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  • 1.
    Abbasi-Ravasjani, Sonia
    et al.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Ctr Dent Amsterdam ACTA, Dept Oral Cell Biol, Amsterdam Movement Sci, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Seddiqi, Hadi
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Ctr Dent Amsterdam ACTA, Dept Oral Cell Biol, Amsterdam Movement Sci, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Moghaddaszadeh, Ali
    Islamic Azad Univ, Dept Biomed Engn, Sci & Res Branch, Tehran, Iran..
    Ghiasvand, Mohammad-Ehsan
    Amirkabir Univ Technol, Dept Mech Engn, Tehran, Iran..
    Jin, Jianfeng
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Ctr Dent Amsterdam ACTA, Dept Oral Cell Biol, Amsterdam Movement Sci, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Oliaei, Erfan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Bacabac, Rommel Gaud
    Univ San Carlos, Dept Phys, Med Biophys Grp, Cebu, Philippines..
    Klein-Nulend, Jenneke
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Ctr Dent Amsterdam ACTA, Dept Oral Cell Biol, Amsterdam Movement Sci, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Sulfated carboxymethyl cellulose and carboxymethyl kappa-carrageenan immobilization on 3D-printed poly-epsilon-caprolactone scaffolds differentially promote pre-osteoblast proliferation and osteogenic activity2022In: Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology, E-ISSN 2296-4185, Vol. 10, article id 957263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lack of bioactivity in three-dimensional (3D)-printing of poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds limits cell-material interactions in bone tissue engineering. This constraint can be overcome by surface-functionalization using glycosaminoglycan-like anionic polysaccharides, e.g., carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), a plant-based carboxymethylated, unsulfated polysaccharide, and kappa-carrageenan, a seaweed-derived sulfated, non-carboxymethylated polysaccharide. The sulfation of CMC and carboxymethylation of kappa-carrageenan critically improve their bioactivity. However, whether sulfated carboxymethyl cellulose (SCMC) and carboxymethyl kappa-carrageenan (CM-kappa-Car) affect the osteogenic differentiation potential of pre-osteoblasts on 3D-scaffolds is still unknown. Here, we aimed to assess the effects of surface-functionalization by SCMC or CM-kappa-Car on the physicochemical and mechanical properties of 3D-printed PCL scaffolds, as well as the osteogenic response of pre-osteoblasts. MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts were seeded on 3D-printed PCL scaffolds that were functionalized by CM-kappa-Car (PCL/CM-kappa-Car) or SCMC (PCL/SCMC), cultured up to 28 days. The scaffolds' physicochemical and mechanical properties and pre-osteoblast function were assessed experimentally and by finite element (FE) modeling. We found that the surface-functionalization by SCMC and CM-kappa-Car did not change the scaffold geometry and structure but decreased the elastic modulus. Furthermore, the scaffold surface roughness and hardness increased and the scaffold became more hydrophilic. The FE modeling results implied resilience up to 2% compression strain, which was below the yield stress for all scaffolds. Surface-functionalization by SCMC decreased Runx2 and Dmp1 expression, while surface-functionalization by CM-kappa-Car increased Cox2 expression at day 1. Surface-functionalization by SCMC most strongly enhanced pre-osteoblast proliferation and collagen production, while CM-kappa-Car most significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization after 28 days. In conclusion, surface-functionalization by SCMC or CM-kappa-Car of 3D-printed PCL-scaffolds enhanced pre-osteoblast proliferation and osteogenic activity, likely due to increased surface roughness and hydrophilicity. Surface-functionalization by SCMC most strongly enhanced cell proliferation, while CM-kappa-Car most significantly promoted osteogenic activity, suggesting that surface-functionalization by CM-kappa-Car may be more promising, especially in the short-term, for in vivo bone formation.

  • 2.
    Agustin, Melissa B.
    et al.
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Finland, P.O. Box 1000; Department of Food and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland, P.O. Box 66.
    Lahtinen, Maarit H.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland, P.O. Box 66.
    Kemell, Marianna
    Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland, P.O. Box 55.
    Oliaei, Erfan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Mikkonen, Kirsi S.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland, P.O. Box 66; Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland, P.O. Box 65.
    Grönqvist, Stina
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT, Finland, P.O. Box 1000.
    Lehtonen, Mari
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland, P.O. Box 66.
    Enzymatic crosslinking of lignin nanoparticles and nanocellulose in cryogels improves adsorption of pharmaceutical pollutants2024In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 266, article id 131168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pharmaceuticals, designed for treating diseases, ironically endanger humans and aquatic ecosystems as pollutants. Adsorption-based wastewater treatment could address this problem, however, creating efficient adsorbents remains a challenge. Recent efforts have shifted towards sustainable bio-based adsorbents. Here, cryogels from lignin-containing cellulose nanofibrils (LCNF) and lignin nanoparticles (LNPs) were explored as pharmaceuticals adsorbents. An enzyme-based approach using laccase was used for crosslinking instead of fossil-based chemical modification. The impact of laccase treatment on LNPs alone produced surface-crosslinked water-insoluble LNPs with preserved morphology and a hemicellulose-rich, water-soluble LNP fraction. The water-insoluble LNPs displayed a significant increase in adsorption capacity, up to 140 % and 400 % for neutral and cationic drugs, respectively. The crosslinked cryogel prepared by one-pot incubation of LNPs, LCNF and laccase showed significantly higher adsorption capacities for various pharmaceuticals in a multi-component system than pure LCNF or unmodified cryogels. The crosslinking minimized the leaching of LNPs in water, signifying enhanced binding between LNPs and LCNF. In real wastewater, the laccase-modified cryogel displayed 8–44 % removal for cationic pharmaceuticals. Overall, laccase treatment facilitated the production of bio-based adsorbents by improving the deposition of LNPs to LCNF. Finally, this work introduces a sustainable approach for engineering adsorbents, while aligning with global sustainability goals.

  • 3.
    Agustin, Melissa B.
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland; VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044, Espoo, Finland.
    Nematollahi, Neda
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland.
    Bhattarai, Mamata
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, 00076, Aalto, Finland.
    Oliaei, Erfan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Lehtonen, Mari
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland.
    Rojas, Orlando J.
    Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, 00076, Aalto, Finland; Bioproducts Institute, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Department of Chemistry and Department of Wood Science, University of British Columbia, 2360, East Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, Canada.
    Mikkonen, Kirsi S.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lignin nanoparticles as co-stabilizers and modifiers of nanocellulose-based Pickering emulsions and foams2023In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 30, no 14, p. 8955-8971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose is very hydrophilic, preventing interactions with the oil phase in Pickering emulsions. This limitation is herein addressed by incorporating lignin nanoparticles (LNPs) as co-stabilizers of nanocellulose-based Pickering emulsions. LNP addition decreases the oil droplet size and slows creaming at pH 5 and 8 and with increasing LNP content. Emulsification at pH 3 and LNP cationization lead to droplet flocculation and rapid creaming. LNP application for emulsification, prior or simultaneously with nanocellulose, favors stability given the improved interactions with the oil phase. The Pickering emulsions can be freeze–dried, enabling the recovery of a solid macroporous foam that can act as adsorbent for pharmaceutical pollutants. Overall, the properties of nanocellulose-based Pickering emulsions and foams can be tailored by LNP addition. This strategy offers a unique, green approach to stabilize biphasic systems using bio-based nanomaterials without tedious and costly modification procedures.

