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  • 1.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed Fawzy
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery. Nuclear Materials Authority. P. O. Box 530, El Maadi, Cairo, Egypt.
    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser
    Assiut University.
    Ashour, Radwa M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery. Nuclear Materials Authority. P. O. Box 530, El Maadi, Cairo, Egypt.
    Fu, Le
    Central South University.
    Dowaidar, Moataz
    King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM).
    Xia, Wei
    Uppsala University.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Magnetic Metal-Organic Frameworks for Efficient Removal of Cadmium(II), and Lead(II) from Aqueous Solution2022In: Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering, ISSN 2213-3437, p. 107467-107467, article id 107467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient and convenient methods for the removal of toxic heavy metal ions especially Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions is of great importance due to their serious threat to public health and the ecological system. In this study, two magnetic metal-organic frameworks (namily: Fe3O4@ZIF-8, and Fe3O4@UiO-66–NH2) were synthesized, fully characterized, and applied for the adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption efficiencies for the prepared nanocomposites are strongly dependent on the pH of the aqueous solution. The maximum adsorption capacities of Fe3O4@UiO-66–NH2, and Fe3O4@ZIF-8 at pH 6.0 were calculated to be 714.3 mg·g 1, and 370 mg·g 1 for Cd(II), respectively, and 833.3 mg·g 1, and 666.7 mg·g 1 for Pb(II), respectively. The adsorption process follows a pseudo-second-order model and fit the Langmuir isotherm model. Moreover, the thermodynamic studies revealed that the adsorption process is endothermic, and spontaneous in nature. A plausible adsorption mechanism was discussed in detail. The magnetic adsorbents: Fe3O4@ZIF-8, and Fe3O4@UiO-66–NH2 showed excellent reusability, maintaining the same efficiency for at least four consecutive cycles. These results reveal the potential use of magnetic Fe3O4@ZIF-8, and Fe3O4@UiO-66–NH2 as efficient adsorbents in removing Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions.

  • 2.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed Fawzy
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Nasser Abdelhamid, Hani
    Ashour, Radwa M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Hierarchical porous zeolitic imidazolate framework nanoparticles for efficient adsorption of rare-earth elements2019In: Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, ISSN 1387-1811, E-ISSN 1873-3093, Vol. 278, p. 175-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hierarchical porous zeolitic imidazolate frameworks nanoparticles (ZIF-8 NPs) were synthesized at room temperature via a template-free approach under dynamic conditions (stirring) using water as a solvent. The ZIF-8 NPs were evaluated as adsorbents for rare earth elements (La3+, Sm3+ and Dy3+). Adsorption equilibrium was reached after 7h and high adsorption capacities were obtained for dysprosium and samarium (430.4 and 281.1 mg g(-1), respectively) and moderate adsorption capacity for lanthanum (28.8 mg g(-1)) at a pH of 7.0. The high adsorption capacitiese, as well as the high stability of ZIF-8 NPs, make the hierarchical ZIF-8 materials as an efficient adsorbent for the recovery of La3+, Sm3+ and Dy3+ from aqueous solution.

  • 3.
    Akbarkermani, Mohammadreza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery. Chemical Engineering Department, Istanbul Technical University, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Genceli Güner, Fatma Elif
    Chemical Engineering Department, Istanbul Technical University, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey; Polar Research Center (PolReC), Istanbul Technical University, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey; Nanotechnology Research and Application Center (ITUNano), Istanbul Technical University, 34469, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Eutectic freeze crystallization in the boric acid–water system2023In: Chemické zvesti, ISSN 0366-6352, E-ISSN 1336-9075, Vol. 77, no 10, p. 5881-5891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boron compounds are widely used in various industries. Current high rates of boron production/usage generate significant wastes. As an ecologically friendly technology, eutectic freeze crystallization (EFC) has the potential to treat boron wastewater ponds for mineral recovery; however, its feasibility has not been examined before. Here, we determined the eutectic point of boric acid (a major boron compound)-water system to be -0.79 °C and 2.5 ± 0.05 wt%. At the eutectic point, ice and boric acid crystals were isolated from the aqueous solution. The nucleation rate and growth rate of boric acid were considered, as well as the boron content in ice crystals. Our results show that it is feasible to separate boric acid and water from boron waste streams by EFC.

  • 4.
    Alemrajabi, Mahmood
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Korkmaz, Kivanc
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Rasmuson, Åke
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Dephosphorization and impurity removal from a rare earth phosphate concentrate2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Alemrajabi, Mahmood
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Rasmuson, Åke
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Recovery of phosphorous and rare earth elements from an apatite concentrate2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Alemrajabi, Mahmood
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Rasmuson, Åke C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Korkmaz, Kivanc
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Processing of a rare earth phosphate concentrate obtained in the nitrophosphate process of fertilizer production2019In: Hydrometallurgy, ISSN 0304-386X, E-ISSN 1879-1158, Vol. 189, article id 105144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, different processes have been developed and applied to treat a rare earth phosphate concentrate obtained within the nitrophosphate process of fertilizer production. Methods to remove impurities such as Fe and Ca have been investigated as well as to separate the phosphorous and thereby facilitate dissolution of the rare earth elements (REE). These methods include thermal treatment with sodium hydroxide and sodium double sulphate precipitation with and without alkaline conversion, followed by selective dissolution in different acids. The proposed processes were compared and analyzed from the perspective of introducing an appropriate intermediate product for further individual REE separation. The results have shown that after thermal treatment with NaOH at 400 °C, the phosphorous can be removed from the rare earth phosphate concentrate by water leaching. Investigation of different REE phosphate concentrates demonstrated that mixed Ca and REE phases, e.g. REEmCan(PO4)3m+2n/3 and CaHPO4 are less likely to dephosphorize than REE(PO4).nH2O and FePO4.H2O under these conditions. The recovery of REE to a mild acidic solution is limited by the presence of remaining phosphate ions and by the formation of REE oxide phases during the thermal treatment. The results also show that a solution containing 40 g/L REE; free of phosphorous, calcium and iron can be obtained after reprecipitation of the rare earth phosphate concentrate as sodium rare earth double sulphates followed by alkaline conversion with sodium hydroxide and dissolution in nitric acid.

  • 7.
    Alemrajabi, Mahmood
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Transport Phenomena.
    Rasmuson, Åke C.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Transport Phenomena.
    Korkmaz, Kivanc
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Transport Phenomena.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Recovery of rare earth elements from nitrophosphoric acid solutions2017In: Hydrometallurgy, ISSN 0304-386X, E-ISSN 1879-1158, Vol. 169, p. 253-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, the recovery of rare earth elements (REEs) from an apatite concentrate in the nitrophosphate process of fertilizer production has been studied. The apatite concentrate has been recovered from iron ore tailings in Sweden by flotation. In the first step, the apatite is digested in concentrated nitric acid, after which Ca(NO3)2.4H2O is separated by cooling crystallization. The solution is then neutralized using ammonia whereby the REEs precipitate mainly as phosphates (REEPO4.nH2O) and together with calcium as REEn Cam (PO4)(3n + 2m) / 3. In this work, the degree of rare earth coprecipitation during seeded cooling crystallization of Ca(NO3)2.4H2O has been studied. The solubility of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate (Ca(NO3)2.4H2O) in acidic nitrophosphoric acid solutions in the temperature range of − 2 °C to 20 °C has been determined. For the neutralization step, it is shown that the calcium concentration and the final pH play an important role in determining the concentration of REEs in the precipitate. It is found that reaching maximum recovery of REE with minimum simultaneous precipitation of calcium requires careful control of the final pH to about 1.8. It is further observed that the precipitation yield of REEs and iron is favored by a longer residence time and higher temperature. Finally, the effect of seeding with synthesized REE phosphate crystals as well as a mixture of REE and Ca phosphates on the precipitation rate and the composition of the precipitate was studied.

  • 8.
    Alemrajabi, Mahmood
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Rasmuson, Åke
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Korkmaz, Kivanc
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Upgrading of a rare earth phosphate concentrate within the nitrophosphate process2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 198, p. 551-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the nitrophosphate process of fertilizer production, rare earth elements (REE) can be recovered as a REE phosphate concentrate. In this process, after digestion of apatite in concentrated nitric acid, Ca(NO3)2.4H2O is first separated by cooling crystallization and then the REE are precipitated in phosphate form by a partial neutralization step using ammonia. The obtained REE phosphate concentrate is contaminated by mainly calcium and iron, and the main solid phases are CaHPO4.2H2O, FePO4.2H2O and REEPO4.nH2O.

    In this study, a process to obtain a concentrate more enriched with REE with low concentration of calcium and iron and free of phosphorous is developed. In the developed process, enrichment and dephosphorization of the rare earth phosphate concentrate has been achieved by selective dissolution and re-precipitation of the REE as a sodium REE double sulfate salt. It is shown that by selective dissolution of the REE concentrate in nitric acid at a pH of 2.4, most of the calcium and phosphorus are dissolved, and a solid phase more enriched in REE is obtained. Thereafter, the REE phosphate concentrate is first dissolved in a mixture of sulfuric-phosphoric acid and then the REE are reprecipitated as NaREE(SO4)2.H2O by addition of a sodium salt. More than 95% of the Ca, Fe and P are removed and a REE concentrate containing almost 30 mass% total REE is obtained.

  • 9.
    Alemrajabi, Mahmood
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Transport Phenomena.
    Ricknell, Jonas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Samak, Sakarias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Rodriguez Varela, Raquel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Martinez, Joaquin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Transport Phenomena.
    Hedman, Fredrik
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Rasmuson, Åke C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Transport Phenomena.
    Separation of Rare-Earth Elements Using Supported Liquid Membrane Extraction in Pilot Scale2022In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of supported liquid membrane extraction for recovery and separation of rare-earth elements (REEs) has been investigated. Experiments have been carried out using the different configurations: (1) standard hollow fiber supported liquid membrane operation (HFSLM), (2) renewal liquid membrane operation (HFRLM), and (3) emulsion pertraction technology (EPT). The experiments were performed in pilot scale using a hollow fiber module with a mass transfer surface area of 8 m2. Synthetic feed solution was used with compositions based on a process for recovery of REE from an apatite concentrate. The total concentration of REE in the feed was varied from 1 to 22 mM REE and the pH was varied in the range 1.5–3.2. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2HEPA) diluted in kerosene, 10% (v/v), was used as the organic membrane solution, and 3 M HCl was used as stripping solution. In supported liquid membrane extraction, the extraction performance is governed by both the kinetics of REE transport through the membrane and by thermodynamics. The effect of feed composition on the selectivity and transport of REE through the liquid membrane have been investigated. The results show that the liquid membrane is more selective toward the heavy REE at lower pH values and higher REE concentration. HFRLM shows a higher transport rate than HFSLM, while the HFSLM configuration gives a higher selectivity toward individual REE. The membrane performance in HFSLM configuration rapidly decays with time, while in the HFRLM and EPT configurations, the performance is much more stable. Possible mechanisms for decaying membrane performance are discussed, and gel formation is identified as being of significant importance. Gel formation is observed at an organic loading above ∼46% for Nd, 38% for Y, 46% for Dy, and 65% for Er. The work performed in this study serves as an initial step to demonstrate that HFRLM and EPT can provide stable operation and be feasible options for processing of REE liquors. A process flow diagram for the recovery of the REE, present in the apatite concentrate, in three fractions is proposed based on the results from this study.

  • 10. An, A. K.
    et al.
    Tyagi, V. K.
    Kumar, M.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Clean Energy and Resource Recovery: Wastewater Treatment Plants as Biorefineries, Volume 22021Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Clean Energy and Resource Recovery: Wastewater Treatment Plants as Bio-refineries, Volume 2, summarizes the fundamentals of various treatment modes applied to the recovery of energy and value-added products from wastewater treatment plants. The book addresses the production of biofuel, heat, and electricity, chemicals, feed, and other products from municipal wastewater, industrial wastewater, and sludge. It intends to provide the readers an account of up-to-date information on the recovery of biofuels and other value-added products using conventional and advanced technological developments. The book starts with identifying the key problems of the sectors and then provides solutions to them with step-by-step guidance on the implementation of processes and procedures. Titles compiled in this book further explore related issues like the safe disposal of leftovers, from a local to global scale. Finally, the book sheds light on how wastewater treatment facilities reduce stress on energy systems, decrease air and water pollution, build resiliency, and drive local economic activity. As a compliment to Volume 1: Biomass Waste Based Biorefineries, Clean Energy and Resource Recovery, Volume 2: Wastewater Treatment Plants as Bio-refineries is a comprehensive reference on all aspects of energy and resource recovery from wastewater. The book is going to be a handy reference tool for energy researchers, environmental scientists, and civil, chemical, and municipal engineers interested in waste-to-energy.

  • 11.
    Arend, Giordana Demaman
    et al.
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Dept Chem & Food Engn, Florianopolis, SC, Brazil..
    Soares, Lenilton Santos
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Dept Chem & Food Engn, Florianopolis, SC, Brazil..
    Camelo-Silva, Callebe
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Dept Chem & Food Engn, Florianopolis, SC, Brazil..
    Ribeiro Sanches, Marcio Augusto
    State Univ Sao Paulo, Food Engn & Technol Dept, Sao Jose Do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil..
    Penha, Frederico M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Diaz-De-Cerio, Elixabet
    Univ Granada, Dept Nutr & Food Sci, Campus Cartuja, E-18071 Granada, Spain..
    Verardo, Vito
    Univ Granada, Dept Nutr & Food Sci, Campus Cartuja, E-18071 Granada, Spain..
    Prudencio, Elane Schwinden
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Dept Food Sci & Technol, Florianopolis, SC, Brazil..
    Segura-Carretero, Antonio
    Univ Granada, Dept Analyt Chem, Granada, Spain.;Univ Granada, Funct Food Res & Dev Ctr CIDAF, Granada, Spain..
    Tischer, Bruna
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Inst Food Sci & Technol, Dept Food Technol, Porto Alegre, Brazil..
    Cunha Petrus, Jose Carlos
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Dept Chem & Food Engn, Florianopolis, SC, Brazil..
    Verruck, Silvani
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Dept Food Sci & Technol, Florianopolis, SC, Brazil..
    Rezzadori, Katia
    Univ Fed Santa Catarina, Dept Food Sci & Technol, Florianopolis, SC, Brazil..
    Is nanofiltration an efficient technology to recover and stabilize phenolic compounds from guava (Psidium guajava) leaves extract?2022In: Food Bioscience, ISSN 2212-4292, E-ISSN 2212-4306, Vol. 50, article id 101997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Guava leaves (Psidium guajava) are popularly known due to their effects antidiabetic, antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory, antidiarrheal, and functional properties. Processes for the concentration of these extracts are necessary since their pharmacological effects are dose-dependent. In this work, guava leaves aqueous extract (GE) concentration was carried out in nanofiltration (NF) equipment. Process performance was evaluated in terms of permeate flux, flux decline modeling, and extract quality (compounds characterization, total phenolic content and antioxidant activity). NF allowed an increase in phenolic compounds next to 20-times, retention coefficients of total phenolic compounds (99%) and enhanced antioxidant capacity (an increase of 4 and 9-fold for ABTS and DPPH, respectively) compared to the initial GE. Forty-two phenolic compounds were identified, being catechin (594.56 mg mL-1) and vescalagin (295.39 mg mL-1) the main compounds. All phenolics pre-sented a significant increase (p < 0.05) after the concentration suggesting that NF is efficient for the recovery and concentration of bioactive compounds and poses as an alternative to obtain functional products and improve added value in agro-industrial residues.

  • 12.
    Ashour, Radwa M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering. Nuclear Materials Authority, P.O. Box 530, ElMaadi, Cairo 11381, Egypt.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed Fawzy
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery. Nuclear Materials Authority, P.O. Box 530, ElMaadi, Cairo 11381, Egypt.
    Wu, Qiong
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Olsson, Richard
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Green Synthesis of Metal-Organic Framework Bacterial Cellulose Nanocomposites for Separation Applications2020In: Polymers, E-ISSN 2073-4360, Vol. 12, no 5, article id 1104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous crystalline materials that can be designed to act as selective adsorbents. Due to their high porosity they can possess very high adsorption capacities. However, overcoming the brittleness of these crystalline materials is a challenge for many industrial applications. In order to make use of MOFs for large-scale liquid phase separation processes they can be immobilized on solid supports. For this purpose, nanocellulose can be considered as a promising supporting material due to its high flexibility and biocompatibility. In this study a novel flexible nanocellulose MOF composite material was synthesised in aqueous media by a novel and straightforward in situ one-pot green method. The material consisted of MOF particles of the type MIL-100(Fe) (from Material Institute de Lavoisier, containing Fe(III) 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate) immobilized onto bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers. The novel nanocomposite material was applied to efficiently separate arsenic and Rhodamine B from aqueous solution, achieving adsorption capacities of 4.81, and 2.77 mg g‒1, respectively. The adsorption process could be well modelled by the nonlinear pseudo-second-order fitting.

  • 13.
    Ashour, Radwa M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Functional Materials, FNM. Nuclear Materials Authority, Egypt.
    El-sayed, R.
    Abdel-Magied, A. F.
    Abdel-khalek, A. A.
    Ali, M. M.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Uheida, Abdusalam
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Dutta, Joydeep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Selective separation of rare earth ions from aqueous solution using functionalized magnetite nanoparticles: kinetic and thermodynamic studies2017In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 327, p. 286-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Separation of rare earth ions (RE3+) from aqueous solution is a tricky problem due to their physico-chemical similarities of properties. In this study, we investigate the influence of the functionalized ligands on the adsorption efficiency and selective adsorption of La3+, Nd3+, Gd3+ and Y3+ from aqueous solution using Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with citric acid (CA@Fe3O4 NPs) or L-cysteine (Cys@Fe3O4 NPs). The microstructure, thermal behavior and surface functionalization of the synthesized nanoparticles were studied. The general adsorption capacity of Cys@Fe3O4 NPs was found to be high (98 mg g−1) in comparison to CA@Fe3O4 NPs (52 mg g−1) at neutral pH 7.0. The adsorption kinetic studies revealed that the adsorption of RE3+ ions follows a pseudo second-order model and the adsorption equilibrium data fits well to the Langmuir isotherm. Thermodynamic studies imply that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. Controlled desorption within 30 min of the adsorbed RE3+ ions from both Cys@Fe3O4 NPs and CA@Fe3O4 NPs was achieved with 0.5 M HNO3. Furthermore, Cys@Fe3O4 NPs exhibited a higher separation factor (SF) in the separation of Gd3+/La3+, Gd3+/Nd3+, Gd3+/Y3+ ions compared to CA@Fe3O4 NPs.

  • 14.
    Atasoy, Merve
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Enhancement of Volatile Fatty Acid Production from Dairy Wastewater2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Resource recovery from waste-streams is a highly promising approach to meet with urbanization and modernization consequences. Rapid human population growth, expanding industrialization and excessive consumption of resources lead to increasing demand for raw materials and energy sources, and an escalation of greenhouse gas emission. The recovery of valuable raw materials from waste-streams is a vital step towards environmentally friendly and sustainable bio-based production. One of the most promising resource recovery approaches from waste-streams is based on anaerobic digestion. In recent years, anaerobic digestion technology has started to go beyond energy recovery with the carboxylate platform. Volatile fatty acids (VFA) are intermediate products of anaerobic digestion and possess great potential for bio-based production from waste streams. Because of its wide range of applications, high market demand and low greenhouse gas emissions, bio-based VFA production has gained attention in recent years. Nevertheless, the current bio-based VFA production is economically non-competitive compared to petroleum-based production because of high substrate cost and production inefficiency. In this thesis, the bioaugmentation strategy was applied in the mixed culture fermentation to produce one-type dominant VFA from dairy industry wastewater. After the optimization of inoculum and dairy industry wastewater for maximal VFA production in the batch reactors, the bioaugmentation strategy was applied by selected pure cultures (Clostridium aceticum, Clostridium butyricum and Propionibacterium acidipropionici) in the anaerobic sequencing batch reactors. Bioaugmentation is a well-known method to enhance the microbial community for different purposes by adding external microbial cultures. The mixed culture was bioaugmented by C. aceticum for acetic acid dominant VFA production, C. butyricum for butyric acid dominant VFA production and P. acidipropionici for propionic acid dominant VFA production, respectively. Simultaneously, a non-bioaugmented control reactor is operated for comparison. The bioaugmented mixed culture by C. aceticum increased acetic acid production as ten-fold; C. butyricum improved butyric acid production more than ten times; P. acidipropionici IV increased propionic production more than four times. The quantity of the selected pure cultures strongly correlated with the acid composition confirming the efficiency of the bioaugmentation strategy. This thesis proves the powerful applicability of bioaugmentation strategies to increase the concentration of the desired VFA type in mixtures. Our approach has the potential to push resource recovery from waste-streams a significant step forward to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development targets 12. Responsible Consumption and Production and 13. Climate Action by controlling global warming and reducing GHG emissions. 

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  • 15.
    Atasoy, Merve
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Bioaugmentation as a strategy for tailor-made volatile fatty acid production2021In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 295, article id 113093Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to develop a novel strategy for tailor-made volatile fatty acid (VFA) composition. For this purpose, the mixed microbial culture was bioaugmented by Propionibacterium acidipropionici. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactors were operated with cheese wastewater under alkali pH. While the maximum propionic acid production almost four times increased (3779 +/- 201 mgCODeq propionic acid/L in the bioaugmented reactor and 942 +/- 172 mgCODeq propionic acid/L in the control reactor), there was no significant difference in VFA composition. The gene copy number of P.acidipropionici increased 20 times after the bioaugmentation. Furthermore, the gene copy number of P.acidipropionici was positively correlated with total VFA and isovaleric acid concentration. The relative abundance of family Flavobacteriaceae increased in the bioaugmented reactor, which might be caused by the syntrophic relation between Flavobacteriaceae and P. acidipropionici. The cycle analysis results showed that the shorter cycle (6h) could ensure the same efficiency.

  • 16.
    Atasoy, Merve
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Bioaugmented Mixed Culture by Clostridium aceticum to Manipulate Volatile Fatty Acids Composition From the Fermentation of Cheese Production Wastewater2021In: Frontiers in Microbiology, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 12, article id 658494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production of targeted volatile fatty acid (VFA) composition by fermentation is a promising approach for upstream and post-stream VFA applications. In the current study, the bioaugmented mixed microbial culture by Clostridium aceticum was used to produce an acetic acid dominant VFA mixture. For this purpose, anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (bioaugmented and control) were operated under pH 10 and fed by cheese processing wastewater. The efficiency and stability of the bioaugmentation strategy were monitored using the production and composition of VFA, the quantity of C. aceticum (by qPCR), and bacterial community profile (16S rRNA Illumina Sequencing). The bioaugmented mixed culture significantly increased acetic acid concentration in the VFA mixture (from 1170 +/- 18 to 122 +/- 9 mgCOD/L) compared to the control reactor. Furthermore, the total VFA production (from 1254 +/- 11 to 5493 +/- 36 mgCOD/L) was also enhanced. Nevertheless, the bioaugmentation could not shift the propionic acid dominancy in the VFA mixture. The most significant effect of bioaugmentation on the bacterial community profile was seen in the relative abundance of the Thermoanaerobacterales Family III. Incertae sedis, its relative abundance increased simultaneously with the gene copy number of C. aceticum during bioaugmentation. These results suggest that there might be a syntropy between species of Thermoanaerobacterales Family III. Incertae sedis and C. aceticum. The cycle analysis showed that 6 h (instead of 24 h) was adequate retention time to achieve the same acetic acid and total VFA production efficiency. Biobased acetic acid production is widely applicable and economically competitive with petroleum-based production, and this study has the potential to enable a new approach as produced acetic acid dominant VFA can replace external carbon sources for different processes (such as denitrification) in WWTPs. In this way, the higher treatment efficiency for WWTPs can be obtained by recovered substrate from the waste streams that promote a circular economy approach.

  • 17.
    Atasoy, Merve
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Bioaugmented mixed culture fermentation by Clostridium aceticum to enhance acetic acid dominant volatile fatty acids production from dairy industry wastewaterIn: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     By increasing volatile fatty acids (VFA) production efficiency via fermentation can lead to shifting from industrial wastewater treatment plants to biorefineries. In the current paper, acetic acid dominant VFA mixture production by bioaugmentation of mixed culture with Clostridium aceticum was aimed. The maximum acetic acid concentration was increased 10 times in the bioaugmented reactor (1170±18 mgCOD/L) than the control reactor (122±9 mgCOD/L). Additionally, the highest total VFA production was 5 times higher in bioaugmented reactor than the control reactor. Nevertheless, the bioaugmentation did not affect the propionic acid dominancy in the VFA mixture. The correlation analysis stated that the copy gene number of C. aceticum was highly correlated with acetic acid (p<0.05) and iso-valeric acid (p<0.01). The cycle analysis stated that 6 hours was adequate retention time to have the same acetic acid and total VFA production efficiency instead of 24 hours. 

  • 18.
    Atasoy, Merve
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Butyric acid dominant volatile fatty acids production: Bio-Augmentation of mixed culture fermentation by Clostridium butyricum2020In: Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering, E-ISSN 2213-3437, Vol. 8, no 6, article id 104496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most sustainable and environmentally friendly butyric acid production method is fermentation; however, low production yield and high substrate cost limit the competition with petrol-based production. The study is aimed to enhance butyric acid production via bioaugmentated mixed culture by Clostridium butyricum. Anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (bioaugmented and control) were operated under alkali pH (pH 10) at 35 °C and fed by dairy industry wastewater as substrate. The performance of bioaugmentation was monitored in three stages: before the application, during the application (C. butyricum was injected as %10 of active reactor volume on a daily basis for seven days), after bioaugmentation. The VFA concentration and composition (by GC-FID) with the copy gene number of C. butyricum (by Q-PCR) were monitored in the bioaugmented reactor during the operation. The bioaugmentation of C. butyricum increased butyric acid production (mgCOD L-1) from 260 ± 36 to 2889 ± 180. The total VFA production (mgCOD L-1) was increased from 1434 ± 217 to 4642 ± 1778 in control and bioaugmented reactors, respectively. There was a positive correlation between the gene copies of C. butyricum with butyric, hexanoic, n-heptanoic, valeric acids production. Furthermore, the bioaugmented mixed culture had better performance than pure culture regarding butyric acid production. The cycle analysis showed that the similar butyric acid production efficiency would be obtained in the first 6 h in the bioaugmented reactor, in the first 14 h in the control reactor of the cycle. The study provides a fundamental solution to step forward to achieve next-generation biorefineries by using both monocultures modularity and mixed culture robustness and stability regarding.

  • 19.
    Atasoy, Merve
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Enhanced propionic acid production via bioaugmented mixed culture fermentation by Propionibacterium acidipropionici In: Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Propionic acid is one of the key chemicals for several industries, nevertheless, the major amount of the production depends on chemical synthesis because of low production efficiency and high substrate cost of fermentation. In this study, improvement of bio-based propionic acid production via bioaugmented mixed culture with Propionibacterium acidipropionici from dairy industry wastewater fermentation under alkali pH was aimed. The results stated that the propionic acid production (3779±201 mg COD/L) was increased more than 4 times than the control reactor. Besides, the total volatile fatty acids (VFA) production (5090±24 mg COD/L) was improved with bioaugmentation almost 4 times than the control reactor. The gene copy number of P.acidipropionici was increased 20 times after the bioaugmentation, which was also positively correlated with total VFA production (0.906) and iso-valeric acid (0.824), whereas, negatively correlated with butyric acid (-0.572). The cycle analysis results stated that 18h shorter cycle time could ensure the same efficiency. Consequently, the bioaugmentation strategy offers higher production and yield for the desired product in the fermentation mixture of waste-stream, which ensures a great opportunity to have bio-based production both in a sustainable and economical competitive way. 

  • 20.
    Atasoy, Merve
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery. Wageningen Univ & Res, UNLOCK, NL-6708 PB Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    The effects of pH on the production of volatile fatty acids and microbial dynamics in long-term reactor operation2022In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 319, p. 115700-, article id 115700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Volatile fatty acids, intermediate products of anaerobic digestion, are one of the most promising biobased products. In this study, the effects of acidic (pH 5), neutral (without pH adjustment) and alkali (pH 10) pH on production efficiency and composition of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and bacterial community profile were analyzed. The anaerobic sequencing batch reactors were fed cheese production wastewater as substrate and inoculated by anaerobic granular seed sludge. The results showed that acidic pH improved VFA production yield (0.92 at pH 5; 0.42 at pH 10 and 0.21 gCOD/gVS at neutral pH). Furthermore, propionic acid was dominant under both pH 10 (64 +/- 20%) and neutral pH (72 +/- 8%), whereas, acetic acid (23 +/- 20%4), propionic acid (22 +/- 3%), butyric acid (21 +/- 4%) and valeric acid (15 +/- 8%) were almost equally distributed under pH 5. Adaptation of bacterial community to different pH conditions might steer the acid profile: Bacteroidetes (50.07 +/- 2%) under pH 10, Proteobacteria (40.74 +/- 7%) under neutral pH and Firmicutes (47.64 +/- 9%) under pH 5 were the most dominant phylum, respectively. Results indicated pH plays a significant role in VFA production, acid composition, and bacterial community structure. However, in order to gain a concrete understanding effects of pH, characterization of intracellular and extracellular metabolites with dynamics of the microbial community is required.

  • 21.
    Atasoy, Merve
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Eyice, O.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    A comprehensive study of volatile fatty acids production from batch reactor to anaerobic sequencing batch reactor by using cheese processing wastewater2020In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 311, article id 123529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) has great potential for closed-loop production in dairy industries via resource recovery from waste-streams. In the current study, the transition of VFA production from batch reactor to anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) by using cheese industry wastewater under alkali pH was evaluated with respect to seed sludge structure, microbial diversity and reactor type. The transition from the batch reactor to the ASBR demonstrated that the maximum VFA production yield (g COD/g SCOD) was comparable in two reactors (batch: 0.97; ASBR: 0.94), whereas, the dominant acid type was different (batch: 49% lactic acid; ASBR: 80% propionic acid). There was a significant correlation between the productions of butyric acid with Gracilibacteraceae and Desulfovibrionaceae; propionic acid with Desulfovibrionaceae and Synergistaceae; lactic acid with Pseudomonadaceae and Rhodocyclaceae. The high VFA production efficiency can be achieved by long term reactor operation, which enables the shift from industrial waste-streams to biorefineries.

  • 22.
    Atasoy, Merve
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Eyice, Ozge
    Queen Mary Univ London, Sch Biol & Chem Sci, London E1 4NS, England..
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Volatile fatty acid production from semi-synthetic milk processing wastewater under alkali pH: The pearls and pitfalls of microbial culture2020In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 297, article id 122415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Volatile fatty acids (WA) are one of the most promising sustainable and environmentally friendly bioproduct owing to their wide usage area and high market demand. For this reason, in this study, the evaluation of VFA production from pure and mixed bacterial cultures was aimed. Three different mixed cultures with C. aceticum, C. butyricum and P. acidipropionici as pure cultures were used for inoculation of milk processing wastewater fermentation under pH 10 for 15 days. The mixed culture fermentation had the highest VFA production efficiency whereas the highest amount of acetic, butyric and propionic acid productions were obtained by C. aceticum, C. butyricum and P. acidipropionici, respectively. Also, the mixed cultures demonstrated faster pH regulation and acclimation than the pure cultures tested. Therefore, development of synthetic cultures may offer a useful approach to produce VFA mixtures with one-dominant acid type and with high production efficiency.

  • 23.
    Atasoy, Merve
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Eyice, Ozge
    Queen Mary Univ London, Sch Biol & Chem Sci, London E1 4NS, England..
    Schnurer, Anna
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Mol Sci, Bioctr, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Volatile fatty acids production via mixed culture fermentation: Revealing the link between pH, inoculum type and bacterial composition2019In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 292, article id 121889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of operational parameters, inoculum type and bacterial community on mixed culture fermentation to produce one dominant acid type in the mixture of volatile fatty acids (VFA). The study was performed using three different inocula (large&small granular and slurry) with glucose under various initial pH. The VFA production efficiency reached to 0,97 (gCOD/gSCOD) by granular sludge. VFA composition was changed by initial pH: in neutral conditions, acetic acid; in acidic conditions, acetic and butyric acids, in alkali conditions butyric acid were dominated, respectively. The VFA production was positively affected by the high relative abundance of Firmicutes. On the contrary, a negative correlation was seen between VFA production and the relative abundance of Chloroflexi. The results revealed the physical sludge structure of inoculum was the key factor for production efficiency, whereas, pH was the most important parameter to affect VFA composition.

  • 24.
    Atasoy, Merve
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Owusu-Agyeman, Isaac
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Plaza, Elzbieta
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Bio-based volatile fatty acid production and recovery from waste streams: Current status and future challenges2018In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 268, p. 773-786Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bio-based volatile fatty acid (VFA) production from waste-stream is getting attention due to increasing market demand and wide range usage area as well as its cost-effective and environmentally friendly approach. The aim of this paper is to give a comprehensive review of bio-based VFA production and recovery methods and to give an opinion on future research outlook. Effects of operation conditions including pH, temperature, retention time, type of substrate and mixed microbial cultures on VFA production and composition were reviewed. The recovery methods in terms of gas stripping with absorption, adsorption, solvent extraction, electrodialysis, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, and membrane contractor of VFA were evaluated. Furthermore, strategies to enhance bio-based VFA production and recovery from waste streams, specifically, in-line VFA recovery and bioaugmentation, which are currently not used in common practice, are seen as some of the approaches to enhance bio-based VFA production.

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  • 25.
    Azimi, Gisele
    et al.
    University of Toronto.
    Forsberg, KerstinKTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.Ouchi, TakanariUniversity of Tokyo.Kim, HojongPennsylvania State University.Alam, ShafiqUniversity of Saskatchewan.Baba, Alafara AbdullahiUniversity of Ilorin.
    Rare Metal Technology 20202020Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Azimi, Gisele
    et al.
    University of Toronto.
    Ouchi, TakanariThe University of Tokyo.Forsberg, KerstinKTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.Kim, HojongThe Pennsylvania State University.Alam, ShafiqUniversity of Saskatchewan.Baba, Alafara AbdullahiUniversity of Ilorin.Neelameggham, NealeIND LLC..
    Rare Metal Technology 20212021Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Balachandran, Srija
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Lemaître, Tom
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Industrial Materials Recycling and Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Vieceli, Nathália
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Industrial Materials Recycling and Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Lombardo, Gabriele
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Industrial Materials Recycling and Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Petranikova, Martina
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Industrial Materials Recycling and Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Comparative Study for Selective Lithium Recovery via Chemical Transformations during Incineration and Dynamic Pyrolysis of EV Li-Ion Batteries2021In: Metals, ISSN 2075-4701, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 1240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selective leaching of Li from spent LIBs thermally pretreated by pyrolysis and incineration between 400 and 700 °C for 30, 60, and 90 min followed by water leaching at high temperature and high L/S ratio was examined. During the thermal pretreatment Li2CO3 and LiF were leached. Along with Li salts, AlF3 was also found to be leached with an efficiency not higher than 3.5%. The time of thermal pretreatment did not have a significant effect on Li leaching efficiency. The leaching efficiency of Li was higher with a higher L/S ratio. At a higher leaching temperature (80 °C), the leaching of Li was higher due to an increase in the solubility of present Li salts. The highest Li leaching efficiency of nearly 60% was observed from the sample pyrolyzed at 700 °C for 60 min under the leaching condition L/S ratio of 20:1 mL g−1 at 80 °C for 3 h. Furthermore, the use of an excess of 10% of carbon in a form of graphite during the thermal treatment did not improve the leaching efficiency of Li.

  • 28.
    Bivins, Aaron
    et al.
    Univ Notre Dame, Dept Civil & Environm Engn & Earth Sci, Notre Dame, IN 46556 USA..
    Ahmad, Arslan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. KWR Water Res Inst, NL-3433 PE Nieuwegein, Netherlands..
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. KWR Water Res Inst, NL-3433 PE Nieuwegein, Netherlands..
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Islam, MD Tahmidul
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Nilsson, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Bibby, Kyle
    Univ Notre Dame, Dept Civil & Environm Engn & Earth Sci, Notre Dame, IN 46556 USA..
    et al.,
    Wastewater-Based Epidemiology: Global Collaborative to Maximize Contributions in the Fight Against COVID-192020In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 54, no 13, p. 7754-7757Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Atasoy, Merve
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery. AlbaNova Univ Ctr, KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Ind Biotechnol, S-11421 Stockholm, Sweden.;Wageningen Univ & Res, UNLOCK, NL-6708 PB Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Cenian, Adam
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Fluid Flow Machinery, PL-80231 Gdansk, Poland..
    Solowski, Gawel
    Polish Acad Sci, Inst Fluid Flow Machinery, PL-80231 Gdansk, Poland..
    Trcek, Janja
    Univ Maribor, Fac Nat Sci & Math, Dept Biol, SI-2000 Maribor, Slovenia.;Univ Maribor, Fac Chem & Chem Engn, SI-2000 Maribor, Slovenia..
    Ugurlu, Aysenur
    Hacettepe Univ, Dept Environm Engn, TR-06800 Ankara, Turkey..
    Sedlakova-Kadukova, Jana
    Univ Ss Cyril & Methodius Trnava, Dept Ecochem & Radioecol, Trnava 91701, Slovakia..
    Bio-Based Processes for Material and Energy Production from Waste Streams under Acidic Conditions2022In: FERMENTATION-BASEL, ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 115-, article id 115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The revolutionary transformation from petrol-based production to bio-based production is becoming urgent in line with the rapid industrialization, depleting resources, and deterioration of the ecosystem. Bio-based production from waste-streams is offering a sustainable and environmentally friendly solution. It offers several advantages, such as a longer operation period, less competition for microorganisms, higher efficiency, and finally, lower process costs. In the current study, several bio-based products (organic acids, biomethane, biohydrogen, and metal leachates) produced under acidic conditions are reviewed regarding their microbial pathways, processes, and operational conditions. Furthermore, the limitations both in the production process and in the scale-up are evaluated with future recommendations.

  • 30.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Dolfing, Jan
    Newcastle Univ, Sch Engn, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Taylor, Jessica
    Univ Warwick, Sch Life Sci, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands, England..
    Purdy, Kevin J.
    Univ Warwick, Sch Life Sci, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands, England..
    Eyice, Ozge
    Queen Mary Univ London, Sch Biol & Chem Sci, London E1 4NS, England..
    COD/sulfate ratio does not affect the methane yield and microbial diversity in anaerobic digesters2019In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 155, no A Z, 1986, APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, V51, P572 rdy KJ, 2003, FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY, V44, P361, p. 444-454Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anaerobic digestion of organic matter is the major route of biomethane production. However, in the presence of sulfate, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) typically outcompete methanogens, which may reduce or even preclude methane production from sulfate-containing wastewaters. Although sulfate reduction and methanogenesis can occur simultaneously, our limited understanding of the microbiology of anaerobic digesters treating sulfate-containing wastewaters constrains improvements in the production of methane from these systems. This study tested the effects of carbon sources and chemical oxygen demand-to-sulfate ratio (COD/SO42-) on the diversity and interactions of SRB and methanogens in an anaerobic digester treating a high-sulfate waste stream. Overall, the data showed that sulfate removal and methane generation occurred in varying efficiencies and the carbon source had limited effect on the methane yield. Importantly, the results demonstrated that methanogenic and SRB diversities were only affected by the carbon source and not by the COD/SO42- ratio. 

  • 31.
    Chagnes, Alexandre
    et al.
    GeoRessources, Université de Lorraine, CNRS, F-54000 Nancy, France.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Raw Material Supply for Lithium-Ion Batteries in the Circular Economy2023In: Metals, E-ISSN 2075-4701, Vol. 13, no 9, article id 1590Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Chen, Song
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed Fawzy
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Fu, Le
    Uppsala Universitet, Department of Engineering Sciences.
    Jonsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Incorporation of strontium and europium in crystals of α-calcium isosaccharinate2019In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 364, p. 309-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The final repository for short-lived, low and intermediate level radioactive waste in Sweden is built to act as a passive repository. Already within a few years after closure water will penetrate the repository and conditions of high alkalinity (pH 10.5―13.5) and low temperature (< 7 °C) will prevail. The mobility of radionuclides in the repository is dependent on the radionuclides distribution between solid and liquid phases. In the present work the incorporation of strontium (II) and europium (III) in α-calcium isosaccharinate (ISA) under alkaline conditions (pH ~10) at 5 °C and 50 °C have been studied. The results show that strontium and europium are incorporated into α-Ca(ISA)2 when crystallized both at 5 °C and 50 °C. Europium is incorporated to a greater extent than strontium. The highest incorporation of europium and strontium at 5 °C rendered the phase compositions Ca0.986Eu0.014(ISA)2 (2.4% of Eu(ISA)3 by mass) and Ca0.98Sr0.02(ISA)2 (2.2% of Sr(ISA)2 by mass). XPS spectra show that both trivalent and divalent Eu coexist in the Eu incorporated samples. Strontium ions were found to retard the elongated growth of the Ca(ISA)2crystals. The incorporation of Sr2+ and Eu3+ into the solid phase of Ca(ISA)2 is expected to contribute to a decreased mobility of these ions in the repository.

  • 33.
    Chen, Song
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Wang, Shihuai
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Kemiska sektionen, Institutionen för kemi - Ångström, Fysikalisk kemi.
    Li, Hu
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Tekniska sektionen, Institutionen för teknikvetenskaper, Tillämpad materialvetenskap..
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Eu3+ doped monetite and its use as fluorescent agent for dental restorations2018In: Ceramics International, ISSN 0272-8842, E-ISSN 1873-3956, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 10510-10516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is essential but challenging to distinguish the dental restorations from the surrounding teeth when removing filling materials from cavity. In this study, Eu3+ doped monetite was proposed as a fluorescent agent for dental restorations to meet this challenge. Eu3+ doped monetite with enhanced fluorescent property was obtained via a precipitation method. The presence of Eu3+ could prevent the phase transformation of brushite to monetite. However, all the brushite particles transformed to monetite at 300 °C and to tricalcium phosphate at 800 °C. The emission intensity increased with the addition of Eu3+ and reached the maximum when 12 mol% Eu3+ was added into the aqueous solution. With either 254 nm or 393 nm excitation, Eu3+ doped monetite showed the strongest fluorescence emission peaking at 616 nm and other two moderate bands peaking at 699 nm and 593 nm. The excitation spectra at the emission wavelength of 616 nm showed strong absorption peaks at 254 nm and 393 nm. We further investigate the fluorescence properties of Eu3+ doped monetite in one type of dental restorations. Glass ionomer cement with Eu3+ doped monetite exhibited clear fluoresce with origin color under UV irradiation at 254 nm, showing that Eu3+doped monetite is a promising fluorescent agent for dental restorations.

  • 34.
    Chernyshev, Alexander
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Jonsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Impact of organic cement additives on the mobility of radionuclides in a radioactive waste repository2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Chernyshev, Alexander N.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Jonsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Characterization and degradation of a polyaryl ether based superplasticizer for use in concrete barriers in deep geological repositories2018In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 95, p. 172-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Superplasticizers are important additives used in concrete barriers in geological waste repositories. Superplasticizers have been a major concern in the long-term assessments of safe geological disposal for radioactive waste since superplasticizers and their degradation products can act as complexing ligands and thereby increase the mobility of radionuclides. In this work a new type of superplasticizer, based on a polyaryl ether polymer, has been characterized. It was found that the superplasticizer combines the structural features of polycarboxylate ether based superplasticizers and sulfonated naphthalene-formaldehyde based superplasticizers and that it contains organophosphatecharged groups. A novel method for evaluating the rate of degradation of the superplasticizer under alkaline conditions was elaborated and the degradation products and rate constant of the process was determined. The results demonstrate that degradation occurs rapidly compared to the typical lifetime of a repository.

  • 36.
    Chernyshev, Alexander N.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Maier, Annika Carolin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Jonsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Solubilization of Ni(II) and Eu(III) through complexation with a polyaryl ether based superplasticizer in alkaline media2021In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 263, article id 127686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solubilisation of Ni(II) and Eu(III) by complexation with a polyaryl ether based superplasticizer (PAE SP) in alkaline solutions was studied. The solubilization was investigated in two types of artificial cement pore waters simulating different stages of cement degradation at a pH of 12.4 and 13.3, respectively. The solubility of Ni(II) and Eu(III) increased as the concentration of superplasticizer was increased from 0.04 to 0.4 wt%. When the concentration of SP was increased from 0.4 to 4%, the solubility of Eu(III) and Ni(II) increased in the pore water with a pH of 12.4, while the concentrations decreased in the pore water with a pH of 13.3. This is explained by a more rapid degradation of the superplasticizer at higher pH leading to a release of phosphate groups and thereby precipitation of Eu(III) and Ni(II) as phosphates. Based on results of the solubilisation of Ni(II) and Eu(III) by model compounds (anisole and PEG 400) and 31P NMR spectroscopy it was confirmed that the complexation of the studied metals with the PAE polymer occurs via the phosphate group of the superplasticizer.

  • 37.
    Crutzen, Jordan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Zeng, Lai
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Svärd, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Transport Phenomena. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Mesoscale clusters in multicomponent systems: the effect of solution preparation and pre-treatment on primary nucleation of a carbamazepine-saccharin cocrystal2023In: CrystEngComm, ISSN 1466-8033, E-ISSN 1466-8033, Vol. 25, no 28, p. 4048-4057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, direct investigation of mesoscale clusters in solution using dynamic light scattering is combined with an indirect method based on the study of primary crystal nucleation and its dependence on the conditions of solution preparation and pre-treatment. In a novel approach we have studied how the nucleation induction time of a pharmaceutical cocrystal, a 1 : 1 saccharin-carbamazepine cocrystal, depends on different preparation and pre-treatment conditions, in particular whether solutions are prepared by dissolving the cocrystal solids or the two coformers separately. Nucleation is clearly affected by some pre-treatment conditions, with longer induction times obtained for a high pre-treatment temperature and when solutions are microfiltered after dissolution. The strongest effect was observed when comparing different starting materials, with solutions prepared using cocrystals leading to much shorter induction times than solutions based on the separate coformers. DLS shows that both types of solutions contain mesoscale clusters of the order of 100-300 nm in size, but that there are clear differences in the amount of scattering indicating a higher cluster concentration in the solutions based on cocrystal solids. The results suggest the possibility that mesoscale clusters can have a structural dimension, associated with slow kinetics, which can directly affect nucleation.

  • 38.
    Diesen, Veronica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Jonsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Effects of cellulose degradation products on the mobility of Eu(III) in repositories for low and intermediate level radioactive waste2017In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 340, p. 384-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The deep repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste SFR in Sweden will contain large amounts of cellulosic waste materials contaminated with radionuclides. Over time the repository will be filled with water and alkaline conditions will prevail. In the present study degradation of cellulosic materials and the ability of cellulosic degradation products to solubilize and thereby mobilise Eu(III) under repository conditions has been investigated. Further, the possible immobilization of Eu(III) by sorption onto cement in the presence of degradation products has been investigated. The cellulosic material has been degraded under anaerobic and aerobic conditions in alkaline media (pH: 12.5) at ambient temperature. The degradation was followed by measuring the total organic carbon (TOC) content in the aqueous phase as a function of time. After 173 days of degradation the TOC content is highest in the anaerobic artificial cement pore water (1547 mg/L). The degradation products are capable of solubilising Eu(III) and the total europium concentration in the aqueous phase was 900 μmol/L after 498 h contact time under anaerobic conditions. Further it is shown that Eu(III) is adsorbed to the hydrated cement to a low extent (<9 μmol Eu/g of cement) in the presence of degradation products.

  • 39.
    Diniz, Mariana O.
    et al.
    Univ Limerick, Ireland Res Ctr Pharmaceut, Sci Fdn, SSPC, Limerick V94T9PX, Ireland.;Univ Limerick, Bernal Inst, Dept Chem Sci, Limerick V94T9PX, Ireland..
    Spoletti, Enrico
    Univ Limerick, Bernal Inst, Dept Chem Sci, Limerick V94T9PX, Ireland..
    Ghosh, Peuli
    Univ Limerick, Ireland Res Ctr Pharmaceut, Sci Fdn, SSPC, Limerick V94T9PX, Ireland.;Univ Limerick, Bernal Inst, Dept Chem Sci, Limerick V94T9PX, Ireland..
    Lusi, Matteo
    Univ Limerick, Bernal Inst, Dept Chem Sci, Limerick V94T9PX, Ireland..
    Svärd, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Rasmuson, Åke C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering. Univ Limerick, Ireland Res Ctr Pharmaceut, Sci Fdn, SSPC, Limerick V94T9PX, Ireland.;Univ Limerick, Bernal Inst, Dept Chem Sci, Limerick V94T9PX, Ireland.
    Hudson, Sarah P.
    Univ Limerick, Ireland Res Ctr Pharmaceut, Sci Fdn, SSPC, Limerick V94T9PX, Ireland.;Univ Limerick, Bernal Inst, Dept Chem Sci, Limerick V94T9PX, Ireland..
    New Solid Forms of Griseofulvin: A Solvate and a Relict Polymorph Related to Reported Solvates2023In: Crystal Growth & Design, ISSN 1528-7483, E-ISSN 1528-7505, Vol. 23, no 12, p. 8953-8961Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents two new solid forms, a polymorph and a solvate, of the antifungal active pharmaceutical ingredient griseofulvin (GSF). The novel forms were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis, and their crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The new polymorphic form (GSF Form VI) was obtained upon drying at room temperature the GSF-acetonitrile solvate. GSF Form VI is a relict structure related to reported solvates of GSF. Thermal stability studies show that Form VI is metastable and monotropically related to the stable GSF Form I. The new GSF-n-butyl acetate solvate was obtained by crystallization from an n-butyl acetate solution. The stoichiometry of the n-butyl acetate solvate is 1:0.5. The solvate loses the solvent from the crystal lattice at a temperature between 363.15 and 374.15 K.

  • 40.
    Elginoz, Nilay
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Alzaboot, Muhammed
    Istanbul Tech Univ, Dept Environm Engn, TR-34469 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Babuna, Fatos Germirli
    Istanbul Tech Univ, Dept Environm Engn, TR-34469 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Iskender, Gulen
    Istanbul Tech Univ, Dept Environm Engn, TR-34469 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Construction of a large water treatment plant: appraisal of environmental hotspots2019In: Desalination and Water Treatment, ISSN 1944-3994, E-ISSN 1944-3986, Vol. 172, p. 309-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study is to examine the environmental impacts arising from the construction phase of a large conventional water treatment plant located in Istanbul by adopting a life cycle assessment methodology. The facility has a maximum flow rate of 400,000 m(3)/d and serves a population of about 2,600,000. A conventional treatment technology composed of rock and fine screens, aeration, coagulation-flocculation units, clarifiers, filters, chlorination, and sludge handling units, is used in the plant. The functional unit is 1,000 kg (1 m(3)) treated water. The investigated environmental impact categories are: global warming potential (GWP), acidification potential (AP), eutrophication potential (EP), abiotic depletion potential fossil (ADP fossil), freshwater aquatic ecotoxicity potential (FAETP), human toxicity potential ( HTP), marine aquatic ecotoxicity potential (MAETP), and terrestrial ecotoxicity potential (TETP). The main contributors to GWP, AP, EP, and HTP are concrete and structural steel. FAETP and TETP are mostly arising due to the polyvinyl chloride pipelines and membranes, and the concrete used. The main shares in MAETP are concrete, aluminum, and structural steel. Transportation does not have a significant contribution to environmental impacts.

  • 41.
    Elginoz, Nilay
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Atasoy, Merve
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Ex-ante life cycle assessment of volatile fatty acid production from dairy wastewater2020In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 269, article id 122267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition from wastewater treatment plants to wastewater resource recovery facilities has led to research into and development of various new processes. The production from wastewater of volatile fatty acids (VFAs), an intermediate product of anaerobic digestion, is one of these processes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the environmental sustainability of VFA production from dairy wastewater, which is still in the laboratory research phase, and to investigate the discrepancies between lab-scale and conceptual full-scale life cycle assessment (LCA) results. In laboratory-scale LCA, electricity consumption for mixing and heating is the major contributor to all impact categories. The material usage and disposal of these materials also contribute significantly to the environmental impacts. Full-scale LCA results show that heating of the reactor and addition of NaOH during the operation stage are the main contributors. Scenario analysis is conducted for heating device efficiency and operating temperature. The recommendations are to use alternative chemicals to NaOH or to co-treat dairy wastewater with alkaline wastewater, using a heating device with a high efficiency, and to try experiments at lower temperatures. There are discrepancies between the LCA results based on laboratory data and upscale data, meaning that there is a further need for investigation of upscaling for LCA purposes.

  • 42.
    Elginoz, Nilay
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Khatami, Kasra
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Owusu-Agyeman, Isaac
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Life Cycle Assessment of an Innovative Food Waste Management System2020In: Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, E-ISSN 2571-581X, Vol. 4, article id 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study has been to investigate the environmental impacts of an innovative food waste management system and compare it with landfilling as a conventional waste management option. The investigated system is still in the laboratory research and development phase. Therefore, inventory data of the laboratory scale food waste management system was collected and then up-scaled for life cycle assessment purposes. The proposed system consists of a hygenization reactor followed by a fermenter and then a centrifuge. The system converts food waste into volatile fatty acid-rich supernatant. Functional unit is management of 1 ton food waste. The results indicate that the proposed system is a better option than landfilling in terms of all impact categories. The produced VFA-rich supernatant is supposed to be used as a replacement for methanol in the denitrification process. In one of the impact categories (ozone depletion potential) the avoided burdens are higher than the burdens and the system provides net gain (-2.82E-07 kg R11 eq.). Majority of the environmental burdens in the proposed system are due to heat consumption for hygenization. Including sludge disposal in the investigated system boundary increases the environmental burdens but the burdens are still lower compared to landfilling option.

  • 43.
    Elginoz, Nilay
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery. IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Life Cycle Management, Sweden..
    Owusu-Agyeman, Isaac
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management. Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology, Environmental Sustainability Assessment and Circularity, Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg..
    Hischier, Roland
    Empa Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Technology and Society Laboratory, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, 9014, St. Gallen, Switzerland..
    Rydberg, Tomas
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Life Cycle Management, Sweden..
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Application and adaptation of a scale-up framework for life cycle assessment to resource recovery for waste systems2022In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prospective life cycle assessment (LCA) studies are widely used for evaluating emerging resource recovery systems. Simulations, engineering-based process calculations and stoichiometric methods are frequently used methods to generate life cycle inventory (LCI) in prospective LCAs. The engineering-based upscaling calculation is an efficient method for LCI generation requiring fewer resources than simulations. This study aims to test an engineering-based upscaling method for LCI generation and adapt it to biochemical resource recovery processes. The method's validity for biochemical resource recovery processes was tested using data for biogas generation by anaerobic digestion in laboratory, pilot, and full scales, and using a combination of lab-scale data and kinetic equations. Biogas generation was chosen for two reasons: (1) there are several emerging technologies based on anaerobic digestion with products other than biogas, and (2) data is available for different scales. The results showed, a substantial difference between the methane production amount in actual and conceptual plants, is an important cause of the variation in impact category results. Different estimations of fugitive emissions have an important impact on the global warming potential results. Combination of lab-scale data and kinetic equations approximates best with the actual plant for the abiotic depletion, eutrophication, freshwater aquatic ecotoxicity, global warming and photochemical ozone creation potentials. The results are sensitive to biogas generation amount in several categories.

  • 44.
    Eriksson, Elsa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Polyhydroxyalkanoate Production from Municipal Waste Streams2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a group of bioplastics, which are produced through microorganisms. They are accumulated in granules inside bacteria’s cell cytoplasm and serve as an energy reserve. Moreover, PHAs are completely biodegradable and biocompatible biopolyesters, which make them to suitable materials for medical applications and replace conventional petrochemical plastics. However, it is not economically feasible to produce PHAs yet, as it is four to nine times as expensive as to produce fossil fuel-based plastics. In order to reduce the price, it is possible to use waste streams rich in carbon and mixed cultures as microorganisms, which was applied in this thesis work.

    In this study, PHAs were synthesized from a volatile fatty acid (VFA) mixture rich in hexanoic acid, which was produced by anaerobic digestion of waste streams. To be able to obtain the maximum PHA content, the experimental work was separated into a selection phase and a production phase respectively. During the selection step, enrichment of the mixed culture took place during 50 days altering feast/famine cycles. The production phase was then conducted in a fed-batch cultivation to accumulate as much PHAs as possible, while utilizing the enriched mixed culture. 

    The selection phase was seen as successful since the quantity of synthesized PHA increased with time. Solely polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) was formed during this period. The specific consumption rates for the hexanoic acid and acetic acid were almost the same in this phase (0.10 g hexanoic acid/(g volatile suspended soilds (VSS),h) and 0.11 g acetic acid/(g VSS,h)), which suggests that the consumption of these majoritarian fatty acids was simultaneous. However, the determined consumption rate for butyric acid was approximately solely half of the values for hexanoic acid and acetic acid. The highest PHA yield obtained in the enrichment phase was 0.26 g PHB/g VFA.  In the production phase, the highest achieved PHA content was 31.4 % of VSS, which was obtained after five hours. Both PHB and polyhydroxyvalerate (PHV) were formed in this phase, even though the quantity of accumulated PHB dominated with its approximately 97 weight-%.

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  • 45.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Preface2024In: Minerals, Metals and Materials Series, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2024, p. v-viChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Valorisation of phosphate rock by hydrometallurgical processing2017In: 16ème Congrès de la Société Française de Génie des Procédés SFGP (16th Congress of the French Chemical Engineering Society), 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Hulme-Smith, Christopher
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Materials - a tangible challenge for the electrification of society2022In: Towards the energy of the future – the invisible revolution behind the electrical socket / [ed] Fredrik Brounéus & Christophe Duwig, Books on Demand , 2022Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Ouchi, TakanariUniversity of Tokyo.Azimi, GiseleUniversity of Toronto.Alam, ShafiqUniversity of Saskatchewan.Neelameggham, Neale R.IND LLC.Baba, Alafara AbdullahiUniversity of Ilorin.Peng, HongUniversity of Queensland.Karamalidis, AthanasiosPennsylvania State University.
    Rare Metal Technology 20242024Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Rodríguez Varela, Raquel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Martínez, Joaquin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Rasmuson, Åke C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Processing of a rare earth element concentrate by hollow fibre supported liquid membrane extraction2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Svärd, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Separation of Rare Earth Elements by Crystallization2024In: Rare Earth Elements: Sustainable Processing, Purification, and Recovery, John Wiley & Sons, 2024Chapter in book (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 136
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