agility. Such critical changes inevitably have a direct impact on the shop-floor operational requirements. In this sense, a number of innovative production paradigms emerged, providing the necessary theoretical background to such systems. Due to similarities between innovative modular production floors and natural complex systems, modern paradigms theoretically rely on bio-inspired concepts to attain the characteristics of biological systems. Nevertheless, during the implementation phase, bio-inspired principles tend to be left behind in favor of more traditional approaches, resulting in simple distributed systems with considerable limitations regarding scalability, reconfigurable ability and distributed problem resolution.

    This paper analyzes and presents a brief critical review on how bio-inspired concepts are currently being explored in the manufacturing environment, in an attempt to formulate a number of challenges and properties that need to be considered in order to implement manufacturing systems that closely follow the biological principles and consequently present overall characteristics of complex natural systems.

  • 21.
    Dias-Ferreira, Joao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Ribeiro, L.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    BIOSOARM: a bio-inspired self-organising architecture for manufacturing cyber-physical shopfloors2016In: Journal of Intelligent Manufacturing, ISSN 0956-5515, E-ISSN 1572-8145, p. 1-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biological collective systems have been an important source of inspiration for the design of production systems, due to their intrinsic characteristics. In this sense, several high level engineering design principles have been distilled and proposed on a wide number of reference system architectures for production systems. However, the application of bio-inspired concepts is often lost due to design and implementation choices or are simply used as heuristic approaches that solve specific hard optimization problems. This paper proposes a bio-inspired reference architecture for production systems, focused on highly dynamic environments, denominated BIO-inspired Self-Organising Architecture for Manufacturing (BIOSOARM). BIOSOARM aims to strictly adhere to bio-inspired principles. For this purpose, both shopfloor components and product parts are individualized and extended into the virtual environment as fully decoupled autonomous entities, where they interact and cooperate towards the emergence of a self-organising behaviour that leads to the emergence of the necessary production flows. BIOSOARM therefore introduces a fundamentally novel approach to production that decouples the system’s operation from eventual changes, uncertainty or even critical failures, while simultaneously ensures the performance levels and simplifies the deployment and reconfiguration procedures. BIOSOARM was tested into both flow-line and “job shop”-like scenarios to prove its applicability, robustness and performance, both under normal and highly dynamic conditions.

  • 22.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Visual replenishment methods in manufacturing industry and suggestion for a decision tool2013Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In almost all supply chains, materials need to be stored or buffered, implying that manufacturing companies need effective replenishment methods. However, this is challenging, since companies must balance inventory costs and customer service in complex and different situations. Therefore, it is important to choose replenishment methods carefully. One well-known and widespread method is Material Requirements Planning (MRP). But the method has problems, such as regarding volume flexibility. There are other methods, but the literature lacks case studies and detailed descriptions and analysis of them, especially for visually oriented methods. Therefore, it is important to explore different methods for materials supply.

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the application of visually oriented replenishment methods in manufacturing industry and further to design a tentative decision tool for selecting methods. The research aims to provide some answers to three key questions.

    The first research question concerns general factors that are important for evaluating how effective replenishment methods are. From the literature review, different factors emerged such as product characteristics (fit in the Kraljic matrix, volume issues, size, etc.); information, trust, and geographical proximity between supplier and customer; and different logistics goals (delivery service elements, tied-up capital, use of resources, inventory accuracy). It is also import to include the basic principles methods are related to. The factors were summarized in an analysis model, which is structured with three main areas (planning environment/conditions, basic principles, and effects). The model is used to analyze four case studies.

    The  second research  question focuses  on  the  characteristics for  visually orientedreplenishment methods. Examples of characteristics are: easy to understand and operate, offers uncomplicated flows, substantially applicable for noncritical and leverage parts with high yearly requirement and fairly even consumption, provides potential for  reduced  errors  in  stores/flows, potential for  providing high  delivery service and low levels of tied-up capital and resource utilization.

    The third research question focuses on what a tentative decision tool for selecting replenishment methods might look like, based on the factors that emerged from the other research questions and studies by others. In order to achieve an efficient materials supply, companies need to consider these factors when selecting replenishment methods. The decision tool consists of different steps, considering aspects of the planning environment/conditions in relation to the product and the supplier. The importance of the companies’ goals/motives for materials supply must also be assessed. The output from the decision tool is appropriate replenishment methods.

