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  • 1.
    Afzal, Mohammad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Numerical modelling and analysis of friction contact for turbine blades2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    High cycle fatigue failure of turbine and compressor blades due to resonance in the operating frequency range is one of the main problems in the design of gas turbine engines. To suppress excessive vibrations in the blades and prevent high cycle fatigue, dry friction dampers are used by the engine manufacturers. However, due to the nonlinear nature of friction contact, analysis of such systems becomes complicated.

    This work focuses on the numerical modelling of friction contact and a 3D friction contact model is developed. To reduce the computation time in the Newton-iteration steps, a method to compute the Jacobian matrix in parallel to the contact forces is proposed. The developed numerical scheme is successfully applied on turbine blades with shroud contact having an arbitrary 3D relative displacement. The equations of motion are formulated in the frequency domain using the multiharmonic balance method to accurately capture the nonlinear contact forces and displacements. Moreover, the equations of motion of the full turbine blade model are reduced to a single sector model by exploiting the concept of the cyclic symmetry boundary condition for a periodic structure.

    The developed 3D coupled numerical contact model is compared with a 3D contact model having uncoupled tangential motion and drawback of the uncoupled contact model is discussed. Furthermore, presence of higher harmonics in the nonlinear contact forces is analyzed and their effect on the excitation of the different harmonic indices (nodal diameters) of the bladed disk are systematically presented. Moreover, due to the quasi-analytical computation of the Jacobian matrix, the developed scheme is proved to be effective in solving the equations of motion and significant reduction in time is achieved without loss of accuracy.

     

     

     

  • 2.
    Afzal, Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics. kth.
    Lopez Arteaga, Ines
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics. Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    A formulation of the Jacobian matrixfor 3D numerical friction contact model applied to turbine blade shroud contactIn: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An analytical expression is formulated to compute the Jacobian matrix for 3D friction contact modelling that eciently evaluates the matrix while computing the friction contact forces in the time domain by means of the alternate frequency time domain approach. The developed expression is successfully used for thecalculation of the friction damping on a turbine blade with shroud contact interface having an arbitrary 3Drelative displacement. The analytical expression drastically reduces the computation time of the Jacobian matrix with respect to the classical finite dierence method, with many points at the contact interface. Therefore,it also significantly reduces the overall computation time for the solution of the equations of motion,since the formulation of the Jacobian matrix is the most time consuming step in solving the large set of nonlinear algebraic equations when a finite dierence approach is employed. The equations of motion are formulated in the frequency domain using the multiharmonic balance method to accurately capture the nonlinear contact forces and displacements. Moreover, the equations of motion of the full turbine blade model are reduced to a single sector model by exploiting the concept of cyclic symmetry boundary condition for aperiodic structure. Implementation of the developed scheme in solving the equations of motion is proved to be effective and significant reduction in time is achieved without loss of accuracy.

  • 3.
    Afzal, Muhammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Raza, R.
    Du, S.
    Lima, R.B.d
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics. Hubei Univ, Fac Phys & Elect Technol, Hubei Collaborat Innovat Ctr Adv Organ Chem Mat, Wuhan 430062, Peoples R China.
    Synthesis of Ba0.3Ca0.7Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ composite material as novel catalytic cathode for ceria-carbonate electrolyte fuel cells2015In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 178, 385-391 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work reports a new composite BaxCa1-xCoyFe1-yO3-delta (BCCF) cathode material for advanced and low temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The BCCF-based composite material was synthesized by sol gel method and investigated as a catalytic cathode for low temperature (LT) SOFCs. XRD analysis of the as-prepared material revealed the dominating BCCF perovskite structure as the main phase accompanied with cobalt and calcium oxides as the secondary phases resulting into an overall composite structure. Structure and morphology of the sample was observed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM). In particular, the Ba0.3Ca0.7Co0.8Fe0.2O3-delta (BCCF37) showed a maximum conductivity of 143 S cm(-1) in air at 550 degrees C measured by DC 4 probe method. The BCCF at the optimized composition exhibited much higher electrical conductivities than the commercial Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-delta (BSCF) perovskite cathode material. A maximum power density of 325 mW cm(-2) at 550 degrees C is achieved for the ceria-carbonate electrolyte fuel cell with BCCF37 as the cathode material.

