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  • 1. Ahmed, Mona
    et al.
    Baumgartner, Roland
    Aldi, Silvia
    Dusart, Philip
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Hedin, Ulf
    Gustafsson, Bjorn
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    Human serum albumin-based probes for molecular targeting of macrophage scavenger receptors2019In: International Journal of Nanomedicine, ISSN 1176-9114, E-ISSN 1178-2013, Vol. 14, p. 3723-3741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Inflammation and accumulation of macrophages are key features of unstable atherosclerotic plaques. The ability of macrophages to take up molecular probes can be exploited in new clinical imaging methods for the detection of unstable atherosclerotic lesions. We investigated whether modifications of human serum albumin (HSA) could be used to target macrophages efficiently in vitro. Materials and methods: Maleylated and aconitylated HSA were compared with unmodified HSA. Fluorescent or radiolabeled (Zr-89) modified HSA was used in in vitro experiments to study cellular uptake by differentiated THP-1 cells and primary human macrophages. The time course of uptake was evaluated by flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, real-time microscopy and radioactivity measurements. The involvement of scavenger receptors (SR-Al, SR-B2, LOX-1) was assessed by knockdown experiments using RNA interference, by blocking experiments and by assays of competition by modified low-density lipoprotein. Results: Modified HSA was readily taken up by different macrophages. Uptake was mediated nonexclusively via the scavenger receptor SR-Al (encoded by the MSR1 gene). Knockdown of CD36 and ORL1 had no influence on the uptake. Modified HSA was preferentially taken up by human macrophages compared with other vascular cell types such as endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. Conclusions: Modified Zr-89-labeled HSA probes were recognized by different subsets of polarized macrophages, and maleylated HSA may be a promising radiotracer for radio-nuclide imaging of macrophage-rich inflammatory vascular diseases.

  • 2.
    Ahmed, Mona
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Ctr Mol Med, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, Björn
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Ctr Mol Med, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Aldi, Silvia
    Karolinska Inst, Sect Med Inflammat Res, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dusart, Philip
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Egri, Gabriella
    Surflay Nanotec GmbH, Max Planck Str 3, D-12489 Berlin, Germany..
    Butler, Lynn M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Bone, Dianna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Ctr Mol Med, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dahne, Lars
    Surflay Nanotec GmbH, Max Planck Str 3, D-12489 Berlin, Germany..
    Hedin, Ulf
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Ctr Mol Med, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Ctr Mol Med, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Molecular Imaging of a New Multimodal Microbubble for Adhesion Molecule Targeting2019In: Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering, ISSN 1865-5025, E-ISSN 1865-5033, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 15-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Inflammation is an important risk-associated component of many diseases and can be diagnosed by molecular imaging of specific molecules. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of targeting adhesion molecules on inflammation-activated endothelial cells and macrophages using an innovative multimodal polyvinyl alcohol-based microbubble (MB) contrast agent developed for diagnostic use in ultrasound, magnetic resonance, and nuclear imaging. Methods: We assessed the binding efficiency of antibody-conjugated multimodal contrast to inflamed murine or human endothelial cells (ECs), and to peritoneal macrophages isolated from rats with peritonitis, utilizing the fluorescence characteristics of the MBs. Single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) was used to illustrate 99m Tc-labeled MB targeting and distribution in an experimental in vivo model of inflammation. Results: Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that binding of antibody-targeted MBs to the adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1, or E-selectin, expressed on cytokine-stimulated ECs, was up to sixfold higher for human and 12-fold higher for mouse ECs, compared with that of non-targeted MBs. Under flow conditions, both VCAM-1- and E-selectin-targeted MBs adhered more firmly to stimulated human ECs than to untreated cells, while VCAM-1-targeted MBs adhered best to stimulated murine ECs. SPECT imaging showed an approximate doubling of signal intensity from the abdomen of rats with peritonitis, compared with healthy controls, after injection of anti-ICAM-1-MBs. Conclusions: This novel multilayer contrast agent can specifically target adhesion molecules expressed as a result of inflammatory stimuli in vitro, and has potential for use in disease-specific multimodal diagnostics in vivo using antibodies against targets of interest.