  • 23. Gernhardt, Benjamin
    et al.
    Vogel, Tobias
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Hemmje, Matthias
    IMPLEMENTATION OF A KNOWLEDGE-BASED PRODUCTION PLANNING INCLUDING A DIRECT MANIPULATIVE PROCESS EDITOR AND A MEDIATOR ARCHITECTURE2017In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASME 12TH INTERNATIONAL MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING CONFERENCE - 2017, VOL 3, AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, in the era of modern Intelligent Production Environments (IPE) and Industry 4.0, the manufacturing of a product takes place in various partial steps and these mostly in different locations, potentially distributed all over the world. The producing companies must assert in the global market and always find new ways to cut costs by saving tax, changing to the best providers, and by using the most efficient and fastest production processes. Furthermore, they must be inevitably based on a cloud-based repository and distributed architectures to make data and information accessible everywhere as well as development processes and knowledge available for a worldwide cooperation. A so called Collaborative Adaptive (Production) Process Planning (CAPP) can be supported by semantic approaches for knowledge representation and management as well as knowledge sharing, access, and re-use in a flexible and efficient way. In this way, to support CAPP scenarios, semantic representations of such knowledge integrated into a machine-readable process formalization is a key enabling factor for sharing in cloud-based knowledge repositories. This is especially required for, e.g., Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs). When SMEs work together on a production planning for a joint product, they exchange component production and manufacturing change information between different planning subsystems. These exchanges are mostly based on the already well-established Standard for the Exchange of Product model data (STEP), not least to obtain a computer-interpretable representation. Moreover, so-called Function Block (FB) Domain Models could support these planning process. FBs serve as a high-level planning-process knowledge-resource template and to the representation of knowledge. Furthermore, methodologies are required, which based on process-oriented semantic knowledge-representation, such as Process-oriented Knowledge-based Innovation Management (German: Wissens-basiertes Prozess-orientiertes Innovations Management, WPIM). WPIM is already a web and cloud-based tool suites and can represent such planning processes and their knowledge resources and can therefore be used to support the integration and the management of distributed CAPP knowledge in Manufacturing Change Management (MCM), as well as its access and re-use. That is also valid for Assembly-, Logistics- and Layout Planning (ALLP). On the one hand, a collaborative planning in a machine-readable and integrated representation will be possible as well as an optimization for mass production. On the other hand, within a cloud-based semantic knowledge repository, that knowledge can be shared with all partners and contributors. To combine all these functionalities, in 2016 we have already introduced a method, called Knowledge-based Production Planning (KPP). We outlined the theoretical advantages of integrating CAPP with Collaborative Manufacturing Change Management (CMCM) in the last year at MSEC16. In this Paper, we will demonstrate our first implementations of the KPP application with an integrated visual direct manipulative process editor as well as a first prototype of our mediator architecture with a semantic integration including a query library based on the KPP ontology.

  • 24.
    Gerth, Robert
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    The Role of Production Topology in Information Based Structuring of Organizations: The design of craft-based and industrialized construction firms2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrialization of construction is a business strategy to significantly improve competitiveness. However, the organization structure of the construction firms needs to support the new production system. The knowledge on why and how this business development can be accomplished is scarce, both within academia and in business practice. This research seeks to fill this knowledge gap.

    The purpose of organization structure and the production system have is to coordinate the firm’s processes and control the work performing resources. Information is one of the most fundamental dimensions for steering and controlling the work. The different information types are determined by the firm’s product customization strategy and the production system flexibility. Further, diverse information types are managed in different extent by the organizational steering mechanisms. Consequently, firms with dissimilar customization strategy or production flexibility should organizationally be designed differently in order to be efficient.

    The developed model identifies four generic production topologies: “engineer-to-order” (ETO), “manufacture-to-order” (MTO), “assembly-to-order” (ATO), and “make-standard-products” (MSP). The differences between the topologies can be related to the location of the “customer-order-decoupling-point” (CODP) in the product realization process; and to what extent the upstream and downstream processes continuously use stored information or process information to accomplish the work of each product order. The model predicts which organization structure mechanisms that should be used for which processes for each production topology. It is the specific configuration of the mechanisms that gives each production topology their organizational capability. The model has been validated by case studies in four organizations, each representing one of the four generic production topologies. Three cases considered housing and one studied truck manufacturing.

    It has been shown that the conventional housing firms have an ETO-production topology, while industrialized housing firms belonging to one of the others, i.e. MTO, ATO or MSP. The reason is that ETO-firms rely on crafts-based production to manage the work, while the other topologies base their steering mechanisms on industrial principles. These two types of production are fundamentally different, which also explain the need for different organization structures. The research complements previous knowledge and significantly increases the ability to predict, analyze and explain an organization’s design and behavior. The model can be used in practice to guide business development work and performance improvement programs.

  • 25.
    Gerth, Robert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Boqvist, Albert
    Lund University.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Design for construction: Utilizing production experiences in development2013In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 31, p. 135-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design process has a significant impact on the performance and profitability of a housing project. Therefore, decisions made during the design process should take into consideration knowledge and experience from other processes in previously accomplished projects, specifically from the production phase. How to capture and use production experience in housing has not gained enough interest, possibly leading to sub-optimal improvements during the construction process. This motivates research on how onsite production experience from similar previous projects can be captured and used to improve constructability without risking customer values. Based on the concept of constructability, ’design for manufacturing and assembly’ and the theory of waste, the method ’design for construction’ (DFC) has been developed. The four-step model complements the conventional construction process, and consists of the following steps: (1) specify customer values and similar previous projects; (2) identify onsite waste and cost drivers in previous projects; (3) develop criteria to evaluate constructability; and (4) evaluate constructability of the design. The DFC method is exemplified and tested through a case study, in which it was shown that the method facilitated identification of all problems that were considered in the investigated project. The method also highlighted other project obstacles that potentially could have been solved to improve constructability.