  • 4. Akinsinde, Lewis O.
    et al.
    Glier, Tomke E.
    Schwartzkopf, Matthias
    Betker, Marie
    Nissen, Matz
    Witte, Maximilian
    Scheitz, Sarah
    Nweze, Christian
    Grimm-Lebsanft, Benjamin
    Gensch, Marc
    Chumakov, Andrei
    Baev, Ivan
    Schurmann, Ulrich
    Dankwort, Torben
    Fischer, Frank
    Martins, Michael
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Kienle, Lorenz
    Ruebhausen, Michael
    Surface characterization and resistance changes of silver-nanowire networks upon atmospheric plasma treatment2021In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 550, article id 149362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly conductive silver-nanowire (Ag-NW) networks are used in composite materials as conductive channels. Their resistance tuning can be accomplished by changing the Ag-NW concentration, and, therefore, changing the network structure. In this study, an alternative pathway to resistance engineering of conductive Ag-NW networks by local atmospheric plasma treatment is employed. The corresponding changes in nanowire network morphology and crystallinity as a function of plasma etching time are investigated by time-resolved grazingincidence X-ray scattering, field-effect scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Three characteristic etching phases are identified. The first two phases enable the controlled engineering of the electrical properties with different rates of resistance change, which results from changes in nanowire shape, network morphology, and different oxidation rates. Phase III is characterized by pronounced fragmentation and destruction of the Ag-NW networks. These results show the feasibility of atmospheric plasma treatments to tune the local electrical properties of conductive Ag-NW networks. Furthermore, we present a physical Monte Carlo model explaining the electrical network properties as a function of plasma etching time based on the network connectivity and a constant plasma etching rate of 570 ng s-1 cm-2.

  • 5.
    Alexakis, Alexandros Efraim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ayyachi, Thayanithi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Mousa, Maryam
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Olsen, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    2-Methoxy-4-Vinylphenol as a Biobased Monomer Precursor for Thermoplastics and Thermoset Polymers2023In: Polymers, E-ISSN 2073-4360, Vol. 15, no 9, article id 2168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To address the increasing demand for biobased materials, lignin-derived ferulic acid (FA) is a promising candidate. In this study, an FA-derived styrene-like monomer, referred to as 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol (MVP), was used as the platform to prepare functional monomers for radical polymerizations. Hydrophobic biobased monomers derived from MVP were polymerized via solution and emulsion polymerization resulting in homo- and copolymers with a wide range of thermal properties, thus showcasing their potential in thermoplastic applications. Moreover, divinylbenzene (DVB)-like monomers were prepared from MVP by varying the aliphatic chain length between the MVP units. These biobased monomers were thermally crosslinked with thiol-bearing reagents to produce thermosets with different crosslinking densities in order to demonstrate their thermosetting applications. The results of this study expand the scope of MVP-derived monomers that can be used in free-radical polymerizations toward the preparation of new biobased and functional materials from lignin.

  • 6.
    Alimohammadzadeh, Rana
    et al.
    Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Nat Sci, SE-85170 Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Deiana, Luca
    Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Nat Sci, SE-85170 Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cordova, Armando
    Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Nat Sci, SE-85170 Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Mild and Versatile Functionalization of Nacre-Mimetic Cellulose Nanofibrils/Clay Nanocomposites by Organocatalytic Surface Engineering2020In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 5, no 31, p. 19363-19370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of surface-engineering strategies, which are facile, versatile, and mild, are highly desirable in tailor-made functionalization of high-performance bioinspired nanocomposites. We herein disclose for the first time a general organocatalytic strategy for the functionalization and hydrophobization of nacre-mimetic nanocomposites, which includes vide supra key aspects of surface engineering. The merging of metal-free catalysis and the design of nacre-mimetic nanocomposite materials were demonstrated by the organocatalytic surface engineering of cellulose nanofibrils/clay nanocomposites providing the corresponding bioinspired nanocomposites with good mechanical properties, hydrophobicity, and useful thia-, amino, and olefinic functionalities.

  • 7. Altuna, Facundo I.
    et al.
    Riccardi, Carmen C.
    Marin Quintero, Diana C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Ruseckaite, Roxana A.
    Stefani, Pablo M.
    Effect of an Anhydride Excess on the Curing Kinetics and Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Synthetic and Biogenic Epoxy Resins2019In: International Journal of Polymer Science, ISSN 1687-9422, E-ISSN 1687-9430, article id 5029153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work analyzes the effect of the anhydride excess on the nonisothermal curing kinetics and on the final properties of synthetic and biobased epoxy resins. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) were crosslinked using methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride (MTHPA) as a curing agent and 1-methylimidazole (1MI) as an initiator. It was shown that the ESO/MTHPA/1MI system reacts slower than the DGEBA/MTHPA/1MI system, giving place to a more significant evaporation of the curing agent during the reaction. As a result, an excess of anhydride improves the final thermal properties of the ESO/MTHPA/1MI network, contrary to the behavior observed for DGEBA/MTHPA/1MI. The knowledge of the kinetics of the curing process and the optimal amount of the curing agent for each system is of critical importance for a more efficient processing of these materials.

  • 8.
    Amorim, Lúcia F.A.
    et al.
    FibEnTech Research Unit, Faculty of Engineering, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã, Portugal.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Gomes, Ana P.
    FibEnTech Research Unit, Faculty of Engineering, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã, Portugal.
    Fangueiro, Raul
    Centre for Textile Science and Technology (2C2T), University of Minho, Guimarães, Portugal.
    Gouveia, Isabel C.
    FibEnTech Research Unit, Faculty of Engineering, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã, Portugal.
    Sustainable bacterial cellulose production by low cost feedstock: evaluation of apple and tea by-products as alternative sources of nutrients2023In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 30, no 9, p. 5589-5606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high applicability of Bacterial Cellulose (BC) is often challenging due to its high production costs, which ultimately prevents its widespread use. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate BC production using alternative feedstock to replace high-cost synthetic carbon and nitrogen sources and to evaluate the physical and structural properties of the produced BC membranes. BC was produced through a microbial consortium from kombucha, and the formulated alternative media sustained promising BC production, especially the association of apple wastes (at 10% (W/V)) with tea mixture, with a yield similar to BC produced on Hestrin–Schramm (HS) control media. Moreover, the BC samples produced in this alternative media also exhibited comparable properties to BC from HS media, with similar water-holding capacity and retention ability, thermal stability, mechanical behavior, and a crystallinity index of 87.61% and 88.08%, respectively. Thus, our findings substantiated that expensive substrates, such as glucose, peptone, and yeast extract, could be successfully replaced by apple wastes, black and green tea, for BC production while maintaining its remarkable physical and structural properties. Furthermore, besides the low-cost advantage, the bioconversion of apple waste also reduces the environmental burden caused by its disposal in landfills.

  • 9.
    Andrieux, Sebastien
    et al.
    Univ Stuttgart, Inst Phys Chem, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany.;Inst Charles Sadron UPR22 CNRS, 23 Rue Loess, F-67034 Strasbourg 2, France..
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Herbst, Michael
    Univ Stuttgart, Inst Phys Chem, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Stubenrauch, Cosima
    Univ Stuttgart, Inst Phys Chem, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany..
    Monodisperse highly ordered chitosan/cellulose nanocomposite foams2019In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 125, article id UNSP 105516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In solid foams, most physical properties are determined by the pore size and shape distributions and the organisation of the pores. For this reason, it is important to control the structure of porous materials. We recently tackled this issue with the help of microfluidic-aided foam templating, which allowed us to generate mono-disperse and highly ordered chitosan foams. However, the properties of foams also depend on the properties of the pore wall constituents. In case of chitosan-based foams, the foams have poor absolute mechanical properties, simply due to the fact that the solubility of chitosan in water is very low, so that the relative density of the freeze-dried foams becomes very small. Drawing inspiration from the field of nanocomposites, we incorporated cellulose nanofibres into the foamed chitosan solutions, with a view to strengthening the pore walls in the foam and thus the mechanical properties of the final foam. We report here how the cellulose nanofibres affect the structure of both the liquid foam template and the solid foam. The resulting nanocomposite foams have improved mechanical properties, which, however, are not proportional to the amount of cellulose nanofibres in the composites. One reason for this observation is the disturbance of the porous structure of the solid foams by the cellulose nanofibres.