  • 4.
    Alberdi-Muniain, Ane
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Magneto-sensitive elastomers in vibration isolation2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Vibration isolators made of rubber are used in numerous engineeringapplications to isolate structures from undesirable effects of vibrations.However, once a vibration isolator is installed in an application, it is not possible to modify its characteristics to adjust to changing conditions. An alternative to obtain more adaptive characteristics is touse magneto-sensitive (MS) elastomers. MS elastomers are a type of smart material consisting of an elastomer matrix, such as natural or synthetic rubber, to which iron particles are added displaying properties that vary rapidly, continuously and reversibly by applying an external magnetic field.The aim of this thesis is to investigate the possibility to use MS natural rubber in vibration isolation.Firstly, dynamic shear properties of MS natural rubber are experimentally studied at various frequencies, dynamic amplitudes and magnetic fields. In addition, the influence on the dynamic properties of adding carbon black and plasticisers to MS rubber is investigated. Carbon black is the most popular reinforcing filler that rubber usually contains in engineering applications to improve mechanical properties where as plasticisers simplify the filler blending process.Furthermore, the effectiveness of MS rubber applied in a vibration isolation system is experimentally investigated by measuring the energy flow into the foundation. The energy flow, including both force and velocity of the foundation, is a suitable measure of the effectiveness of a real vibration isolation system where the foundation is not perfectly rigid. The vibration isolation system in this study consists of a solid aluminium mass excitedby an electro-dynamic shaker and mounted upon four nonlinear frequency,amplitude and magnetic field dependent MS isolators being connected to a relatively stiff foundation. The energy flow through the MS isolators is directly measured by inserting a force transducer below each isolator andan accelerometer on the foundation close to each isolator. MS isolators are shown to be more useful than conventional rubber isolators since the dynamic stiffness varies with the application of an external magnetic field,thus resulting in more effective vibration isolation. In addition, the indirect technique is employed to measure the energy flow while requiring only accelerometers since it is usually difficult to directly measure the force in a real application. The indirect technique is validated by direct measurements.Finally, a model of the energy flow through the nonlinear frequency,amplitude and magnetic field dependent MS isolators is developed for the tested vibration isolation system. Vibration isolators are usually only a small connecting component within a more complex system. Hence, simple discrete models are frequently used to characterise the frequency and dynamic amplitude dependence of rubber. Recently, a model of this type has been modified to include magneto-sensitivity and thus model MS rubber. In this study, this novel MS rubber model is incorporated into the full system to model the MS isolators while the foundation is characterised by its driving-point and transfer inertances at and between the connection points.The energy flow model results are compared to those of measurements,showing good agreement. The developed energy flow model provides a basis to design vibration isolator systems made of MS isolators.

  • 5.
    Alberdi-Muniain, Ane
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Gil-Negrete, N.
    Department of Applied Mechanics, CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra).
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Direct energy flow measurement in magneto-sensitive vibration isolator systems2012In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 331, no 9, 1994-2006 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effectiveness of highly nonlinear, frequency, amplitude and magnetic field dependent magneto-sensitive natural rubber components applied in a vibration isolation system is experimentally investigated by measuring the energy flow into the foundation. The energy flow, including both force and velocity of the foundation, is a suitable measure of the effectiveness of a real vibration isolation system where the foundation is not perfectly rigid. The vibration isolation system in this study consists of a solid aluminium mass supported on four magneto-sensitive rubber components and is excited by an electro-dynamic shaker while applying various excitation signals, amplitudes and positions in the frequency range of 20-200 Hz and using magneto-sensitive components at zero-field and at magnetic saturation. The energy flow through the magneto-sensitive rubber isolators is directly measured by inserting a force transducer below each isolator and an accelerometer on the foundation close to each isolator. This investigation provides novel practical insights into the potential of using magneto-sensitive material isolators in noise and vibration control, including their advantages compared to traditional vibration isolators. Finally, nonlinear features of magneto-sensitive components are experimentally verified.

  • 6.
    Alberdi-Muniain, Ane
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Gil-Negrete, N
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Indirect energy flow measurement in magneto-sensitive vibration isolator systems2013In: Applied Acoustics, ISSN 0003-682x, ISSN 0003-682x, Vol. 74, no 4, 575-584 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The indirect energy flow measurement method is extended to cover highly nonlinear, frequency, amplitude and magnetic field dependent magneto-sensitive natural rubber isolators applied in a real vibration isolation system. Energy flow is an effective measure of vibration isolation while being a single quantity that considers both force and velocity. The use of the indirect technique is of interest while requiring only accelerometers since it is usually difficult to directly measure the force in a real application. The vibration isolation system is composed of four magneto-sensitive rubber isolators that are inserted under a vibrating source consisting of a solid aluminium mass excited by an electro-dynamic shaker. Magneto-sensitive rubber isolators are more useful than conventional rubber isolators since the dynamic stiffness varies with the application of an external magnetic field, thus resulting in more effective vibration isolation. Various approximations regarding the indirect technique are investigated, concluding that average stiffness of magneto-sensitive isolators can be used and auto-spectrum of the foundation velocity ignored. In addition, various error analyses are performed. Finally, the indirect measurement of the energy flow is validated by direct measurements, showing very good agreement.