  • 3. Berger, Ashton C
    et al.
    Korkut, Anil
    Kanchi, Rupa S
    Hegde, Apurva M
    Lenoir, Walter
    Liu, Wenbin
    Liu, Yuexin
    Fan, Huihui
    Shen, Hui
    Ravikumar, Visweswaran
    Rao, Arvind
    Schultz, Andre
    Li, Xubin
    Sumazin, Pavel
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Mestdagh, Pieter
    Gunaratne, Preethi H
    Yau, Christina
    Bowlby, Reanne
    Robertson, A Gordon
    Tiezzi, Daniel G
    Wang, Chen
    Cherniack, Andrew D
    Godwin, Andrew K
    Kuderer, Nicole M
    Rader, Janet S
    Zuna, Rosemary E
    Sood, Anil K
    Lazar, Alexander J
    Ojesina, Akinyemi I
    Adebamowo, Clement
    Adebamowo, Sally N
    Baggerly, Keith A
    Chen, Ting-Wen
    Chiu, Hua-Sheng
    Lefever, Steve
    Liu, Liang
    MacKenzie, Karen
    Orsulic, Sandra
    Roszik, Jason
    Shelley, Carl Simon
    Song, Qianqian
    Vellano, Christopher P
    Wentzensen, Nicolas
    Weinstein, John N
    Mills, Gordon B
    Levine, Douglas A
    Akbani, Rehan
    A Comprehensive Pan-Cancer Molecular Study of Gynecologic and Breast Cancers.2018In: Cancer Cell, ISSN 1535-6108, E-ISSN 1878-3686, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 690-705.e9, article id S1535-6108(18)30119-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyzed molecular data on 2,579 tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) of four gynecological types plus breast. Our aims were to identify shared and unique molecular features, clinically significant subtypes, and potential therapeutic targets. We found 61 somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs) and 46 significantly mutated genes (SMGs). Eleven SCNAs and 11 SMGs had not been identified in previous TCGA studies of the individual tumor types. We found functionally significant estrogen receptor-regulated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and gene/lncRNA interaction networks. Pathway analysis identified subtypes with high leukocyte infiltration, raising potential implications for immunotherapy. Using 16 key molecular features, we identified five prognostic subtypes and developed a decision tree that classified patients into the subtypes based on just six features that are assessable in clinical laboratories.

  • 4.
    Danielsson, Frida
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. Royal Inst Technol, Sci Life Lab, S-17165 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Peterson, McKenzie Kirsten
    Univ Utah, Sch Med, Dept Pathol, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA..
    Araujo, Helena Caldeira
    Univ Madeira, Ctr Quim, P-9020105 Funchal, Portugal..
    Lautenschlaeger, Franziska
    Saarland Univ, Leibniz Inst Neue Mat gGmbH INM & Expt Phys, NT Fac, Campus D2 2,E 2 6, D-66123 Saarbrucken, Germany..
    Britt Gad, Annica Karin
    Univ Madeira, Ctr Quim, P-9020105 Funchal, Portugal.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Biochem & Microbiol, S-75237 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Vimentin Diversity in Health and Disease2018In: CELLS, ISSN 2073-4409, Vol. 7, no 10, article id 147Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vimentin is a protein that has been linked to a large variety of pathophysiological conditions, including cataracts, Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, HIV and cancer. Vimentin has also been shown to regulate a wide spectrum of basic cellular functions. In cells, vimentin assembles into a network of filaments that spans the cytoplasm. It can also be found in smaller, non-filamentous forms that can localise both within cells and within the extracellular microenvironment. The vimentin structure can be altered by subunit exchange, cleavage into different sizes, re-annealing, post-translational modifications and interacting proteins. Together with the observation that different domains of vimentin might have evolved under different selection pressures that defined distinct biological functions for different parts of the protein, the many diverse variants of vimentin might be the cause of its functional diversity. A number of review articles have focussed on the biology and medical aspects of intermediate filament proteins without particular commitment to vimentin, and other reviews have focussed on intermediate filaments in an in vitro context. In contrast, the present review focusses almost exclusively on vimentin, and covers both ex vivo and in vivo data from tissue culture and from living organisms, including a summary of the many phenotypes of vimentin knockout animals. Our aim is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current understanding of the many diverse aspects of vimentin, from biochemical, mechanical, cellular, systems biology and medical perspectives.