  • 26. Gustavsson, P.
    et al.
    Syberfeldt, A.
    Brewster, R.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Human-robot Collaboration Demonstrator Combining Speech Recognition and Haptic Control2017In: Manufacturing Systems 4.0 – Proceedings of the 50th CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 63, p. 396-401Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years human-robot collaboration has been an important topic in manufacturing industries. By introducing robots into the same working cell as humans, the advantages of both humans and robots can be utilized. A robot can handle heavy lifting, repetitive and high accuracy tasks while a human can handle tasks that require the flexibility of humans. If a worker is to collaborate with a robot it is important to have an intuitive way of communicating with the robot. Currently, the way of interacting with a robot is through a teaching pendant, where the robot is controlled using buttons or a joystick. However, speech and touch are two communication methods natural to humans, where speech recognition and haptic control technologies can be used to interpret these communication methods. These technologies have been heavily researched in several research areas, including human-robot interaction. However, research of combining these two technologies to achieve a more natural communication in industrial human-robot collaboration is limited. A demonstrator has thus been developed which includes both speech recognition and haptic control technologies to control a collaborative robot from Universal Robots. This demonstrator will function as an experimental platform to further research on how the speech recognition and haptic control can be used in human-robot collaboration. The demonstrator has proven that the two technologies can be integrated with a collaborative industrial robot, where the human and the robot collaborate to assemble a simple car model. The demonstrator has been used in public appearances and a pilot study, which have contributed in further improvements of the demonstrator. Further research will focus on making the communication more intuitive for the human and the demonstrator will be used as the platform for continued research.

  • 27. Holm, Magnus
    et al.
    Danielsson, Oscar
    Syberfeldt, Anna
    Moore, Philip
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Adaptive instructions to novice shop-floor operators using Augmented Reality2017In: JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL AND PRODUCTION ENGINEERING, ISSN 2168-1015, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 362-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a novel system using Augmented Reality and Expert Systems to enhance the quality and efficiency of shop-floor operators. The novel system proposed provides an adaptive tool that facilitates and enhances support on the shop-floor, due to its ability to dynamically customize the instructions displayed, dependent upon the competence of the user. A comparative study has been made between an existing method of quality control instructions at a machining line in an automotive engine plant and this novel system. It has been shown that the new approach outcompetes the existing system, not only in terms of perceived usability but also with respect to two other important shop-floor variables: quality and productivity. Along with previous research, the outcomes of these test cases indicate the value of using Augmented Reality technology to enhance shop-floor operators' ability to learn and master new tasks.

  • 28.
    Jensen, Patrik
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Olofsson, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Smiding, Erik
    Tyrens AB.
    Gerth, Robert
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Applying products in product platforms in the AEC firm2014In: / [ed] Dr. R. Raymond Issa, 2014, p. 1-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 5 step method for developing configurable “products in product” platforms to be used in an engineer-to-order (ETO) design process is proposed. The idea is based on the transformation of typical product architectures into modular design platforms where standard and variant modules are identified and developed. The platform modules can then be configured and combined with traditional design methods to meet the project specific requirements in the design process. Based on 1193 project designs, several configurable “products in product” were identified and developed in a real case study using the proposed method.

  • 29.
    Ji, Wei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. Harbin University of Science and Technology, China.
    Liu, X.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems. Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin, China.
    Meng, Y.
    Wu, X.
    A study on geometry modelling of a ball-end mill with chamfered cutting edge2015In: Journal of Manufacturing Processes, ISSN 1526-6125, Vol. 19, p. 205-211, article id 279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a geometry modelling approach to cross-section parameters of chamfered cutting edge on a ball-end mill of solid carbide (BEMSC). Both the cutting edge curve and the CR (chamfer in rake face) face models are derived. Based on the CR face model, a new method for CR face grinding path generation is proposed. By determining the relationship between the length and the angle parameters of the CR face equation, its grinding path can be derived. After solving the rake face equation using this method, its grinding path as well as the grinding paths of the LF (land on flank face) face and the second flank face can also be computed. The geometry model has been validated through a series of numerical simulations.