  • 10.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Epoxies can solve moisture problems in nanocellulose materials2017In: International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials 2017, TAPPI Press , 2017, p. 1220-1227Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Galland, Sylvain
    Fernberg, P.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Stiff and ductile nanocomposites of epoxy reinforced with cellulose nanofibrils2013In: ICCM International Conferences on Composite Materials, International Committee on Composite Materials , 2013, p. 5575-5582Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Antonio, Capezza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Andersson, Richard L.
    Ström, Valter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Wu, Qiong
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Sacchi, Benedetta
    Univ Milan, Dept Chem, Via Golgi 19, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Farris, Stefano
    Univ Milan, DeFENS, Dept Food Environm & Nutr Sci, Packaging Div, Via Celoria 2, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Olsson, Richard T.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Preparation and Comparison of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Carbon Nanotubes as Fillers in Conductive Natural Rubber for Flexible Electronics2019In: Omega, ISSN 0030-2228, E-ISSN 1541-3764, Vol. 4, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conductive natural rubber (NR) nanocomposites were prepared by solvent-casting suspensions of reduced graphene oxide(rGO) or carbon nanotubes (CNTs), followed by vulcanization of the rubber composites. Both rGO and CNT were compatible as fillers in the NR as well as having sufficient intrinsic electrical conductivity for functional applications. Physical (thermal) and chemical reduction of GO were investigated, and the results of the reductions were monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for establishing a reduction protocol that was useful for the rGO nanocomposite preparation. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy showed that both nanofillers were adequately dispersed in the main NR phase. The CNT composite displays a marked mechanical hysteresis and higher elongation at break, in comparison to the rGO composites for an equal fraction of the carbon phase. Moreover, the composite conductivity was always ca. 3-4 orders of magnitude higher for the CNT composite than for the rGO composites, the former reaching a maximum conductivity of ca. 10.5 S/m, which was explained by the more favorable geometry of the CNT versus the rGO sheets. For low current density applications though, both composites achieved the necessary percolation and showed the electrical conductivity needed for being applied as flexible conductors for a light-emitting diode. 

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  • 13.
    Arcieri, Nicolò
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin, Italy.
    Chen, Bin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Tavares da Costa, Marcus Vinicius
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Karlstad University, Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences, SE-651 88 Karlstad, Sweden.
    Crack growth study of wood and transparent wood-polymer composite laminates by in-situ testing in weak TR-direction2023In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 173, article id 107693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TW transparent wood/polymer biocomposite laminates are of interest as multifunctional materials with good longitudinal modulus, tensile strength and optical transmittance. The effect of filling the pore space in wood with a polymer matrix on fracture toughness and crack growth is not well understood. Here, we carried out in-situ fracture tests on neat birch wood and laminates made of four layers of delignified birch veneers impregnated with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and investigated crack growth in the tangential-radial (TR) fracture system. Fracture toughness KIc and JIc at crack initiation were estimated, including FEM analysis. SEM microscopy revealed that cracks primarily propagate along the ray cells, but cell wall peeling and separation between the PMMA and wood phases also take place. A combination of in-situ tests and strain field measured by digital image correlation (DIC) showed twice as long fracture process zone of TW laminates compared with neat birch.

  • 14.
    Ashraf, Shakeel
    et al.
    Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Elect, S-85170 Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Forsberg, Viviane
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Mattsson, Claes G.
    Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Elect, S-85170 Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Thungström, Göran
    Mid Sweden Univ, Dept Elect, S-85170 Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Thermoelectric Properties of n-Type Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) Thin Film by Using a Simple Measurement Method2019In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 12, no 21, article id 3521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a micrometre thin film of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is characterized for thermoelectric properties. The sample was prepared through mechanical exfoliation of a molybdenite crystal. The Seebeck coefficient measurement was performed by generating a temperature gradient across the sample and recording the induced electrical voltage, and for this purpose a simple measurement setup was developed. In the measurement, platinum was utilized as reference material in the electrodes. The Seebeck value of MoS2 was estimated to be approximately -600 mu V/K at a temperature difference of 40 degrees C. The negative sign indicates that the polarity of the material is n-type. For measurement of the thermal conductivity, the sample was sandwiched between the heat source and the heat sink, and a steady-state power of 1.42 W was provided while monitoring the temperature difference across the sample. Based on Fourier's law of conduction, the thermal conductivity of the sample was estimated to be approximately 0.26 Wm(-1) K-. The electrical resistivity was estimated to be 29 Omega cm. The figure of merit of MoS2 was estimated to be 1.99 x 10(-4).

  • 15.
    Bera, Anup Kumar
    et al.
    UGC DAE Consortium Sci Res, Khandwa Rd, Indore 452001, India..
    Dev, Arun Singh
    UGC DAE Consortium Sci Res, Khandwa Rd, Indore 452001, India..
    Kuila, Manik
    UGC DAE Consortium Sci Res, Khandwa Rd, Indore 452001, India..
    Ranjan, Mukesh
    Inst Plasma Res, FCIPT, Bhat 382428, Gandhinagar, India..
    Pandit, Pallavi
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Schwartzkopf, Matthias
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Reddy, Varimalla R.
    UGC DAE Consortium Sci Res, Khandwa Rd, Indore 452001, India..
    Kumar, Dileep
    UGC DAE Consortium Sci Res, Khandwa Rd, Indore 452001, India..
    Morphology induced large magnetic anisotropy in obliquely grown nanostructured thin film on nanopatterned substrate2022In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 581, article id 152377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The artificial tailoring of magnetic anisotropy by manipulating surface and interface morphology is attracting widespread interest for its application in spintronic and magnetic memory devices. Here oblique angle deposition on a nanopatterned rippled substrate is presented as a novel route of inducing large in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) in magnetic thin films. For this purpose, Cobalt films and rippled SiO2 substrates have been taken as a model system for the present study. Here, nanopatterned substrates are prepared by low energy ion beam erosion (IBE), above which films are deposited obliquely along and normal to the ripple directions. A clear anisotropy in the growth behavior has been observed due to the inhomogeneous in-plane organization of adatoms in the form of columns. The increased shadowing effect in the films deposited obliquely normal to the direction of the ripple patterns causes preferential coalescence of the columns along the substrate ripples, resulting in stronger in-plane UMA in the film. This peculiarity in magnetic behavior is addressed by considering the morphological anisotropy governed by enhanced shadowing effect, the shape anisotropy and the dipolar interactions among the magnetostatically coupled ripple structure.

  • 16.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Farahani, Saina Kishani
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    de Carvalho, Danila Morais
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Acetylation and Sugar Composition Influence the (In)Solubility of Plant beta-Mannans and Their Interaction with Cellulose Surfaces2020In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, E-ISSN 2168-0485, Vol. 8, no 27, p. 10027-10040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant beta-mannans are complex heteropolysaccharides that represent an abundant resource from lignocellulosic biomass. The influence of the molecular motifs of plant mannans on the backbone flexibility, solubility, and the interaction with cellulose was investigated by computational and experimental approaches. The regioselectivity of the acetyl substitutions at C2 and C3 distinctively influenced backbone flexibility in aqueous media, as revealed by molecular dynamic simulations. The molecular weight and degree of acetylation were tailored for two model seed mannans (galactomannan and glucomannan) and compared to spruce acetylated galactoglucomannan. The thermal stability was enhanced with increasing acetyl substitutions, independently of the type of mannan. Dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy revealed that the occurrence of galactosylation and a low degree of acetylation (similar to that of native acetylated galactoglucomannans) enhanced solubility/dispersibility of mannans, whereas the solubility/dispersibility decreased for higher degrees of acetylation. Mannan solubility influenced their interactions with cellulose at water-cellulose interfaces in terms of adsorbed mass and viscoelastic properties of the adsorbed mannan layers. Our results reveal that modulating the molecular motifs of plant beta-mannans influences their macromolecular conformation and physicochemical properties, with fundamental implications for their role in the plant cell wall and the design of wood-based materials.

