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  • 1. Abbasi Hoseini, A.
    et al.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Andersson, H. I.
    Finite-length effects on dynamical behavior of rod-like particles in wall-bounded turbulent flow2015In: International Journal of Multiphase Flow, ISSN 0301-9322, E-ISSN 1879-3533, Vol. 76, 13-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combined Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) measurements have been performed in dilute suspensions of rod-like particles in wall turbulence. PIV results for the turbulence field in the water table flow apparatus compared favorably with data from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of channel flow turbulence and the universality of near-wall turbulence justified comparisons with DNS of fiber-laden channel flow. In order to examine any shape effects on the dynamical behavior of elongated particles in wall-bounded turbulent flow, fibers with three different lengths but the same diameter were used. In the logarithmic part of the wall-layer, the translational fiber velocity was practically unaffected by the fiber length l. In the buffer layer, however, the fiber dynamics turned out to be severely constrained by the distance z to the wall. The short fibers accumulated preferentially in low-speed areas and adhered to the local fluid speed. The longer fibers (l/z > 1) exhibited a bi-modal probability distribution for the fiber velocity, which reflected an almost equal likelihood for a long fiber to reside in an ejection or in a sweep. It was also observed that in the buffer region, high-speed long fibers were almost randomly oriented whereas for all size cases the slowly moving fibers preferentially oriented in the streamwise direction. These phenomena have not been observed in DNS studies of fiber suspension flows and suggested l/z to be an essential parameter in a new generation of wall-collision models to be used in numerical studies.

  • 2.
    Acharya, Rutvika
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Fluid Dynamics of Phonation.2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims at presenting the studies conducted using computational modeling for understanding physiology of glottis and mechanism of phonation. The process of phonation occurs in the larynx, commonly called the voice box, due to the self-sustained vibrations induced in the vocal folds by the airflow. The physiology of glottis can be understood using fluid dynamics which is a vital process in developing and discovering voice disorder treatments.

    Simulations have been performed on a simplified two-dimensional version of the glottis to study the behavior of the vocal folds with help of fluid structure interaction. Fluid and structure interact in a two-way coupling and the flow is computed by solving 2D compressible Navier-Stokes equations. This report will present the modeling approach, solver characteristics and outcome of the three studies conducted; glottal gap study, Reynolds number study and elasticity study.

  • 3.
    Acharya, Rutvika
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Investigation of Differences in Ansys Solvers CFX and Fluent2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims at presenting Computational Fluid Dynamics studies conducted on an axisymmetric model of the Siemens SGT-800 burner using Ansys Fluent, Ansys CFX and Ansys ICEM. The goal is to perform a mesh study and turbulence model study for isothermal flow. The result will show the differences observed while using the two solvers by Ansys, Fluent and CFX. Two different meshes, A, coarse and B, optimal have been used for the mesh study. This will reveal the mesh dependency of the different parameters and if any differences are observed between the solver’s convergence and mesh independency performance. To further validate the mesh independency, a simplified test case is simulated for turbulent flow for 32 different cases testing the numerical algorithms and spatial discretization available in Ansys Fluent and finding the optimal method to achieve convergence and reliable results. Turbulence model study has been performed where k-ε, k-ω and k-ω Shear Stress Transport (SST) model have been simulated and the results between solvers and models are compared to see if the solvers’ way of handling the different models varies.Studies from this thesis suggest that both solvers implement the turbulence models differently. Out of the three models compared, k-ω SST is the model with least differences between solvers. The solution looks alike and therefore it could be suggested to use this model, whenever possible, for future studies when both solvers are used. For the models k-ε and k-ω significant differences were found between the two solvers when comparing velocity, pressure and turbulence kinetic energy. Different reasons for its occurrence are discussed in the thesis and also attempts have been made to rule out few of the reasons to narrow down the possible causes. One of the goals of the thesis was to also discuss the differences in user-interface and solver capabilities which have been presented in the conclusions and discussions section of the report. Questions that still remain unanswered after the thesis are why these differences are present between solvers and which of the solvers’ results are more reliable when these differences have been found.

  • 4. Agarwal, A.
    et al.
    Brandt, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Zaki, T. A.
    Transition to Turbulence in Viscoelastic Channel Flow2015In: Procedia IUTAM, Elsevier, 2015, 519-526 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of viscoelasticity on bypass transition to turbulence in channel flow is studied using data from direct numerical simulations by Agarwal et al. (2014) 1. The initial field is a superposition of a laminar base state and a localized disturbance. Relative to the Newtonian conditions, the polymeric FENE-P flow delays the onset of transition and extends its duration. The former effect is due to a weakening of the pre-transitional disturbance field, while the prolonged transition region is due to a slower spreading rate of the turbulent spots. Once turbulence occupies the full channel, a comparison of the turbulence fields shows that energetic flow structures are longer and wider in the polymeric flow. The final turbulent state is compared to elasto-inertial turbulence (EIT), where the polymer conformation field takes the form of elongated sheets with wide spanwise extent. © 2015 The Authors.

  • 5. Agarwal, Akshat
    et al.
    Brandt, Luca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Zaki, Tamer A.
    Linear and nonlinear evolution of a localized disturbance in polymeric channel flow2014In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 760, 278-303 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The evolution of an initially localized disturbance in polymeric channel flow is investigated, with the FENE-P model used to characterize the viscoelastic behaviour of the flow. In the linear growth regime, the flow response is stabilized by viscoelasticity, and the maximum attainable disturbance energy amplification is reduced with increasing polymer concentration. The reduction in the energy growth rate is attributed to the polymer work, which plays a dual role. First, a spanwise polymer-work term develops, and is explained by the tilting action of the wall-normal voracity on the mean streamwise conformation tensor. This resistive term weakens the spanwise velocity perturbation thus reducing the energy of the localized disturbance. The second action of the polymer is analogous, with a wall-normal polymer work term that weakens the vertical velocity perturbation. Its indirect effect on energy growth is substantial since it reduces the production of Reynolds shear stress and in turn of the streamwise velocity perturbation, or streaks. During the early stages of nonlinear growth, the dominant effect of the polymer is to suppress the large-scale streaky structures which are strongly amplified in Newtonian flows. As a result, the process of transition to turbulence is prolonged and, after transition, a drag-reduced turbulent state is attained.