  • 30.
    Ji, Wei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. Harbin University of Science and Technology, China.
    Shi, J.
    Liu, X.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Liang, S. Y.
    A Novel Approach of Tool Wear Evaluation2017In: Journal of manufacturing science and engineering, ISSN 1087-1357, E-ISSN 1528-8935, Vol. 139, no 9, article id 091015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high-efficiency utilization of cutting tool resource is closely related to the flexible decision of tool life criterion, which plays a key role in manufacturing systems. Targeting a flexible method to evaluate tool life, this paper presents a data-driven approach considering all the machining quality requirements, e.g., surface integrity, machining accuracy, machining stability, chip control, and machining efficiency. Within the context, to connect tool life with machining requirements, all patterns of tool wear including flank face wear and rake face wear are fully concerned. In this approach, tool life is evaluated systematically and comprehensively. There is no generalized system architecture currently, and a four-level architecture is therefore proposed. Workpiece, cutting condition, cutting parameter, and cutting tool are the input parameters, which constrain parts of the independent variables of the evaluation objective including first-level and second-level indexes. As a result, tool wears are the remaining independent variables, and they are calculated consequently. Finally, the performed processes of the method are experimentally validated by a case study of turning superalloys with a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) cutting tool.

  • 31.
    Ji, Wei
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems. Harbin University of Science and Technology, China.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Big Data Analytics Based Optimisation for Enriched Process Planning: A Methodology2017In: Manufacturing Systems 4.0 – Proceedings of the 50th CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 63, p. 161-166Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve flexibility and accurateness of the optimisation in machining, this paper presents a big data analytics based optimisation method for enriched process planning in the concept of which cutting condition and cutting tool are optimised together and simultaneously. Within the context, the machining factors (workpiece, machining requirement, machine tool, machining process and machining result etc.) are concerned and represented by data attributes. In case that, the new machining resource, new materials and new machining tools etc., can be represented by a group of parameters, so that each machining cases can be treated by data regardless of the relevant experiments, which can enhance practicality and flexibility of potential application in real industry. Also a hybrid method combining neural networks (NN), analytic hierarchy process (AHP), and evolution based algorithm (EBA) or swarm intelligence based algorithm (SIBA) is proposed. NN based model is trained by the big data to improve the accurateness of each single objective, AHP is employed for multi-objective, and EBA or SBA is used to execute the optimising calculation.

  • 32.
    João, Dias Ferreira
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Bio-Inspired Self-Organisation in Evolvable Production Systems2013Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing market fluctuations and customized products demand have dramatically changed the focus of industry towards organizational sustainability and supply chain agility. Such critical changes in the strategic vision of the companies inevitably have a direct impact on the shop-floor operational requirements. In this sense, traditional shop-floor approaches are becoming increasingly inadequate leading to the adoption of more pluggable and reusable solutions.

    The emergence o modern manufacturing paradigms translates the effort undertaken by the academia in order to provide the required background to support the implementation of such distributed mechatronic systems. Biological systems, due to their similar distributed network-like structure, represent naturally a common analogy and source of inspiration for such distributed modular approaches. Hence, modern manufacturing paradigms usually rely on complexity science biologically inspired concepts to attain distributed control, adaptability, evolution, flexibility and robustness as core concepts. This originated the implementation of a number of different multi-agent based architectures. Nevertheless, with time the majority of the these implementation efforts left behind most of the bio-inspired concepts resulting in simple distributed approaches with considerable limitations regarding scalability, reconfigurability and distributed problem resolution. Particularly under the scope of Evolvable Production System (EPS) the implementation of self-organising mechanisms based on negotiation interaction protocols and dynamic coalition-based hierarchical complexity, have considerable hindered the system performance and limited the full exploitation of the paradigm potential.

    In this context, this licentiate thesis is focused on the development of a self-organising manufacturing systems that holistically mimics the main structural and regulatory principles followed by natural systems.

    For this purpose, the present approach was designed as opposed to the current tendency followed by modern productions approaches, in which the product holds the production knowledge and is responsible for the management of its own production. Instead, the production knowledge was reduced to the minimum and distributed over the manufacturing components. Self-organising principles heavily inspired on the regulatory mechanisms of biological systems, were then devised to regulate the critical control mechanisms of the manufacturing system. Hence, similarly to the natural world the characteristics and the system overall production emerge as consequence of the micro-dynamics of the systems. In this way, it becomes therefore possible to attain a system that is not only highly reconfigurable and scalable but also able to distributively tackle the manufacturing processes.

    Although the present work has been developed under the Evolvable Production System context, the introduced approach can be easily adapted to a wider range of modular networked-based systems.

  • 33. Lei, P.
    et al.
    Zheng, L.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Wang, Y.
    Li, C.
    Li, X.
    MTConnect compliant monitoring for finishing assembly interfaces of large-scale components: A vertical tail section application2017In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 45, p. 121-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monitoring is a significant issue for finishing the assembly interfaces of large-scale components before final assembly. Acquisition and supervision of the pivotal data is essential to ensure the security and reliability for machining the large and complicated components with high-value. This process is generally cumbersome and time-consuming because there are various types of data coming from different components and sensors. The problem becomes more serious when considering the whole shop floor. Recently, MTConnect has been proven to be an effective method to realize standardized data collection and monitoring process. However, MTConnect is still under development and cannot cover the whole finishing process such as on-machining measuring (OMM) and fixturing. To address the issue, an MTConnect compliant method with extended data models is proposed in this paper to implement a standardized monitoring system. Firstly, a finishing system for the assembly interfaces is introduced, including the framework, workflow and key procedures and data. Then extended MTConnect data models are proposed to represent the finishing system including on-machine touch-trigger probe and sensor-based intelligent fixturing related information. Based on the extended MTConnect data models, a web-based monitoring system is developed for data collection and monitoring by combining an MTConnect agent and an OPC adapter. The proposed approach is validated by collecting and monitoring the key process data using an airplane vertical tail as an application. The advantages of using MTConnect would be more significant when extended to the entire factory and implemented in cloud manufacturing in the future.