  • 7.
    Alberdi-Muniain, Ane
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Gil-Negrete, N.
    Department of Applied Mechanics, CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra).
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Influence of carbon black and plasticisers on dynamic properties of isotropic magnetosensitive natural rubber2012In: Plastics, rubber and composites, ISSN 1465-8011, E-ISSN 1743-2898, Vol. 41, no 7, 310-317 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamic shear modulus of magnetosensitive (MS) natural rubber composites is experimentallystudied, where influences of carbon black, plasticiser and iron particle concentrations areinvestigated at various dynamic shear strain amplitudes and external magnetic fields within thelower structure borne frequency range. The iron particles embedded in natural rubber areirregularly shaped and randomly distributed; the plasticisers simplify the iron particle blendingprocess, while carbon black reduces the production costs and improves the mechanicalproperties. The results show that the relative MS effect on the shear modulus magnitude increaseswith increased plasticiser and iron particle concentration and decreases with increased carbonblack concentration. Furthermore, their relative contributions are quantified. Consequently, thestudy provides a basis for optimising the composition of MS natural rubber to meet a variety ofrequirements, including those of vibration isolation, a promising application area for MS materials.

  • 8.
    Alberdi-Muniain, Ane
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Gil-Negrete, N
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Modelling energy flow through magneto-sensitive vibration isolators2013In: International Journal of Engineering Science, ISSN 0020-7225, E-ISSN 1879-2197, Vol. 65, 22-39 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A highly nonlinear model of the energy flow in a magneto-sensitive (MS) vibration isolation system is developed where it is possible to investigate the influences of MS rubber material parameters; magnetic field strength; MS isolator dimension and position; excitation force magnitude, position and frequency; engine mass, inertia and dimension and, finally, foundation inertance. The MS vibration isolation system consists of an engine modelled by a solid mass, excited by a vertical force and mounted upon four MS isolators being connected to a relatively stiff foundation characterised by its driving-point and transfer inertances at and between the connection points. The energy flow into the foundation is the most appropriate indicator of the effectiveness of a real vibration isolation system while considering both foundation velocity and force. The MS isolator model applied is a nonlinear MS rubber model including frequency, dynamic amplitude and magnetic field dependence. The energy flow model results are compared to those of measurements, showing good agreement. Finally, parameter studies are carried out. The developed energy flow model provides a basis for designing MS vibration isolation systems to meet specific requirements.

  • 9.
    Alberdi-Muniain, Ane
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Gil-Negrete, N.
    Department of Applied Mechanics, CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra).
    Nieto, F.J.
    Department of Applied Mechanics, CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra).
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Vinolas, J.
    Department of Applied Mechanics, CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra).
    An experimental study of magneto-sensitive natural rubber components applied in a vibration isolation system2009In: CONSTITUTIVE MODELS FOR RUBBER VI / [ed] Gert Heinrich, Michael Kaliske, Alexander Lion, London: Taylor & Francis, 2009, 99-104 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effectiveness of magneto-sensitive natural rubber components applied in a vibration isolation system is experimentally investigated, where influences of excitation position, amplitude, frequency and magnetic field are examined. The magneto-sensitive elastomer consists of micron-sized, irregularly shaped iron particles blended in soft natural rubber at a concentration close to the critical particle volume fraction, shown to be the most favorable composition for optimum behaviour. A rigid aluminium mass supported on four vibration isolators is excited by an electro-dynamic shaker. Each component of this vibration isolation system is composed of two thin, square shaped, symmetrically positioned magneto-sensitive elements excited in simple shear with a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the motion by an electromagnet. The magnetic field is varied by applying different intensities through the coil. The excitation position is either on the centre or on the edge of the surface of the mass, using step-sine excitation of various amplitudes in the frequency range of 0 to 300 Hz. The results show that it is possible to use magneto-sensitive rubber for vibration control purposes.

  • 10.
    Andersson, Patrik B. U.
    et al.
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Eskil
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Boundary Element Method for Intensity Potential Approach: Predicting the Radiated Sound Power from Partially Enclosed Noise Sources2012In: Acta Acoustica united with Acustica, ISSN 1610-1928, E-ISSN 1861-9959, Vol. 98, no 4, 588-599 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes the boundary element method for the intensity potential for prediction of high-frequency sound power flow through partial enclosures. The intensity potential approach is based on the local power balance in a lossless medium and the Helmholtz decomposition of the vector field of time-averaged sound intensity. The result is a Poisson equation for a scalar intensity potential. The intensity potential formulation and the boundary element method are both suitable for exterior problems. The governing equations of the intensity potential and the boundary element method for solving this problem are presented. Results from the proposed method are compared with experimental results, for the case of radiated sound power in one-third-octave bands from sources in a partial enclosure. The results show that the method is applicable for estimation of global radiated sound power in one-third-octave bands in the high-frequency range.

