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  • 1.
    Ahmadi, Parisa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Analysis of traffic patterns for large scale outdoor events: A case study of Vasaloppet ski event2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Vasaloppet is a cross country ski event which has been held in Sweden for about 50 years. Now

    more than 50,000 people of different ages participate in various cross country ski races during the

    Vasaloppet winter week in Dalarna County. This increasing demand needs good traffic and

    transportation planning to avoid congestion and provide safe, on time and environmentally

    friendly transportation for participants and visitors to the area. The key for a good event traffic

    planning is reliable and up-to-date traffic data which is not available for the Vasaloppet winter

    week.

    This study is an attempt to collect traffic data in order to find the movement patterns in the area

    and estimate origin-destination matrices for the main event of Vasaloppet week. Based on

    resources and time limitation it was decided to use a web-base

    d participants’ survey in order to

    collect traffic data. The link to the survey was sent to email address of a sample of 5000

    participants.

    About 64% of the participants drove from their home town to the area and about 31 percent

    travelled by bus. Train and airplane have a very small share in travel mode to the area. Malungsälen,

    Mora and Älvdalen are three municipalities in Dalarna County with the highest share in

    accommodating participants. On the day of the race, bus and car have approximately the same

    share in travel mode with 45% and 47% respectively.

  • 2. Allström, Andreas
    et al.
    Rahmani, Mahmood
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Koutsopoulos, Haris
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Gundlegård, David
    Archer, Jeffery
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Mobile Millennium Stockholm2011In: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Models and Technologies for ITS, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Al-Mudhaffar, Azhar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Svante, Berg
    Ramböll, Sweden, Traffic and Transport.
    Signal Control of Roundabouts2011In: 6TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON HIGHWAY CAPACITY AND QUALITY OF SERVICE, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade many traffic signal controlled intersections have been replaced by roundabouts. There has been a trend towards the establishment of roundabouts where pedestrians and cyclists need to be considered specifically, sometimes by including one or more signal controlled crosswalks. Knowledge on adequate design, control and effects of different solutions, particularly with accessibility and traffic safety in mind, has been limited in Sweden. This lack of knowledge was the basis for a project in 2007 financed by the Swedish National Road Administration and which was divided into two parts. In the first part an inventory of available knowledge on signal controlled roundabouts both in Sweden and abroad was carried out. The following alternative forms of signal control were determined for the projects aspects: A1: Signal controlled crosswalks at the approach and in the direct vicinity of the gyratory (off signal). A2: Signal control of crosswalks at the approach up-and downstream. B1: Complete signal control of an approach. The crosswalks on both directions are passed in a single step. B2: Complete signal control of an approach. The crosswalks are passed in two steps (with intermediate stops). C: Coordinated, fully signal control of the roundabout. In the second part of the project accessibility analysis for the different alternatives was carried out with the help of field studies and calculations using the traffic modeling tool TRANSYT for signal optimization and VISSIM for evaluation of the effects. The traffic safety aspects were analyzed with the aid of specific interviews with the regulatory organizations, accident statistics from STRADA (Swedish Traffic Accident Data Acquisition) and field studies of traffic behavior at two roundabout locations. The project concluded following recommendations regarding accessibility and safety: Alternative (A1) should be avoided from both a capacity and a traffic safety aspect. Use B. Alternative (A2) should be placed a minimum of 22 m from the roundabout due to both capacity and a traffic safety aspects. Alternative (B2), which has higher capacity than (B1) can be applied if there is a need for signalized crosswalks. Alternative (C) can be considered due to capacity constraints at high pedestrians' flow of several approaches.

  • 4.
    Alsharifi, Hussein
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Metodik för att effektivisera arbetsprocessen av ombyggnad av tåg med ETCS utrustning.: Anpassning av svenska fordon.2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In 1996, the European Union decided that all countries in Europe will implement a new

    standardized traffic control system for the railway. The systems that are available today will be

    replaced with ERTMS (European Rail Traffic Management System), which is a safer and more

    efficient traffic control system. ERTMS consists of four different systems: GSM-R is a radio

    communication system, ETCS (European Train Control System) is a signaling and safety

    systems for ground and onboard equipment, INESS (Integrated European Signalling System) is a

    project that will improve the performance of signaling and Europtirails, which is

    a standardized IT systems.

    Railways in Europe have been divided into six different corridors, corridor A to F. Corridor B is

    the corridor that extends through Sweden. The Swedish part of Corridor B extends from

    Stockholm to Malmö. This route is much trafficked, therefore it is out of importance that the

    system should be flawless and work efficiently, when the work of implementing the ETCS

    begins. Today, the rebuilding work of the trains with ETCS equipment takes long time and is

    quite costly due to long downtime in the workshop. Many of the small train operators do not

    have the economy to rebuild the trains and in turn, the system is not flawless, it becomes more

    difficult to persuade the operators to perform this reconstruction. The work to equip the Swedish

    railway with ETCS has started and more and more lines are being equipped with ETCS. Train

    operators that will operate on ETCS lines will be required to equip their trains with this system to

    be able to operate on tracks with ETCS. In order to handle this volume of trains, it requires that

    the engineers have more efficient working methods in order to minimize the downtime of the

    train in the workshop.