  • 34.
    Lieder, Michael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Integrated evaluation of resource efficiency and cost effectiveness in production systems2014Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Improved use of resources is of enormously high relevance and crucial for achieving as well as maintaining a sustainable condition. Especially industrial production has a superior responsibility in creating a long-term viable way of living. However, there is a lack of systematic evaluation procedures for operational resources in production systems, meaning product material, energy, equipment and humans. Especially small and medium-sized enterprises, representing the largest number of all companies in Europe, are mostly not able to deal with these kinds of issues in addition to their daily business.

    The purpose of this licentiate thesis is the investigation for and development of an evaluation approach for resource efficiency and effectiveness in small and medium-sized enterprises. Two literature reviews and one industrial case study have been carried out. To start with, the first  literature  review  founds a theoretical  basis  for  the meaning of resource efficiency and effectiveness. The second literature review investigates latest measures and approaches for production system evaluation. In the next step an evaluation approach for resource efficiency and effectiveness evaluation in small and medium-sized enterprises is developed and tested within a single case study. The result consists of a comprehensive approach for small and medium-sized enterprises with focus on economic short-term and long-term improvements.

     

  • 35.
    Lieder, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Towards circular economy implementation: a comprehensive review in context of manufacturing industry2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 115, p. 36-51Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of circular economy (CE) is to an increasing extent treated as a solution to series of challenges such as waste generation, resource scarcity and sustaining economic benefits. However the concept of circularity is not of novel as such. Specific circumstances and motivations have stimulated ideas relevant to circularity in the past through activities such as reuse, remanufacturing or recycling. Main objectives of this work are: to provide a comprehensive review of research efforts encompassing aspects of resources scarcity, waste generation and economic advantages; to explore the CE landscape in the context of these three aspects especially when they are considered simultaneously; based on an idea of a comprehensive CE framework, propose an implementation strategy using top-down and bottom-up approach in a concurrent manner. To fulfill this objective a comprehensive review of state-of-the-art research is carried out to understand different ideas relevant to CE, motivation for the research and context of their recurrence. Main contributions of this paper are a comprehensive CE framework and a practical implementation strategy for a regenerative economy and natural environment. The framework emphasizes on a combined view of three main aspects i.e. environment, resources and economic benefits. It also underlines that joint support of all stakeholders is necessary in order to successfully implement the CE concept at large scale. The proposed framework and implementation strategy also identify new avenues for future research and practice in the field of CE.

  • 36.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Research initiative in production engineering2011In: Public Service Review. European Union, ISSN 1472-3395, Vol. 22, p. 620-621Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Semere, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Kjellberg, Ann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Enablers for reconfiguration of machine tools in a changeable manufacturingIn: CIRP Annals Manufacturing TechnologyArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Liu, Hongyi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    An AR-based Worker Support System for Human-Robot Collaboration2017In: Procedia Manufacturing, ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 11, p. 22-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In human-robot collaborative manufacturing, industrial robots would work alongside the human workers who jointly perform the assigned tasks. Recent researches revealed that recognised human motions could be used as input for industrial robots control. However, the information feedback channel from industrial robots to human workers is still limited. In response to the requirement, this research explores the potential of adopting augmented reality (AR) technologies in a worker support system for human-robot collaborative manufacturing. The robot commands and worker instructions can be virtually augmented for human workers intuitively and instantly. The designed AR-based worker support system is demonstrated by a case study.

  • 39.
    Liu, Xian-Li
    et al.
    Harbin Univ Sci & Technol, Harbin 150080, Heilongjiang, Peoples R China..
    Shi, Jin-Kui
    Harbin Univ Sci & Technol, Harbin 150080, Heilongjiang, Peoples R China..
    Ji, Wei
    Harbin Univ Sci & Technol, Harbin 150080, Heilongjiang, Peoples R China.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Experimental Evaluation on Grinding Texture on Flank Face in Chamfer Milling of Stainless Steel2018In: CHINESE JOURNAL OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, ISSN 1000-9345, Vol. 31, no 1, article id UNSP 71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The surface quality of chamfer milling of stainless steel is closed related to the products of 3C (Computer, Communication and Consumer electronics), where a cutter is a major part to achieve that. Targeting a high-quality cutter, an experimental evaluation is carried out on the influence of grinding texture of cutter flank face on surface quality. The mathematic models of chamfer cutter are established, and they are validated by a numerical simulation. Also the grinding data are generated by the models and tested by a grinding simulation for safety reasons. Then, a set of chamfer cutting tools are machined in a five-axis CNC grinding machine, and consist of five angles between the cutting edge and the grinding texture on the 1st flank faces, i.e., 0A degrees, 15A degrees, 30A degrees, 45A degrees and 60A degrees. Furthermore, the machined cutting tools are tested in a series of milling experiments of chamfer hole of stainless steel, where cutting forces and surface morphologies are measured and observed. The results show that the best state of both surface quality and cutting force is archived by the tool with 45A degrees grinding texture, which can provide a support for manufacturing of cutting tool used in chamfer milling.