  • 11.
    Austrell, Per-Erik
    et al.
    Division of Structural Mechanics, Lund Institute of Technology.
    Kari, LeifKTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Constitutive Models for Rubber IV: proceedings of the 4th European Conference for Constitutive Models for Rubber, ECCMR 2005, Stockholm, Sweden, 27-29 June 20052005Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The unique properties of elastomeric materials are taken advantage of in many engineering applications. Elastomeric units are used as couplings or mountings between stiff parts. Examples are shock absorbers, vibration insulators, flexible joints, seals and suspensions etc.

     

    However, the complicated nature of the material behavior makes it difficult to accurately predict the performance of these units, using for example finite element modelling. It is therefore necessary that the constitutive model accurately capture relevant aspects of the mechanical behavior.

     

    The latest development concerning constitutive modelling of rubber is collected in these proceedings. It is the fourth ECCMR-European Conference on Constitutive Modelling in a series on this subject.

     

    Topics included in this volume are, Hyperelastic models, Strength, fracture & fatigue, Dynamic properties & the Fletcher-Gent effect, Micro-mechanical & statistical approaches, Stress softening, Viscoelasticity, Filler reinforcement, and Tyres, fiber & cord reinforced rubber.

  • 12.
    Azhdar, Bruska
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Stenberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Determination of dynamic and sliding friction, and observation of stick-slip phenomenon on compacted polymer powders during high-velocity compaction2006In: Polymer testing, ISSN 0142-9418, E-ISSN 1873-2348, Vol. 25, no 8, 1069-1080 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic friction, sliding friction, and the stick-slip phenomenon have been studied on compacted polymer powders during high-velocity compaction. It is particularly important from a practical point of view to distinguish the stick-slip mechanism and the sliding mechanism which occur concurrently. A practical experimental system has been successfully developed to study the dry frictional force and to measure the sliding coefficient between the polymer powder particles and the die wall during high-velocity compaction. Two new components have been introduced as relaxation assists to improve the compaction process by reducing the frictional forces. It was found that the relaxation assist device leads to an improvement in the polymer powder compaction process by giving a more homogeneous opposite velocity and a better locking of the powder bed in the compacted form with less change in dimensions. The subsequent movement of the particles can be reduced and the powder bed attains a higher density with a minimum total elastic spring-back. The relative time of the stick-slip phenomenon during the compacting stage is also reduced so that the time needed to transfer from an intermittent stick-slip state to a smooth sliding state is reduced and the powder bed slides smoothly. It was found that the dynamic, dry frictional force is intermittent (stick-slip mechanism) at low compaction rates but that at high compaction rates is becomes more smooth (sliding mechanism). Both mechanisms depend on the nature of the powder and on the compaction conditions. At the beginning of the compaction stage, the sliding coefficient decreases due to an increase in the radial to axial stress ratio until the maximum pressure has been reached. During the reorganization stage, more time is needed for large particles to move, rotate and slide due to their relatively large diameter and mass. As a result, the reorganization stage is extended and the stick-slip phenomenon is observed more with increasing particle size. Much better transfer of the pressure throughout the powder bed and less loss of pressure lead to a higher sliding coefficient due to the overall friction during the compaction process. It was found that the sliding coefficient is proportional to the density. A more homogeneous density distribution in the compacted powder and a smaller pressure loss during compaction has a major influence on the sliding coefficient and on the quality of the compacted material

  • 13.
    Azhdar, Bruska
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Stenberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Determination of springback gradient in the die on compacted polymer powders during high-velocity compaction2006In: Polymer testing, ISSN 0142-9418, E-ISSN 1873-2348, Vol. 25, no 1, 114-123 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A uniaxial high-velocity compaction process for polymer powder using a cylindrical, hardened steel die and a new technique with relaxation assist was tested with various heights. The influences of the relaxation assist device on the process characteristics are discussed. Two bonded strain gauges and a high-speed video camera system were used to investigate the springback phenomenon during the compaction process. It was found that the relaxation assist improves the compaction of the polymer powder by locking the powder bed in the compacted form. It is shown that the high-velocity compaction process is an interruption process and that the delay times between the pressure waves can be reduced by increasing the height of the relaxation assist device. The delay times between the pressure waves are also strongly dependent on the strain rate. If the height of the relaxation assist device is increased, the first gross instantaneous springback, and the total elastic springback, are reduced. In addition, the density of the powder bed is increased. The relative times of the compacting stage, decompacting stage and the reorganisation of the particles can be also controlled by altering the height of the relaxation assist.