  • 5.
    Gonzalez-Granillo, Marcela
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Endocrinol Metab & Diabet, Dept Med, Metab & Mol Nutr Unit, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Dept Med, Karolinska Inst, AstraZeneca Integrated Cardio Metab Ctr, C2-94, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Helguero, Luisa A.
    Univ Aveiro, Inst Biomed, Dept Med Sci, Aveiro, Portugal..
    Alves, Eliana
    Univ Aveiro, Mass Spectrometry Ctr, Dept Chem QOPNA CESAM & ECOMARE, Aveiro, Portugal..
    Archer, Amena
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Ctr Innovat Med, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Savva, Christina
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Endocrinol Metab & Diabet, Dept Med, Metab & Mol Nutr Unit, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Dept Med, Karolinska Inst, AstraZeneca Integrated Cardio Metab Ctr, C2-94, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pedrelli, Matteo
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Innovat Med, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Huddinge, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ, Hosp Huddinge, Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med,Div Clin Chem, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Ahmed, Osman
    Karolinska Univ, Hosp Huddinge, Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med,Div Clin Chem, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Li, Xidan
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Endocrinol Metab & Diabet, Dept Med, Metab & Mol Nutr Unit, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Dept Med, Karolinska Inst, AstraZeneca Integrated Cardio Metab Ctr, C2-94, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Domingues, Maria Rosario
    Univ Aveiro, Mass Spectrometry Ctr, Dept Chem QOPNA CESAM & ECOMARE, Aveiro, Portugal..
    Parini, Paolo
    Karolinska Univ, Hosp Huddinge, Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med,Div Clin Chem, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, Jan-Ake
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Innovat Med, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Huddinge, Sweden.;Univ Houston, Ctr Nucl Receptors & Cell Signalling, Dept Biol & Biochem, Houston, TX USA..
    Korach-Andre, Marion
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Innovat Med, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Huddinge, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Endocrinol Metab & Diabet, Dept Med, Metab & Mol Nutr Unit, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Dept Med, Karolinska Inst, AstraZeneca Integrated Cardio Metab Ctr, C2-94, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sex-specific lipid molecular signatures in obesity-associated metabolic dysfunctions revealed by lipidomic characterization in ob/ob mouse2019In: Biology of Sex Differences, ISSN 2042-6410, Vol. 10, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The response to overfeeding is sex dependent, and metabolic syndrome is more likely associated to obesity in men or postmenopausal women than in young fertile women. We hypothesized that obesity-induced metabolic syndrome is sex dependent due to a sex-specific regulation of the fatty acid (FA) synthesis pathways in liver and white adipose depots. We aimed to identify distinctive molecular signatures between sexes using a lipidomics approach to characterize lipid species in liver, perigonadal adipose tissue, and inguinal adipose tissue and correlate them to the physiopathological responses observed. Males had less total fat but lower subcutaneous on visceral fat ratio together with higher liver weight and higher liver and serum triglyceride (TG) levels. Males were insulin resistant compared to females. Fatty acid (FA) and TG profiles differed between sexes in both fat pads, with longer chain FAs and TGs in males compared to that in females. Remarkably, hepatic phospholipid composition was sex dependent with more abundant lipotoxic FAs in males than in females. This may contribute to the sexual dimorphism in response to obesity towards more metaflammation in males. Our work presents an exhaustive novel description of a sex-specific lipid signature in the pathophysiology of metabolic disorders associated with obesity in ob/ob mice. These data could settle the basis for future pharmacological treatment in obesity.