  • 40.
    Liu, Yongkui
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Wang, Yuquan
    KTH.
    Wang, Xi Vincent
    KTH, Centres, XPRES, Excellence in production research. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Zhang, L.
    China.
    Multi-agent-based scheduling in cloud manufacturing with dynamic task arrivals2018In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier, 2018, p. 953-960Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scheduling is a critical means for providing on-demand manufacturing services in cloud manufacturing. Multi-agent technologies provide an effective approach for addressing scheduling issues in cloud manufacturing, which, however, have rarely been used for solving the issue. This paper addresses scheduling issues in cloud manufacturing using multi-agent technologies. A multi-agent architecture for scheduling in cloud manufacturing is proposed firstly. Then, a corresponding multi-agent model is presented, which incorporates many-to-many negotiations based on an extended contract net protocol and takes into account dynamic task arrivals. Simulation results indicate the feasibility of the model and approach proposed.

  • 41. Liu, Zhenkai
    et al.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems. National Research Council of Canada.
    Sequencing of interacting prismatic machining features for process planning2007In: Computers in industry (Print), ISSN 0166-3615, E-ISSN 1872-6194, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 295-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    oday, feature-based process planning has been popular in academia and industry with its ability to rigorously integrate design and manufacturing. To date, research on feature sequencing is mainly focused on using expert systems or knowledge-based systems, geometric based approaches, unsupervised-leaming or artificial neural network, and genetic algorithms. The approach presented in this paper, however, is a hybrid one using both knowledge-based rules and geometric reasoning rules. In addition to feature sequencing rules formulation, our research contributions consist of: (1) determining machining precedence constraints by a set of defined knowledge-based rules, (2) grouping machining features into setups based on tool approaching directions, and (3) sequencing features within each setup through geometric reasoning. The sequence of materials (features) to be removed depends on two types of interactions: adjacent interaction and volumetric interaction. A set of rules for geometric reasoning is therefore developed to generate feature sequence. The developed approach has been implemented as the Sequence Generator module in a Distributed Process Planning system and is validated through a case study.

  • 42. Lu, S.
    et al.
    Xu, C.
    Zhong, R. Y.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    A RFID-enabled positioning system in automated guided vehicle for smart factories2017In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 44, p. 179-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart factory, as one of key future for our industry, requires logistics automation within a manufacturing site such as a shop floor. Automated guided vehicle (AGV) systems may be one solution, whose accuracy will be influenced by some factors. This paper presents a radio frequency identification (RFID)-enabled positioning system in AGV for smart factory. Key impact factors on AGV's accuracy such as magnetic field in circular antenna, circular magnetic field, and circular contours stability are examined quantitatively. Based on the examinations, simulation studies and a testbed are carried out to evaluate the feasibility and practicality of the proposed approach. It is observed that large diameter antennas are used in driving zone and small diameter antennas are used in parking zone. This approach was compared with another method using passive RFID tags and it is superior to that method with greatly reduced tags’ deployment. Observations and lessons from simulation and testbed studies could be used for guiding automatic logistics within a smart manufacturing shop floor.

  • 43.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Characterisation of the Business Models for Innovative, Non-Mature Production Automation Technology2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing companies are nowadays facing an unprecedented series of challenges to their survival: global competition and product mass-customization are the shaping forces of tomorrow’s business success. The consequent need for agile and sustainable production solutions is the utmost motivation behind the development of innovative approaches which often are not in line with the state of art. It is well documented that companies fail in recognizing how such disruptively innovative approaches can yield an interesting economic output. This, in turn, enhances the risk of leaving the aforementioned promising technologies conceptually and practically underdeveloped.  In the field of automatic production systems the Evolvable Production System paradigm proposes modular architectures with distributed, autonomous control rather than integral design and hierarchical, centralized control. EPS technology is thus disruptive: it refuses the present paradigm of Engineer to Order in industrial automation by proposing an advanced Configure to Order system development logic.

    This dissertation investigates the possibility of using the recent sophisticated developments of the concept of Business Model as a holistic analytical tool for the characterization and solution of the issue of bringing disruptive and non-fully mature innovation to proficient application in production environments. In order to purse this objective the main contributions in the relevant literature have been extracted and combined to an original definition of business model able to encompass the aspects deemed critical for the problem. Such a construct is composed of three elements: (1) Value Proposition that describe the features of a technology that generates value for a given customer, (2) the Value Configuration and the (3) Architecture of the Revenue which describe the mechanisms that allows to create and capture such value respectively.   