  • 17.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Peijs, Ton
    Cellulose Biocomposites: From Bulk Moldings to Nanostructured Systems2010In: MRS bulletin, ISSN 0883-7694, E-ISSN 1938-1425, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 201-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose biocomposites are widely used in industry as a low-cost engineering material with plant fiber reinforcement. However, chemical and microstructural heterogeneity causes low strength, low strain-to-failure, high moisture sensitivity, and odor and discoloration problems. Efforts toward improved performance through fiber orientation control, increased fiber lengths, and biopolymer use are reviewed. Interfacial strength control and moisture sensitivity are remaining challenges. As an attractive alternative reinforcement, high-quality cellulose nanofibers obtained by wood pulp fiber disintegration can be prepared at low cost. These nanofibers have high length/diameter ratios, diameters in the 5-15 nm range, and intrinsically superior physical properties. Wood cellulose nanofibers are interesting as an alternative reinforcement to more expensive nanoparticles, such as carbon nanotubes. Nanopaper and polymer matrix nanocomposites based on cellulose nanofiber networks show high strength, high work-of-fracture, low moisture adsorption, low thermal expansion, high thermal stability, high thermal conductivity, exceptional barrier properties, and high optical transparency. The favorable mechanical performance of bioinspired foams and low-density aerogels is reviewed. Future applications of cellulose biocomposites will be extended from the high-volume/low-cost end toward high-tech applications, where cellulose properties are fully exploited in nanostructured materials.

  • 18.
    Berglund, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Yang, Xuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berthold, Fredrik
    RISE Bioecon, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holocellulose fibers: combining mechanical performance and optical transmittance2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Boujemaoui, Assya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Ansari, Farhan
    Stanford Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanostructural Effects in High Cellulose Content Thermoplastic Nanocomposites with a Covalently Grafted Cellulose-Poly(methyl methacrylate) Interface2019In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 598-607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A critical aspect in materials design of polymer nanocomposites is the nature of the nanoparticle/polymer interface. The present study investigates the effect of manipulation of the interface between cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) on the optical, thermal, and mechanical properties of the corresponding nanocomposites. The CNF/PMMA interface is altered with a minimum of changes in material composition so that interface effects can be analyzed. The hydroxyl-rich surface of CNF fibrils is exploited to modify the CNF surface via an epoxide-hydroxyl reaction. CNF/PMMA nanocomposites are then prepared with high CNF content (similar to 38 wt %) using an approach where a porous CNF mat is impregnated with monomer or polymer. The nanocomposite interface is controlled by either providing PMMA grafts from the modified CNF surface or by solvent-assisted diffusion of PMMA into a CNF network (native and modified). The high content of CNF fibrils of similar to 6 nm diameter leads to a strong interface and polymer matrix distribution effects. Moisture uptake and mechanical properties are measured at different relative humidity conditions. The nanocomposites with PMMA molecules grafted to cellulose exhibited much higher optical transparency, thermal stability, and hygro-mechanical properties than the control samples. The present modification and preparation strategies are versatile and may be used for cellulose nanocomposites of other compositions, architectures, properties, and functionalities.

  • 20.
    Brett, Calvin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Forslund, Ola Kenji
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Nocerino, Elisabetta
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Kreuzer, Lucas
    Wiedmann, Tobias
    Porcar, Lionel
    Yamada, Norifumi
    Matsubara, Nami
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Månsson, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Müller-Buschbaum, Peter
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Humidity-induced Nanoscale Restructuring in PEDOT:PSS and Cellulose reinforced Bio-based Organic ElectronicsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Brett, Calvin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg 22607, Germany.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Ohm, Wiebke
    Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestr. 85, 22607, Hamburg, Germany.
    Gensch, Marc
    Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestr. 85, 22607, Hamburg, Germany.
    Kreuzer, Lucas P.
    Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestr. 85, 22607, Hamburg, Germany.
    Körstgens, Volker
    Lehrstuhl für Funktionelle Materialien, Physik-Department, and ¶ Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Technische Universitat ̈ München, Garching 85748, Germany.
    Månsson, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Frielinghaus, Henrich
    Jülich Centre for Neutron Science at MLZ.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg 22607, Germany.
    Water-Induced Structural Rearrangements on the Nanoscale in Ultrathin Nanocellulose Films2019In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 52, no 12, p. 4721-4728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many nanoscale biopolymer building blocks with defect-free molecular structure and exceptional mechanical properties have the potential to surpass the performance of existing fossil-based materials with respect to barrier properties, load-bearing substrates for advanced functionalities, as well as light-weight construction. Comprehension and control of performance variations of macroscopic biopolymer materials caused by humidity-driven structural changes at the nanoscale are imperative and challenging. A long-lasting challenge is the interaction with water molecules causing reversible changes in the intrinsic molecular structures that adversely affects the macroscale performance. Using in situ advanced X-ray and neutron scattering techniques, we reveal the structural rearrangements at the nanoscale in ultrathin nanocellulose films with humidity variations. These reversible rearrangements are then correlated with wettability that can be tuned. The results and methodology have general implications not only on the performance of cellulose-based materials but also for hierarchical materials fabricated with other organic and inorganic moisture-sensitive building blocks.

  • 22.
    Brett, Calvin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ohm, Wiebke
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany..
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. DESY, Hamburg, Germany..
    GISAS study of spray deposited metal precursor ink on a cellulose template2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Brett, Calvin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. DESY, Photon Sci, Hamburg, Germany.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ohm, Wiebke
    DESY, Photon Sci, Hamburg, Germany..
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. DESY, Photon Sci, Hamburg, Germany..
    In situ self-assembly study in bio-based thin films2018In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Brett, Calvin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics.
    Ohm, Wiebke
    Fricke, Björn
    Laarmann, Tim
    Körstgens, Volker
    Müller-Buschbaum, Peter
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Nanocellulose-Assisted Thermally-Induced Growth of Silver Nanoparticles for Optical ApplicationsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Brunova, Alica
    et al.
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Vegso, Karol
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia.;Slovak Acad Sci, Ctr Adv Mat Applicat, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Nadazdy, Vojtech
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia.;Slovak Acad Sci, Ctr Adv Mat Applicat, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Nadazdy, Peter
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Subair, Riyas
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Jergel, Matej
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia.;Slovak Acad Sci, Ctr Adv Mat Applicat, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Majkova, Eva
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia.;Slovak Acad Sci, Ctr Adv Mat Applicat, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Pandit, Pallavi
    DESY, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. DESY, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Krasnansky, Alexander
    Boston Univ, Dept Phys, 233 Bay State Rd, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Hinderhofer, Alexander
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Appl Phys, Morgenstelle 10, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany..
    Schreiber, Frank
    Univ Tubingen, Inst Appl Phys, Morgenstelle 10, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany..
    Tian, Jianjun
    Univ Sci & Technol Beijing, Inst Adv Mat & Technol, Beijing 100083, Peoples R China..
    Siffalovic, Peter
    Slovak Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia.;Slovak Acad Sci, Ctr Adv Mat Applicat, Dubravska Cesta 9, Bratislava 84511, Slovakia..
    Structural and Trap-State Density Enhancement in Flash Infrared Annealed Perovskite Layers2021In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 8, no 14, article id 2100355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perovskite solar cells are well-known for their high energy conversion efficiency, low-temperature processing, and cost-effective production. Flash infrared annealing (FIRA) of slot-die cast perovskite precursors offers an attractive manufacturing route using high-throughput roll-to-roll technology. Despite the recent progress in FIRA perovskite annealing, the optimal composition of the perovskite precursor is yet to be developed. Here, the effect of methylammonium chloride (MACI) on the perovskite structure and trap-state density as a function ofthe FIRA annealing time is investigated. In situ real-time grazingincidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) is employed to monitor the perovskite layer formation during FIRA annealing with millisecond temporal resolution. In addition, the density of states in the bandgap is estimated using ex situ energy-resolved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Evidence is found that adding 10% MACI into the perovskite precursor solution significantly improves the crystallographic orientation of the perovskite layers while reducing the trap-state density by one order of magnitude. In addition, using time-resolved GIWAXS, the most favorable time window for the FIRA processing of perovskite films with the lowest mosaicity and trap-state density is identified. The results are of general importance for elucidating the appropriate temporal windows in complex and fast-evolving crystallization processes.