  • 6.
    Häussler, Ragna S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bendes, Annika
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Iglesias, Maria Jesus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, 9010, Norway.
    Sanchez-Rivera, Laura
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dodig-Crnkovic, Tea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Byström, Sanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Birgersson, Elin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dale, Matilda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Edfors, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Uhlèn, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Technical University of Denmark, Hørsholm, 2970, Denmark.
    Qundos, Ulrika
    Atlas Antibodies AB, Bromma, 168 69, Sweden.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Systematic Development of Sandwich Immunoassays for the Plasma Secretome2019In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, article id 1900008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The plasma proteome offers a clinically useful window into human health. Recent advances from highly multiplexed assays now call for appropriate pipelines to validate individual candidates. Here, a workflow is developed to build dual binder sandwich immunoassays (SIA) and for proteins predicted to be secreted into plasma. Utilizing suspension bead arrays, ≈1800 unique antibody pairs are first screened against 209 proteins with recombinant proteins as well as EDTA plasma. Employing 624 unique antibodies, dilution-dependent curves in plasma and concentration-dependent curves of full-length proteins for 102 (49%) of the targets are obtained. For 22 protein assays, the longitudinal, interindividual, and technical performance is determined in a set of plasma samples collected from 18 healthy subjects every third month over 1 year. Finally, 14 of these assays are compared with with SIAs composed of other binders, proximity extension assays, and affinity-free targeted mass spectrometry. The workflow provides a multiplexed approach to screen for SIA pairs that suggests using at least three antibodies per target. This design is applicable for a wider range of targets of the plasma proteome, and the assays can be applied for discovery but also to validate emerging candidates derived from other platforms.

  • 7.
    Ibrahim, Ahmed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hugerth, Luisa W.
    Hases, Linnea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Saxena, Ashish
    Seifert, Maike
    Thomas, Quentin Angelo Pierre
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gustafsson, Jan-Åke
    Engstrand, Lars
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Colitis-induced colorectal cancer and intestinal epithelial estrogen receptor beta impact gut microbiota diversity2019In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 144, no 12, p. 3086-3098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic inflammation of the colon (colitis) is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). Hormone-replacement therapy reduces CRC incidences, and the estrogen receptor beta (ERβ/ESR2) has been implicated in this protection. Gut microbiota is altered in both colitis and CRC and may influence the severity of both. Here we test the hypothesis that intestinal ERβ impacts the gut microbiota. Mice with and without intestine-specific deletion of ERβ (ERβKOVil ) were generated using the Cre-LoxP system. Colitis and CRC were induced with a single intraperitoneal injection of azoxymethane (AOM) followed by administration of three cycles of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water. The microbiota population were characterized by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing of DNA extracted from fecal samples (N = 39). Differences in the microbiota due to AOM/DSS and absence of ERβ were identified through bioinformatic analyses of the 16S-Seq data, and the distribution of bacterial species was corroborated using qPCR. We demonstrate that colitis-induced CRC reduced the gut microbiota diversity and that loss of ERβ enhanced this process. Further, the Bacteroidetes genus Prevotellaceae_UCG_001 was overrepresented in AOM/DSS mice compared to untreated controls (3.5-fold, p = 0.004), and this was enhanced in females and in ERβKOVil mice. Overall, AOM/DSS enriched for microbiota impacting immune system diseases and metabolic functions, and lack of ERβ in combination with AOM/DSS enriched for microbiota impacting carbohydrate metabolism and cell motility, while reducing those impacting the endocrine system. Our data support that intestinal ERβ contributes to a more favorable microbiome that could attenuate CRC development.