  • 14.
    Azhdar, Bruska
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Stenberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Development of a High-Velocity Compaction process for polymer powders2005In: Polymer testing, ISSN 0142-9418, E-ISSN 1873-2348, Vol. 24, no 7, 909-919 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The High-Velocity Compaction (HVC) process for powder polymers has been studied, with a focus on the compactibility characteristics and surface morphology of the compacted materials, with and without relaxation assists, by increasing compacting quantity and direction. The basic phenomena associated with HVC are explained and the general energy principle is introduced to explain pull-out phenomena during the decompacting stage. Polyamide-11 powders with different particle size distributions have been compacted with the application of different compaction profiles, e.g. different energies and velocities. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image computer board camera, (IC-PCI Imaging Technology) have been used to the study the morphological characteristics, the limit of plastic deformation and particle bonding by plastic flow at contact points, and pull-out phenomena. The relative green density is influenced more by the pre-compacting (primary compaction step) than by the post-compacting (secondary compaction step). The pressure and density distribution differences between the upper and lower surface are not uniform. Projectile supports or 'relaxation assists' are presented as a new technique to reduce pull-out phenomenon. Experimental results for different compaction profiles are presented showing the effect of varying the opposite velocity during the decompacting stage, and how to improve the homogeneous densification between the upper and lower surface and the evenness of the upper surface of the compacted powder bed by using relaxation assists.

  • 15.
    Azhdar, Bruska
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Stenberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Polymer-nanofiller prepared by high-energy ball milling and high velocity cold compaction2008In: Polymer Composites, ISSN 0272-8397, E-ISSN 1548-0569, Vol. 29, no 3, 252-261 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-energy ball milling using comilling in a solid state by low-temperature mechanical alloying to prepare nickel-ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanopowders and ultrafine poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), dispersing nanoparticles in a polymer matrix, and a uniaxial high-velocity cold compaction process using a cylindrical, hardened steel die and a new technique with relaxation assists have been studied. The focus has been on the particle size distributions of the nanocomposite powder during the milling and on the surface morphology of the nanocomposite-compacted materials after compaction with and without relaxation assists. Experimental results for different milling systems are presented showing the effects of milling time and material ratio. It was found that a longer mixing time give a higher degree of dispersion of the nanopowder on the PMMA particle surfaces. Furthermore, with increasing content of NiFe2O4 nanopowder, the reduction of the particle size was more effective. Different postcompacting profiles, i.e. different energy distributions between the upper and lower parts of the compacted powder bed, lead to different movements of the various particles and particle layers. Uniformity, homogeneity, and densification on the surfaces in the compacted powder are influenced by the postcompacting magnitude and direction. It was found that the relaxation assist device leads to an improvement in the polymer powder compaction process by reducing the expansion of the compacted volume and by reducing the different opposite velocities, giving the compacted composite bed a more homogeneous opposite velocity during the decompacting stage and reducing the delay time between the successive pressure waves.

  • 16.
    Barbagallo, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    A natural variational principle for Biot's equation: Waveguide FE and SEA of multilayered structures comprising porous materials2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Barbagallo, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    A self-adjoint variational principle for anisotropic viscoelastic Biot’s equations2013In: International Journal of Engineering Science, ISSN 0020-7225, E-ISSN 1879-2197, Vol. 63, 71-83 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A variational principle for anisotropic viscoelastic Biot’s equations of motion is presented. It is based upon an extended Hamilton’s principle, also valid for dissipative systems. Using this principle, a functional analogous to the Lagrangian is defined, starting from Biot’s variational formulation based on frame and fluid displacements. Then, a mixed displacement–pressure formulation is presented, which reduces the number of variables of response from six to four. The corresponding functional analogous to the Lagrangian is derived making full use of variational calculus. The derived functionals are self-adjoint and stationary for true motion.

  • 18.
    Barbagallo, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Characterisation of a generic trim-panel: sound reduction index and material parameters2013Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Barbagallo, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Spatial energy decay and indirect couplings in statistical energy analysis2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatial energy decay within elements affects the validity of SEA. This is particularly significant for chains of similar long well-connected structures such as ventilation ducts, fluid-filled pipes and rib-stiffened plates found in ships, aircraft and railway cars. The effects of spatial energy decay on the high frequency response of one-dimensional well-connected elements are herein studied by comparing calculations by an SEA, a spectral finite element method and an SEA-like model. An SEA only includes direct coupling loss factors (CLFs); conversely, an SEA-like model also contains indirect CLFs. At high frequencies, the spatial energy decay increases and SEA overestimates the energies in all elements away from the excitation. Moreover, the indirect CLFs in the SEA-like model have to be considered when evaluating the energy flows, as the accumulated spatial decay from the excitation to the observed point increases. Thus, SEA cannot predict the high frequency response of similar long well-connected elements and alternative formulations are needed.