    The aim of this study was to study the onboard departments working process and to find

    improvement proposals for how the onboard department should increase their efficiency in their

    work process with help of the Toyota Production System (TPS), The Toyota Way and

    Standardized way of working.

    In order to identify the problems that exist in the work process, interviews, questionnaires,

    observations and case study on onboard department has been implemented. The work process

    includes work in workshop, approval authorities and other departments within the company. To

    get an overall picture of the work, interviews with staff from each department and observation

    and case study of the workshop has been performed. Literature study of Lean Production and

    standardized work process has been carried out to find an approach that enhances and

    streamlines the engineering’s working

    With the help of the Lean philosophy, the study has developed several aspects that need to be

    implemented in the working method to get a sufficiently efficient working structure from the

    beginning of the project. If these improvements get implemented in the department, it should

    minimize the downtime for trains in the workshop. The work of each department works great,

    but the rebuilding work requires several departments to work together and that is where the

    weakness lies. There are three main reasons that cause the long downtime; Bad communication

    between those involved in the process, delay of materials, and high workload. These three

    problem areas affect each other, therefore the thesis studied all these three problems with extra

    attention.

    The engineers have a high workload because each engineer has over 20 different roles. High

    workload poses a significant risk of work delay and rework due to errors. In order to reduce the

    workload the thesis has developed a structure to show how the work should be divided and that

    the work should be done in groups instead of individually. Each engineer will be assigned to a

    maximum of five roles, the roles should be assigned after skills. To make this possible, it is

    required that all roles are identified, a role description for each role must be created and the

    engineering expertise must be identified.

    Bad communication between the different departments creates misunderstanding and delay of

    materials to the workshop. Delay of materials is one of the biggest reasons to increased standstill

    time. To reduce misunderstanding it is required that in the early stages hold a project meeting

    where all the involved departments are participated. A structure map is needed where all

    employees can see what authority, roles and project them and their fellow employees have. In this

    way, communication will improve, as each person knows whom to contact for questions and

    concerns.

    Delay of materials to the workshop is a problem that causes delays and longer downtime. The

    reason for this is that the components that are ordered are incorrect or that misunderstanding

    regarding delivered time emerges. Another reason is that the company does not have spare parts.

    When a component is damaged, it can sometimes take several weeks until the new part can be

    delivered. Workshop staff must, in this case, interrupt the rebuilding until the component has

    arrived. To reduce the risk of ordering wrong parts and to be able to order the parts in the early

    stages, it requires an accurate vehicle surveys from the beginning of the project.

    Much of the work is spent on writing documentation, thus it is important to have a good process

    regarding document writing. A problem that exists today is that the engineers do not have time to

    write all the documentation on time and it is postponed to the end of the project. In the final

    phase of a project, the engineers have large volumes of documentation that needs to be written.

    Writing a large part of the documentation at the end of the project is not the most efficient way.

    Therefore, it is good to have a process where the work does not proceed until all the

    documentation for the specific phase are completed and reviewed. The approval of the

    documentation takes quite a long time, therefore it requires a working method in which the

    documentation is sent continuously for approval.

    To minimize the downtime for the prototype vehicle it requires an efficient work process that

    minimizes the waste. In order to get such work process it is required that the onboard

    department of Bombardier RCS implements The Toyota Ways 14 principles and the Lean

    philosophy of “always striving for improvement” and that the workload most decreases

  • 5.
    Andersson, Evert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Berg, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Nelldal, Bo-Lennart
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Fröidh, Oskar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    TOSCA. Rail freight transport: Techno-economic analysis of energy and greenhouse gas reductions2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Stage 1 of the EU/FP7-funded project TOSCA (Technology Opportunities and Strategies toward Climate-friendly trAnsport) the techno-economical feasibility of different technolo-gies and means to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is being analysed for different modes of transport. This is made over the long-term perspective until 2050, with 2009 as the reference year. This is the report on the rail freight transport market, applicable to the European Union (EU-27).The analysis presented in this report estimates that a number of efficient technologies and means are available, individually and in combination, to significantly reduce energy use and the resulting GHG emissions on the rail freight market until 2050. The analysis has considered the following technologies and means:

    – heavy freight trains (high payload capacity per metre of train as well as longer trains)

    – eco-driving, including traffic flow management

    – energy recovery

    – high-efficiency machinery in locomotives and electric supply

    – low air drag

    – incremental improvements, in particular reduced tare mass of wagons.