    The subsequent work has focused on the EPS paradigm as a specific case of the overall problem. The first step has been a full characterization of the related value proposition through an innovative approach based on a bottom-up decomposition in its elementary components, followed by their aggregation into meaningful value offerings: with reference to the EPS paradigm such an approach has disclosed an overall value proposition composed of six potentially independent value offerings. This collection of Value Offerings has then been used as a basis to generate the EPS business models. In particular for each single offering a possible set of necessary activities and resources has been devised and organized in a coherent value configuration. The resulting creation mechanisms have then been linked among each other following a logical supplier-customer scheme for capturing the value: this allowed establishing the architecture of revenue, last element of the overall production paradigm. Finally the results have been validated in a semi-industrial system developed for the (IDEAS, 2010-2013) project through the individuation of the areas of application of such business models.

  • 44.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Design and Management of Manufacturing Systems, DMMS.
    Lohse, Niels
    Analysis of the Student Perception of the Link between Product and Production System: Towards Effective Strategies to Teach the Holistic Nature of Product Design2014In: International journal of engineering education, ISSN 0949-149X, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 1357-1366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product design has a huge and widespread impact on the eventual design of the related production processes, such as procurement, manufacturing, assembly, maintenance and recycling, amongst others. Understanding the full the nature of such a complex relationship is a cornerstone in the professional development of any production engineering student and practitioner. Acquiring sophisticated concepts is a long process consisting of acquiring the necessary notions and mentally structuring them through different semantic links in a consistent body of knowledge. This generates a large set of intermediate states between the novice and the expert. Phenomenography focuses on identifying and classifying these perceptions with the aim of identifying the related pattern for good learning. In particular, this phenomenographic analysis focuses on investigating the students' perception of the articulated link between the design of a product and that of the related assembly process. The study is based on courses that exploit the principles of Design for Assembly (DFA) methods to present and detail such a domain. In the first section of the paper, the aforementioned focal issue is fully characterized as a 'Threshold Concept'. The central part of the paper describes five generic levels of understanding of such a matter: from a simple mechanical use of DFA to a more sophisticated correct holistic understanding of all the implications of such a tool. The classification has been inferred through a series of informal, semi-structured interviews with the students. The characterization introduced is finally discussed with the aim of disclosing the pattern of good learning that, in turn, could provide the base for studies aimed at disclosing useful hints for the effective development of the related teaching activities.

  • 45.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Ferreira, Joao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Emerging Behavior as Driver for the Sustainability of a Modular, "Skills-Centric" Production System2011In: IEEE AFRICON 2011, IEEE , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current main challenge for the future production system lies in the correct integration of the issues related to sustainability and to agility. The "Evolvable Paradigm" addresses this concern with a new way of engineering the whole production system. The concept of Skill is declined as common denominator between the definitions of manufacturing process and manufacturing equipment. Each production module holds some of the skills that compose the process definition and it is endowed with the necessary intelligence to come together with the other modules in an organized society. This work introduces the approach adopted in the IDEAS project (Instantly Deployable Evolvable Assembly System) to cope with the above mentioned requirement through the presented paradigm. While fully featured and described IDEAS mechatronic architecture allows rapid reconfiguration of the system, the issue of sustainability is targeted by the open definition of the concepts of skill and skills interaction. The result of skill aggregation is hereby called Emergent Behavior and in the proposed model it can be seen as the main driver for the sustainable use of the system.

  • 46.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    A FRAMEWORK FOR PHENOMENOGRAPIC ANALYSIS AND CLASSIFICATION OF TROUBLESOME KNOWLEDGE IN THE ENGINEERING DOMAIN2016In: EDULEARN16: 8TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION AND NEW LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A& DEVELOPMENT , 2016, p. 5882-5888Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of effective teaching and learning activities must create an experience able to elicit the intended learning outcomes of the educational unit. For this purpose, it is then fundamental to account for the different ways students can experience the specific content taught. This paper introduces a structured approach to perform phenomenographic studies aimed at disclosing the most common student perceptions of a given topic and highlight the patterns that can bring students with poor understanding of the target concept to a more sophisticated perception. The method has been formulated based on specific cases in the production engineering domain. In detail a phenomenographic study the first step is to describe, as a knowledgeable person would do, both the subject of the study and its domain. This description is then considered the target perception of the focal topic. In the second phase the students that have already been assessed for the educational unit in exam must be interviewed with open question about both subject and domain. Their answer must be plotted according to sound parameters along two dimension (again subject and domain related) of increasingly sophisticated level of understanding. The result of such interview must be then classified in clusters of understanding that will give the different common perception of the students about the given topic. Finally, the relation among the cluster must be studied with the aim of disclosing suitable teaching and learning activities to help students migrate to a perception cluster close to the above-mentioned target perception.