  • 6.
    Ahlberg, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    An experimental study of fiber suspensions between counter-rotating discs2009Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The behavior of fibers suspended in a flow between two counter-rotating discs has been studied experimentally. This is inspired by the refining process in the papermaking process where cellulose fibers are ground between discs in order to change performance in the papermaking process and/or qualities of the final paper product.

    To study the fiber behavior in a counter-rotating flow, an experimental set-up with two glass discs was built. A CCD-camera was used to capture images of the fibers in the flow. Image analysis based on the concept of steerable filters extracted the position and orientation of the fibers in the plane of the discs. Experiments were performed for gaps of 0.1-0.9 fiber lengths, and for equal absolute values of the angular velocities for the upper and lower disc. The aspect ratios of the fibers were 7, 14 and 28.

    Depending on the angular velocity of the discs and the gap between them, the fibers were found to organize themselves in fiber trains. A fiber train is a set of fibers positioned one after another in the tangential direction with a close to constant fiber-to-fiber distance. In the fiber trains, each individual fiber is aligned in the radial direction (i.e. normal to the main direction of the train).

    The experiments show that the number of fibers in a train increases as the gap between the discs decreases. Also, the distance between the fibers in a train decreases as the length of the train increases, and the results for short trains are in accordance with previous numerical results in two dimensions.Furthermore, the results of different aspect ratios imply that there are three-dimensional fiber end-effects that are important for the forming of fiber trains.

  • 7.
    Ahlman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    A study of turbulence and scalar mixing in a wall-jet using direct numerical simulation2006Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct numerical simulation is used to study the dynamics and mixing in a turbulent plane wall-jet. The investigation is undertaken in order to extend the knowledge base of the influence of the wall on turbulent dynamics and mixing. The mixing statistics produced can also be used to evaluate and develop models for mixing and combustion. In order to perform the simulations, a numerical code was developed. The code employs compact finite difference schemes, of high order, for spatial integration, and a low-storage Runge-Kutta method for the temporal integration. In the simulations performed the inlet based Reynolds and Mach numbers of the wall jet were Re = 2000 and M=0.5, respectively. Above the jet a constant coflow of 10% of the inlet jet velocity was applied. A passive scalar was added at the inlet of the jet, in a non-premixed manner, enabling an investigation of the wall-jet mixing as well as the dynamics. The mean development and the respective self-similarity of the inner and outer shear layers were studied. Comparisons of properties in the shear layers of different character were performed by applying inner and outer scaling. The characteristics of the wall-jet was compared to what has been observed in other canonical shear flows. In the inner part of the jet, 0 ≤ y+ ≤ 13, the wall-jet was found to closely resemble a zero pressure gradient boundary layer. The outer layer was found to resemble a free plane jet. The downstream growth rate of the scalar was approximately equal to that of the streamwise velocity, in terms of the growth rate of the half-width. The scalar fluxes in the streamwise and wall-normal direction were found to be of comparable magnitude.

  • 8.
    Ahlman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Numerical studies of turbulent wall-jets for mixing and combustion applications2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct numerical simulation is used to study turbulent plane wall-jets. The investigation is aimed at studying dynamics, mixing and reactions in wall bounded flows. The produced mixing statistics can be used to evaluate and develop models for mixing and combustion. An aim has also been to develop a simulation method that can be extended to simulate realistic combustion including significant heat release. The numerical code used in the simulations employs a high order compact finite difference scheme for spatial integration, and a low-storage Runge-Kutta method for the temporal integration. In the simulations the inlet based Reynolds and Mach numbers of the wall-jet are Re = 2000 and M=0.5 respectively, and above the jet a constant coflow of 10% of the inlet jet velocity is applied. The development of an isothermal wall-jet including passive scalar mixing is studied and the characteristics of the wall-jet are compared to observations of other canonical shear flows. In the near-wall region the jet resembles a zero pressure gradient boundary layer, while in the outer layer it resembles a plane jet. The scalar fluxes in the streamwise and wall-normal direction are of comparable magnitude. In order to study effects of density differences, two non-isothermal wall-jets are simulated and compared to the isothermal jet results. In the non-isothermal cases the jet is either warm and propagating in a cold surrounding or vice versa. The turbulence structures and the range of scales are affected by the density variation. The warm jet contains the largest range of scales and the cold the smallest. The differences can be explained by the varying friction Reynolds number. Conventional wall scaling fails due to the varying density. An improved collapse in the inner layer can be achieved by applying a semi-local scaling. The turbulent Schmidt and Prandtl number vary significantly only in the near-wall layer and in a small region below the jet center. A wall-jet including a single reaction between a fuel and an oxidizer is also simulated. The reactants are injected separately at the inlet and the reaction time scale is of the same order as the convection time scale and independent of the temperature. The reaction occurs in thin reaction zones convoluted by high intensity velocity fluctuations.

  • 9.
    Ahlman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Brethouwer, Geert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Johansson, Arne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    A numerical method for simulation of turbulence and mixing in a compressible wall-jet2007Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Ahlman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Brethouwer, Geert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Johansson, Arne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Direct numerical simulation of a plane turbulent wall-jet including scalar mixing2007In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 19, no 6, 065102- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct numerical simulation is used to study a turbulent plane wall-jet including the mixing of a passive scalar. The Reynolds and Mach numbers at the inlet are Re=2000 and M=0.5, respectively, and a constant coflow of 10% of the inlet jet velocity is used. The passive scalar is added at the inlet enabling an investigation of the wall-jet mixing. The self-similarity of the inner and outer shear layers is studied by applying inner and outer scaling. The characteristics of the wall-jet are compared to what is reported for other canonical shear flows. In the inner part, the wall-jet is found to closely resemble a zero pressure gradient boundary layer, and the outer layer is found to resemble a free plane jet. The downstream growth rate of the scalar is approximately equal to that of the streamwise velocity in terms of the growth rate of the half-widths. The scalar fluxes in the streamwise and wall-normal direction are found to be of comparable magnitude. The scalar mixing situation is further studied by evaluating the scalar dissipation rate and the mechanical to mixing time scale ratio.