  • 26. Cao, W.
    et al.
    Yin, S.
    Bitsch, M.
    Liang, S.
    Plank, M.
    Opel, M.
    Scheel, M. A.
    Gallei, M.
    Janka, O.
    Schwartzkopf, M.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestraße 85, Hamburg, 22607, Germany..
    Müller-Buschbaum, P.
    In Situ Study of FePt Nanoparticles-Induced Morphology Development during Printing of Magnetic Hybrid Diblock Copolymer Films2022In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 2107667-, article id 2107667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of magnetic hybrid films containing diblock copolymers (DBCs) and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) by printing is a highly promising method for scalable and low-cost fabrication. During printing, the drying and arrangement kinetics of the DBC and magnetic NPs play an important role in the film formation concerning morphology and magnetic properties. In this study, the morphology evolution of ultrahigh molecular weight DBC polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) and magnetic iron platinum (FePt) NPs is investigated with grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) in situ during printing. For comparison, a pure DBC film is printed without FePt NPs under the same conditions. The GISAXS data suggest that the addition of NPs accelerates the solvent evaporation, leading to a faster film formation of the hybrid film compared to the pure film. As the solvent is almost evaporated, a metastable state is observed in both films. Compared with the pure film, such a metastable state continues longer during the printing process of the hybrid film because of the presence of FePt NPs, which inhibits the reorganization of the DBC chains. Moreover, investigations of the field-dependent magnetization and temperature-dependent susceptibility indicate that the printed hybrid film is superparamagnetic, which makes this film class promising for magnetic sensors.

  • 27. Cao, Wei
    et al.
    Yin, Shanshan
    Plank, Martina
    Chumakov, Andrei
    Opel, Matthias
    Chen, Wei
    Kreuzer, Lucas P.
    Heger, Julian E.
    Gallei, Markus
    Brett, Calvin J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Schwartzkopf, Matthias
    Eliseev, Artem A.
    Anokhin, Evgeny O.
    Trusov, Lev A.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter
    Spray-Deposited Anisotropic Ferromagnetic Hybrid Polymer Films of PS-b-PMMA and Strontium Hexaferrite Magnetic Nanoplatelets2021In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1592-1602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spray deposition is a scalable and cost-effective technique for the fabrication of magnetic hybrid films containing diblock copolymers (DBCs) and magnetic nanoparticles. However, it is challenging to obtain spray-deposited anisotropic magnetic hybrid films without using external magnetic fields. In the present work, spray deposition is applied to prepare perpendicular anisotropic magnetic hybrid films by controlling the orientation of strontium hexaferrite nanoplatelets inside ultra-high-molecular-weight DBC polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) films. During spray deposition, the evolution of DBC morphology and the orientation of magnetic nanoplatelets are monitored with in situ grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). For reference, a pure DBC film without nanoplatelets is deposited with the same conditions. Solvent-controlled magnetic properties of the hybrid film are proven with solvent vapor annealing (SVA) applied to the final deposited magnetic films. Obvious changes in the DBC morphology and nanoplatelet localization are observed during SVA. The superconducting quantum interference device data show that ferromagnetic hybrid polymer films with high coercivity can be achieved via spray deposition. The hybrid films show a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy before SVA, which is strongly weakened after SVA. The spray-deposited hybrid films appear highly promising for potential applications in magnetic data storage and sensors.

  • 28.
    Capezza, Antonio Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials. SLU Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Sundsvagen 10,POB 101, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden.
    Wu, Qiong
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Newson, William R.
    SLU Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Sundsvagen 10,POB 101, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden..
    Olsson, Richard
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Espuche, Eliane
    Univ Lyon, Univ Lyon1, Ingn Mat Polymeres, UMR CNRS 5223, Batiment Polytech 15,Bd Andre Latarjet, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France..
    Johansson, Eva
    SLU Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Plant Breeding, Sundsvagen 10,POB 101, SE-23053 Alnarp, Sweden..
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Superabsorbent and Fully Biobased Protein Foams with a Natural Cross-Linker and Cellulose Nanofibers2019In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 4, no 19, p. 18257-18267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of fully natural wheat gluten foams showing rapid and high uptake of water, sheep blood, and saline solution, while maintaining high mechanical stability in the swollen state, is presented. Genipin was added as a natural and polar cross-linker to increase the polarity of the protein chains, whereas cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) were added as a reinforcement/stiffener of the foams, alone or in combination with the genipin. The presence of only genipin resulted in a foam that absorbed up to 25 g of water per gram of foam and a more than 15 g uptake in only 8 min. In contrast, with CNF alone, it was not possible to maintain the mechanical stability of the foam during the water uptake and the protein foam disintegrated. The combination of CNF and genipin yielded a material with the best mechanical stability of the tested samples. In the latter case, the foam could be compressed repeatedly more than 80% without displaying any structural damage. The results revealed that a strong network had formed between the wheat gluten matrix, genipin, and cellulose in the foam structure. A unique feature of the absorbent/foam, in contrast to commercial superabsorbents, was that it was able to rapidly absorb nonpolar liquids (here, n-heptane) due to the open-cell structure. The capillary-driven absorption due to the open-cell structure, the high liquid absorption in the cell walls, and the mechanical properties (both in dry and swollen states) of these natural foams make them interesting as a sustainable replacement for a range of petroleum-based foam materials, including absorbent hygiene products such as sanitary pads.

  • 29. Carosio, F.
    et al.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Kochumalayil, Joby
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Green and Fire Resistant Nanocellulose/Hemicellulose/Clay Foams2021In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 8, no 18, article id 2101111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lightweight polymer foams from synthetic polymers are commonly used in a wide-spread spectrum of application fields. Their intrinsic flammability coupled with restrictions on flame retardant chemicals poses a severe threat to safety. Here, fire resistant foams comprising biobased components capable of replacing petroleum-based foams are investigated. Cellulose nanofibers are combined with 2D montmorillonite nanoplatelets and a native xyloglucan hemicellulose binder, using a water-based freeze casting approach. Due to the silicate nanoplatelets, these lightweight foams self-extinguish the flame during flammability tests. The limiting oxygen index is as high as 31.5% and in the same range as the best fire-retardant synthetic foams available. In cone calorimetry, the foams display extremely low combustion rates. Smoke release is near the detection limit of the instrument. In addition, the foams are withstanding the penetration of a flame torch focused on one side of the specimen (T on surface 800 °C) and structural integrity is maintained. At the same time, the unexposed side is insulated, as demonstrated by a through-thickness temperature drop of 680 °C cm−1. The results represent a tremendous opportunity for the development of fire-safe foams combining excellent sustainability with multifunctional performance.

  • 30.
    Cederholm, Linnea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Olsen, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Odelius, Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Chemical recycling to monomer: thermodynamic and kinetic control of the ring-closing depolymerization of aliphatic polyesters and polycarbonatesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Cederholm, Linnea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Olsen, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Odelius, Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Chemical recycling to monomer: thermodynamic and kinetic control of the ring-closing depolymerization of aliphatic polyesters and polycarbonates2023In: Polymer Chemistry, ISSN 1759-9954, E-ISSN 1759-9962, Vol. 14, no 28, p. 3270-3276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thermodynamic equilibrium between ring-opening polymerization and ring-closing depolymerization is influenced by monomer-solvent-polymer interactions, an effect that can be utilized to promote chemical recycling to monomer. Here, the influence of monomer structure on this solvent effect has been investigated, showing that the chemical structure of the monomer influences the power of the solvent to supress the ceiling temperature. The study also demonstrates how catalyst selectivity can be utilized to obtain selective ring-closing depolymerization of one component of a polymer blend, even when the thermodynamics dictate otherwise.