  • 8. Mönnich, M.
    et al.
    Borgeskov, L.
    Breslin, L.
    Jakobsen, L.
    Rogowski, M.
    Doganli, C.
    Schrøder, J. M.
    Mogensen, J. B.
    Blinkenkjær, L.
    Harder, L. M.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Geimer, S.
    Christensen, S. T.
    Andersen, J. S.
    Larsen, L. A.
    Pedersen, L. B.
    CEP128 Localizes to the Subdistal Appendages of the Mother Centriole and Regulates TGF-β/BMP Signaling at the Primary Cilium2018In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 2601-2614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The centrosome is the main microtubule-organizing center in animal cells and comprises a mother and daughter centriole surrounded by pericentriolar material. During formation of primary cilia, the mother centriole transforms into a basal body that templates the ciliary axoneme. Ciliogenesis depends on mother centriole-specific distal appendages, whereas the role of subdistal appendages in ciliary function is unclear. Here, we identify CEP128 as a centriole subdistal appendage protein required for regulating ciliary signaling. Loss of CEP128 did not grossly affect centrosomal or ciliary structure but caused impaired transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenetic protein (TGF-β/BMP) signaling in zebrafish and at the primary cilium in cultured mammalian cells. This phenotype is likely the result of defective vesicle trafficking at the cilium as ciliary localization of RAB11 was impaired upon loss of CEP128, and quantitative phosphoproteomics revealed that CEP128 loss affects TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of multiple proteins that regulate cilium-associated vesicle trafficking. Mönnich et al. show that CEP128 localizes to the subdistal appendages of the mother centriole and basal body of the primary cilium. CEP128 regulates vesicular trafficking and targeting of RAB11 to the primary cilium. CEP128 loss leads to impaired TGF-β/BMP signaling, which, in zebrafish, is associated with defective organ development.

  • 9. O'Hagan, Steve
    et al.
    Muelas, Marina Wright
    Day, Philip J.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kell, Douglas B.
    GeneGini: Assessment via the Gini Coefficient of Reference "Housekeeping'' Genes and Diverse Human Transporter Expression Profiles2018In: Cell Systems, ISSN 2405-4712, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 230-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expression levels of SLC or ABC membrane transporter transcripts typically differ 100- to 10,000-fold between different tissues. The Gini coefficient characterizes such inequalities and here is used to describe the distribution of the expression of each transporter among different human tissues and cell lines. Many transporters exhibit extremely high Gini coefficients even for common substrates, indicating considerable specialization consistent with divergent evolution. The expression profiles of SLC transporters in different cell lines behave similarly, although Gini coefficients for ABC transporters tend to be larger in cell lines than in tissues, implying selection. Transporter genes are significantly more heterogeneously expressed than the members of most non-transporter gene classes. Transcripts with the stablest expression have a low Gini index and often differ significantly from the "housekeeping'' genes commonly used for normalization in transcriptomics/qPCR studies. PCBP1 has a low Gini coefficient, is reasonably expressed, and is an excellent novel reference gene. The approach, referred to as GeneGini, provides rapid and simple characterization of expression-profile distributions and improved normalization of genome-wide expression-profiling data.

  • 10.
    Sullivan, Devin P.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Winsnes, Casper F.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Åkesson, Lovisa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hjelmare, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wiking, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schutten, Rutger
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Campbell, Linzi
    CCP Hf, Reyjkavik, Iceland..
    Leifsson, Hjalti
    CCP Hf, Reyjkavik, Iceland..
    Rhodes, Scott
    CCP Hf, Reyjkavik, Iceland..
    Nordgren, Andie
    CCP Hf, Reyjkavik, Iceland..
    Smith, Kevin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computational Science and Technology (CST). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Revaz, Bernard
    MMOS Sarl, Monthey, Switzerland..
    Finnbogason, Bergur
    CCP Hf, Reyjkavik, Iceland..
    Szantner, Attila
    MMOS Sarl, Monthey, Switzerland..
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Deep learning is combined with massive-scale citizen science to improve large-scale image classification2018In: Nature Biotechnology, ISSN 1087-0156, E-ISSN 1546-1696, Vol. 36, no 9, p. 820-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pattern recognition and classification of images are key challenges throughout the life sciences. We combined two approaches for large-scale classification of fluorescence microscopy images. First, using the publicly available data set from the Cell Atlas of the Human Protein Atlas (HPA), we integrated an image-classification task into a mainstream video game (EVE Online) as a mini-game, named Project Discovery. Participation by 322,006 gamers over 1 year provided nearly 33 million classifications of subcellular localization patterns, including patterns that were not previously annotated by the HPA. Second, we used deep learning to build an automated Localization Cellular Annotation Tool (Loc-CAT). This tool classifies proteins into 29 subcellular localization patterns and can deal efficiently with multi-localization proteins, performing robustly across different cell types. Combining the annotations of gamers and deep learning, we applied transfer learning to create a boosted learner that can characterize subcellular protein distribution with F1 score of 0.72. We found that engaging players of commercial computer games provided data that augmented deep learning and enabled scalable and readily improved image classification.