  • 11.
    Ahlman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Brethouwer, Geert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Johansson, Arne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Direct numerical simulation of a reacting turbulent wall-jet2007Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Ahlman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Brethouwer, Geert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Johansson, Arne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Direct numerical simulation of non-isothermal turbulent wall-jets2009In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 21, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct numerical simulations of plane turbulent nonisothermal wall jets are performed and compared to the isothermal case. This study concerns a cold jet in a warm coflow with an ambient to jet density ratio of ρa/ρj = 0.4, and a warm jet in a cold coflow with a density ratio of ρa/ρj = 1.7. The coflow and wall temperature are equal and a temperature dependent viscosity according to Sutherland’s law is used. The inlet Reynolds and Mach numbers are equal in all these cases. The influence of the varying temperature on the development and jet growth is studied as well as turbulence and scalar statistics. The varying density affects the turbulence structures of the jets. Smaller turbulence scales are present in the warm jet than in the isothermal and cold jet and consequently the scale separation between the inner and outer shear layer is larger. In addition, a cold jet in a warm coflow at a higher inlet Reynolds number was also simulated. Although the domain length is somewhat limited, the growth rate and the turbulence statistics indicate approximate self-similarity in the fully turbulent region. The use of van Driest scaling leads to a collapse of all mean velocity profiles in the near-wall region. Taking into account the varying density by using semilocal scaling of turbulent stresses and fluctuations does not completely eliminate differences, indicating the influence of mean density variations on normalized turbulence statistics. Temperature and passive scalar dissipation rates and time scales have been computed since these are important for combustion models. Except for very near the wall, the dissipation time scales are rather similar in all cases and fairly constant in the outer region.

  • 13.
    Ahlman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Brethouwer, Gert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Turbulence.
    Johansson, Arne V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Direct numerical simulation of mixing in a plane compressible and turbulent wall jet2005In: 4th International Symposium on Turbulence and Shear Flow Phenomena, 2005, 1131-1136 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to simulate the mixing of a passive scalar in a plane compressible and turbulent wall jet. The Mach number of the jet is M = 0.5 at the inlet. The downstream development of the jet is studied and compared to experimental data. Mixing in the inner and outer shear layers of the wall jet is investigated through scalar fluxes, the probability density function of the scalar concentration and the joint probability density function of the wall normal velocity fluctuation and the scalar concentration

  • 14.
    Ahlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Aeroelastic FE modelling of wind turbine dynamicsIn: Computers & structures, ISSN 0045-7949, E-ISSN 1879-2243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By designing wind turbines with very flexible components it is possible toreduce loads and consequently the associated cost. As a result, the increased flexibilitywill introduce geometrical nonlinearities. Design tools that can cope with those nonlinearitieswill therefore be necessary at some stage of the design process. The developedmodel uses the commercial finite element system MSC.Marc, which is an advanced finiteelement system focused on nonlinear design and analysis, to predict the structuralresponse. The aerodynamic model named AERFORCE, used to transform the wind toloads on the blades, is a Blade-Element/Momentum model, developed by The SwedishDefence Research Agency (FOI, previously named FFA). The paper describes the developedmodel with focus on component modelling to allow for geometrical nonlinearities.Verification results are presented and discussed for an extensively tested Danwin 180 kWstall-controlled wind turbine. Code predictions of mechanical loads, fatigue and spectralproperties, obtained at normal operational conditions, have been compared with measurements.The simulated results correspond well with measurements. Results from a bladeloss simulation are presented to exemplify the versatility of the developed code.

  • 15.
    Ahlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Aerolastic simulation of wind turbine dynamics2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The work in this thesis deals with the development of an aeroelastic simulation tool for horizontal axis wind turbine applications.

    Horizontal axis wind turbines can experience significant time varying aerodynamic loads, potentially causing adverse effects on structures, mechanical components, and power production. The needs for computational and experimental procedures for investigating aeroelastic stability and dynamic response have increased as wind turbines become lighter and more flexible.

    A finite element model for simulation of the dynamic response of horizontal axis wind turbines has been developed. The developed model uses the commercial finite element system MSC.Marc, focused on nonlinear design and analysis, to predict the structural response. The aerodynamic model, used to transform the wind flow field to loads on the blades, is a Blade-Element/Momentum model. The aerodynamic code is developed by The Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI, previously named FFA) and is a state-of-the-art code incorporating a number of extensions to the Blade-Element/Momentum formulation. The software SOSIS-W, developed by Teknikgruppen AB was used to generate wind time series for modelling different wind conditions.

    The method is general, and different configurations of the structural model and various type of wind conditions can be simulated. The model is primarily intended for use as a research tool when influences of specific dynamic effects are investigated. Verification results are presented and discussed for an extensively tested Danwin 180 kW stall-controlled wind turbine. Code predictions of mechanical loads, fatigue and spectral properties, obtained at different conditions, have been compared with measurements. A comparison is also made between measured and calculated loads for the Tjæreborg 2 MW wind turbine during emergency braking of the rotor. The simulated results correspond well to measured data.

  • 16.
    Ahlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Emergency stop simulation using a finite element model developed for large blade deflections2006In: Wind Energy, ISSN 1095-4244, E-ISSN 1099-1824, Vol. 9, no 3, 193-210 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Predicting the load in every possible situation is necessary in order to build safe and optimized structures. A highly dynamical case where large loads are developed is an emergency stop. Design simulation tools that can cope with the upcoming non-linearities will be especially important as the turbines get bigger and more flexible. The model developed here uses the advanced commercial finite element system MSC.Marc, focused on non-linear design and analysis, to predict the structural response. The aerodynamic model named AERFORCE, used to transform the wind to loads on the blades, is a blade element momentum model. A comparison is made between measured and calculated loads for the Tjaere-borg wind turbine during emergency braking of the rotor. The simulation results correspond well with measured data. The conclusion is that the aeroelastic tool is likely to perform well when simulating more flexible turbines.

  • 17.
    Ahlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Influence of wind turbine flexibility on loads and power production2006In: Wind Energy, ISSN 1095-4244, E-ISSN 1099-1824, Vol. 9, no 3, 237-249 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most aeroelastic codes used today assume small blade deflections and application of loads on the undeflected structure. However, with the design of lighter and more flexible wind turbines, this assumption is not obvious. By scaling the system mass and stiffness properties equally, it is possible to compare wind turbines of different degrees of slenderness and at the same time keep system frequencies the some in an undeformed state. The developed model uses the commercial finite element system MSC. Marc, focused on non-linear design and analysis, to predict the structural response. The aerodynamic model AERFORCE, used to transform the wind to loads on the blades, is a blade element momentum model. A comparison is made between different slenderness ratios in three wind conditions below rated wind speed. The results show that large blade deflections have a major influence on power production and the resulting structural loads and must be considered in the design of very slender turbines.