    Despite anticipated higher train speeds in most future train operations the above-mentioned technologies and means have, according to the analysis, the potential to reduce the average energy use per net-tonne-km (tkm) of payload by 40–50 % until 2050. As a consequence also the direct and indirect GHG emissions will be reduced. Energy use and GHG emissions are measured per net-tonne-km, assuming representative load factors in different operations.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Evert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Berg, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Nelldal, Bo-Lennart
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Fröidh, Oskar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    TOSCA. Rail passenger transport: Techno-economic analysis of energy and greenhouse gas reductions2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Stage 1 of the EU/FP7-funded project TOSCA (Technology Opportunities and Strategies toward Climate-friendly trAnsport) the techno-economical feasibility of different technologies and means to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is being analysed for the different modes of transport. This is made in the long-term perspective until 2050, with 2009 as the reference year. This is the report on rail passenger transport, applicable to the European Union (EU-27).The present report has been subject to review among railway experts, representing train suppliers, railway operators as well as academia. They have also responded to a questionnaire. Further, a workshop was held, where the report with assumptions and results was discussed.In the analysis presented in this report it is estimated that a number of efficient improvements that, individually and in combination, are available in order to significantly reduce energy use and the resulting GHG emissions on the rail passenger market until 2050. The analysis has considered different technologies and means:

    – low air drag

    – low train mass

    – energy recovery

    – eco-driving, including traffic flow management

    – space efficiency in trains (increasing payload per metre of train)

    – incremental improvements of energy efficiency, in particular reduced losses.

    Despite anticipated higher average train speeds in the future these combined approaches will, according to the analysis, have the potential to reduce the average specific energy use per passenger-km (pkm) in the order of 45–50 % in the very long term until 2050. As a consequ-ence also the direct and indirect GHG emissions will be reduced. The highest reductions are possible in city and regional rail operations. Reductions are more limited in high-speed opera-tions, because of the advanced technologies already applied. However, high-speed rail has today a comparatively low energy use per passenger-km, partly due to its high average load factor. To be consistent with other work packages of TOSCA, energy use and GHG emissions are measured per passenger-km, assuming representative load factors in different operations.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Evert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Kottenhoff, Karl
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Nelldal, Bo-Lennart
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Extra wide-body passenger trains in Sweden2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Andersson, Evert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Nelldal, Bo-Lennart
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Effektiva Tågsystem för framtida persontrafik – analys av förutsättningar och möjligheter för attraktiv tågtrafik1997Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Andersson, Evert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Nelldal, Bo-Lennart
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Sammanfattning av Effektiva Tågsystem för framtida persontrafik – analys av förutsättningar och möjligheter för attraktiv tågtrafik1997Report (Other academic)
  • 10. Antoniou, C
    et al.
    Balakrishna, R
    Koutsopoulos, Haris
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    A synthesis of emerging data collection technologies and their impact on traffic management applications2011In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 139-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    act

    Purpose: The objective of this research is to provide an overview of emerging datacollection technologies and their impact on traffic management applications. Methods: Several existing and emerging surveillance technologies are being used for traffic datacollection. Each of these technologies has different technical characteristics and operating principles, which determine the types of data collected, accuracy of the measurements, levels of maturity, feasibility and cost, and network coverage. This paper reviews the different sources of traffic surveillance data currently employed, and the types of traffic management applications they may support. Results: Automated Vehicle Identification data have several applications in traffic management and many more are certain to emerge as these data become more widely available, reliable, and accessible. Representative examples in this field are presented. Furthermore, the fusion of condition information with traffic data can result in better and more responsive dynamic trafficmanagement applications with a richer data background. Conclusions: The current state-of-the-art of traffic modeling is discussed, in the context of using emerging data sources for better planning, operations and dynamic management of road networks. 

  • 11. Antoniou, C
    et al.
    Balakrishna, R
    Koutsopoulos, Haris
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Ben-Akiva, Moshe
    Calibration Methods for Simulation-Based Dynamic Traffic Assignment Systems2011In: International Journal of Modelling and Simulation, ISSN 0228-6203, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 227-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic Traffic Assignment (DTA) integrates complex transportation demand and network supply simulation models to estimate prevailing traffic conditions, predict future network performance and generate consistent, anticipatory route guidance. Prior to deployment, the DTA's parameters and inputs must be calibrated to accurately reflect travel behaviour and traffic dynamics. This paper presents a unified framework for off-line and on-line DTA calibration. Off-line calibration simultaneously estimates demand and supply model parameters. On-line calibration jointly updates - in real-time - the off-line estimates in order to more accurately capture current conditions. The developed methodsare flexible and can be applied to any simulation model and may utilize any availabletraffic surveillance information (including Automated Vehicle Identification systems, probe vehicles and other emerging data sources). The off-line and on-line components complement each other to efficiently combine historical and real-time information. Thecalibration approaches are demonstrated with DynaMIT (Dynamic network assignmentfor the Management of Information to Travelers), using time-varying count, speed and density data from conventional traffic sensors.

  • 12. Antoniou, C
    et al.
    Balakrishna, R
    Koutsopoulos, Haris
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Ben-Akiva, Moshe
    Off-Line and On-Line Calibration of Dynamic Traffic Assignment Systems2009In: IFAC Proceedings Volumes, 2009, p. 104-111Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic traffic assignment (DTA) systems integrate complex transportation demand and network supply simulation models to estimate current traffic conditions, predictfuture network performance and generate consistent, anticipatory route guidance. Before they are applied, DTA system parameters and inputs must be calibrated to accurately reect travel behavior and traffic dynamics. This paper presents a systematic approach that unifies the offline and on-line calibration of DTA systems through a common framework.Off-line calibration simultaneously estimates demand and supply model parameters. The on-line calibration jointly updates in real-time the demand and supply parameter values estimated during the of-line step to better reect prevailing conditions. The methods are general and can utilize any available traffic surveillance information (including emerging data sources, such as Automated Vehicle Identification systems or probe vehicles). The two components complement each other so that the calibration of the DTAsystem parameters efficiently utilizes both historical as well as real-time information. Thecalibration approaches are demonstrated with DynaMIT (Dynamic network assignmentfor the Management of Information to Travelers), using time-varying count, speed and density data obtained from standard loop detectors.

  • 13.
    Antoniou, C
    et al.
    MIT.
    Ben-Akiva, Moshe
    Koutsopoulos, Haris
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    On-line Calibration of Traffic Prediction Models2004In: Intelligent Transportation Systems, 2004. Proceedings. The 7th International IEEE Conference on, Washington, D.C., 2004, p. 82-87Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A methodology for the on-line calibration of the speed-density relationship is formulated as a flexible state-space model. Applicable solution approaches are discussed and three of them (extended Kalman filter (EKF), iterated EKF, and unscented Kalman filter (UKF) are selected and presented in detail. An application of the methodology with freeway sensor data from two networks in Europe and the U.S. is presented. The improvement in the estimation and prediction of speeds due to on-line calibration (compared with the speeds obtained from the off-line calibrated relationship) is demonstrated. The EKF provides the most straightforward solution to this problem, and indeed achieves considerable improvements in estimation and prediction accuracy. The benefits obtained from the -more computationally expensive-iterated EKF algorithm are shown. An innovative solution technique (the UKF) is also presented. The UKF has a number of unique qualities and advantages over the EKF, including no assumption of analytical representation of the model and no need for explicit computation of derivatives. Empirical results suggest that the UKF outperforms the other two solution techniques in prediction accuracy.

  • 14. Antoniou, C
    et al.
    Ben-Akiva, Moshe
    Koutsopoulos, Haris
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Practical considerations for on-line calibration of traffic simulation models2011In: Proceedings of ITS2011: Intelligent Transportation Systems, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15. Antoniou, C.
    et al.
    Koutsopoulos, Harilaos N.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Yannis, G.
    Dynamic data-driven local traffic state estimation and prediction2013In: Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, ISSN 0968-090X, E-ISSN 1879-2359, Vol. 34, p. 89-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traffic state prediction is a key problem with considerable implications in modern traffic management. Traffic flow theory has provided significant resources, including models based on traffic flow fundamentals that reflect the underlying phenomena, as well as promote their understanding. They also provide the basis for many traffic simulation models. Speed-density relationships, for example, are routinely used in mesoscopic models. In this paper, an approach for local traffic state estimation and prediction is presented, which exploits available (traffic and other) information and uses data-driven computational approaches. An advantage of the method is its flexibility in incorporating additional explanatory variables. It is also believed that the method is more appropriate for use in the context of mesoscopic traffic simulation models, in place of the traditional speed-density relationships. While these general methods and tools are pre-existing, their application into the specific problem and their integration into the proposed framework for the prediction of traffic state is new. The methodology is illustrated using two freeway data sets from Irvine, CA, and Tel Aviv, Israel. As the proposed models are shown to outperform current state-of-the-art models, they could be valuable when integrated into existing traffic estimation and prediction models.

  • 16. Antoniou, Constantinos
    et al.
    Koutsopoulos, Haris N.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Ben-Akiva, Moshe
    Chauhan, Akhilendra S.
    Evaluation of diversion strategies using dynamic traffic assignment2011In: Transportation planning and technology (Print), ISSN 0308-1060, E-ISSN 1029-0354, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 199-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A framework for the evaluation of the effectiveness of traffic diversion strategies for non-recurrent congestion, based on predictive guidance and using dynamic traffic assignment, is presented. Predictive guidance is based on a short-term prediction of traffic conditions, incorporating user reaction to information and guidance. A case study of the Lower Westchester County network in New York State, using DynaMIT-P, is presented to illustrate the application of the framework. DynaMIT-P is capable of evaluating diversion strategies based on predicted conditions, which take into account drivers' response to traffic information. The case study simulates the operations of predictive variable message signs positioned in strategic locations. DynaMIT-P is calibrated for the study network and used to establish base conditions for two incident scenarios in the absence of advanced traveller information systems. The effectiveness of predictive diversion strategies is evaluated (using rigorous statistical tests) by comparing traffic conditions with and without diversion strategies. The empirical findings suggest that incident diversion strategies based on predictive guidance result in travel time savings and increased travel time reliability.

  • 17. Balakrishna, R
    et al.
    Ben-Akiva, Moshe
    Koutsopoulos, Haris
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Simulation-Based Evaluation of DynaMIT's Route Guidance and its Impact on Network Travel Times2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Bayley, Michael
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Regional development via high-speed rail: A study of the Stockholm-Mälaren region and possibilities for Melbourne-regional Victoria2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to examine, based on a study of the regional high-speed corridors in the Stockholm-Mälaren Region, the possibilities for regional high-speed rail in Melbourne-regional Victoria (Australia) to improve accessibility, and achieve regional development and balanced growth between the capital and its surrounding regions. It deals with the concept of 'regional' high-speed rail, a variant of classic high-speed rail that serves centres along regional corridors stemming from a large city and whose travel purpose includes a high share of daily commuting and occasional business and leisure travel with journey times of up to two hours.

    The literature review reveals an emerging market for regional high-speed rail, which also has the potential to stimulate regional development and give rise to a complementary polycentric structure, subject to appropriate supporting conditions. The link between high-speed rail and regional development is based on the assumption that increased accessibility expands labour markets and offers people and firms wider location choices by permitting longer commuting.

    The Stockholm-Mälaren region analysis includes a review of the past-studied Svealand line, a comparative study of city groups and case studies. Key outcomes are summarised as follows:

    • Regional centres have in general strongly benefited from a high-speed rail connection, a finding supported by steadily increasing commuting, and population and job growth.

    • Cities within one hour of Stockholm experienced the greatest increase in commuting that was matched by consistently positive population and emerging job growth; these centres have benefited the most from high-speed, which reinforced ongoing activities.

    • Small-medium cities greater than one hour from Stockholm suffering population and job decline experienced recovery to neutral or positive growth with the introduction of high-speed; these centres depend on supportive strategies to fully capture its benefits, particularly those that foster inter-city exchange and the formation of city networks.

    • Supportive strategies for high-speed rail include: public transport coordination, station redevelopment, establishment of public offices and measures for inter-city exchange.

    Regional high-speed rail is proposed in Melbourne-regional Victoria based on the application of speed enhancements (to 160, 200 and 250 km/h) on existing rail corridors, which reduce travel times between Melbourne and regional centres, facilitating increased commuting and stimulating regional development. The key outcomes are summarised as follows:

    • The improvement of inner lines to 200-250 km/h and outer lines to 160 km/h achieves an efficient balance between improved accessibility and economy in the short-medium term; future enhancements include peripheral links and higher speeds on outer lines.

    • Upgrading lines to true ‘high-speed’ status requires electrification, modern signalling and track improvements, which deliver improved run times for the higher investment.

    • Estimated demand growth factors range from 1.4 to 2.0 depending on speed and route.

    • Positive regional development effects are expected if appropriate supportive strategies are applied, especially ones that support economic specialisation and city networking.

  • 19. Ben-Akiva, Moshe
    et al.
    Koutsopoulos, Haris
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Antoniou, C
    Balakrishna, R
    Traffic Simulation with DynaMIT2010In: Fundamentals of Traffic Simulation, Springer, 2010, p. 363-398Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DynaMIT (Dynamic Network Assignment for the Management of Information to Travelers) is a dynamic traffic assignment model system that estimates and predicts traffic. DynaMIT is also a real-time system for decision support at traffic management centers for generation of predictive traffic information. A planning version also exists. DynaMIT captures the dynamic performance of the network (e.g., lane-based queuing and spillback effects), travel behavior, its sensitivity to traffic conditions and available traffic information, and consistency between demand and supply. DynaMIT consists of a demand simulator, a supply simulator, and algorithms that capture demand and supply interactions. Methodologies for the online and offline estimation of OD flows and the offline and online calibration of various inputs and parameters (such as network performance parameters) have been developed as well. Several case studies from the United States, Europe, and Asia are discussed, and a distributed version of DynaMIT is also presented.

  • 20. Ben-Akiva, Moshe
    et al.
    Koutsopoulos, Haris
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Toledo, Tomer
    Yang, Qi
    Choundhury, Charisma
    Antoniou, Constantinos
    Balakrishna, Ramachandran
    Traffic Simulation with MITSIMLab2010In: Fundamentals of Traffic Simulation, Springer, 2010, p. 233-268Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MITSIMLab (MIcroscopic Traffic SIMulation Laboratory) is a microscopic traffic simulation model that evaluates the impacts of alternative traffic management system designs at the operational level and assists in their subsequent refinement. MITSIMLab models the travel and driving behavior of individual vehicles, the detailed movement of transit vehicles, and the various control and information provision strategies through a generic controller. A calibration methodology for important parameters and inputs was also developed. The model has been extended to address the special driving behavior evidenced in urban networks and has been used as a test bed for the evaluation of advanced traveler information systems (ATIS). Calibration and validation results from networks in the United States and Europe are discussed.

  • 21.
    Bjäring, Camilla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    ITS under byggtid - utvärdering med dynameq: Fallstudie: Intunnling av E4/E20 Tomteboda - Haga södra2012Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Essingeleden in Stockholm is the most heavily congested road segment in Scandinavia and it is of

    great importance for as well traffic within the city as for transit traffic. The capacity of Essingeleden

    and Norra Länken is not enough to accommodate all traffic. At times it is not moving at all, which

    results in long queues and an augmented risk of accidents. Consequently measures for increasing the

    capacity on E4/E20, which will reduce congestion and the risk of accidents, are implemented by

    Trafikverket. In fall 2012 one lane of three at Pampas will be closed and so will the exit from

    Essingeleden to Norra Stationsgatan, called Parkeringsbron. No new connection will be in place until

    2017. This implies that if no measures are taken the congestion will be exacerbated. The purpose of

    the thesis was to study how ITS can be used to divert the traffic, with the aim of gaining an

    accessibility that is as good as possible through the construction site at Norra Station, during the time

    Parkeringsbron is closed. Thereafter an ITS

    solution was suggested and evaluated using traffic

    simulation. The problem was modelled with the mesoscopic simulation tool Dynameq, which like

    microscopic models treats congestion and queue build

    up and dissipation in a detailed way, while it

    is an equilibrium model with consistent route choices, like macroscopic models. A Dynameq network

    of Stockholm was available, but the work with coding and calibrating the model proved to be too

    extensive, why the decision was taken that focus should be on having the network behave as

    expected according to traffic flow theory and that evaluation and analysis should be done as

    comparisons between scenarios. This implies that the model does not properly represent reality and

    that the results thus not can be applied on the real scenario. Initially the cause was to evaluate

    solutions to the problem using Dynameq, but during the work process more and more of the

    software’s weaknesses were discovered, which makes it unsuitable for this type of analysis. There

    are, among others are deficiencies in modelling of lane

    ‐choice and lane‐change and in route‐

    choice

    modelling. An analysis was still performed and the result showed that large gains of travel time and

    throughput can be made when an ITS

    solution is implemented, if it is well planned and clear and

    thereby leads to a large diversion rate. This contributes to a more efficient use of the road network

    and shorter travel times for all vehicles.

  • 22.
    Boysen, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Developing larger loading gauges for Europe2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Boysen, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Developing larger loading gauges for Europe2013Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The needs and opportunities for larger loading gauges in Europe are investigated for railway wagonload as well as intermodal transportation. Dimensional constraints on both railways and highways are investigated, and a set of large railway loading gauges are proposed, which are already implemented on select mainlines in northern Europe. These large gauges are compared with the most prevalent gauges presently in use, and the increased capacity is quantified for general commodities and specific load units. Recommendations are made for existing freight corridors as well as for upgraded and new railway lines.

  • 24.
    Boysen, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Effektivare godstransporter genom längre tåg2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Boysen, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Electric Light-Rail Vehicles for Hong Kong1993In: Rolling Stock Technology, no 199Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Boysen, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Electropneumatic Braking of Japanese Freight Trains1997Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Boysen, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Fran-Scan, intermodal korridor2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Boysen, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Incremental Capacity Expansion: Heavier Loads, Faster Empties and Quicker Meets2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     To meet growing demand, a study is being done on measures to raise transportation capacity, including increased tonnage per loaded train using the existing locomotives, higher return speed for empty trains, and quicker meets.  Results show that for a trailing tonnage increase of some 19 %, the longer loading, transit and unloading times would be more than recovered by raising the empty return speed by some 10 km/h.  Simultaneous entry to meets will further raise capacity and reduce cycle time

  • 29.
    Boysen, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Multipurpose application of VEL Wagon2012Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Boysen, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Quicker meets, heavier loads and faster empties: Effects on transportation capacity and cycle time2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Boysen, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    The Fran-Scan hi-cube intermodal corridor2011In: Proceedings of the 7th SoNorA University Think Tank Conference, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Boysen, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Øresund and Fehmarnbelt high-capacity rail corridor standards2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Øresund and the planned Fehmarnbelt fixed links have recently adopted a set of standards thatcan significantly raise the operating efficiency and capacity of freight by rail  These standards are explained in the context of the German-Scandinavian railway corridor and in comparison to the European Technical Specifications for Interoperability  Using a quantitative model, the mass and volume loading capacity per train are calculated  Compared to present limitations in the German-Scandinavian corridor, the mass loading capacity per train can be increased by 60%, and the volume loading capacity by up to 214%.

  • 33.
    Boysen, Hans
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Andersson, Evert
    Track-Friendly Bogies for High Speeds and Heavy Payloads1990Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Boysen, Hans E.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    General model of railway transportation capacity2012In: Computers in Railways XIII: Computer System Design and Operation in the Railway and Other Transit Systems, 2012, p. 335-347Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A general model of railway transportation capacity has been developed, which models mass transportation capacity and volume transportation capacity per unit time. It can also be adapted to passenger transportation. The model is easy to use and can handle trade-offs between conflicting effects. It is a suitable tool in capacity planning for preliminary assessment of the capacity effects of candidate investment and operating scenarios, and can point to areas where detailed analysis with other methods should be applied. Application of the capacity model to cases of higher axle loads and higher speeds in freight transportation showed significant and mixed capacity effects that would not have been obvious otherwise.