  • 32.
    Cederholm, Linnea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Olsen, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Odelius, Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Design for recycling: polyester and polycarbonate based A-B-A block copolymers and their recyclability back to monomerManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Cederholm, Linnea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Olsen, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Odelius, Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Design for Recycling: Polyester- and Polycarbonate-Based A-B-A Block Copolymers and Their Recyclability Back to Monomers2023In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 56, no 10, p. 3641-3649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemical recycling to monomers (CRMs) of A-B-Ablockcopolymers is governed by the chemical structure and thereby the thermodynamicbehavior of different block constituents. Here, we show how a thermodynamictoolkit based on a cyclic monomer structure and solvent propertiescan be utilized in the design of recyclable A-B-A blockcopolymers with varying material properties. By combining four cyclicmonomers lactide, epsilon-decalactone, 2,2-diethyltrimethylene carbonate,and trimethylene carbonate, three different block copolymers werecreated, suitable for different CRM scenarios. The chemical structureof the soft midblock (epsilon-decalactone or trimethylene carbonate)appeared to have a critical impact both on the ring-closing depolymerizationbehavior and mechanical properties, where changing from a polyesterto a polycarbonate soft block increased Young's modulus from14 to 200 MPa. Hence, this work demonstrates the complexity as wellas the opportunities in the design of macromolecular structures fora circular economy.

  • 34.
    Cederholm, Linnea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Olsen, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Hakkarainen, Minna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Odelius, Karin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    “Like Recycles Like”: Selective Ring-Closing Depolymerization of Poly(L-Lactic Acid) to L-Lactide2022In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 61, no 33, article id e202204531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemical recycling of poly(L-lactic acid) to the cyclic monomer L-lactide is hampered by low selectivity and by epimerization and elimination reactions, impeding its use on a large scale. The high number of side reactions originates from the high ceiling temperature (Tc) of L-lactide, which necessitates high temperatures or multistep reactions to achieve recycling to L-lactide. To circumvent this issue, we utilized the impact of solvent interactions on the monomer–polymer equilibrium to decrease the Tc of L-lactide. Analyzing the observed Tc in different solvents in relation to their Hildebrand solubility parameter revealed a “like recycles like” relationship. The decreased Tc, obtained by selecting solvents that interact strongly with the monomer (dimethyl formamide or the green solvent γ-valerolactone), allowed chemical recycling of high-molecular-weight poly(L-lactic acid) directly to L-lactide, within 1–4 h at 140 °C, with >95 % conversion and 98–99 % selectivity. Recycled L-lactide was isolated and repolymerized with high control over molecular weight and dispersity, closing the polymer loop. 

  • 35.
    Chen, Bin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Coppieters, S.
    Department of Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Ghent Campus, Gebroeders De Smetstraat 1, 9000, Ghent, Belgium, Ghent Campus, Gebroeders De Smetstraat 1.
    Meshfree Digital Image Correlation Using Element Free Galerkin Method: Theory, Algorithm and Validation2023In: Experimental mechanics, ISSN 0014-4851, E-ISSN 1741-2765, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 517-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The association of advanced digital image correlation (DIC) and numerical simulation has been widely used for inverse parameter identification. Objective: It is attractive to develop an accurate DIC method sharing the common features with numerical simulation, which can lead to better synergy between experiments and simulations. Methods: A new meshfree digital image correlation (MF-DIC) using element free Galerkin method (EFGM) is proposed for deformation measurement. The EFGM is a classical meshfree method in numerical studies, and it is directly used to construct the shape function in MF-DIC from a set of scattered nodes for image matching. The MF-DIC is principally different from the classical local DIC and global DIC since it does not rely on the concept of a subset or an element. Results: In MF-DIC, the C1-continuous displacement for every point is constructed based on a group of scattered nodes in a small support domain surrounding it. The continuous strain map can then be directly derived from the displacement, instead of using an additional smoothing technique as required in classical local DIC or post-processing used in global DIC. A performance assessment based on the Metrological Efficiency Indicator (MEI), as defined in DIC Challenge 2.0, shows that the proposed MF-DIC yields an excellent balance between spatial resolution and measurement resolution for both displacement and strain measurements. Conclusions: Given that the proposed MF-DIC shares common features with the classical meshfree method in computational mechanics, it paves the way for an enhanced synergy between experiments and simulations required for robust inverse parameter identification methods.

  • 36.
    Chen, Bin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Coppieters, Sam
    Department of Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Ghent Technology Campus, Gebroeders De Smetstraat 1, 9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Jungstedt, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Element-removal global digital image correlation for accurate discontinuous deformation field measurement in fracture mechanics2023In: Engineering Fracture Mechanics, ISSN 0013-7944, E-ISSN 1873-7315, Vol. 290, article id 109493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose an element-removal (ER) global digital image correlation (DIC) method to improve the measurement accuracy of discontinuous deformation fields, such as crack propagation. The occurrence of cracks in materials or structures inevitably deteriorates the tracking accuracy, and, consequently, the strain field accuracy obtained by regular subset and global DIC. The proposed ER-global-DIC algorithm iteratively identifies and removes all the elements covering the crack, during the updating of displacement fields. In the remaining elements, the continuous shape function is applicable for accurate deformation measurement. In principle, although elements that contain the cracks are removed, the algorithm preserves the same number of nodes since the nodes are retained by the remaining elements. Synthetically deformed images based on analytical discontinuous displacement fields validate the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed method. The ER-global-DIC is further applied to measure the discontinuous displacement fields containing a crack deflection, generated from a finite element model with a cohesive zone model. The results demonstrate the potential of the proposed method for discontinuous deformation measurement on advanced materials, e.g., fiber-reinforced composites.

  • 37.
    Chen, Bin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Jungstedt, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Fast and large-converge-radius inverse compositional Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for digital image correlation: principle, validation, and open-source toolbox2022In: Optics and lasers in engineering, ISSN 0143-8166, E-ISSN 1873-0302, Vol. 151, article id 106930Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an inverse compositional Levenberg-Marquardt (IC-LM) algorithm for robust, efficient, and accurate image registration in digital image correlation (DIC). In essence, the IC-LM algorithm is a mixture of the classical inverse compositional Gaussian-Newton (IC-GN) and gradient descent algorithms. Further normalization of the local coordinate and image intensity is also introduced to adaptively initialize the damping parameter in the IC-LM algorithm. The proposed IC-LM algorithm is proven to hold a larger converge radius while having comparable accuracy, precision, and efficiency compared with the classical IC-GN algorithm. The efficient reliability-guided displacement tracking strategy is also merged into the IC-LM algorithm to provide an accurate initial guess for all calculation points. For the sake of reproducibility of this algorithm, the open-source MATLAB toolbox featuring the IC-LM algorithm is available on GitHub ( https://github.com/cbbuaa/DIC _ ICLM _ MATLAB ).

  • 38.
    Chen, Bin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Montanari, Celine
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Photonics.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    A distortion-map-based method for morphology generation in multi-phase materials - application to wood2023In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 244, article id 110262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased use of multi-phase, wood-based biocomposites may contribute to sustainable development. The porous microstructure offers unique possibilities for modification, but global properties are often predicted based on simplified unit cells and homogenization. For materials design, simulations based on complex 3D microstructures with statistical variability are alternatives to better understanding physical properties. Parametric models are developed in a distortion-map-based method to represent 3D wood microstructures. Basic structures of uniform tubular cells and other features are generated followed by distortion mapping. These maps are highly adaptable and can generate realistic features and variability. Fibers, vessels, and ray cells are realistically distributed. The models are realistic, versatile, and scalable, as well as can be used to simulate the mechanical, optical, and hydrodynamic properties of complex composites. The model is promising for generating large sets of data to train deep learning networks for multi-physics research.

  • 39. Chen, C.
    et al.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Burgert, I.
    Hu, L.
    Wood Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies2021In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 33, no 28, article id 2006207Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40. Chen, C.
    et al.
    Kuang, Y.
    Zhu, S.
    Burgert, I.
    Keplinger, T.
    Gong, A.
    Li, T.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Eichhorn, S. J.
    Hu, L.
    Structure-property-function relationships of natural and engineered wood2020In: Nature Reviews Materials, ISSN 2058-8437, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 642-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The porous hierarchical structure and anisotropy of wood make it a strong candidate for the design of materials with various functions, including load bearing, multiscale mass transport, and optical and thermal management. In this Review, the composition, structure, characterization methods, modification strategies, properties and applications of natural and modified wood are discussed.