  • 18.
    Ahmadian Saieni, Hooman
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Non-linear vibrations of tensegrity structures2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A study has been done on different methods to solve the linear and non-linear problems with single or multi degrees of freedom structures. To do that direct time integration methods are used to solve the dynamic equilibrium equations. It has been tried to perform general methods to apply in most structures. In this thesis structures are made of cables and bars but the solution methods which is presented can be applied for any structure, and to utilize those implicit and explicit methods for all structures it is needed to know the tangent stiffness matrix and mass matrix for the structure. Then, it would be possible to analyze the dynamic response of structures under general loads and by general it can be understood that by application of arbitrary forces on different nodes of structure, the method generates result based on applied forces. It is crucial to get the right tangent stiffness matrix and mass matrix to know the dynamic equation in each node. Hence, the method will then work correctly to solve the dynamic problems. More, a parametric study has been done to see the effects of times step, stiffness of elements, length of elements, and other mechanical properties of elements, and this parametric study enables one to produce new results by changing every parameter. Also, continuation of the study on x-frame tensegrity has been done by solving them to check out dynamic response of structure with proposed methods of this thesis. Moreover, a method is presented to use the codes of solver methods of current thesis to apply them for other structures. Hence, as a future work, one can combine the codes of structures and solver codes of this thesis for dynamic response of structure. In fact the main effort of this thesis is on presenting different methods to solve various structures.

  • 19.
    Ahmed, Mansoor
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Numerical simulations of micro-organisms in shear flows2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 20.
    Akbaripour Sheijnai, Solmaz
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Numerical studies on receptivity and control of a three-dimensional boundary layer2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Receptivity in three-dimensional boundary layer ow to localized roughness elements over a at plate is studied by means of direct numerical simulations (DNS). The surface roughness is modeled by applying nonhomogeneous boundary conditions along the wall as well as considering as a surface deformation by inserting the bump shape into the numerical mesh. Under the assumption of the small amplitudes of the roughness, although dierent disturbances amplitudes are observed in the vicinity of the bump for the meshed and modeled case, the boundary layer response downstream of the roughness is independent if the way of the bump implementation. Dierent roughness heights are considered in order to compare the boundary layer response of two approaches. Also, the boundary layer is excited by random distributed surface roughness and the receptivity results are studied. Moreover, a simple model for natural roughness excites steady multi wavenumber crossow instabilities. A localised surface roughness i.e. control roughness is applied to stabilise the latter. The control mode which is subcritical with respect to transition aects the most steady unstable mode. Suppression of the most dangerous mode is observed through nonlinear interactions with the control mode.

  • 21.
    Alaniz, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    Belyayev, Serhiy
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    Bergman, David
    Casselbrant, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    Honeth, Mark
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    Huang, Jiangwei
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    Ivchenko, Nickolay
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Space and Plasma Physics.
    Laukkanen, Mikko
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    Michelsen, Jacob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    Pronenko, Vira
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    Paulson, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    Schlick, Georg
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    Tibert, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    Valle, Mario
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    The SQUID sounding rocket experiment2011In: Proceedings of the 20th ESA Symposium on European Rocket and Balloon Programmes and Related Research, European Space Agency, 2011, 159-166 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the SQUID project is to develop and in flight verify a miniature version of a wire boom deployment mechanism to be used for electric field measurements in the ionosphere. In February 2011 a small ejectable payload, built by a team of students from The Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), was launched from Esrange on-board the REXUS-10 sounding rocket. The payload separated from the rocket, deployed and retracted the wire booms, landed with a parachute and was subsequently recovered. Here the design of the experiment and post fight analysis are presented.

  • 22.
    Albernaz, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Phase change, surface tension and turbulence in real fluids2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sprays are extensively used in industry, especially for fuels in internal combustion and gas turbine engines. An optimal fuel/air mixture prior to combustion is desired for these applications, leading to greater efficiency and minimal levels of emissions. The optimization depends on details regarding the different breakups, evaporation and mixing processes. Besides, one should take into consideration that these different steps depend on physical properties of the gas and fuel, such as density, viscosity, heat conductivity and surface tension.

    In this thesis the phase change and surface tension of a droplet for different flow conditions are studied by means of numerical simulations.This work is part of a larger effort aiming to developing models for sprays in turbulent flows. We are especially interested in the atomization regime, where the liquid breakup causes the formation of droplet sizes much smaller than the jet diameter. The behavior of these small droplets is important to shed more light on how to achieve the homogeneity of the gas-fuel mixture as well as that it directly contributes to the development of large-eddy simulation (LES) models.

    The numerical approach is a challenging process as one must take into account the transport of heat, mass and momentum for a multiphase flow. We choose a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) due to its convenient mesoscopic natureto simulate interfacial flows. A non-ideal equation of state is used to control the phase change according to local thermodynamic properties. We analyze the droplet and surrounding vapor for a hydrocarbon fuel close to the critical point. Under forced convection, the droplet evaporation rate is seen to depend on the vapor temperatureand Reynolds number, where oscillatory flows can be observed. Marangoni forces are also present and drivethe droplet internal circulation once the temperature difference at the droplet surface becomes significant.In isotropic turbulence, the vapor phase shows increasing fluctuations of the thermodynamic variables oncethe fluid approaches the critical point. The droplet dynamics is also investigated under turbulent conditions, where the presence of coherent structures with strong shear layers affects the mass transfer between the liquid-vapor flow, showing also a correlation with the droplet deformation. Here, the surface tension and droplet size play a major role and are analyzed in detail.

  • 23.
    Albernaz, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Do, Quang Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Multirelaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for droplet heating and evaporation under forced convection2015In: Physical Review E. Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics, ISSN 1539-3755, E-ISSN 1550-2376, Vol. 91, no 4, 043012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the evaporation of a droplet surrounded by superheated vapor with relative motion between phases. The evaporating droplet is a challenging process, as one must take into account the transport of mass, momentum, and heat. Here a lattice Boltzmann method is employed where phase change is controlled by a nonideal equation of state. First, numerical simulations are compared to the D-2 law for a vaporizing static droplet and good agreement is observed. Results are then presented for a droplet in a Lagrangian frame under a superheated vapor flow. Evaporation is described in terms of the temperature difference between liquid-vapor and the inertial forces. The internal liquid circulation driven by surface-shear stresses due to convection enhances the evaporation rate. Numerical simulations demonstrate that for higher Reynolds numbers, the dynamics of vaporization flux can be significantly affected, which may cause an oscillatory behavior on the droplet evaporation. The droplet-wake interaction and local mass flux are discussed in detail.