  • 20.
    Barbagallo, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Liu, Hao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Statistical energy analysis of the sound transmission through layered panels using a variational formulation of the porous materialArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 21. BECKENBAUER, THOMAS
    et al.
    JEAN, PHILIPPE
    KROPP, WOLFGANG
    STEINAUER, BERNHARD
    UECKERMANN, ANDREAS
    SCHULZE, CHRISTIAN
    MEYER, ANDRE
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Fahrbahnbelag und Verfahren zur Herstellung desselben2008Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Berglund, Per-Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    Feng, Leping
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    An application of the noise synthesis technology (NST) to a system with an axial fan2002In: Forum Acustica 2002, Seville, Spain, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Blom, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    A non-linear constitutive audio frequency magneto-sensitive rubber model including amplitude, frequency and magnetic field dependence.2011In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 330, no 5, 947-954 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel constitutive model of magneto-sensitive rubber in the audible frequency range is presented. Characteristics inherent to magneto-sensitive rubber within this dynamic regime are defined: magnetic sensitivity, amplitude dependence, elasticity and viscoelasticity. Prior to creating the model assumptions based on experimental observations concerning these components are formulated. The first observation is that not only does the rubber display a strong amplitude dependence even for small strains, but also the magnetic sensitivity is strongly amplitude dependent. The second and third are, respectively, that the elastic component is magneto-sensitive, whereas the viscoelastic dependence on magnetic induction appears to be small. Thus, the model is developed from these assumptions and parameters are optimized with respect to experimental values for one case and subsequently validated for others; a very good agreement is obtained.

  • 24.
    Blom, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Amplitude and frequency dependence of magneto-sensitive rubber in a wide frequency range2005In: Polymer testing, ISSN 0142-9418, E-ISSN 1873-2348, Vol. 24, no 5, 656-662 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two new aspects of the dynamic behaviour in the audible frequency range of magneto-sensitive (MS) rubber are highlighted: the existence of an amplitude dependence of the shear modulus - referred to as the Fletcher-Gent effect - for even small displacements, and the appearance of large MS effects. In order to illustrate these two features, results are presented of measurements performed in the audible frequency range on two different kinds of rubber: silicone and natural rubber with a respective iron particle volume concentration of 33%. The particles used are of irregular shape and randomly distributed within the rubber. An external magnetic field of 0-0.8 T is applied. Both kinds of rubber are found to be strongly amplitude dependent and, furthermore, displaying large responses to externally applied magnetic fields - a maximum of 115%. Also included are graphs of measurements on silicone and natural rubber devoid of iron particles. Those results support the conclusion that introducing iron particles in the rubber gives rise to a strong, non-negligible, amplitude dependence in the entire frequency range.

  • 25.
    Blom, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Magneto-sensitive rubber in the audible frequency range2005In: CONSTITUTIVE MODELS FOR RUBBER IV / [ed] Per-Erik Austrell, Leif Kari, London: Taylor & Francis, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Blom, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Smart audio frequency energy flow control by magneto-sensitive rubber isolators2008In: Smart materials and structures (Print), ISSN 0964-1726, E-ISSN 1361-665X, Vol. 17, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A magneto-sensitive rubber isolator inserted between a source and an infinite plate is modelled in the audible frequency range, and the energy flow into the plate with the rubber subjected to a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the axial displacement is calculated. Subsequently the result is compared to the corresponding energy flow for zero magnetic induction; upon the application of an external magnetic field the rubber becomes stiffer, thus shifting the internal resonances of the isolator. This is a fast and reversible process enabling adaption of the isolator to rapidly changing audio frequency conditions by simply turning on and off a magnetic field. In the application example considered, the energy flow into the plate at the first internal dynamic peak stiffness frequency is reduced by approximately 7 dB-a large difference in a sound and vibration context-by inducing magnetic saturation of the rubber.

  • 27.
    Blom, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    The frequency, amplitude and magnetic field dependent torsional stiffness of a magneto-sensitive rubber bushing2011In: International Journal of Mechanical Sciences, ISSN 0020-7403, E-ISSN 1879-2162, Vol. 60, no 1, 54-58 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A dynamic torsional stiffness model of a magneto-sensitive circular annular rubber bushing is presented where influences of frequency, amplitude and magnetic field dependence are included. This is achieved by employing a newly developed non-linear magneto-sensitive audio frequency constitutive equation in an engineering formula for the torsional stiffness of a rubber bushing. The engineering stiffness formula predicts the frequency and amplitude dependent stiffness in a simple way, based on geometric dimensions and the shear modulus. The shear modulus is provided by the rubber model. The results from these calculations predict and clearly display the possibility of controlling over a large frequency range, through the application of a magnetic field, the magneto-sensitive rubber bushing stiffness.

  • 28.
    Bodén, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Experimental source characterization techniques for studying the acoustic properties of perforates under high level acoustic excitation2011In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 130, no 5, 2639-2647 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses experimental techniques for obtaining the acoustic properties of in-duct samples with non-linear acoustic characteristic. The methods developed are intended both for studies of non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics for samples only accessible from one side such as wall treatment in aircraft engine ducts or automotive exhaust systems and for samples accessible from both sides such as perforates or other top sheets. When harmonic sound waves are incident on the sample nonlinear energy transfer results in sound generation at higher harmonics at the sample (perforate) surface. The idea is that these sources can be characterized using linear system identification techniques similar to one-port or two-port techniques which are traditionally used for obtaining source data for in-duct sources such as IC-engines or fans. The starting point will be so called polyharmonic distortion modeling which is used for characterization of nonlinear properties of microwave systems. It will be shown how acoustic source data models can be expressed using this theory. Source models of different complexity are developed and experimentally tested. The results of the experimental tests show that these techniques can give results which are useful for understanding non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics.