  • 11.
    Thul, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Åkesson, Lovisa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mahdessian, Diana
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bäckström, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Danielsson, Frida
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gnann, Christian
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hjelmare, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schutten, Rutger
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stadler, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sullivan, Devin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Winsnes, Casper
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Galea, Gabriella
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pepperkok, R.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Exploring the Proteome of Multilocalizing Proteins2017In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, ISSN 1059-1524, E-ISSN 1939-4586, Vol. 28Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12. Wang, Jun
    et al.
    Aydoğdu, Eylem
    Mukhopadhyay, Srijita
    Helguero, Luisa A
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    A miR-206 regulated gene landscape enhances mammary epithelial differentiation.2019In: Journal of Cellular Physiology, ISSN 0021-9541, E-ISSN 1097-4652, Vol. 234, no 12, p. 22220-22233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    miR-206 is known to suppress breast cancer. However, while it is expressed in mammary stem cells, its function in such nontumor cells is not well understood. Here, we explore the role of miR-206 in undifferentiated, stem-like mammary cells using the murine mammary differentiation model HC11, genome-wide gene expression analysis, and functional assays. We describe the miR-206-regulated gene landscape and propose a network whereby miR-206 suppresses tumor development. We functionally demonstrate that miR-206 in nontumor stem-like cells induces a G1-S cell cycle arrest, and reduces colony formation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers. Finally, we show that addition of miR-206 accelerates the mammary differentiation process along with related accumulation of lipids. We conclude that miR-206 impacts a network of signaling pathways, and acts as a regulator of proliferation, stemness, and mammary cell differentiation in nontumor stem-like mammary cells. Our study provides a broad insight into the breast cancer suppressive functions of miR-206.

  • 13.
    Zheng, Daoshan
    et al.
    Dept Canc Biol, 4500 San Pablo Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA..
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Institute.
    Vold, Jeremy A.
    Mayo Canc Registry, 4500 San Pablo Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA..
    Nguyen, Justin H.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Surg, 4500 San Pablo Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA.;Mayo Clin, Mayo Clin Canc Ctr, 4500 San Pablo Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA..
    Harnois, Denise M.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Surg, 4500 San Pablo Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA.;Mayo Clin, Mayo Clin Canc Ctr, 4500 San Pablo Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA..
    Bagaria, Sanjay P.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Surg, 4500 San Pablo Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA.;Mayo Clin, Mayo Clin Canc Ctr, 4500 San Pablo Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA..
    McLaughlin, Sarah A.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Surg, 4500 San Pablo Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA.;Mayo Clin, Mayo Clin Canc Ctr, 4500 San Pablo Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA..
    Li, Zhaoyu
    Dept Canc Biol, 4500 San Pablo Rd, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA..
    Regulation of sex hormone receptors in sexual dimorphism of human cancers2018In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 438, p. 24-31Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender differences in the incidences of cancers have been found in almost all human cancers. However, the mechanisms that underlie gender disparities in most human cancer types have been under-investigated. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of potential mechanisms underlying sexual dimorphism of each cancer regarding sex hormone signaling. Fully addressing the mechanisms of sexual dimorphism in human cancers will greatly benefit current development of precision medicine. Our discussions of potential mechanisms underlying sexual dimorphism in each cancer will be instructive for future cancer research on gender disparities.

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