  • 24.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Simulation of a suspended droplet under evaporation with Marangoni effects2016In: International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, ISSN 0017-9310, E-ISSN 1879-2189, Vol. 91, 853-860 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the Marangoni effects in a hexane droplet under evaporation and close to its critical point. A lattice Boltzmann model is used to perform 3D numerical simulations. In a first case, the droplet is placed in its own vapor and a temperature gradient is imposed. The droplet locomotion through the domain is observed, where the temperature differences across the surface is proportional to the droplet velocity and the Marangoni effect is confirmed. The droplet is then set under a forced convection condition. The results show that the Marangoni stresses play a major role in maintaining the internal circulation when the superheated vapor temperature is increased. Surprisingly, surface tension variations along the interface due to temperature change may affect heat transfer and internal circulation even for low Weber number. Other results and considerations regarding the droplet surface are also discussed.

  • 25.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lattice Boltzmann Method for the evaporation of a suspended droplet2013In: Interfacial phenomena and heat transfer, ISSN 2167-857X, Vol. 1, 245-258 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we consider a thermal multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to investigate the heating and vaporization of a suspended droplet. An important benefit from the LBM is that phase separation is generated spontaneously and jump conditions for heat and mass transfer are not imposed. We use double distribution functions in order to solve for momentum and energy equations. The force is incorporated via the exact difference method (EDM) scheme where different equations of state (EOS) are used, including the Peng-Robinson EOS. The equilibrium and boundary conditions are carefully studied. Results are presented for a hexane droplet set to evaporate in a superheated gas, for static condition and under gravitational effects. For the static droplet, the numerical simulations show that capillary pressure and the cooling effect at the interface play a major role. When the droplet is convected due to the gravitational field, the relative motion between the droplet and surrounding gas enhances the heat transfer. Evolution of density and temperature fields are illustrated in details.

  • 26.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Hermanson, J. C.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Droplet deformation and heat transfer in isotropic turbulence2017In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 820, 61-85 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The heat and mass transfer of deformable droplets in turbulent flows is crucial. to a wide range of applications, such as cloud dynamics and internal combustion engines. This study investigates a single droplet undergoing phase change in isotropic turbulence using numerical simulations with a hybrid lattice Boltzmann scheme. Phase separation is controlled by a non-ideal equation of state and density contrast is taken into consideration. Droplet deformation is caused by pressure and shear stress at the droplet interface. The statistics of thermodynamic variables are quantified and averaged over both the liquid and vapour phases. The occurrence of evaporation and condensation is correlated to temperature fluctuations, surface tension variation and turbulence intensity. The temporal spectra of droplet deformations are analysed and related to the droplet surface area. Different modes of oscillation are clearly identified from the deformation power spectrum for low Taylor Reynolds number Re, whereas nonlinearities are produced with the increase of Re A, as intermediate frequencies are seen to overlap. As an outcome, a continuous spectrum is observed, which shows a decrease in the power spectrum that scales as similar to f(-3) Correlations between the droplet Weber number, deformation parameter, fluctuations of the droplet volume and thermodynamic variables are also developed.

  • 27.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Hermanson, J. C.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Thermodynamics of a real fluid near the critical point in numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence2016In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 28, no 12, 125105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the behavior of a fluid near the critical point by using numerical simulations of weakly compressible three-dimensional isotropic turbulence. Much has been done for a turbulent flow with an ideal gas. The primary focus of this work is to analyze fluctuations of thermodynamic variables (pressure, density, and temperature) when a non-ideal Equation Of State (EOS) is considered. In order to do so, a hybrid lattice Boltzmann scheme is applied to solve the momentum and energy equations. Previously unreported phenomena are revealed as the temperature approaches the critical point. Fluctuations in pressure, density, and temperature increase, followed by changes in their respective probability density functions. Due to the non-linearity of the EOS, it is seen that variances of density and temperature and their respective covariance are equally important close to the critical point. Unlike the ideal EOS case, significant differences in the thermodynamic properties are also observed when the Reynolds number is increased. We also address issues related to the spectral behavior and scaling of density, pressure, temperature, and kinetic energy.

  • 28.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Hermanson, Jim C.
    University of Washington, USA.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Droplet deformation and heat transfer in isotropic turbulence2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The heat and mass transfer of deformable droplets in turbulent flows is crucial to a wide range of applications, such as cloud dynamics and internal combustion engines. This study investigates a droplet undergoing phase change in isotropic turbulence using numerical simulations with a hybrid lattice Boltzmann scheme. We solve the momentum and energy transport equations, where phase separation is controlled by a non-ideal equation of state and density contrast is taken into consideration. Deformation is caused by pressure and shear stress at the droplet interface. The statistics of thermodynamic variables is quantified and averaged in terms of the liquid and vapor phases. The occurrence of evaporation and condensation is correlated to temperature fluctuations, surface tension variation and turbulence intensity. The temporal spectra of droplet deformations are analyzed and related to the droplet surface area.Different modes of oscillation are clearly identified from the deformation power spectrum for low Taylor Reynolds number $Re_\lambda$, whereas nonlinearities are produced with the increase of $Re_\lambda$, as intermediate frequencies are seen to overlap. As an outcome a continuous spectrum is observed, which shows a decrease that scales as $\sim f^{-3}$.Correlations between the droplet Weber number, deformation parameter, fluctuations of the droplet volume and thermodynamic variables are also examined.

  • 29.
    Albernaz, Daniel L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Hermanson, Jim C.
    University of Washington, USA.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Real fluids near the critical point in isotropic turbulenceIn: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the behavior of a uid near the critical point by using numerical simulations of weakly compressible three-dimensional isotropic turbulence. Much has been done for a turbulent ow with an ideal gas. The primary focus of this work is to analyze uctuations of thermodynamic variables (pressure, density and temperature) when a non-ideal Equation Of State (EOS) is considered. In order to do so, a hybrid lattice Boltzmann scheme is applied to solve the momentum and energy equations. Previously unreported phenomena are revealed as the temperature approaches the critical point. These phenomena include increased uctuations in pressure, density and temperature, followed by changes in their respective probability density functions (PDFs). Unlike the ideal EOS case, signicant dierences in the thermodynamic properties are also observed when the Reynolds number is increased. We also address issues related to the spectral behavior and scaling of density, pressure, temperature and kinetic energy.