  • 29.
    Cameron, Christopher John
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Lind Nordgren, Eleonora
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Wennhage, Per
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Göransson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    A Design Method using Toplogy, Property, and Size Optimization to Balance Structural and Acoustic Performance of Sandwich Panels for Vehicle ApplicationsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Coja, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    A simple engineering audible-frequency stiffness model for a preloaded conical rubber isolatorManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Coja, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    An analytical, closed-form stiffness model for preloaded conical rubber mounting in the audible frequency range2005In: CONSTITUTIVE MODELS FOR RUBBER IV / [ed] Per-Erik Austrell, Leif Kari, London: Taylor & Francis, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Coja, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    An effective waveguide model for pre-compressed vibration isolatorsIn: Acta Acoustica united with Acustica, ISSN 1610-1928, E-ISSN 1861-9959Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Coja, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Axial audio-frequency stiffness of a bush mounting: the waveguide solution2007In: Applied Mathematical Modelling, ISSN 0307-904X, E-ISSN 1872-8480, Vol. 31, no 1, 38-53 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An axial, dynamic stiffness model of an arbitrary wide and long rubber bush mounting is developed within the audible-frequency range, where influences of audible frequencies, material properties, bush mounting length and radius, are investigated. The problems of simultaneously satisfying the locally non-mixed boundary conditions at the radial and end surfaces are solved by adopting a waveguide approach, using the dispersion relation for axially symmetric waves in thick-walled infinite plates, while satisfying the radial boundary conditions by mode matching. The rubber is assumed nearly incompressible, displaying dilatation elasticity and deviatoric viscoelasticity based on a fractional derivative, standard linear solid embodying a Mittag-Leffler relaxation kernel, the main advantage being the minimum parameter number required to successfully model wide-frequency band material properties. The stiffness is found to depend strongly on frequency, displaying acoustical resonance phenomena; such as stiffness peaks and troughs. The presented model agrees fully with a simplified, long-bush model while diverging from it for increased diameter-to-length ratios. To a great extent, the increased influences of higher order modes and dispersion explain the discrepancies reported for the approximate approach.

  • 34.
    Coja, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Kari, Leif
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Rubber versus steel vibration isolators - The audible frequency contest2005In: KGK Kautschuk Gummi Kunststoffe, ISSN 0948-3276, Vol. 58, no 11, 564-569 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The audible frequency axial dynamic stiffness of three vibration isolators plausibly used in the design of a ship main engine suspension system are examined and compared for different static preloads. An indirect measurement method is used to investigate the blocked dynamic transfer stiffness using a specially designed test rig displaying a strong frequency dependence where resonance and antiresonance phenomena appear in the form of troughs and peaks respectively. The significant influence of the preload effects is also assessed for each isolator. Clearly, the rubber isolator presents superior performances in comparison with the two others, steel and combined steel-rubber isolators, over the studied frequency range 200 to 1000 Hz for each preload 30, 40 and 50 kN.

  • 35.
    Cuenca, Jacques
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Numerical acoustics.
    Van der Kelen, Christophe
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Numerical acoustics.
    Göransson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Numerical acoustics.
    A general methodology for inverse estimation of the elastic and anelastic properties of anisotropic open-cell porous materials-with application to a melamine foam2014In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 115, no 8, 084904- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes an inverse estimation method for the characterisation of the elastic and anelastic properties of the frame of anisotropic open-cell foams used for sound absorption. A model of viscoelasticity based on a fractional differential constitutive equation is used, leading to an augmented Hooke's law in the frequency domain, where the elastic and anelastic phenomena appear as distinctive terms in the stiffness matrix. The parameters of the model are nine orthotropic elastic moduli, three angles of orientation of the material principal directions and three parameters governing the anelastic frequency dependence. The inverse estimation consists in numerically fitting the model on a set of transfer functions extracted from a sample of material. The setup uses a seismic-mass measurement repeated in the three directions of space and is placed in a vacuum chamber in order to remove the air from the pores of the sample. The method allows to reconstruct the full frequency-dependent complex stiffness matrix of the frame of an anisotropic open-cell foam and in particular it provides the frequency of maximum energy dissipation by viscoelastic effects. The characterisation of a melamine foam sample is performed and the relation between the fractional-derivative model and other types of parameterisations of the augmented Hooke's law is discussed.