  • 47.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Hofmann, Andreas
    From Flexibility to true Evolvability: an introduction to the basic requirements2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the field of production engineering, most of the past paradigms introduced automation and computer science at shopfloor level based on the concept of system flexibility. Nevertheless their limits in approaching some fundamental areas such as the modularisation or the control issues, make them unsuitable to tackle the current dynamic scenarios & challenges. In this paper a review of past approaches, underlining their weaknesses, leads to propose a methodology for the creation of a manufacturing system, based on the Evolvable Paradigm. The salient points of this scheme are the process oriented approach to modularisation and the link between the development of the system and the design of the product. The potential economical benefits can render automation a sustainable solution even for SMEs. One fundamental requirement to pursue Full Autonomy and Evolvability is to deeply study the processes in order to represent them at hardware level, enabling the exploitment of the Emergent Behavior by the Control System, that for this reason has to be distributed.

  • 48.
    Meng, Yue
    et al.
    Harbin Univ Sci & Technol, Sch Mech & Power Engn, Harbin 150080, Heilongjiang, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Lee, Chen-Han
    Huazhong Univ Sci & Technol, Sch Mech Sci & Engn, Wuhan 430000, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Ji, Wei
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Liu, Xianli
    Harbin Univ Sci & Technol, Sch Mech & Power Engn, Harbin 150080, Heilongjiang, Peoples R China..
    Plastic deformation-based energy consumption modelling for machining2018In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 96, no 1-4, p. 631-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To predict energy consumption in machining, a mathematical modelling method to mimic the cutting energy consumption during machining is proposed in this paper. The established model is based on the law of energy conservation. The mechanical material property coefficients and cutting parameters are included in the model by using material deformation theory and friction calculation which are used to represent the phenomena in machining. Cutting energy of material removal process is refined by analysing the effect of tool edge geometry. In addition, the machining process is divided into two machining elements, linear element and circular arc element, of which energy consumptions are established based on the principal theories above. Calculation method on the instantaneous cutting thickness for circular arc elements is proposed. Finally, a test example is given to validate the proposed modelling approach. With the proposed method, the separate impacts of the factors (e.g. cutting parameters, workpiece, tool) have been analysed and the physical background behind the known experimental dependence of the cutting parameters on cutting energy is revealed.

  • 49.
    Mikler, Jerzy
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Frangoudis, Constantinos
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    On a Systematic Approach to Development of Maintenance Plans for Production Equipment2011In: Journal of Machine Engineering, ISSN 1895-7595, Vol. 11, no 1-2, p. 87-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reliability is a collective term covering several abilities of the technical system: to deliver required functions, to uphold quality of products and services, to assure that the safety requirements associated with the system are properly fulfilled with regards both to the users and the environment and finally to uphold the durability of the technical system during its whole life cycle. All this has to be performed at acceptable risks, optimal cost, and correspond to operational needs of the business. Even though there is an advanced, well thought-out concept for this purpose - reliability centred maintenance (RCM) - that correctly applied might result in very good quality maintenance programs, it is not broadly used in the industry due to the vast efforts required for its implementation. An appropriate methodology supporting systematic functional break down of a studied systems, and guidelines how to couple functional failures to failure modes, integrated with RCM, would greatly speed up generating of effective maintenance programs. In this paper we present our research towards development of such a methodology, and show a pilot implementation to analysis of machine tool spindle. The methodology is based on Hubka's theory of design and AFD/TRIZ.

  • 50.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Reconfiguration Methodology to improve the agility and sustainability of Plug and Produce Systems2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of globalisation, market turbulence and sustainability requirements is challenging production companies to devise new strategies to offer large product diversity, keep low inventories, and timely produce small batches of customised and personalised products. Agile shop-floors that can be promptly deployed and re-configured with minimum integration and programming efforts are perceived as a promising strategy to tackle this problem.

    This has led to the advent of the Plug and Produce (P&P) concept, where different production modules can be plugged in the system and start working autonomously without ceasing production. P&P systems support structure and functionality transformations through plug/unplug of modules, and dynamic production and fault-tolerance through self-organization. This will naturally increase its complexity in design, operation and exact performance predictability, and therefore it sets the need for the definition of methodologies and decision supporting tools that can help system designers and production managers deciding which layouts and configurations could accommodate constantly changing production requirements (i.e. different product plans and volumes). This thesis focuses exactly on those points, aiming at providing a reconfiguration methodology that can contribute to the increase of agility and sustainability of P&P systems.

    This methodology enables the systematic generation and assessment of reconfiguration alternatives for P&P systems. For this purpose, it uses graph theory and a set of metrics to assess the potential performance of different reconfiguration alternatives. The experimental tests provided present evidence that the use of the proposed methodology can help designers selecting a suitable reconfiguration alternative whenever new product requirements are posed. The use of this methodology can therefore increase the agility and sustainability of P&P systems and potentially contribute to their industrial deployment.

12 1 - 50 of 86
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