  • 30.
    Aldaeus, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    Lin, Yuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Roeraade, Johan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    Multi-step dielectrophoresis for separation of particles2006In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 1131, no 1-2, 261-266 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new concept for separation of particles based on repetitive dielectrophoretic trapping and release in a flow system is proposed. Calculations using the finite element method have been performed to envision the particle behavior and the separation effectiveness of the proposed method. As a model system, polystyrene beads in deionized water and a micro-flow channel with arrays of interdigited electrodes have been used. Results show that the resolution increases as a direct function of the number of trap-and-release steps, and that a difference in size will have a larger influence on the separation than a difference in other dielectrophoretic properties. About 200 trap-and-release steps would be required to separate particles with a size difference of 0.2%. The enhanced separation power of dielectrophoresis with multiple steps could be of great importance, not only for fractionation of particles with small differences in size, but also for measuring changes in surface conductivity, or for separations based on combinations of difference in size and dielectric properties.

  • 31.
    Aldaeus, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    Lin, Yuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Roeraade, Johan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Superpositioned dielectrophoresis for enhanced trapping efficiency2005In: Electrophoresis, ISSN 0173-0835, E-ISSN 1522-2683, Vol. 26, no 22, 4252-4259 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the major applications for dielectrophoresis is selective trapping and fractionation of particles. If the surrounding medium is of low conductivity, the trapping force is high, but if the conductivity increases, the attraction decreases and may even become negative. However, high-conductivity media are essential when working with biological material such as living cells. In this paper, some basic calculations have been performed, and a model has been developed which employs both positive and negative dielectrophoresis in a channel with interdigitated electrodes. The finite element method was utilized to predict the trajectories of Escherichia coli bacteria in the superpositioned electrical fields. It is shown that a drastic improvement of trapping efficiency can be obtained in this way, when a high conductivity medium is employed.

  • 32. Alegre, Cesar
    et al.
    McNally, Donal
    Choi, Kwing-So
    Tammisola, Outi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    The effect or arterial flow elasticity on the flow through a stenosis2016In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Bionic Engineering 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Alenius, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Large eddy simulations of acoustic-flow interaction at an orifice plate2015In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 345, 162-177 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scattering of plane waves by an orifice plate with a strong bias flow, placed in a circular or square duct, is studied through large eddy simulations and dynamic mode decomposition. The acoustic-flow interaction is illustrated, showing that incoming sound waves at a Strouhal number of 0.43 trigger a strong axisymmetric flow structure in the orifice in the square duct, and interact with a self-sustained axisymmetric oscillation in the circular duct orifice. These structures then generate a strong sound, increasing the acoustic energy at the frequency of the incoming wave. The structure triggered in the square duct is weaker than that present in the circular duct, but stronger than structures triggered by waves at other frequencies. Comparing the scattering matrix with measurements, there is a good agreement. However, the results are found to be sensitive to the inflow, where the self-sustained oscillation in the circular duct simulation is an artefact of an axisymmetric, undisturbed inflow. This illustrates a problem with using an undisturbed inflow for studying vortex-sound effects, and can be of interest when considering musical instruments, where the aim is to get maximum amplification of specific tones. Further, it illustrates that at the frequency where an amplification of acoustic energy is found for the orifice plate, the flow has a natural instability, which is suppressed by non-axisymmetry and incoming disturbances.

  • 34.
    Alenius, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    LES of Acoustic-Flow Interaction at an Orifice Plate2012In: 18th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference (33rd AIAA Aeroacoustics Conference), 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The scattering of plane waves by a thick orifice plate, placed in a circular or square duct with flow, is studied through Large Eddy Simulation. The scattering matrix is computed and compared to measurements, showing reasonably good agreement except around one frequency ($St \approx 0.4$). Here a stronger amplification of acoustic energy is observed in the circular duct simulations than in the measurements and the square duct simulations. In order to improve the understanding of the interaction between an incoming wave, the flow, and the plate, a few frequencies are studied in more detail. A Dynamic Mode Decomposition is performed to identify flow structures at significant frequencies. This shows that the amplification of acoustic energy occurs at the frequency where the jet in the circular duct has an axisymmetric instability. Furthermore, the incoming wave slightly amplifies this instability, and suppresses background flow fluctuations.

  • 35.
    Alenius, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Scattering of Plane Waves by a Constriction2011In: Proceedings of ASME Turbo Expo 2011, Vol 7, Parts A-C, American Society Of Mechanical Engineers , 2011, 1043-1052 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liner scattering of low frequency waves by an orifice plate has been studied using Large Eddy Simulation and an acoustic two-port model. The results have been compared to measurements with good agreement for waves coming from the downstream side. For waves coming from the upstream side the reflection is over-predicted, indicating that not enough of the acoustic energy is converted to vorticity at the upstream edge of the plate. Furthermore, the sensitivity to the amplitude of the acoustic waves has been studied, showing difficulties to simultaneously keep the amplitude low enough for linearity and high enough to suppress flow noise with the relatively short times series available in LES.

  • 36.
    Alfredsson, Bo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.). STandUP Wind.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. STandUP Wind.
    Wind farms in complex terrains: an introduction2017In: Philosophical Transactions. Series A: Mathematical, physical, and engineering science, ISSN 1364-503X, E-ISSN 1471-2962, Vol. 375, no 2091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wind energy is one of the fastest growing sources of sustainable energy production. As more wind turbines are coming into operation, the best locations are already becoming occupied by turbines, and wind-farm developers have to look for new and still available areas-locations that may not be ideal such as complex terrain landscapes. In these locations, turbulence and wind shear are higher, and in general wind conditions are harder to predict. Also, the modelling of the wakes behind the turbines is more complicated, which makes energy-yield estimates more uncertain than under ideal conditions. This theme issue includes 10 research papers devoted to various fluid-mechanics aspects of using wind energy in complex terrains and illustrates recent progress and future developments in this important field. This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  • 37.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Imayama, Shintaro
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lingwood, Rebecca J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. University of Cambridge, United Kingdom .
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Turbulent boundary layers over flat plates and rotating disks-The legacy of von Karman: A Stockholm perspective2013In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 40, 17-29 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many of the findings and ideas of von Karman are still of interest to the fluid dynamics community. For instance, his result that the mean velocity distribution in turbulent flows has a logarithmic behavior with respect to the distance from the centreline is still a cornerstone for everybody working in wall-bounded turbulence and was first presented to an international audience in Stockholm at the Third International Congress for Applied Mechanics in 1930. In this paper we discuss this result and also how the so-called von Karman constant can be determined in a new simple way. We also discuss the possibility of a second (outer) maximum of the streamwise velocity fluctuations, a result that was implicit in some of the assumptions proposed by von Karman.

