Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Benyahia Erdal, Nejla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Adolfsson, Karin H.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Green Strategy to Reduced Nanographene Oxide through Microwave Assisted Transformation of Cellulose2018In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1245-1255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A green strategy for fabrication of biobased reduced nanographene oxide (r-nGO) was developed. Cellulose derived nanographene oxide (nGO) type carbon nanodots were reduced by microwave assisted hydrothermal treatment with superheated water alone or in the presence of caffeic acid (CA), a green reducing agent. The carbon nanodots, r-nGO and r-nGO-CA, obtained through the two different reaction routes without or with the added reducing agent, were characterized by multiple analytical techniques including FTIR, XPS, Raman, XRD, TGA, TEM, AFM, UV-vis, and DLS to confirm and evaluate the efficiency of the reduction reactions. A significant decrease in oxygen content accompanied by increased number of sp2 hybridized functional groups was confirmed in both cases. The synergistic effect of superheated water and reducing agent resulted in the highest C/O ratio and thermal stability, which also supported a more efficient reduction. Interesting optical properties were detected by fluorescence spectroscopy where nGO, r-nGO, and r-nGO-CA all displayed excitation dependent fluorescence behavior. r-nGO-CA and its precursor nGO were evaluated toward osteoblastic cells MG-63 and exhibited nontoxic behavior up to 200 μg mL-1, which gives promise for utilization in biomedical applications.

  • 2.
    Erdal, Nejla B.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Adolfsson, Karin H.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    De Lima, Sara
    Karolinska Inst, St Erik Eye Hosp, Div Ophthalmol & Vis, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    In vitro and in vivo effects of ophthalmic solutions on silicone hydrogel bandage lens material Senofilcon A2018In: Clinical and experimental optometry, ISSN 0816-4622, E-ISSN 1444-0938, Vol. 101, no 3, p. 354-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Acuvue Oasys silicone hydrogel contact lenses (Senofilcon A) are used as bandage lenses and often combined with ophthalmic solutions in the treatment of ocular diseases. Concerns have been raised regarding the compatibility and effect of eye-drop solutions on the bandage lenses, which have led to frequent replacement of lenses causing clinical problems. Some patients experience pain or discomfort during treatments and the accumulation of drugs and preservatives in lenses has been suggested as a possible reason. The aim with this study was to investigate the effect of ophthalmic solutions on silicone hydrogel bandage lens material Senofilcon A in vitro and in vivo. Methods: The effect of three common ophthalmic solutions Isopto-Maxidex, Timosan and Oftaquix on Acuvue Oasys (Senofilcon A) bandage lenses was evaluated. An in vitro model method was developed where drug and preservative uptake by Acuvue Oasys was monitored with ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and laser desorption ionisation mass spectrometry. Surface morphology changes of the lenses were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The method was then implemented for the in vivo pilot study evaluating lenses worn by patients. Results: In vitro model study monitoring the drug and preservatives uptake showed that the active ingredients from all the eye drops together with preservatives were taken up by the lenses in significant amounts. For the in vivo study no traces of active ingredients or preservatives could be found on the worn and treated lenses regardless of time being worn or dosage profiles. The surface morphology changes in the in vivo study were also minor in contrast to the changes observed in the in vitro scanning electron microscopy images. Conclusion: The in vivo results demonstrate minor effects of the ophthalmic solutions on the worn lenses. These results do not support the building up of preservatives and drugs on the contact lenses as the cause of pain or discomfort experienced by some patients, which is encouraging for the use of bandage lenses in combination with ophthalmic solutions.

  • 3.
    Erdal, Nejla B.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Construction of Bioactive and Reinforced Bioresorbable Nanocomposites by Reduced Nano-Graphene Oxide Carbon Dots2018In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 1074-1081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bioactive and reinforced poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) films were constructed by incorporation of cellulose derived reduced nanographene oxide (r-nGO) carbon nanodots. Two different microwave-assisted reduction routes in superheated water were utilized to obtain r-nGO and r-nGO-CA. For the latter, a green reducing agent caffeic acid (CA), was incorporated in the reduction process. The materials were extruded and compression molded to obtain proper dispersion of the carbon nanodots in the polymer matrix. FTIR results revealed favorable interactions between r-nGO-CA and PCL that improved the dispersion of r-nGO-CA. r-nGO, and r-nGO-CA endorsed PCL with several advantageous functionalities including improved storage modulus and creep resistance. The considerable increase in storage modulus demonstrated that the carbon nanodots had a significant reinforcing effect on PCL. The PCL films with r-nGO-CA were also evaluated for their osteobioactivity and cytocompatibility. Bioactivity was demonstrated by formation of hydroxyapatite (HA) minerals on the surface of r-nGO-CA loaded nanocomposites. At the same time, the good cytocompatibility of PCL was retained as illustrated by the good cell viability to MG63 osteoblast-like cells giving promise for bone tissue engineering applications.