  • 35.
    Boysen, Hans
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Nelldal, Bo-Lennart
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Cross-border freight transportation by rail Oslo-Gothenburg-Copenhagen-Hamburg: Challenges and opportunities2014Report (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Burghout, Wilco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Koutsopoulos, Haris
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Andreasson, Ingmar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    A Discrete-Event Mesoscopic Traffic Simulation Model for Hybrid Traffic Simulation2006In: IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems Conference, 2006. ITSC'06, IEEE , 2006, p. 1102-1107Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents a mesoscopic traffic simulation model, particularly suited for the development of integrated meso-micro traffic simulation models. The model combines a number of the recent advances in simulation modeling, such as discrete-event time resolution and combined queue-server and speed-density modeling, with a number of new features such as the ability to integrate with microscopic models to create hybrid traffic simulation. The ability to integrate with microscopic models extends the area of use to include evaluation of ITS systems, which often require the detailed modeling of vehicles in areas of interest, combined with a more general modeling of large surrounding areas to capture network effects of local phenomena. The paper discusses the structure of the model, presents a framework for integration with micro models, and illustrates its validity through a case study with a congested network north of Stockholm. It also compares its performance with a hybrid model applied to the same network.

  • 37.
    Burghout, Wilco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR.
    Koutsopoulos, Haris
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Andreasson, Ingmar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR.
    Incident Management and Traffic Information: Tools and Methods for Simulation-Based Traffic Prediction2010In: TRB 89th Annual Meeting Compendium of Papers,, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Börjesson, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Forecasting demand for high speed rail2014In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 70, p. 81-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is sometimes argued that standard state-of-practice logit-based models cannot forecast the demand for substantially reduced travel times, for instance due to High Speed Rail (HSR). The present paper investigates this issue by reviewing the literature on travel time elasticities for long distance rail travel and comparing these with elasticities observed when new HSR lines have opened. This paper also validates the Swedish long distance model, Sampers, and its forecast demand for a proposed new HSR, using aggregate data revealing how the air-rail modal split varies with the difference in generalized travel time between rail and air. The Sampers long distance model is also compared to a newly developed model applying Box-Cox transformations. The paper contributes to the empirical literature on long distance travel, long distance elasticities and HSR passenger demand forecasts. Results indicate that the Sampers model is indeed able to predict the demand for HSR reasonably well. The new non-linear model has even better model fit and also slightly higher elasticities.

  • 39.
    Börjesson, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Eliasson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Kristoffersson, Ida
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Trängselskatt på Essingeleden minskar trängseln kraftigt. PM till TV4 201104252011Report (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Börjesson, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Jonsson, R. Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Lundberg, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    An ex-post CBA for the Stockholm Metro2014In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 70, p. 135-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper performs an ex-post cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of the Metro system in Stockholm built in the 1950s. We find that the Metro was socially beneficial and that the largest benefit of the Metro is its capacity, making it possible for many people to travel to and from the city center. We also assess the significance of the wider economic impacts due to labor market distortions and the land-use effects in the case of the Stockholm Metro. The wider economic impacts increase the consumer surplus with 48%, and the yearly income in the county with 1.5%. A land-use model is used to simulate how the land-use has been influenced by the Metro over the years 1956-2006. This simulation indicates that the historical centralized planning of housing along transit corridors has developed the region into a more dispersed region than if the market forces had ruled. The simulation also suggests that the land-use impact from the investment itself is small, but that the land-use impact from the planning accompanying the decision to build the Metro has been substantial.

  • 41.
    Börjesson, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Kristoffersson, Ida
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Estimating welfare effects of congestion charges in real world settings2011In: Journal of Urban Economics, ISSN 0094-1190, E-ISSN 1095-9068Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Börjesson, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Kristoffersson, Ida
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Welfare effects of Stockholm congestion charges using dynamic network assignment2011In: Proceedings of the European Transport Conference, Glasgow, UK, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the standard textbook analysis, drivers as a group will be worse off with congestion charging if not compensated by revenues. This result is confirmed by an analysis of the Stockholm congestion charging scheme using a static model with homogenous users. However, both this static model and the standard textbook analysis omit three important factors: taste heterogeneity, effects of charges on the larger network arising from less blocking back of upstream links and behavioural adjustments in the temporal dimensions. Taking account of these factors, using a dynamic model with heterogeneous users in a large-scale network, we find that drivers as a group benefit directly from the charging scheme in Stockholm. This paper investigates the importance of the three factors omitted in the standard textbook and the static model analysis in the Stockholm case, finding that all three add significantly to the benefit of the charges.