  • 38.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lingwood, Rebecca J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. University of Cambridge, United Kingdom .
    Rotation Effects on Wall-Bounded Flows: Some Laboratory Experiments2014In: Modeling Atmospheric and Oceanic Flows: Insights from Laboratory Experiments and Numerical Simulations, Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, 83-100 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on three different categories: (1) system rotation vector parallel to mean-flow vorticity; (2) flows set up by the rotation of one or more boundaries; and (3) system rotation aligned with the mean-flow direction. The flows in the different categories above differ with respect to their geometry but, more importantly, in how rotation affects them. The chapter focuses on three different flows that are relatively amenable to laboratory investigation, one from each category described above: One is plane Couette flow undergoing system rotation about an axis normal to the mean flow, another is the von Kármán boundary layer flow, and the third is axially rotating pipe flow. It defines important nondimensional parameters that govern them and discuss some of their interesting flow features in various parameter ranges. Various experimental realizations of the three different flow systems are described and considerations and limitations regarding the laboratory systems are discussed.

  • 39.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the "outer" peak2011In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 23, no 4, 041702- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One recent focus of experimental studies of turbulence in high Reynolds number wall-bounded flows has been the scaling of the root mean square of the fluctuating streamwise velocity, but progress has largely been impaired by spatial resolution effects of hot-wire sensors. For the near-wall peak, recent results seem to have clarified the controversy; however, one of the remaining issues in this respect is the emergence of a second (so-called outer) peak at high Reynolds numbers. The present letter introduces a new scaling of the local turbulence intensity profile, based on the diagnostic plot by Alfredsson and Orlu [Eur. J. Mech. B/Fluids 42, 403 (2010)], which predicts the location and amplitude of the "outer" peak and suggests its presence as a question of sufficiently large scale separation.

  • 40.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Tillmark, Nils
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Instability, transition and turbulence in plane Couette flow with system rotation2005In: IUTAM Symposium on Laminar-Turbulent Transition and Finite Amplitude Solutions / [ed] Mullin, T; Kerswell, R, Springer Netherlands, 2005, Vol. 77, 173-193 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    System rotation may have either stabilizing or destabilizing effects on shear flows depending on the direction of rotation vector as compared to the vorticity vector of mean flow. This study describes experimental results of laminar, transitional and turbulent plane Couette flow with both stabilizing and destabilizing system rotation. For laminar flow with destabilizing rotation roll cells appear in the flow which may undergo several different types of secondary instabilities, especially interesting is a repeating pattern of wavy structures followed by breakdown, thereafter roll cells reappear in a cyclic pattern. For higher Reynolds number roll cells appear also in a turbulent environment. It is also shown how stabilizing rotation may quench the turbulence completely.

  • 41.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    The diagnostic plot - a litmus test for wall bounded turbulence data2010In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 29, no 6, 403-406 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diagnostic plot is suggested that can be used to judge wall bounded turbulence data of the mean and the rms of the streamwise velocity in terms of reliability both near the wall, around the maximum in the rms as well as in the outer region. The important feature of the diagnostic plot is that neither the wall position nor the friction velocity needs to be known, since it shows the rms value as a function of the streamwise mean velocity, both normalized with the free stream velocity. One must remember, however, that passing the test is a necessary, but not sufficient condition to prove good data quality.

  • 42.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Kurian, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Fransson, Jens H. M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Segalini, A.
    Rüedi, Jean-Daniel
    Talamelli, Alessandro
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    The diagnostic plot: a new way to appraise turbulent boundary-layer data2009In: ADVANCES IN TURBULENCE XII: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 12TH EUROMECH EUROPEAN TURBULENCE CONFERENCE / [ed] Eckhardt, B., 2009, Vol. 132, 609-612 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    The viscous sublayer revisited-exploiting self-similarity to determine the wall position and friction velocity2011In: Experiments in Fluids, ISSN 0723-4864, E-ISSN 1432-1114, Vol. 51, no 1, 271-280 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In experiments using hot wires near the wall, it is well known that wall interference effects between the hot wire and the wall give rise to errors, and mean velocity data from the viscous sublayer can usually not be used to determine the wall position, nor the friction velocity from the linear velocity distribution. Here, we introduce a new method that takes advantage of the similarity of the probability density distributions (PDF) or rather the cumulative distribution functions (CDF) in the near-wall region. By using the velocity data in the CDF in a novel way, it is possible to circumvent the problem associated with heat transfer to the wall and to accurately determine both the wall position and the friction velocity. Prior to its exploitation, the self-similarity of the distribution functions of the streamwise velocity fluctuations within the viscous sublayer is established, and it is shown that they can accurately be described by a lognormal distribution.

  • 44.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    A new formulation for the streamwise turbulence intensity distribution2011In: 13th European Turbulence Conference (ETC13): Wall-Bounded Flows And Control Of Turbulence, Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2011, 022002- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerical and experimental data from zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers over smooth walls have been analyzed by means of the so called diagnostic plot introduced by Alfredsson & Orlu [Eur. J. Fluid Mech. B/Fluids, 4 2, 403 (2010)]. In the diagnostic plot the local turbulence intensity is shown as a function of the local mean velocity normalized with a reference velocity scale. In the outer region of the boundary layer a universal linear decay of the turbulence intensity is observed independent of Reynolds number. The deviation from this linear region appears in the buffer region and seems to be universal when normalized with the friction velocity. Therefore, a new empirical fit for the streamwise velocity turbulence intensity distribution is proposed and the results are compared with up to date reliable high-Reynolds number experiments and extrapolated towards Reynolds numbers relevant to atmospherical boundary layers.