  • 36.
    Dazel, O.
    et al.
    LAUM, Uni du Maine, Le Mans France.
    Brouard, B.
    LAUM, Uni du Maine, Le Mans France.
    Göransson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    An efficient solver for finite-element poroelastic problems2012In: Proceedings - European Conference on Noise Control, 2012, 851-853 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Structural-acoustic finite element models including 3D modelling of poroelastic media modelled with the Biot theory are generally computationally costly. While being the most commonly used predictive tool in the context of noise reduction applications, efficient solution strategies are required. In this work, an original modal reduction technique, involving real-valued decoupled modes computed from a classical eigenvalue solver is proposed to reduce the size of the problem associated to the porous media. The idea of this technique is to enhance the modal basis with static correction calculated analytically which account for the response of non-preserved modes.

  • 37.
    Dovstam, Krister
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Göransson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Gartmeier, Otto
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    On linear modeling of interface damping in vibrating structures2012In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 331, no 19, 4299-4312 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dissipation of mechanical vibration energy at contact interfaces in a structure, commonly referred to as interface damping, is an important source of vibration damping in built-up structures and its modeling is the focus of the present study. The approach taken uses interface forces which are linearly dependent on the relative vibration displacements at the contact interfaces. The main objective is to demonstrate a straightforward technique for simulation of interface damping in built-up structures using FE modeling and simple, distributed, damping forces localized to interfaces where the damping occurs. As an illustration of the resulting damping the dissipated power is used for evaluation purposes. This is calculated from surface integrals over the contact interfaces and allows for explicit assessment of the effect of simulated interface forces for different cases and frequencies. The resulting loss factor at resonance is explicitly evaluated and, using linear simulations, it is demonstrated that high damping levels may arise even though the displacement differences between contacting surfaces at damped interfaces may be very small.

  • 38.
    Enflo, Bengt Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Theoretical and Applied Mechanics.
    Hedberg, Claes M.Blekinge Institute of Technology.Kari, LeifKTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Non-Linear Acoustics: Fundamentals and Applications2008Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Feng, Leiping
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Modified honeycomb panels to improve sound insulation properties2005In: Acta Acoustica united with Acustica, ISSN 1610-1928, E-ISSN 1861-9959, Vol. 91, no 2, 386-388 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A modified honeycomb panel with improved bonding technique is presented in this paper. The idea is to keep the basic mechanical properties of a honeycomb panel while to eliminate the coincidence phenomenon of the whole system by using modified bonding technique. A specimen was made and measurement was performed. Results show that the coincidence phenomenon of the whole system disappears and the weighted intensity sound reduction index is 4 dB higher than that of the corresponding honeycomb panel with similar surface density and static strength.

  • 40.
    Feng, Leping
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Acoustic models of axial and centrifugal fans for NST technology2003In: Euronoise 2003, Naples, Italy, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Feng, Leping
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Acoustic properties of fluid-filled elastic pipes1994In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 176, no 3, 399-413 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Feng, Leping
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Acoustical Measurements2007Report (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Feng, Leping
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Active control of structurally radiated sound using multi-actuator method1995In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 98, no 1, 397-402 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Feng, Leping
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Comparison of different methods for surface impedance and transmission loss measurements in duct2008In: Inter-noise 2008, Shanghai, China, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Feng, Leping
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Experimental studies of the acoustic behaviour of a finite pipe filled with/without fluid1996In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 189, no 4, 511-524 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Feng, Leping
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Influence of compartment size on radiated sound power level of a centrifugal fan2001In: 17th International Congress on Acoustics, Rome, Italy, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Feng, Leping
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Influence of structural damping on sound radiation from a point-excited beam2007In: Turkish Acoustical Society - 36th International Congress and Exhibition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2007 ISTANBUL, 2007, 967-975 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The track is the main noise source of a railway when the frequency is below about 1250 Hz. Quite a few efforts have been made to increase the attenuation of the railway track in order to reduce the radiated sound. The attempt of this paper is to investigate the influence of the structural damping on the sound pressure level at the area close to the excitation point instead of the total radiated sound power. For this purpose, the simplest model, i.e. an infinite beam, is adapted. Both near field solution and the propagating wave are included. Results show that when the sound pressure levels at a certain areas close to the excitation is concerned only, the influence of the structural damping is somewhat lower than what expected on the total sound power, partly due to the contribution of the near field solution and partly due to the wave propagation. If the area concerned is small, this influence is also dependent on frequency, because of the length of the bending wave. It is difficult to estimate the influence of the structural damping on wayside noise from laboratory tests with a short track and a point excitation.

  • 48.
    Feng, Leping
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Noise and vibration of fluid-filled elastic pipe coated with an absorptive layer on the inner side of the wall1995In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 183, no 1, 169-178 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Feng, Leping
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Prediction of sound pressure levels from an air-handling unit using Noise Synthesis Technology2002In: The 9th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, Orlando, Florida, USA, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Feng, Leping
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Some aspects on sound transmission loss of finite curved structures with or without pressure difference at the two sides2006In: National congress of the acoustical society of China, Xiamen, China, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
1234 1 - 50 of 176
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