  • 43.
    Börjesson, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Kristoffersson, Ida
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Welfare effects of Stockholm congestion charges using dynamic network assignment2012In: Proceedings of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) 91st Annual Meeting, Washington D.C. USA, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the standard textbook analysis, drivers as a group will be worse off with congestion charging if not compensated by revenues. This result is confirmed by an analysis of the Stockholm congestion charging scheme using a static model with homogenous users. However, both this static model and the standard textbook analysis omit three important factors: taste heterogeneity, effects of charges on the larger network arising from less blocking back of upstream links and behavioural adjustments in the temporal dimensions. Taking account of these factors, using a dynamic model with heterogeneous users in a large-scale network, we find that drivers as a group benefit directly from the charging scheme in Stockholm. This paper investigates the importance of the three factors omitted in the standard textbook and the static model analysis in the Stockholm case, finding that all three add significantly to the benefit of the charges.

  • 44.
    Börjesson, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Kristoffersson, Ida
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Welfare effects of Stockholm congestion charges using dynamic network assignment2011In: Proceedings of the 2011 Conference and the Summer School, Stockholm, Sweden, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the standard textbook analysis, drivers as a group will be worse off with congestion charging if not compensated by revenues. This result is confirmed by an analysis of the Stockholm congestion charging scheme using a static model with homogenous users. However, both this static model and the standard textbook analysis omit three important factors: taste heterogeneity, effects of charges on the larger network arising from less blocking back of upstream links and behavioural adjustments in the temporal dimensions. Taking account of these factors, using a dynamic model with heterogeneous users in a large-scale network, we find that drivers as a group benefit directly from the charging scheme in Stockholm. This paper investigates the importance of the three factors omitted in the standard textbook and the static model analysis in the Stockholm case, finding that all three add significantly to the benefit of the charges.

  • 45.
    Cats, Oded
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Dynamic Modeling of Transit Operations and Passenger Decisions2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analysis and evaluation of transit operations and control, in particular  in the context of Advanced Public Transport System (APTS) requires the dynamic  modeling of the transit system. A dynamic transit simulation model has to  capture the interactions between three main components: passengers, transit  operations and traffic dynamics at the network level. BusMezzo is a dynamic  transit analysis and evaluation tool that represents timetables, vehicle  scheduling, control and management strategies, real-time information and  adaptive passenger choices. Individual passengers carry out a sequence of  boarding, walking and alighting decisions along their journey. The model had  been applied for the evaluation of holding control strategies and information  provision scenarios.

  • 46.
    Cats, Oded
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR.
    Dynamic Modelling of Transit Operations and Passenger Decisions2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient and reliable public transport systems are fundamental in promoting green growth developments in metropolitan areas. A large range of Advanced Public Transport Systems (APTS) facilitates the design of real-time operations and demand management. The analysis of transit performance requires a dynamic tool that will enable to emulate the dynamic loading of travelers and their interaction with the transit system.

    BusMezzo, a dynamic transit operations and assignment model was developed to enable the analysis and evaluation of transit performance and level of service under various system conditions and APTS. The model represents the interactions between traffic dynamics, transit operations and traveler decisions. The model was implemented within a mesoscopic traffic simulation model. The different sources of transit operations uncertainty including traffic conditions, vehicle capacities, dwell times, vehicle schedules and service disruptions are modeled explicitly.

    The dynamic path choice model in BusMezzo considers each traveler as an adaptive decision maker. Travelers’ progress in the transit system consists of successive decisions that are defined by the need to choose the next path element. The evaluations are based on the respective path alternatives and their anticipated downstream attributes. Travel decisions are modeled within the framework of discrete random utility models. A non-compensatory choice-set generation model and the path utility function were estimated based on a web-based survey.

    BusMezzo enables the analysis and evaluation of proactive control strategies and the impacts of real-time information provision. Several experiments were conducted to analyze transit performance from travelers, operator and drivers perspectives under various holding strategies. This analysis has facilitated the design of a field trial of the most promising strategy. Furthermore, a case study on real-time traveler information systems regarding the next vehicle arrival time investigated the impacts of various levels of coverage and comprehensiveness. As passengers are more informed, passenger loads are subject to more fluctuation due to the traveler adaptations.

  • 47.
    Cats, Oded
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Dynamic transit operations tool with passenger route choice2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Cats, Oded
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Dynamic Transit Supply and Demand Modeling2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Cats, Oded
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR.
    Effektivisering av busstrafik genom BuzMezzo2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Cats, Oded
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. Delft University of Technology, Netherlands .
    Regularity-driven bus operation: Principles, implementation and business models2014In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 36, p. 223-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service reliability is a key determinant of public transport performance. In the context of high-frequency urban lines, irregular service results with long waiting times, bunched vehicles, long delays, uneven passenger loads, poor capacity utilization and higher operational costs. Field experiments were conducted in Stockholm, Sweden, in order to test the feasibility and implications of a regularity-driven operation scheme designed to mitigate bus bunching and facilitated by a real-time control strategy. This paper investigates alternative service indicators and business models that could best support the long-term implementation of operation geared towards better regularity performance. A paradigm shift towards regularity-based service evidently requires the consideration of a series of measures along the service chain as it involves a paradigm shift in production planning, operations, control center and performance monitoring.

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