  • 45.
    Alfredsson, P. Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Segalini, Antonio
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    A new formulation for the streamwise turbulence intensity distribution in wall-bounded turbulent flows2012In: European journal of mechanics. B, Fluids, ISSN 0997-7546, E-ISSN 1873-7390, Vol. 36, 167-175 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The distribution of the streamwise velocity turbulence intensity has recently been discussed in several papers both from the viewpoint of new experimental results as well as attempts to model its behavior. In the present paper numerical and experimental data from zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers, channel and pipe flows over smooth walls have been analyzed by means of the so called diagnostic plot introduced by Alfredsson & ÖrlÌ [P.H. Alfredsson, R. ÖrlÌ, The diagnostic plot-a litmus test for wall bounded turbulence data, Eur. J. Mech. B Fluids 29 (2010) 403-406]. In the diagnostic plot the local turbulence intensity is plotted as function of the local mean velocity normalized with a reference velocity scale. Alfredsson et al. [P.H. Alfredsson, A. Segalini, R. ÖrlÌ, A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the outer peak, Phys. Fluids 23 (2011) 041702] observed that in the outer region of the boundary layer a universal linear decay of the turbulence intensity independent of the Reynolds number exists. This approach has been generalized for channel and pipe flows as well, and it has been found that the deviation from the previously established linear region appears at a given wall distance in viscous units (around 120) for all three canonical flows. Based on these results, new empirical fits for the streamwise velocity turbulence intensity distribution of each canonical flow are proposed. Coupled with a mean streamwise velocity profile description the model provides a composite profile for the streamwise variance profile that agrees nicely with existing numerical and experimental data. Extrapolation of the proposed scaling to high Reynolds numbers predicts the emergence of a second peak of the streamwise variance profile that at even higher Reynolds numbers overtakes the inner one.

  • 46. Altimira, M.
    et al.
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Numerical investigation of throttle flow under cavitating conditions2015In: International Journal of Multiphase Flow, ISSN 0301-9322, Vol. 75, 124-136 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper shows the importance of the resolution of large unsteady flow structures in numerical simulations of cavitating flows. Three-dimensional simulations of the flow through a throttle geometry representative for fuel injectors have been performed to characterise the inception and development of cavitation, adopting the implicit Large Eddy Simulation approach. The two-phase flow has been handled by the Volume of Fluid method; whilst the simplified Rayleigh equation has been adopted to handle bubble dynamics. The mathematical model has been solved in the open source C++ toolbox OpenFOAM 2.0.1. Results obtained with the mathematical model are compared with those from RANS-based simulations and validated against experimental measurements. The performed Large Eddy Simulations not only are able to reproduce vortex cavitation, but also give further insight into the complex interaction between cavitation and turbulence through the assessment of the different terms of the vorticity equation.

  • 47.
    Altimira, Mireia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Casanueva, Carlos
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    RAISING AWARENESS ON DIVERSITY AND EQUALITY IN STEM DEGREES IN HIGHER EDUCATION2017In: INTED2017: 11TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A& DEVELOPMENT , 2017, 1037-1041 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education environments are becoming more and more diverse, regarding both gender and cultural background, which could pose significant challenges for both students and teachers. In order to raise the topic amongst STEM students, a lecture on Diversity has been implemented in the course Research Methodologies for Engineering Mechanics, where different concepts regarding equality have been introduced and unconscious bias have been explained to the students. The lecture was placed in the middle of the course so that students could reflect back on their previous evaluations and enable them to correct their biases in the second half of the course. Feedback of the whole course has also been compared between the 2016 and 2015 editions, where this lecture was not present. The results show that a lecture in Diversity and Equality is especially useful for female students, strongly supporting its inclusion in the course.

  • 48.
    Altimira, Mireia
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Fuchs, Laszlo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics of Industrial Processes.
    Effect of fuel flexibility on cavitation in injector-like flows2014In: Proceedings of the 26th ILASS-Europe 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Altimira, Mireia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Teaching Research Methodologies2016In: INTED2016 Proceedings, IATED , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the methodology employed in the Research Methodology course, part of the Master Program in Engineering Mechanics of the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). As a higher education institution, KTH aims at excellence in both generation and dissemination of knowledge. Even though these two activities are traditionally seen as independent –or even mutually exclusive-, there is a positive correlation between performance in research andin pedagogical activities, reinforced by the fact that inquiry-based or researchbased learning activities enhance deep learning among the students. The course Research Methodology in Engineering Mechanics poses a unique opportunity to engage the students to research in different areas through diversity-oriented learning activities.The course’s main learning outcome is that the students become acquainted with the most common concepts and research methodologies used in the fields of Fundamental Mechanics, Solid Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, Acoustics and Biomechanics. After the completion of the course, the student should also be able to identify and analyze the methodologies in a given published work.The course consists of 9 lectures and a group project, with an estimation of the total dedication time of 80h (3hp). One lecture is focused on research ethics;while in the other 8 researchers from KTH present their areas of expertise, introducing the most relevant methodologies applied. The attendance is about40 students.In the last two years, and based on the course assessment survey, the structure of the course has been continuously shifting from traditional lectures to cover a broader range of teaching activities. In this way, different learning styles are covered and the learning outcomes can be achieved by as many students as possible. In this regard, traditional lectures are combined with problem-based or case-based lectures, and role-play. Additionally, in the content of the lectures we also try to keep a balance between experimental and numerical research methods of the different disciplines, in such a way that the students get a holistic view of the research in that particular field.This project involves reading a research journal article in the subject of engineering mechanics and presenting, in written and oral form, a critical analysis of the methodologies employed. In the beginning of their project, the students give an oral presentation of their article to another group. At the end of this activity, each group is asked to mention a positive aspect of the presentation they just heard and something that they believe should be improved. As an additional task, each group is asked to peer-review another group’s report. To do so, the students are given a document with some guidelines and evaluation criteria. Special instructions are given to make sure positive feedback is also included in the review. With this, the students get to read the work of others, learn to apply quality criteria and give feedback, and self-reflect on their own work after the review process.

  • 50.
    Altimira, Mireia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Rivas, A.
    Ramos, J. C.
    Anton, R.
    On The Disintegration Of Fan-Shaped Liquid Sheets2012In: Atomization and sprays, ISSN 1044-5110, Vol. 22, no 9, 733-755 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the disintegration of fan-shaped liquid sheets produced by industrial fan-spray atomizers. The disintegration regimes observed for different geometries and operating conditions are described, proving the paramount role of nozzle flow on the final characteristics of the spray produced. The concept of breakup length is redefined to account for the stochastic nature of liquid stream disintegration. An analogy is established between the breakup of a liquid sheet dominated by the wave mode and a radial sheet, obtaining good agreement with the experiments. However, in those cases where several disintegration regimes coexist, the breakup length cannot be given by an analytical expression. Finally, the influence of the disintegration regime on both the droplet size and the spatial distribution of the droplets is investigated, confirming the strong influence of rim breakup.

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