    The complex structure of wood, one of the most abundant biomaterials on Earth, has been optimized over 270 million years of tree evolution. This optimization has led to the highly efficient water and nutrient transport, mechanical stability and durability of wood. The unique material structure and pronounced anisotropy of wood endows it with an array of remarkable properties, yielding opportunities for the design of functional materials. In this Review, we provide a materials and structural perspective on how wood can be redesigned via structural engineering, chemical and/or thermal modification to alter its mechanical, fluidic, ionic, optical and thermal properties. These modifications enable a diverse range of applications, including the development of high-performance structural materials, energy storage and conversion, environmental remediation, nanoionics, nanofluidics, and light and thermal management. We also highlight advanced characterization and computational-simulation approaches for understanding the structure-property-function relationships of natural and modified wood, as well as informing bio-inspired synthetic designs. In addition, we provide our perspective on the future directions of wood research and the challenges and opportunities for industrialization.

  • 41.
    Chen, Hui
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Light Scattering Effects in Transparent Wood Biocomposites2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparent wood (TW) shows interesting optical properties and offers a sustainable alternative to petroleum-based polymer glasses. The influence of the TW internal structure (e.g. fiber alignment, volume fraction of cellulose, lignin content, defects from preparation process) on the optical properties is poorly understood, which limits its use in various applications. It is also true for transparent cellulose biocomposites in general. In this thesis, eco-friendly TW biocomposites are investigated. The work focuses on experimental characterization, structure-optical property relationships and possibilities to quantify such relationships.  

                    TWs made of delignified wood substrates with longitudinal direction of the tree parallel to the specimen surface are prepared. Relationships between anisotropic scattering and fiber alignment are studied by scattering angle measurement. Anisotropic photons distributions are compared between two fiber directions and various sample thicknesses. Next, attenuation coefficients (related to the anisotropic diffusion coefficients and absorption coefficient) for TWs are obtained by combining the photon diffusion equation with total transmittance measurements. The results indicate strong influence from the air gaps between wood substrate phase and polymer in the lumen pores on the scattering. Beside the airgaps between wood substrate and polymer, refractive index mismatch between polymer and wood substrate strongly influences the scattering. Thus, immersion liquid method (based on the total transmittance measurement) combined with a light transmission model (based on Fresnel reflection theory) is applied to estimate the refractive index of the delignified wood substrate. This facilitates TW design (i.e. the proper polymer selection for various applications) and modelling of the optical properties of delignified wood based transparent materials. Finally, extinction coefficients, Rayleigh scattering and absorption coefficients of TW are extracted from photon budget measurements combined with a light diffusion model developed. With higher volume fraction of cellulose, all these parameters are increased, although polymer-cellulose refractive index mismatch is the dominating factor controlling transmittance. The strong forward scattering in TW is analysed, and Rayleigh scattering has a strong effect on haze. The influence of lignin content on the absorption coefficient is also discussed.

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  • 42.
    Chen, Hui
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Montanari, Celine
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Shanker, Ravi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Marcinkevičius, Saulius
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Photonics.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Sychugov, Ilya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Photonics.
    Photon Walk in Transparent Wood: Scattering and Absorption in Hierarchically Structured Materials2022In: Advanced Optical Materials, ISSN 2162-7568, E-ISSN 2195-1071, article id 2102732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The optical response of hierarchical materials is convoluted, which hinders their direct study and property control. Transparent wood (TW) is an emerging biocomposite in this category, which adds optical function to the structural properties of wood. Nano- and microscale inhomogeneities in composition, structure and at interfaces strongly affect light transmission and haze. While interface manipulation can tailor TW properties, the realization of optically clear wood requires detailed understanding of light-TW interaction mechanisms. Here we show how material scattering and absorption coefficients can be extracted from a combination of experimental spectroscopic measurements and a photon diffusion model. Contributions from different length scales can thus be deciphered and quantified. It is shown that forward scattering dominates haze in TW, primarily caused by refractive index mismatch between the wood substrate and the polymer phase. Rayleigh scattering from the wood cell wall and absorption from residual lignin have minor effects on transmittance, but the former affects haze. Results provide guidance for material design of transparent hierarchical composites towards desired optical functionality; we demonstrate experimentally how transmittance and haze of TW can be controlled over a broad range.

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  • 43.
    Chen, Hui
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Montanari, Celine
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Yan, Max
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Photonics.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Photonics.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Sychugov, Ilya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Photonics.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Refractive index of delignified wood for transparent biocomposites2020In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 10, p. 40719-40724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Refractive index (RI) determination for delignified wood templates is vital for transparent wood composite fabrication. Reported RIs in the literature are based on either single plant fibers or wood powder, measured by the immersion liquid method (ILM) combined with mathematical fitting. However, wood structure complexity and the physical background of the fitting were not considered. In this work, RIs of delignified wood templates were measured by the ILM combined with a light transmission model developed from the Fresnel reflection/refraction theory for composite materials. The RIs of delignified balsa wood are 1.536 ± 0.006 and 1.525 ± 0.008 at the wavelength of 589 nm for light propagating perpendicular and parallel to the wood fiber direction, respectively. For delignified birch wood, corresponding values are 1.537 ± 0.005 and 1.529 ± 0.006, respectively. The RI data for delignified wood scaffolds are important for tailoring optical properties of transparent wood biocomposites, and also vital in optical properties investigations by theoretical modelling of complex light propagation in transparent wood and related composites. The developed light transmission model in combination with the immersion liquid method can be used to determine the RI of complex porous or layered solid materials and composites.

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  • 44. Chen, P.
    et al.
    Nishiyama, Y.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Quantifying the influence of dispersion interactions on the elastic properties of crystalline cellulose2021In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 28, no 17, p. 10777-10786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dispersion and electrostatic interactions both contribute significantly to the tight assembly of macromolecular chains within crystalline polysaccharides. Using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT) calculation, we estimated the elastic tensor of the four crystalline cellulose allomorphs whose crystal structures that are hitherto available, namely, cellulose Iα, Iβ, II, IIII. Comparison between calculations with and without dispersion correction allows quantification of the exact contribution of dispersion to stiffness at molecular level.

  • 45.
    Chen, Pan
    et al.
    Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Beijing Engn Res Ctr Cellulose & Its Derivat, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Nishiyama, Yoshiharu
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, CERMAV, CNRS, F-38000 Grenoble, France..
    Pingali, Sai Venkatesh
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Neutron Scattering Div, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 USA.;Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Ctr Struct Mol Biol, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 USA..
    O'Neill, Hugh M.
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Neutron Scattering Div, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 USA.;Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Ctr Struct Mol Biol, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 USA..
    Zhang, Qiu
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Neutron Scattering Div, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 USA.;Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Ctr Struct Mol Biol, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 USA..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Small Angle Neutron Scattering Shows Nanoscale PMMA Distribution in Transparent Wood Biocomposites2021In: Nano Letters, ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 2883-2890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparent wood biocomposites based on PMMA combine high optical transmittance with excellent mechanical properties. One hypothesis is that despite poor miscibility the polymer is distributed at the nanoscale inside the cell wall. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments are performed to test this hypothesis, using biocomposites based on deuterated PMMA and "contrast-matched" PMMA. The wood cell wall nanostructure soaked in heavy water is quantified in terms of the correlation distance d between the center of elementary cellulose fibrils. For wood/deuterated PMMA, this distance d is very similar as for wood/heavy water (correlation peaks at q approximate to 0.1 angstrom(-1)). The peak disappears when contrast-matched PMMA is used, indeed proving nanoscale polymer distribution in the cell wall. The specific processing method used for transparent wood explains the nanocomposite nature of the wood cell wall and can serve as a nanotechnology for cell wall impregnation of polymers in large wood biocomposite structures.