  • 4.
    Feng, Zhaoxuan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Odelius, Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Tunable chitosan hydrogels for adsorption: Property control by biobased modifiers2018In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 196, p. 135-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sustainable strategy to fabricate chitosan-based composite hydrogels with tunable properties and controllable adsorption capacity of trace pharmaceuticals was demonstrated. Two biobased modifiers were utilized to tune the properties, nano-graphene oxide (nGO) derived from chitosan via microwave-assisted carbonization and oxidation, and genipin as the crosslinking agent. An increase in genipin content facilitated an increase in the degree of crosslinking as shown by improved storage modulus and decreased swelling ratio. Increasing nGO content changed the surface microtopography of the hydrogel which correlated with the surface wettability. nGO also catalyzed the genipin-crosslinking reaction. The hydrogel was further shown to be an effective adsorbent for a common anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac sodium (DCF), with the removal efficiency ranging from 91 to 100% after 48 h. DCF adsorption efficiency could be tuned through simple alteration of nGO and genipin concentration, which provides promising potential for this environmental-friendly adsorbent in removal of DCF from pharmaceutical waste water.

  • 5.
    Feng, Zhaoxuan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Odelius, Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Rajarao, Gunaratna Kuttuva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Microwave carbonized cellulose for trace pharmaceutical adsorption2018In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 346, p. 557-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A promising sustainable strategy to valorize cellulose to high-value adsorbents for trace pharmaceuticals, like diclofenac sodium (DCF), in the water is demonstrated. Carbon nanospheres (CN) as the DCF adsorbent were derived from cellulose through a one-pot microwave-assisted hydrothermal carbonization method. CN exhibited efficient DCF removal (100% removal of 0.001 mg/mL DCF in 30 s and 59% removal of 0.01 mg/mL DCF in 1 h). The adsorption kinetics and isotherm data were well-fitted with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir model, respectively. The adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous as confirmed by the thermodynamic parameters. Multiple characterization techniques including SEM/EDS, FTIR, FTIR-imaging and zeta potential were applied to qualitatively investigate the adsorption process. π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding were proposed as the dominant adsorption interactions. CN also demonstrated effective adsorption capacity towards three other commonly-detected contaminants in the wastewater including ketoprofen (KP), benzophenone (BZP), and diphenylamine (DPA), each bearing partial structural similarity with DCF. The affinity of the contaminants towards CN followed the order DPA > BZP > DCF > KP, which could be explained by the different configurations and chemical units. It was speculated that for DCF and KP, the steric hindrance and electrostatic repulsion produced by dissociated carboxyl groups can impede the adsorption process as compared to DPA and BZP. This methodology could offer further insights into the drug adsorption on the cellulose-derived carbon adsorbents and the use of bioderived carbons for treatment of wastewaters contaminated with pharmaceuticals.

  • 6. Golda-Cepa, M
    et al.
    Chorylek, A
    Chytrosz, P
    Brzychezy-Wloch, M
    Jaworska, J
    Kasperczyk, J
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Engvall, Klas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Kotarba, A
    Multifunctional PLGA/parylene C coating for implant materials – an integral approach for biointerface optimization2016In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 8, p. 22093-22105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functionalizing implant surfaces is critical for improving their performance. An integrated approach was employedto develop a multifunctional implant coating based on oxygen plasma-modified parylene C and drug-loaded, biodegradablepoly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA). The key functional attributes of the coating (i.e., anti-corrosion, biocompatible, antiinfection,and therapeutic) were thoroughly characterized at each fabrication step by spectroscopic, microscopic, and biologicmethods and at different scales, ranging from molecular, through the nano- and microscales to the macroscopic scale. Thechemistry of each layer was demonstrated separately, and their mutual affinity was shown to be indispensable for thedevelopment of versatile coatings for implant applications.

  • 7.
    Hua, Geng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Ring-opening Approaches to Functional Renewable Polymers2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    The full text will be freely available from 2019-05-04 14:51
  • 8. Ohm, Wiebke
    et al.
    Rothkirch, Andre
    Pandit, Pallavi
    Koerstgens, Volker
    Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter
    Rojas, Ramiro
    Yu, Shun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Brett, Calvin J.
    Soderberg, Daniel L.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Morphological properties of airbrush spray-deposited enzymatic cellulose thin films2018In: JOURNAL OF COATINGS TECHNOLOGY AND RESEARCH, ISSN 1945-9645, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 759-769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the layer formation of enzymatic cellulose by airbrush spray coating on silicon oxide surfaces. The layer structure and morphology of enzymatic cellulose films in the thickness range between 86 nm and 2.1 A mu m is determined as a function of the spray coating procedures. For each spray coating step, layer buildup, surface topography, crystallinity as well as the nanoscale structure are probed with atomic force microscopy and surface-sensitive X-ray scattering methods. Without intermittent drying, the film thickness saturates; with intermittent drying, a linear increase in layer thickness with the number of spray pulses is observed. A closed cellulose layer was always observed. The crystallinity remains unchanged; the nanoscale structures show three distinct sizes. Our results indicate that the smallest building blocks increasingly contribute to the morphology inside the cellulose network for thicker films, showing the importance of tailoring the cellulose nanofibrils. For a layer-by-layer coating, intermittent drying is mandatory.