  • 46.
    Chen, Pan
    et al.
    Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Beijing Engn Res Ctr Cellulose & Its Derivat, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Lo Re, Giada
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Ind & Mat Sci, SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Surface modification effects on nanocellulose - molecular dynamics simulations using umbrella sampling and computational alchemy2020In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, E-ISSN 2050-7496, Vol. 8, no 44, p. 23617-23627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Topochemical modification of nanocellulose particles, in particular acetylation, is commonly used to reduce hygroscopicity and improve their dispersibility in non-polar polymers. Despite enormous experimental efforts on cellulose surface modification, there is currently no comprehensive model which considers both (a) the specific interactions between nanocellulose particles and the surrounding liquid or polymer matrix, and (b) the interactions between the particles themselves. The second mechanism is therefore frequently ignored. The present approach is based on atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, where computational alchemy is used to calculate the changes in interactions between nanocellulose and the surrounding medium (liquid or polymer) upon modification. This is combined with another method, based on potential of mean force, to calculate interactions between particles. Results show that both contributions are of equal importance for nanoparticle surface acetylation effects. The proposed method is not restricted to either cellulose or acetylation, and has the prospect to find application in a broad context of nanomaterials design.

  • 47.
    Chen, Pan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Beijing Engn Res Ctr Cellulose & Derivat, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Furo, Istvan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Water as an Intrinsic Structural Element in Cellulose Fibril Aggregates2022In: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, ISSN 1948-7185, E-ISSN 1948-7185, Vol. 13, no 24, p. 5424-5430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While strong water association with cellulose in plant cell walls and man-made materials is well-established, its molecular scale aspects are not fully understood. The thermodynamic consequences of having water molecules located at the microfibril-microfibril interfaces in cellulose fibril aggregates are therefore analyzed by molecular dynamics simulations. We find that a thin layer of water molecules at those interfaces can be in a state of thermal equilibrium with water surrounding the fibril aggregates because such an arrangement lowers the free energy of the total system. The main reason is enthalpic: water at the microfibril- microfibril interfaces enables the cellulose surface hydroxyls to experience a more favorable electrostatic environment. This enthalpic gain overcomes the entropic penalty from strong immobilization of water molecules. Hence, those particular water molecules stabilize the cellulose fibril aggregates, akin to the role of water in some proteins. Structural and functional hypotheses related to this finding are presented.

  • 48.
    Chen, Pan
    et al.
    Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Beijing Engn Res Ctr Cellulose & Its Derivat, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Zhao, Changjun
    Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Beijing Engn Res Ctr Cellulose & Its Derivat, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Huanyu
    Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Beijing Engn Res Ctr Cellulose & Its Derivat, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Li, Yiwei
    Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Beijing Engn Res Ctr Cellulose & Its Derivat, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Tan, Guoqiang
    Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Beijing Engn Res Ctr Cellulose & Its Derivat, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Shao, Ziqiang
    Beijing Inst Technol, Sch Mat Sci & Engn, Beijing Engn Res Ctr Cellulose & Its Derivat, Beijing 100081, Peoples R China..
    Nishiyama, Yoshiharu
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, CERMAV, F-38000 Grenoble, France..
    Hu, Tao
    Shanghai Univ, Dept Mat Sci, Shanghai 200444, Peoples R China..
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Quantifying the Contribution of the Dispersion Interaction and Hydrogen Bonding to the Anisotropic Elastic Properties of Chitin and Chitosan2022In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 1633-1642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The elastic tensors of chitin and chitosan allomorphs were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with and without the dispersion correction and compared with experimental values. The longitudinal Young's moduli were 114.9 or 126.9 GPa for alpha-chitin depending on the hydrogen bond pattern: 129.0 GPa for beta-chitin and 191.5 GPa for chitosan. Furthermore, the moduli were found to vary between 17.0 and 52.8 GPa in the transverse directions and between 2.2 and 15.2 GPa in shear. Switching off the dispersion correction led to a decrease in modulus by up to 63%, depending on the direction. The transverse Young's moduli of a-chitin strongly depended on the hydroxylmethyl group conformation coupled with the dispersion correction, suggesting a synergy between hydrogen bonding and dispersion interactions. The calculated longitudinal Young's moduli were, in general, higher than experimental values obtained in static conditions, and the Poisson's ratios were lower than experimental values obtained in static conditions.

  • 49. Chen, W.
    et al.
    Guo, R.
    Tang, H.
    Wienhold, K. S.
    Li, N.
    Jiang, Z.
    Tang, J.
    Jiang, X.
    Kreuzer, L. P.
    Liu, H.
    Schwartzkopf, M.
    Sun, X. W.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany.
    Wang, K.
    Xu, B.
    Müller-Buschbaum, P.
    Operando structure degradation study of PbS quantum dot solar cells2021In: Energy & Environmental Science, ISSN 1754-5692, E-ISSN 1754-5706, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 3420-3429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PbS quantum dot (QD) solar cells demonstrate great potential in solar energy conversion with a broad and flexible spectral response. Even though long-term storage stabilities of QD solar cells were reported in literature, the operation stability from a more practical aspect, to date, has been not yet investigated. Herein, we observe the structure degradation process of a PbS QD-ink based solar cell during the device operation. Simultaneously to probing the solar cell parameters, the overall structure evolutions of the QDs in both, active layer and hole transport layer of the solar cell are studied with grazing-incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS/GIWAXS). We find a spontaneous decrease of the QD inter-dot distance with an increase in the spatial disorder in the active layer (PbX2-PbS QDs, X = I, and Br) during the operation induced degradation. Consequently, the structure disorder-induced broadening of the energy state distribution is responsible for the decrease in open-circuit voltageVocleading to the device degradation. These findings elucidate the origin of light-soaking as well as the structure degradation of QD ink-based solar cells and indicate that the stability of the device can be realized by the positional stabilization of the QDs in the QD solid.

  • 50.
    Chen, Wei
    et al.
    Physik Department, Lehrstuhl für Funktionelle Materialien, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching, Germany.
    Liang, Suzhe
    Physik Department, Lehrstuhl für Funktionelle Materialien, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching, Germany.
    Löhrer, Franziska C.
    Physik Department, Lehrstuhl für Funktionelle Materialien, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching, Germany.
    Schaper, Simon J.
    Physik Department, Lehrstuhl für Funktionelle Materialien, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching, Germany.
    Li, Nian
    Physik Department, Lehrstuhl für Funktionelle Materialien, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching, Germany.
    Cao, Wei
    Physik Department, Lehrstuhl für Funktionelle Materialien, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching, Germany.
    Kreuzer, Lucas P.
    Physik Department, Lehrstuhl für Funktionelle Materialien, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching, Germany.
    Liu, Haochen
    Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Xueyuan Blvd. 1088, 518055 Shenzhen, China.
    Tang, Haodong
    Körstgens, Völker
    Physik Department, Lehrstuhl für Funktionelle Materialien, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching, Germany.
    Schwartzkopf, Matthias
    Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany.
    Wang, Kai
    Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Xueyuan Blvd. 1088, 518055 Shenzhen, China.
    Sun, X. W.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Müller-Buschbaum, P.
    In situ Grazing-Incidence Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Observation of Gold Sputter Deposition on a PbS Quantum Dot Solid2020In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 12, no 41, p. 46942-46952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For PbS quantum dot (QD)-based optoelectronic devices, gold is the most frequently used electrode material. In most device architectures, gold is in direct contact with the QD solid. To better understand the formation of the interface between gold and a close-packed QD layer at an early stage, in situ grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering is used to observe the gold sputter deposition on a 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT)-treated PbS QD solid. In the kinetics of gold layer growth, the forming and merging of small gold clusters (radius less than 1.6 nm) are observed at the early stages. The thereby formed medium gold clusters (radius between 1.9-2.4 nm) are influenced by the QDs' templating effect. Furthermore, simulations suggest that the medium gold clusters grow preferably along the QDs' boundaries rather than as a top coating of the QDs. When the thickness of the sputtered gold layer reaches 6.25 nm, larger gold clusters with a radius of 5.3 nm form. Simultaneously, a percolation layer with a thickness of 2.5 nm is established underneath the gold clusters. This fundamental understanding of the QD-gold interface formation will help to control the implementation of sputtered gold electrodes on close-packed QD solids in device manufacturing processes.

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