  • 9. Sharma, Sunita
    et al.
    Sapkota, Dipak
    Xue, Ying
    Rajthala, Saroj
    Yassin, Mohammed A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Wistrand, Anna Finne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Mustafa, Kamal
    Delivery of VEGFA in bone marrow stromal cells seeded in copolymer scaffold enhances angiogenesis, but is inadequate for osteogenesis as compared with the dual delivery of VEGFA and BMP2 in a subcutaneous mouse model2018In: Stem Cell Research & Therapy, E-ISSN 1757-6512, Vol. 9, article id 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In bone tissue engineering (BTE), extensive research into vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA)-mediated angiogenesis has yielded inconsistent results. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence on angio-and osteogenesis of adenoviral-mediated delivery of VEGFA alone or in combination with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) seeded onto a recently developed poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffold. Methods: Human BMSC were engineered to express VEGFA alone or in combination with BMP2 and seeded onto poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds. Changes in angiogenic and osteogenic gene and protein levels were examined by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), PCR array, and alkaline phosphatase assay. An in vivo subcutaneous mouse model was used to investigate the effect on angio-and osteogenesis of VEGFA alone or in combination with BMP2, using microcomputed tomography (mu CT), histology, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. Results: Combined delivery of a lower ratio (1: 3) of VEGFA and BMP2 (ad-BMP2 + VEGFA) led to upregulation of osteogenic and angiogenic genes in vitro at 3 and 14 days, compared with mono-delivery of VEGFA (ad-VEGFA) and other controls. In vivo, in a subcutaneous mouse model, both ad-VEGFA and ad-BMP2 + VEGFA scaffold explants exhibited increased angiogenesis at 2 weeks. Enhanced angiogenesis was largely related to the recruitment and differentiation of mouse progenitor cells to the endothelial lineage and, to a lesser extent, to endothelial differentiation of the implanted BMSC. mu CT and histological analyses revealed enhanced de novo bone formation only in the ad-BMP2 + VEGFA group, corresponding at the molecular level to the upregulation of genes related to osteogenesis, such as ALPL, RUNX2, and SPP1. Conclusions: Although BMSC expressing VEGFA alone or in combination with BMP2 significantly induced angiogenesis, VEGFA alone failed to demonstrate osteogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. These results not only call into question the use of VEGFA alone in bone regeneration, but also highlight the importance in BTE of appropriately formulated combined delivery of VEGFA and BMP2.

  • 10.
    Wahlström, Niklas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Harrysson, H.
    Undeland, I.
    Edlund, Ulrica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    A Strategy for the Sequential Recovery of Biomacromolecules from Red Macroalgae Porphyra umbilicalis Kützing2018In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 42-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A nondestructive, multicomponent fractionation strategy has been developed to extract proteins and polysaccharides from the red macroalgae Porphyra umbilicalis collected along the west coast of Sweden and cultivated indoors under controlled conditions. First, a protein-rich fraction was extracted in an ice-cold alkaline solution. The overall protein content in Porphyra umbilicalis was estimated to be 30.6% of the dry weight, and out of that, 15.0% could be recovered. Water-soluble polysaccharides were then extracted from the insoluble residual fraction using sequential alkaline and acidic treatments at 90 °C for 4 h. Spectroscopic and chromatographic analyses of the polysaccharide fractions show that high-molecular-weight carrageenans were obtained from the alkaline extraction and a galactose-rich pectin substance was obtained from the acidic extraction. The insoluble fraction remaining after all extraction steps was rich in cellulose. An elemental analysis of Porphyra umbilicalis via scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS) showed the presence of C, O, Na, Ca, Mg, Al, Cl, and S. However, no heavy metals or other toxic elements, such as Pb, Hg, and As, were found.

  • 11.
    Wu, Duo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Samanta, A.
    Srivastava, R. K.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Nano-graphene oxide functionalized bioactive poly(lactic acid) and poly(ε-caprolactone) nanofibrous scaffolds2018In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 11, no 4, article id 566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A versatile and convenient way to produce bioactive poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds is described. PLA and PCL are extensively used as biocompatible scaffold materials for tissue engineering. Here, biobased nano graphene oxide dots (nGO) are incorporated in PLA or PCL electrospun scaffolds during the electrospinning process aiming to enhance the mechanical properties and endorse osteo-bioactivity. nGO was found to tightly attach to the fibers through secondary interactions. It also improved the electrospinnability and fiber quality. The prepared nanofibrous scaffolds exhibited enhanced mechanical properties, increased hydrophilicity, good cytocompatibility and osteo-bioactivity. Therefore, immense potential for bone tissue engineering applications is anticipated.

1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf