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  • 1.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Remnestål, Julia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nellgård, B.
    Vunk, Helian
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Kotol, David
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Edfors, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Ilag, L. L.
    Zetterberg, H.
    Blennow, K.
    Månberg, Anna
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Development of parallel reaction monitoring assays for cerebrospinal fluid proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease2019In: Clinica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0009-8981, E-ISSN 1873-3492, Vol. 494, p. 79-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detailed knowledge of protein changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) across healthy and diseased individuals would provide a better understanding of the onset and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we selected 20 brain-enriched proteins previously identified in CSF by antibody suspension bead arrays (SBA) to be potentially biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and verified these using an orthogonal approach. We examined the same set of 94 CSF samples from patients affected by AD (including preclinical and prodromal), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), non-AD dementia and healthy individuals, which had previously been analyzed by SBA. Twenty-eight parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) assays were developed and 13 of them could be validated for protein quantification. Antibody profiles were verified by PRM. For seven proteins, the antibody profiles were highly correlated with the PRM results (r > 0.7) and GAP43, VCAM1 and PSAP were identified as potential markers of preclinical AD. In conclusion, we demonstrate the usefulness of targeted mass spectrometry as a tool for the orthogonal verification of antibody profiling data, suggesting that these complementary methods can be successfully applied for comprehensive exploration of CSF protein levels in neurodegenerative disorders.

  • 2.
    Annelies, Nonneman
    et al.
    KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Dept Neurosci, Lab Neurobiol & Expt Neurol, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;LBI, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Ctr Brain & Dis Res, VIB, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Nathan, Criem
    Ctr Brain & Dis Res, VIB, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Ctr Mol & Vasc Biol, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Dept Human Genet, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Lewandowski, Sebastian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rik, Nuyts
    KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Dept Neurosci, Lab Neurobiol & Expt Neurol, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;LBI, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Ctr Brain & Dis Res, VIB, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Dietmar, Thal R.
    KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Dept Neurosci, Lab Neuropathol, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Neurol, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Frank, Pfrieger W.
    Univ Strasbourg, CNRS UPR 3212, Inst Cellular & Integrat Neurosci, F-67084 Strasbourg, France..
    John, Ravits
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Neurosci, 9500 Gilman Dr, San Diego, CA 92093 USA..
    Philip, Van Damme
    KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Dept Neurosci, Lab Neurobiol & Expt Neurol, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;LBI, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Ctr Brain & Dis Res, VIB, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Neurol, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    An, Zwijsen
    Ctr Brain & Dis Res, VIB, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Ctr Mol & Vasc Biol, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Dept Human Genet, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Ludo, Van Den Bosch
    KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Dept Neurosci, Lab Neurobiol & Expt Neurol, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;LBI, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Ctr Brain & Dis Res, VIB, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Wim, Robberecht
    KU Leuven Univ Leuven, Dept Neurosci, Lab Neurobiol & Expt Neurol, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;LBI, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Ctr Brain & Dis Res, VIB, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.;Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Neurol, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Astrocyte-derived Jagged-1 mitigates deleterious Notch signaling in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis2018In: Neurobiology of Disease, ISSN 0969-9961, E-ISSN 1095-953X, Vol. 119, p. 26-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a late-onset devastating degenerative disease mainly affecting motor neurons. Motor neuron degeneration is accompanied and aggravated by oligodendroglial pathology and the presence of reactive astrocytes and microglia. We studied the role of the Notch signaling pathway in ALS, as it is implicated in several processes that may contribute to this disease, including axonal retraction, microgliosis, astrocytosis, oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation and differentiation, and cell death. We observed abnormal activation of the Notch signaling pathway in the spinal cord of SOD1(G93A) mice, a well-established model for ALS, as well as in the spinal cord of patients with sporadic ALS (sALS). This increased activation was particularly evident in reactive GFAP-positive astrocytes. In addition, one of the main Notch ligands, Jagged-1, was ectopically expressed in reactive astrocytes in spinal cord from ALS mice and patients, but absent in resting astrocytes. Astrocyte-specific inactivation of Jagged-1 in presymptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice further exacerbated the activation of the Notch signaling pathway and aggravated the course of the disease in these animals without affecting disease onset. These data suggest that aberrant Notch signaling activation contributes to the pathogenesis of ALS, both in sALS patients and SOD1(G93A) mice, and that it is mitigated in part by the upregulation of astrocytic Jagged-1.

  • 3.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Multiplexed antigen bead arrays for the assessment of antibody selectivity and epitope mapping2018In: Epitope Mapping Protocols, Humana Press Inc. , 2018, p. 239-248Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing number of binding reagents for affinity-based investigations of the human proteome, high-throughput tools for the characterization of the used reagents become essential. For the analysis of binding selectivity, bead-based antigen arrays offer a miniaturized and parallelized assay platform to meet such needs, as they enable two-dimensional multiplexing to analyze up to 384 samples against up to 500 analytes in a single round of analysis. In this chapter, we describe our protocols for the generation of multiplex bead arrays built on immobilized protein fragments, as well as biotinylated peptides. Combined together, these two versions of antigen arrays offer a versatile approach for multiplexed characterization of antibody binding selectivity, off-target interactions, as well as mapping for the amino acids of epitopes involved in antibody binding.

  • 4.
    Bedri, Sahl Khalid
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Ola B.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Advice Foretagsassistans & Stockholm AB, TCER AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fink, Katharina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Neurol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Månberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Affin Prote, SciLifeLab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hamsten, Carl
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Immunol & Allergy Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Affin Prote, SciLifeLab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Manouchehrinia, Ali
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Affin Prote, SciLifeLab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hillert, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Grönlund, Hans
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Glaser, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Plasma protein profiling reveals candidate biomarkers for multiple sclerosis treatment2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 5, article id e0217208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment options have improved significantly over the past decades, but the consequences of MS can still be devastating and the needs for monitoring treatment surveillance are considerable. In the current study we used affinity proteomics technology to identify potential biomarkers which could ultimately be used to as facilitate treatment decisions. We profiled the intra-individual changes in the levels of 59 target proteins using an antibody suspension bead array in serial plasma samples from 44 MS patients during treatment with natalizumab followed by fingolimod. Nine proteins showed decreasing plasma levels during natalizumab treatment, with PEBP1 and RTN3 displaying the most significant changes. Protein levels remained stable during fingolimod treatment for both proteins. The decreasing PEBP1 levels during natalizumab treatment could be validated using ELISA and replicated in an independent cohort. These results support the use of this technology as a high throughput method of identifying potentially useful biomarkers of MS treatment.

  • 5.
    Bremer, Hanna D.
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Clin Sci, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Landegren, Nils
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, CMM, L8 01, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Sci Life Lab, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hallgren, Asa
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, CMM, L8 01, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Renneker, Stefanie
    Euroimmun AG, D-23560 Lubeck, Germany..
    Lattwein, Erik
    Euroimmun AG, D-23560 Lubeck, Germany..
    Leonard, Dag
    Uppsala Univ, Rheumatol & Sci Life Lab, Dept Med Sci, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Eloranta, Maija-Leena
    Uppsala Univ, Rheumatol & Sci Life Lab, Dept Med Sci, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ronnblom, Lars
    Uppsala Univ, Rheumatol & Sci Life Lab, Dept Med Sci, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nordmark, Gunnel
    Uppsala Univ, Rheumatol & Sci Life Lab, Dept Med Sci, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Andersson, Goran
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Lilliehook, Inger
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Clin Sci, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin
    Broad Inst Harvard & MIT, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA.;Uppsala Univ, Sci Life Lab, IMBIM, SE-75123 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kampe, Olle
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, CMM, L8 01, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Sci Life Lab, Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.;Univ Bergen, KG Jebsen Ctr Autoimmune Disorders, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Med, N-5021 Bergen, Norway..
    Hansson-Hamlin, Helene
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Clin Sci, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    ILF2 and ILF3 are autoantigens in canine systemic autoimmune disease2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 4852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dogs can spontaneously develop complex systemic autoimmune disorders, with similarities to human autoimmune disease. Autoantibodies directed at self-antigens are a key feature of these autoimmune diseases. Here we report the identification of interleukin enhancer-binding factors 2 and 3 (ILF2 and ILF3) as autoantigens in canine immune-mediated rheumatic disease. The ILF2 autoantibodies were discovered in a small, selected canine cohort through the use of human protein arrays; a method not previously described in dogs. Subsequently, ILF3 autoantibodies were also identified in the same cohort. The results were validated with an independent method in a larger cohort of dogs. ILF2 and ILF3 autoantibodies were found exclusively, and at a high frequency, in dogs that showed a speckled pattern of antinuclear antibodies on immunofluorescence. ILF2 and ILF3 autoantibodies were also found at low frequency in human patients with SLE and Sjogren's syndrome. These autoantibodies have the potential to be used as diagnostic biomarkers for canine, and possibly also human, autoimmune disease.

  • 6. Chen, Ziqing
    et al.
    Dodig-Crnkovic, Tea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tao, Sheng-ce
    Current applications of antibody microarrays2018In: Clinical Proteomics, ISSN 1542-6416, E-ISSN 1559-0275, Vol. 15, article id 7Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of antibody microarrays is one of the most versatile approaches within multiplexed immunoassay technologies. These types of arrays have increasingly become an attractive tool for the exploratory detection and study of protein abundance, function, pathways, and potential drug targets. Due to the properties of the antibody microarrays and their potential use in basic research and clinical analytics, various types of antibody microarrays have already been developed. In spite of the growing number of studies utilizing this technique, few reviews about antibody microarray technology have been presented to reflect the quality and future uses of the generated data. In this review, we provide a summary of the recent applications of antibody microarray techniques in basic biology and clinical studies, providing insights into the current trends and future of protein analysis.

  • 7. Crivello, M.
    et al.
    Hogg, M. C.
    Jirström, E.
    Halang, L.
    Woods, I.
    Rayner, M.
    Coughlan, K. S.
    Lewandowski, Sebastian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Tissue Biology Laboratory, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska vägen 8A, Stockholm, 17164, Sweden.
    Prehn, J. H. M.
    Vascular regression precedes motor neuron loss in the FUS (1-359) ALS mouse model2019In: Disease Models and Mechanisms, ISSN 1754-8403, E-ISSN 1754-8411, Vol. 12, no 8, article id dmm040238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) presents a poorly understood pathogenesis. Evidence from patients and mutant SOD1 mouse models suggests vascular damage may precede or aggravate motor dysfunction in ALS. We have previously shown angiogenin (ANG) treatment enhances motor neuron survival, delays motor dysfunction and prevents vascular regression in the SOD1G93A ALS model. However, the existence of vascular defects at different stages of disease progression remains to be established in other ALS models. Here, we assessed vascular integrity in vivo throughout different disease stages, and investigated whether ANG treatment reverses vascular regression and prolongs motor neuron survival in the FUS (1-359) mouse model of ALS. Lumbar spinal cord tissue was collected from FUS (1-359) and non-transgenic control mice at postnatal day (P)50, P90 and P120. We found a significant decrease in vascular network density in lumbar spinal cords from FUS (1-359) mice by day 90, at which point motor neuron numbers were unaffected. ANG treatment did not affect survival or counter vascular regression. Endogenous Ang1 and Vegf expression were unchanged at P50 and P90; however, we found a significant decrease in miRNA 126 at P50, indicating vascular integrity in FUS mice may be compromised via an alternative pathway. Our study demonstrates that vascular regression occurs before motor neuron degeneration in FUS (1-359) mice, and highlights that heterogeneity in responses to novel ALS therapeutics can already be detected in preclinical mouse models of ALS.

  • 8. Djureinovic, D.
    et al.
    Dodig-Crnkovic, Tea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hellström, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Holgersson, G.
    Bergqvist, M.
    Mattsson, J. S. M.
    Pontén, F.
    Ståhle, E.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Micke, P.
    Detection of autoantibodies against cancer-testis antigens in non-small cell lung cancer2018In: Lung Cancer, ISSN 0169-5002, E-ISSN 1872-8332, Vol. 125, p. 157-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) are defined as proteins that are specifically expressed in testis or placenta and their expression is frequently activated in cancer. Due to their ability to induce an immune response, CTAs may serve as suitable targets for immunotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate if there is reactivity against CTAs in the plasma of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients through the detection of circulating antibodies. Materials and methods: To comprehensively analyze autoantibodies against CTAs the multiplexing capacities of suspension bead array technology was used. Bead arrays were created with 120 protein fragments, representing 112 CTAs. Reactivity profiles were measured in plasma samples from 133 NSCLC patients and 57 cases with benign lung diseases. Results: Altogether reactivity against 69 antigens, representing 81 CTAs, was demonstrated in at least one of the analyzed samples. Twenty-nine of the antigens (45 CTAs) demonstrated exclusive reactivity in NSCLC samples. Reactivity against cancer-testis antigen family 47; member A (CT47A) genes, P antigen family member 3 (PAGE3), variable charge X-linked (VCX), melanoma antigen family B1 (MAGEB1), lin-28 homolog B (LIN28B) and chromosome 12 open reading frame 54 (C12orf54) were only found in NSCLC patients at a frequency of 1%–4%. The presence of autoantibodies towards these six antigens was confirmed in an independent group of 34 NSCLC patients. Conclusion: We identified autoantibodies against CTAs in the plasma of lung cancer patients. The reactivity pattern of autoantibodies was higher in cancer patients compared to the benign group, stable over time, but low in frequency of occurrence. The findings suggest that some CTAs are immunogenic and that these properties can be utilized as immune targets. 

  • 9.
    Drobin, Kimi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Assadi, Ghazaleh
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    Andersson, Eni
    Fredolini, Claudia
    Forsström, Björn
    Reznichenko, Anna
    Akhter, Tahmina
    Ek, Weronica
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Berner Hansen, Mark
    Sandberg, Kristian
    Greco, Dario
    Repsilber, Dirk
    Schwenk, Jochen
    D'Amato, Mauro
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Targeted analysis of serum proteins encoded at known inflammatory bowel disease risk lociManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Drobin, Kimi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Assadi, Ghazaleh
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Anggraeni Andersson, Margaretha
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Royal Inst Technol, KTH, Sch Biotechnol, Affin Prote,SciLifeLab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Forsström, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Reznichenko, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Akhter, Tahmina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ek, Weronica E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Sci Life Lab, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden.;Biodonostia Hlth Res Inst, Dept Gastrointestinal & Liver Dis, San Sebastian, Spain..
    Hansen, Mark Berner
    AstraZeneca R&D, Innovat & Global Med, Molndal, Sweden.;Univ Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Hosp, Ctr Digest Dis, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Sandberg, Kristian
    Uppsala Univ, Sci Life Lab, Drug Discovery & Dev Platform, Uppsala, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Uppsala Biomed Ctr, Dept Med Chem, Organ Pharmaceut Chem, Uppsala, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Greco, Dario
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Biotechnol, Helsinki, Finland..
    Repsilber, Dirk
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden..
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    D'Amato, Mauro
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden.;BioDonostia Hlth Res Inst, San Sebastian, Spain.;Ikerbasque, Basque Fdn Sci, Bilbao, Spain..
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Orebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Gastroenterol, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Targeted Analysis of Serum Proteins Encoded at Known Inflammatory Bowel Disease Risk Loci2019In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 306-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few studies have investigated the blood proteome of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We characterized the serum abundance of proteins encoded at 163 known IBD risk loci and tested these proteins for their biomarker discovery potential. Based on the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) antibody availability, 218 proteins from genes mapping at 163 IBD risk loci were selected. Targeted serum protein profiles from 49 Crohns disease (CD) patients, 51 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, and 50 sex- and age-matched healthy individuals were obtained using multiplexed antibody suspension bead array assays. Differences in relative serum abundance levels between disease groups and controls were examined. Replication was attempted for CD-UC comparisons (including disease subtypes) by including 64 additional patients (33 CD and 31 UC). Antibodies targeting a potentially novel risk protein were validated by paired antibodies, Western blot, immuno-capture mass spectrometry, and epitope mapping. By univariate analysis, 13 proteins mostly related to neutrophil, T-cell, and B-cell activation and function were differentially expressed in IBD patients vs healthy controls, 3 in CD patients vs healthy controls and 2 in UC patients vs healthy controls (q < 0.01). Multivariate analyses further differentiated disease groups from healthy controls and CD subtypes from UC (P < 0.05). Extended characterization of an antibody targeting a novel, discriminative serum marker, the laccase (multicopper oxidoreductase) domain containing 1 (LACC1) protein, provided evidence for antibody on-target specificity. Using affinity proteomics, we identified a set of IBD-associated serum proteins encoded at IBD risk loci. These candidate proteins hold the potential to be exploited as diagnostic biomarkers of IBD.

  • 11.
    Edfors, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsström, Björn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Vunk, Helian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kotol, David
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Maddalo, Gianluca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Svensson, Anne-Sophie
    KTH.
    Boström, Tove
    KTH.
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, SE-17165 Solna, Sweden.;Tech Univ Denmark, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Biosustainabil, DK-2970 Horsholm, Denmark..
    Screening a Resource of Recombinant Protein Fragments for Targeted Proteomics2019In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 2706-2718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The availability of proteomics resources hosting protein and peptide standards, as well as the data describing their analytical performances, will continue to enhance our current capabilities to develop targeted proteomics methods for quantitative biology. This study describes the analysis of a resource of 26,840 individually purified recombinant protein fragments corresponding to more than 16,000 human protein-coding genes. The resource was screened to identify proteotypic peptides suitable for targeted proteomics efforts, and we report LC-MS/MS assay coordinates for more than 25,000 proteotypic peptides, corresponding to more than 10,000 unique proteins. Additionally, peptide formation and digestion kinetics were, for a subset of the standards, monitored using a time-course protocol involving parallel digestion of isotope-labeled recombinant protein standards and endogenous human plasma proteins. We show that the strategy by adding isotope-labeled recombinant proteins before trypsin digestion enables short digestion protocols (<= 60 min) with robust quantitative precision. In a proof-of-concept study, we quantified 23 proteins in human plasma using assay parameters defined in our study and used the standards to describe distinct clusters of individuals linked to different levels of LPA, APOE, SERPINAS, and TFRC. In summary, we describe the use and utility of a resource of recombinant proteins to identify proteotypic peptides useful for targeted proteomics assay development.

  • 12.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Byström, Sanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sanchez-Rivera, Laura
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ioannou, Marina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tamburro, Davide
    Karolinska Inst, Sci Life Lab, Dept Oncol Pathol, Canc Prote, S-17121 Solna, Sweden..
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Sci Life Lab, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Branca, Rui M.
    Karolinska Inst, Sci Life Lab, Dept Oncol Pathol, Canc Prote, S-17121 Solna, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lehtio, Janne
    Karolinska Inst, Sci Life Lab, Dept Oncol Pathol, Canc Prote, S-17121 Solna, Sweden..
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Systematic assessment of antibody selectivity in plasma based on a resource of enrichment profiles2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 8324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a strong need for procedures that enable context and application dependent validation of antibodies. Here, we applied a magnetic bead assisted workflow and immunoprecipitation mass spectrometry (IP-MS/MS) to assess antibody selectivity for the detection of proteins in human plasma. A resource was built on 414 IP experiments using 157 antibodies (targeting 120 unique proteins) in assays with heat-treated or untreated EDTA plasma. For each protein we determined their antibody related degrees of enrichment using z-scores and their frequencies of identification across all IP assays. Out of 1,313 unique endogenous proteins, 426 proteins (33%) were detected in >20% of IPs, and these background components were mainly comprised of proteins from the complement system. For 45% (70/157) of the tested antibodies, the expected target proteins were enriched (z-score >= 3). Among these 70 antibodies, 59 (84%) co-enriched other proteins beside the intended target and mainly due to sequence homology or protein abundance. We also detected protein interactions in plasma, and for IGFBP2 confirmed these using several antibodies and sandwich immunoassays. The protein enrichment data with plasma provide a very useful and yet lacking resource for the assessment of antibody selectivity. Our insights will contribute to a more informed use of affinity reagents for plasma proteomics assays.

  • 13.
    Hambardzumyan, K.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hamsten, C.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Unit Immunol & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Idborg, H.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lourido, Lucia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Saevarsdottir, S.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    van Vollenhoven, R.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jakobsson, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Evaluation of serum protein levels at baseline as predictors of response to methotrexate in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: results from the SWEFOT trial population2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 47, p. 31-31Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Häggmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Bradley, Frideborg
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Ctr Mol Med, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna,Unit Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Qundos, Ulrika
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Guthrie, Brandon L.
    Univ Washington, Dept Global Hlth, Washington, DC USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol Hlth, Washington, DC USA..
    Birse, Kenzie
    Univ Manitoba, Dept Med Microbiol, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.;Publ Hlth Agcy Canada, JC Wilt Infect Dis Ctr, Natl HIV & Retrovirol Labs, Winnipeg, MB, Canada..
    Noel-Romas, Laura
    Univ Manitoba, Dept Med Microbiol, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.;Publ Hlth Agcy Canada, JC Wilt Infect Dis Ctr, Natl HIV & Retrovirol Labs, Winnipeg, MB, Canada..
    Lindskog, Cecilia
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, SciLifeLab, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bosire, Rose
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Kiarie, James
    Univ Nairobi, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Farquhar, Carey
    Univ Washington, Dept Med Global Hlth & Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Burgener, Adam D.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Ctr Mol Med, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna,Unit Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Manitoba, Dept Med Microbiol, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.;Publ Hlth Agcy Canada, JC Wilt Infect Dis Ctr, Natl HIV & Retrovirol Labs, Winnipeg, MB, Canada..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Broliden, Kristina
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Ctr Mol Med, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna,Unit Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden..
    A High-throughput Bead-based Affinity Assay Enables Analysis of Genital Protein Signatures in Women At Risk of HIV Infection2019In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 461-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women at high risk of HIV infection, including sex workers and those with active genital inflammation, have molecular signatures of immune activation and epithelial barrier remodeling in samples of their genital mucosa. These alterations in the local immunological milieu are likely to impact HIV susceptibility. We here analyze host genital protein signatures in HIV uninfected women, with high frequency of condom use, living in HIV-serodiscordant relationships. Cervicovaginal secretions from women living in HIV-serodiscordant relationships (n = 62) were collected at three time points over 12 months. Women living in HIV-negative seroconcordant relationships (controls, n = 25) were sampled at one time point. All study subjects were examined for demographic parameters associated with susceptibility to HIV infection. The cervicovaginal samples were analyzed using a high-throughput bead-based affinity assay. Proteins involved in epithelial barrier function and inflammation were increased in HIV-serodiscordant women. By combining several methods of analysis, a total of five proteins (CAPG, KLK10, SPRR3, elafin/PI3, CSTB) were consistently associated with this study group. Proteins analyzed using the affinity set-up were further validated by label-free tandem mass spectrometry in a partially overlapping cohort with concordant results. Women living in HIV-serodiscordant relationships thus had elevated levels of proteins involved in epithelial barrier function and inflammation despite low prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and a high frequency of safe sex practices. The identified proteins are important markers to follow during assessment of mucosal HIV susceptibility factors and a high-throughput bead-based affinity set-up could be a suitable method for such evaluation.

  • 15.
    Häussler, Ragna S.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bendes, Annika
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Iglesias, Maria Jesus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, 9010, Norway.
    Sanchez-Rivera, Laura
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dodig-Crnkovic, Tea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Byström, Sanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Birgersson, Elin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dale, Matilda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Edfors, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Uhlèn, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Technical University of Denmark, Hørsholm, 2970, Denmark.
    Qundos, Ulrika
    Atlas Antibodies AB, Bromma, 168 69, Sweden.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Systematic Development of Sandwich Immunoassays for the Plasma Secretome2019In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, article id 1900008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The plasma proteome offers a clinically useful window into human health. Recent advances from highly multiplexed assays now call for appropriate pipelines to validate individual candidates. Here, a workflow is developed to build dual binder sandwich immunoassays (SIA) and for proteins predicted to be secreted into plasma. Utilizing suspension bead arrays, ≈1800 unique antibody pairs are first screened against 209 proteins with recombinant proteins as well as EDTA plasma. Employing 624 unique antibodies, dilution-dependent curves in plasma and concentration-dependent curves of full-length proteins for 102 (49%) of the targets are obtained. For 22 protein assays, the longitudinal, interindividual, and technical performance is determined in a set of plasma samples collected from 18 healthy subjects every third month over 1 year. Finally, 14 of these assays are compared with with SIAs composed of other binders, proximity extension assays, and affinity-free targeted mass spectrometry. The workflow provides a multiplexed approach to screen for SIA pairs that suggests using at least three antibodies per target. This design is applicable for a wider range of targets of the plasma proteome, and the assays can be applied for discovery but also to validate emerging candidates derived from other platforms.

  • 16.
    Idborg, H.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Gustafsson, J. T.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gunnarsson, I.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svenungsson, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Jakobsson, P. J.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    CHARACTERISATION OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS SUBGROUPS WITH FEATURES OF ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID OR SJOGRENS'S SYNDROME UTILISING AFFINITY PROTEOMICS2016In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 75, p. A53-A53Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Idborg, H.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Gustafsson, J. T.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gunnarsson, I.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svenungsson, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Jakobsson, P. -J
    CHARACTERIZATION OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS SUBGROUPS WITH FEATURES OF ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID OR SJOGRENS'S SYNDROME UTILIZING AFFINITY PROTEOMICS2016In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 75, p. 116-116Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Idborg, Helena
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Ossipova, Elena
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wigren, Edvard
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Preger, Charlotta
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mobarrez, Fariborz
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Akad Hosp, Dept Med Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Checa, Antonio
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Div Physiol Chem 2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sohrabian, Azita
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Pucholt, Pascal
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Rheumatol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sandling, Johanna K.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Rheumatol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Fernandes-Cerqueira, Catia
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ronnelid, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Oke, Vilija
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Grosso, Giorgia
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kvarnstrom, Marika
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Clin Chem, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wheelock, Craig E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Div Physiol Chem 2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Syvanen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Mol Med & Sci Life Lab, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ronnblom, Lars
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Rheumatol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kultima, Kim
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Clin Chem, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Persson, Helena
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sci Life Lab, Drug Discovery & Dev, Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Graslund, Susanne
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jakobsson, Per-Johan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Circulating Levels of Interferon Regulatory Factor-5 Associates With Subgroups of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients2019In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 10, article id 1029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, which currently lacks specific diagnostic biomarkers. The diversity within the patients obstructs clinical trials but may also reflect differences in underlying pathogenesis. Our objective was to obtain protein profiles to identify potential general biomarkers of SLE and to determine molecular subgroups within SLE for patient stratification. Plasma samples from a cross-sectional study of well-characterized SLE patients (n = 379) and matched population controls (n = 316) were analyzed by antibody suspension bead array targeting 281 proteins. To investigate the differences between SLE and controls, Mann-Whitney U-test with Bonferroni correction, generalized linear modeling and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis were performed. K-means clustering was used to identify molecular SLE subgroups. We identified Interferon regulating factor 5 (IRF5), solute carrier family 22 member 2 (SLC22A2) and S100 calcium binding protein A12 (S100A12) as the three proteins with the largest fold change between SLE patients and controls (SLE/Control = 1.4, 1.4, and 1.2 respectively). The lowest p-values comparing SLE patients and controls were obtained for S100A12, Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1) and SLC22A2 (p(adjusted) = 3 x 10(-9), 3 x 10(-6), and 5 x 10(-6) respectively). In a set of 15 potential biomarkers differentiating SLE patients and controls, two of the proteins were transcription factors, i.e., IRF5 and SAM pointed domain containing ETS transcription factor (SPDEF). IRF5 was up-regulated while SPDEF was found to be down-regulated in SLE patients. Unsupervised clustering of all investigated proteins identified three molecular subgroups among SLE patients, characterized by (1) high levels of rheumatoid factor-IgM, (2) low IRF5, and (3) high IRF5. IRF5 expressing microparticles were analyzed by flow cytometry in a subset of patients to confirm the presence of IRF5 in plasma and detection of extracellular IRF5 was further confirmed by immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry (IP-MS). Interestingly IRF5, a known genetic risk factor for SLE, was detected extracellularly and suggested by unsupervised clustering analysis to differentiate between SLE subgroups. Our results imply a set of circulating molecules as markers of possible pathogenic importance in SLE. We believe that these findings could be of relevance for understanding the pathogenesis and diversity of SLE, as well as for selection of patients in clinical trials.

  • 19.
    Idborg, Helena
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sandberg, Ann-Sofi
    Sci Life Lab, Dept Oncol Pathol, Clin Prote Mass Spectrometry, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Elvin, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Transfus Med, Unit Clin Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Truedsson, Lennart
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Sect Microbiol Immunol & Glycobiol, Lund, Sweden..
    Sohrabian, Azita
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ronnelid, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Mo, John
    AstraZeneca R&D, Patient Safety Resp Inflammat Autoimmun Infect &, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Grosso, Giorgia
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kvarnström, Marika
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gunnarsson, Iva
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lehtio, Janne
    Sci Life Lab, Dept Oncol Pathol, Clin Prote Mass Spectrometry, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jakobsson, Per-Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Two subgroups in systemic lupus erythematosus with features of antiphospholipid or Sjogren's syndrome differ in molecular signatures and treatment perspectives2019In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 21, article id 62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundPrevious studies and own clinical observations of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) suggest that SLE harbors distinct immunophenotypes. This heterogeneity might result in differences in response to treatment in different subgroups and obstruct clinical trials. Our aim was to understand how SLE subgroups may differ regarding underlying pathophysiology and characteristic biomarkers.MethodsIn a cross-sectional study, including 378 well-characterized SLE patients and 316 individually matched population controls, we defined subgroups based on the patients' autoantibody profile at inclusion. We selected a core of an antiphospholipid syndrome-like SLE (aPL+ group; positive in the lupus anticoagulant (LA) test and negative for all three of SSA (Ro52 and Ro60) and SSB antibodies) and a Sjogren's syndrome-like SLE (SSA/SSB+ group; positive for all three of SSA (Ro52 and Ro60) and SSB antibodies but negative in the LA test). We applied affinity-based proteomics, targeting 281 proteins, together with well-established clinical biomarkers and complementary immunoassays to explore the difference between the two predefined SLE subgroups.ResultsThe aPL+ group comprised 66 and the SSA/SSB+ group 63 patients. The protein with the highest prediction power (receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve=0.89) for separating the aPL+ and SSA/SSB+ SLE subgroups was integrin beta-1 (ITGB1), with higher levels present in the SSA/SSB+ subgroup. Proteins with the lowest p values comparing the two SLE subgroups were ITGB1, SLC13A3, and CERS5. These three proteins, rheumatoid factor, and immunoglobulin G (IgG) were all increased in the SSA/SSB+ subgroup. This subgroup was also characterized by a possible activation of the interferon system as measured by high KRT7, TYK2, and ETV7 in plasma. In the aPL+ subgroup, complement activation was more pronounced together with several biomarkers associated with systemic inflammation (fibrinogen, -1 antitrypsin, neutrophils, and triglycerides).ConclusionsOur observations indicate underlying pathogenic differences between the SSA/SSB+ and the aPL+ SLE subgroups, suggesting that the SSA/SSB+ subgroup may benefit from IFN-blocking therapies while the aPL+ subgroup is more likely to have an effect from drugs targeting the complement system. Stratifying SLE patients based on an autoantibody profile could be a way forward to understand underlying pathophysiology and to improve selection of patients for clinical trials of targeted treatments.

  • 20.
    Just, David
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    On the profiling of autoantibodies in psychiatric disorders2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a great need to increase our understanding of diseases affecting the brain and their underlying pathogenic mechanisms. To address this need, the work presented in this thesis applied affinity based proteomic techniques to profile proteins, and to investigate protein profiles and the autoantibody repertoire in brain related disorders. Studies included in this thesis cover traumatic brain injuries, first-episode psychosis, schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorders. Paper I describes the profiling of rat serum samples of a traumatic brain injury model to increase the understanding of injury related protein markers and their potential role in patient outcome. Changes in protein profiles over time were characterized as well as potential injury markers related to oxygen intake. Paper II-IV describe the use of protein fragment-based arrays to investigate potential pathogenic autoantibodies associated to the disease. In Paper II possible predictive autoantibodies for the development of schizophrenia were identified, Paper III identified probable brain reactive autoantibodies in schizophrenia patients and Paper IV described the exploration of autoantibodies which might have an association to obsessive-compulsive disorder. Further characterization of these autoantibody repertoires in psychiatric disorders and future efforts could increase our understanding of their role in the associated diseases. Taken together, this work provides the basis for future research in the search for novel disease associated proteins and autoantibody profiles in brain related disorders. An increased understanding and additional diagnostic or prognostic markers of these disorders would be beneficial for both researchers and patients.

  • 21.
    Just, David
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Månberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Carlström, Eva Lindholm
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Cunningham, Janet
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Towards Molecular Insights Into Psychiatric Disorders Using Affinity Proteomics2018In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, ISSN 0586-7614, E-ISSN 1745-1701, Vol. 44, p. S223-S223Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Just, David
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Månberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Mitsios, Nicholas
    Stockmeier, Craig
    Rajkowska, Grazyna
    Mulder, Jan
    Feuk, Lars
    Cunningham, Janet
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Lindholm Carlström, Eva
    Exploring autoantibody signatures in brain tissue lysates from patients with schizophreniaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Just, David
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Månberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Burman, Joachim
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Cunningham, Janet
    Exploring the autoantibody repertoire in patients with obsessive compulsive disorderManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Khoonsari, Payam Emami
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Clin Chem, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Shevchenko, Ganna
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem BMC, Analyt Chem, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Herman, Stephanie
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Clin Chem, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Remnestål, Julia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci Geriatr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Brundin, RoseMarie
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci Geriatr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Gunnarsson, Malin Degerman
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci Geriatr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kilander, Lena
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci Geriatr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Zetterberge, Henrik
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Dept Psychiat & Neurochem, Molndal, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Clin Neurochem Lab, Molndal, Sweden.;UK Dementia Res Inst UCL, London, England.;UCL Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, Queen Sq, London, England..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lannfelt, Lars
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci Geriatr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci Geriatr, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kultima, Kim
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Clin Chem, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Improved Differential Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease by Integrating ELISA and Mass Spectrometry-Based Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers2019In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 639-651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is diagnosed based on a clinical evaluation as well as analyses of classical biomarkers: A beta(42), total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Although the sensitivities and specificities of the classical biomarkers are fairly good for detection of AD, there is still a need to develop novel biochemical markers for early detection of AD. Objective: We explored if integration of novel proteins with classical biomarkers in CSF can better discriminate AD from non-AD subjects. Methods: We applied ELISA, mass spectrometry, and multivariate modeling to investigate classical biomarkers and the CSF proteome in subjects (n = 206) with 76 AD patients, 74 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients, 11 frontotemporal dementia (FTD) patients, and 45 non-dementia controls. The MCI patients were followed for 4-9 years and 21 of these converted to AD, whereas 53 remained stable. Results: By combining classical CSF biomarkers with twelve novel markers, the area of the ROC curves (AUROCS) of distinguishing AD and MCl/AD converters from non-AD were 93% and 96%, respectively. The FTDs and non-dementia controls were identified versus all other groups with AUROCS of 96% and 87%, respectively. Conclusions: Integration of new and classical CSF biomarkers in a model-based approach can improve the identification of AD, FTD, and non-dementia control subjects.

  • 25. Liang, B.
    et al.
    Ge, C.
    Lönnblom, E.
    Lin, X.
    Feng, H.
    Xiao, L.
    Bai, J.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nandakumar, K. S.
    Zhao, M.
    Holmdahl, R.
    The autoantibody response to cyclic citrullinated collagen type II peptides in rheumatoid arthritis2019In: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, E-ISSN 1462-0332, Vol. 58, no 9, p. 1623-1633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The detection of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPAs) is a serological hallmark of RA. Autoantibodies reactive with collagen type II (CII) are present in RA sera and synovial fluid and are potentially pathogenic. Here, we investigate the prevalence and specificity of the autoantibody responses to defined citrullinated cyclic peptides derived from CII in a China RA cohort. METHODS: Using bead-based multiplex assay, we examined the presence of autoantibodies binding to 54 cyclic 17-mer citrullinated CII peptides, encompassing all citrullinate epitopes in CII, and the corresponding unmodified peptides in 415 RA patients, in addition to 304 patients with OA. Furthermore, the autoantibody responses to a selected set of 10 cyclic citrullinated peptides were also examined in 203 healthy individuals. RESULTS: Autoantibody responses to cyclic citrullinated CII peptides were higher in RA patients as compared with OA patients or healthy individuals, whereas little or negligible antibody responses to cyclic unmodified CII peptides were observed. Interestingly, several novel citrullinated CII epitopes were identified. Antibodies to these novel citrullinated CII epitopes showed not only substantial overlapping reactivities but also had unique specificities. CONCLUSION: We found a high prevalence of autoantibodies against cyclic citrullinated CII in the sera of patients in a China RA cohort. The present study revealed heterogeneous binding patterns against novel citrullinated CII epitopes, which may help to stratify RA patients into different subgroups.

  • 26.
    Lind, Anne-Li
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Surg Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Just, David
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Mikus, Maria
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Ioannou, Marina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gerdle, Bjorn
    Linköping Univ, Pain & Rehabil Ctr, Linköping, Sweden.;Linköping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping Univ, Pain & Rehabil Ctr, Linköping, Sweden.;Linköping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Backryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping Univ, Pain & Rehabil Ctr, Linköping, Sweden.;Linköping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Tanum, Lars
    Akershus Univ Hosp, Dept R&D Mental Hlth, Lorenskog, Norway..
    Gordh, Torsten
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Surg Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Månberg, Anna
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    CSF levels of apolipoprotein C1 and autotaxin found to associate with neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia2019In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 12, p. 2875-2889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia are two common and poorly understood chronic pain conditions that lack satisfactory treatments, cause substantial suffering and societal costs. Today, there are no biological markers on which to base chronic pain diagnoses, treatment choices or to understand the pathophysiology of pain for the individual patient. This study aimed to investigate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein profiles potentially associated with fibromyalgia and neuropathic pain. Methods: CSF samples were collected from 25 patients with neuropathic pain (two independent sets, n=14 patients for discovery, and n=11 for verification), 40 patients with fibromyalgia and 134 controls without neurological disease from two different populations. CSF protein profiling of 55 proteins was performed using antibody suspension bead array technology. Results: We found increased levels of apolipoprotein C1 (APOC1) in CSF of neuropathic pain patients compared to controls and there was a trend for increased levels also in fibromyalgia patients. In addition, levels of ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase family member 2 (ENPP2, also referred to as autotaxin) were increased in the CSF of fibromyalgia patients compared to all other groups including patients with neuropathic pain. Conclusion: The increased levels of APOC1 and ENPP2 found in neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia patients may shed light on the underlying mechanisms of these conditions. Further investigation is required to elucidate their role in maintaining pain and other main symptoms of these disorders.

  • 27. Lorenzen, E.
    et al.
    Dodig-Crnkovic, Tea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kotliar, I. B.
    Pin, Elisa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ceraudo, E.
    Vaughan, R. D.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Huber, T.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sakmar, T. P.
    Multiplexed analysis of the secretin-like GPCR-RAMP interactome2019In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 5, no 9, article id eaaw2778Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Receptor activity–modifying proteins (RAMPs) have been shown to modulate the functions of several G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), but potential direct interactions among the three known RAMPs and hundreds of GPCRs have never been investigated. Focusing mainly on the secretin-like family of GPCRs, we engineered epitope-tagged GPCRs and RAMPs, and developed a multiplexed suspension bead array (SBA) immunoassay to detect GPCR-RAMP complexes from detergent-solubilized lysates. Using 64 antibodies raised against the native proteins and 4 antibodies targeting the epitope tags, we mapped the interactions among 23 GPCRs and 3 RAMPs. We validated nearly all previously reported secretin-like GPCR-RAMP interactions, and also found previously unidentified RAMP interactions with additional secretin-like GPCRs, chemokine receptors, and orphan receptors. The results provide a complete interactome of secretin-like GPCRs with RAMPs. The SBA strategy will be useful to search for additional GPCR-RAMP complexes and other interacting membrane protein pairs in cell lines and tissues. Copyright

  • 28.
    Lorenzen, Emily
    et al.
    Rockefeller Univ, Lab Chem Biol & Signal Transduct, 1230 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA..
    Dodig-Crnkovic, Tea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kotliar, Ilana B.
    Rockefeller Univ, Lab Chem Biol & Signal Transduct, 1230 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA.;Tri Inst PhD Program Chem Biol, New York, NY 10065 USA..
    Pin, Elisa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ceraudo, Emilie
    Rockefeller Univ, Lab Chem Biol & Signal Transduct, 1230 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA..
    Vaughan, Roger D.
    Rockefeller Univ, Ctr Clin & Translat Sci, 1230 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA..
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Huber, Thomas
    Rockefeller Univ, Lab Chem Biol & Signal Transduct, 1230 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA..
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Sakmar, Thomas P.
    Rockefeller Univ, Lab Chem Biol & Signal Transduct, 1230 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Sect Neurogeriatr, S-17164 Solna, Sweden..
    Multiplexed analysis of the secretin-like GPCR-RAMP interactome2019In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 5, no 9, article id eaaw2778Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) have been shown to modulate the functions of several G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), but potential direct interactions among the three known RAMPs and hundreds of GPCRs have never been investigated. Focusing mainly on the secretin-like family of GPCRs, we engineered epitope-tagged GPCRs and RAMPs, and developed a multiplexed suspension bead array (SBA) immunoassay to detect GPCR-RAMP complexes from detergent-solubilized lysates. Using 64 antibodies raised against the native proteins and 4 antibodies targeting the epitope tags, we mapped the interactions among 23 GPCRs and 3 RAMPs. We validated nearly all previously reported secretin-like GPCR-RAMP interactions, and also found previously unidentified RAMP interactions with additional secretin-like GPCRs, chemokine receptors, and orphan receptors. The results provide a complete interactome of secretin-like GPCRs with RAMPs. The SBA strategy will be useful to search for additional GPCR-RAMP complexes and other interacting membrane protein pairs in cell lines and tissues.

  • 29.
    Lourido, L.
    et al.
    Hosp Univ A Coruna, INIBIC, RIER RED Inflamac & Enfermedades Reumat, La Coruna, Spain.;Hosp Univ A Coruna, INIBIC, Rheumatol Div, ProteoRed ISCIII Prote Grp, La Coruna, Spain..
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Henjes, Frauke
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Fuentes, M.
    Univ Salamanca, IBSAL, Prote Unit ProteoRed ISCIII, Canc Res Ctr CIC,Dept Med, Salamanca, Spain..
    Ruiz-Romero, C.
    Hosp Univ A Coruna, INIBIC, Rheumatol Div, ProteoRed ISCIII Prote Grp, La Coruna, Spain.;Hosp Univ A Coruna, INIBIC, Inst Salud Carlos 3, CIBER BBN, La Coruna, Spain..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Blanco, F. J.
    Hosp Univ A Coruna, INIBIC, RIER RED Inflamac & Enfermedades Reumat, La Coruna, Spain.;Hosp Univ A Coruna, INIBIC, Rheumatol Div, ProteoRed ISCIII Prote Grp, La Coruna, Spain..
    DISCOVERY OF POTENTIAL SERUM BIOMARKERS IN OSTEOARTHRITIS USING PROTEIN ARRAYS2015In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 74, p. 373-374Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Lourido, L.
    et al.
    INIBIC Hosp Univ Rio A Coruna, ProteoRed ISCIII Prote Grp, Rheumatol Div, La Coruna, Spain.;RIER RED Inflamac & Enfermedades Reumat, Madrid, Spain..
    Ruiz-Romero, C.
    INIBIC Hosp Univ Rio A Coruna, ProteoRed ISCIII Prote Grp, Rheumatol Div, La Coruna, Spain.;INIBIC CHUAC, CIBER BBN Inst Salud Carlos III, La Coruna, Spain..
    Camacho, M.
    INIBIC Hosp Univ Rio A Coruna, ProteoRed ISCIII Prote Grp, Rheumatol Div, La Coruna, Spain..
    Rego-Perez, I.
    INIBIC Hosp Univ Rio A Coruna, ProteoRed ISCIII Prote Grp, Rheumatol Div, La Coruna, Spain..
    Oreiro, N.
    INIBIC Hosp Univ Rio A Coruna, ProteoRed ISCIII Prote Grp, Rheumatol Div, La Coruna, Spain..
    Fernandez-Lopez, C.
    INIBIC Hosp Univ Rio A Coruna, ProteoRed ISCIII Prote Grp, Rheumatol Div, La Coruna, Spain..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Blanco, F.
    INIBIC Hosp Univ Rio A Coruna, ProteoRed ISCIII Prote Grp, Rheumatol Div, La Coruna, Spain.;RIER RED Inflamac & Enfermedades Reumat, Madrid, Spain..
    ITIH1 (INTER-ALPHA TRYPSIN INHIBITOR HEAVY CHAIN 1) IS A POTENTIAL PROTEOMIC BIOMARKER TO PREDICT EARLY KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS. A QUALIFICATION PHASE STUDY USING DATA FROM THE OSTEOARTHRITIS INICIATIVE (OAI)2019In: Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, ISSN 1063-4584, E-ISSN 1522-9653, Vol. 27, p. S69-S70Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Mikus, Maria
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Array-based identification of disease-associated proteins2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To increase our understanding of the human body in both health and disease, proteins can be studied in samples such as plasma and serum to provide a molecular profile of the physiological status. In the work presented in this thesis, array-based methods were used to study associations of protein and autoantibody profiles with disease. The methods included antibody suspension bead arrays for protein profiling and planar antigen arrays or antigen suspension bead arrays for autoantibody profiling.

    In Paper I, we studied protein levels in the context of the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We identified three proteins, NEFM, RGS18 and SLC25A20, to be significantly elevated in patients with ALS. We also evaluated the diagnostic potential of these proteins, reaching areas under the curves (AUCs) between 0.78 and 0.86 for each of the three proteins individually.

    In Paper II, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) cases and controls were studied in four independent cohorts of longitudinal and cross-sectional design and covering a range of drugs. The protein FABP1 was elevated in DILI cases upon initiation of treatment whereas CDH5 were elevated before treatment. Furthermore, we compared FABP1 with the clinically measured alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and identified some aspects in which FABP1 was superior: tissue distribution – FABP1 was not found in skeletal and heart muscle tissue, injuries in which can cause elevations of ALT; kinetics – FABP1 is smaller and has a lower half-life compared to ALT. Both of these circumstances mean that FABP1 as a biomarker has the potential to more accurately reflect ongoing injury.

    In Paper III, asthma of different severities, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and healthy controls from two independent cohorts were studied. The levels of ten proteins were verified to be significantly elevated in severe asthma compared to both mild-to-moderate asthma and healthy controls in both cohorts. We also clustered asthma patients based on their protein profiles and identified six subgroups that could help to guide the appropriate treatment.

    In Paper IV, atopic dermatitis (AD) of different severities and healthy controls were studied. Increased autoantibody reactivity to four antigens, KRTAP17-1, HSPA4, S100A12 and S100Z, were observed in AD patients or in any of the two severity disease subgroups compared to controls.

    In summary, the work included in this thesis highlights the applicability of protein array-based methods in various contexts and in studying various research questions. Disease-associated proteins were identified and further studies will determine their utility.

  • 32.
    Mikus, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Johansson, Catharina
    Acevedo, Nathalie
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Scheynius, Annika
    The antimicrobial protein S100A12 identified as a potential autoantigen in a subgroup of atopic dermatitis patientsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Mikus, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kolmert, Johan
    James, Anna
    Andersson, Lars I
    Gomez, Cristina
    Ericsson, Magnus
    Thörngren, John-Olof
    Dahlén, Barbro
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dahlén, Sven-Erik
    Identification of proteins associated with asthma severityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Neiman, Maja
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Hellström, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Just, David
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Schuppe-Koistinen, Ina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gummesson, Anders
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Pathol & Genet, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bergstrom, Goran
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Kallioniemi, Olli
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland, FIMM, Helsinki, Finland.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Pathol & Oncol, SciLifeLab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Achour, Adnane
    Karolinska Inst, SciLifeLab, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Div Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sallinen, Riitta
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland, FIMM, Helsinki, Finland.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Pathol & Oncol, SciLifeLab, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Individual and stable autoantibody repertoires in healthy individuals2019In: Autoimmunity, ISSN 0891-6934, E-ISSN 1607-842X, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the era towards precision medicine, we here present the individual specific autoantibody signatures of 193 healthy individuals. The self-reactive IgG signatures are stable over time in a way that each individual profile is recognized in longitudinal sampling. The IgG autoantibody reactivity towards an antigen array comprising 335 protein fragments, representing 204 human proteins with potential relevance to autoimmune disorders, was measured in longitudinal plasma samples from 193 healthy individuals. This analysis resulted in unique autoantibody barcodes for each individual that were maintained over one year's time. The reactivity profiles, or signatures, are person specific in regards to the number of reactivities and antigen specificity. Two independent data sets were consistent in that each healthy individual displayed reactivity towards 0-16 antigens, with a median of six. Subsequently, four selected individuals were profiled on in-house produced high-density protein arrays containing 23,000 protein fragments representing 14,000 unique protein coding genes. Based on a unique, broad and deep longitudinal profiling of autoantibody reactivities, our results demonstrate a unique autoreactive profile in each analyzed healthy individual. The need and interest for broad-ranged and high-resolution molecular profiling of healthy individuals is rising. We have here generated and assessed an initial perspective on the global distribution of the self-reactive IgG repertoire in healthy individuals, by investigating 193 well-characterized healthy individuals.

  • 35.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Affinity proteomics for array based profiling of autoantibody repertoires.2018In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 24, p. 69-70Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Papiol, Sergi
    et al.
    Univ Munich, Inst Psychiat Phen & Genom, Med Ctr, Munich, Germany..
    Just, David
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kannaiyan, Nirmal
    Univ Munich, Inst Psychiat Phen & Genom, Med Ctr, Munich, Germany.;Univ Munich, Med Ctr, Mol & Behav Neurobiol, Munich, Germany..
    Anderson-Schmidt, Heike
    Univ Med Ctr Goettingen, Gottingen, Germany..
    Budde, Monika
    Univ Munich, Inst Psychiat Phen & Genom, Med Ctr, Munich, Germany..
    Gade, Katrin
    Univ Munich, Inst Psychiat Phen & Genom, Med Ctr, Munich, Germany..
    Heilbronner, Urs
    Univ Munich, Inst Psychiat Phen & Genom, Med Ctr, Munich, Germany..
    Rossner, Moritz
    Univ Munich, Med Ctr, Mol & Behav Neurobiol, Munich, Germany..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schulze, Thomas
    Univ Munich, Inst Psychiat Phen & Genom, Med Ctr, Munich, Germany..
    HIGH-THROUGHPUT ANTIBODY-BASED PROFILING OF SERUM IN SCHIZOPHRENIA AND BIPOLAR DISORDER PATIENTS: AN INTEGRATIVE GENOMICS-PROTEOMICS PILOT STUDY2019In: European Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0924-977X, E-ISSN 1873-7862, Vol. 29, p. S993-S994Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Perotin, Jeanne-Marie
    et al.
    Univ Southampton, NIHR Southampton Biomed Res Ctr, Clin & Expt Sci, Fac Med, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Mikus, Maria
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden.;Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gozzard, Neil
    UCB, Slough, Berks, England..
    Epithelial dysregulation in obese severe asthmatics with gastro-oesophageal reflux2019In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 53, no 6, article id 1900453Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Pin, Elisa
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Just, David
    KTH.
    Mescia, Federica
    Heeringa, Peter
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands..
    van Sleen, Yannick
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Rutgers, Abraham
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Brouwer, Elisabeth
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands..
    Lyons, Paul
    Univ Cambridge, Cambridge, England..
    Kain, Renate
    Med Univ Vienna, Vienna, Austria..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    PROFILING THE AUTOANTIBODY REPERTOIRE IN VASCULITIS2019In: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, E-ISSN 1462-0332, Vol. 58Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Quintana, Maria del Pilar
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ch'ng, Jun-Hong
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden.;Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Microbiol & Immunol, Singapore, Singapore..
    Moll, Kirsten
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Idris, Zulkarnain Md
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Kebangsaan, Malaysia Med Ctr, Fac Med, Dept Parasitol & Med Entomol, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia..
    Saiwaew, Somporn
    Mahidol Univ, Fac Trop Med, Dept Clin Trop Med, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Qundos, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wahlgren, Mats
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Antibodies in children with malaria to PfEMP1, RIFIN and SURFIN expressed at the Plasmodium falciparum parasitized red blood cell surface2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 3262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Naturally acquired antibodies to proteins expressed on the Plasmodium falciparum parasitized red blood cell (pRBC) surface steer the course of a malaria infection by reducing sequestration and stimulating phagocytosis of pRBC. Here we have studied a selection of proteins representing three different parasite gene families employing a well-characterized parasite with a severe malaria phenotype (FCR3S1.2). The presence of naturally acquired antibodies, impact on rosetting rate, surface reactivity and opsonization for phagocytosis in relation to different blood groups of the ABO system were assessed in a set of sera from children with mild or complicated malaria from an endemic area. We show that the naturally acquired immune responses, developed during malaria natural infection, have limited access to the pRBCs inside a blood group A rosette. The data also indicate that SURFIN4.2 may have a function at the pRBC surface, particularly during rosette formation, this role however needs to be further validated. Our results also indicate epitopes differentially recognized by rosette-disrupting antibodies on a peptide array. Antibodies towards parasite-derived proteins such as PfEMP1, RIFIN and SURFIN in combination with host factors, essentially the ABO blood group of a malaria patient, are suggested to determine the outcome of a malaria infection.

  • 40.
    Quintana, Maria del Pilar
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Biomedicum, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ch'ng, Jun-Hong
    Karolinska Inst, Biomedicum, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden.;Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Microbiol & Immunol, Singapore, Singapore..
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Imam, Maryam
    Karolinska Inst, Biomedicum, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hultenby, Kjell
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Res Ctr, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Theisen, Michael
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Congenital Disorders, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Dept Int Hlth Immunol & Microbiol, Ctr Med Parasitol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Qundos, Ulrika
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Moll, Kirsten
    Karolinska Inst, Biomedicum, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Chan, Sherwin
    Karolinska Inst, Biomedicum, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wahlgren, Mats
    Karolinska Inst, Biomedicum, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    SURGE complex of Plasmodium falciparum in the rhoptry-neck (SURFIN4.2-RON4-GLURP) contributes to merozoite invasion2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 8, article id e0201669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmodium falciparum invasion into red blood cells (RBCs) is a complex process engaging proteins on the merozoite surface and those contained and sequentially released from the apical organelles (micronemes and rhoptries). Fundamental to invasion is the formation of a moving junction (MJ), a region of close apposition of the merozoite and the RBC plasma membranes, through which the merozoite draws itself before settling into a newly formed parasitophorous vacuole (PV). SURFIN4.2 was identified at the surface of the parasitized RBCs (pRBCs) but was also found apically associated with the merozoite. Using antibodies against the N-terminus of the protein we show the presence of SURFIN4.2 in the neck of the rhoptries, its secretion into the PV and shedding into the culture supernatant upon schizont rupture. Using immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry we describe here a novel protein complex we have named SURGE where SURFIN4.2 forms interacts with the rhoptry neck protein 4 (RON4) and the Glutamate Rich Protein (GLURP). The N-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of SURFIN4.2 mediates binding to the RBC membrane and its interaction with RON4 suggests its involvement in the contact between the merozoite apex and the RBC at the MJ. Supporting this suggestion, we also found that polyclonal antibodies to the extracellular domain (including the CRD) of SURFIN4.2 partially inhibit merozoite invasion. We propose that the formation of the SURGE complex participates in the establishment of parasite infection within the PV and the RBCs.

  • 41.
    Schofield, James P. R.
    et al.
    Ctr Prote Res, Biol Sci, Southampton, Hants, England.;NIHR Southampton Biomed Res Ctr, Clin & Expt Sci, Fac Med, Southampton, Hants, England.;Univ Southampton, Inst Life Sci, Ctr Prote Res, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Mikus, Maria
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Sigmund, Ralf
    BI, Res Methodol & Biostat, Ingelheim, Germany..
    Stratification of asthma phenotypes by airway proteomic signatures2019In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 144, no 1, p. 70-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Stratification by eosinophil and neutrophil counts increases our understanding of asthma and helps target therapy, but there is room for improvement in our accuracy in prediction of treatment responses and a need for better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Objective: We sought to identify molecular subphenotypes of asthma defined by proteomic signatures for improved stratification. Methods: Unbiased label-free quantitative mass spectrometry and topological data analysis were used to analyze the proteomes of sputum supernatants from 246 participants (206 asthmatic patients) as a novel means of asthma stratification. Microarray analysis of sputum cells provided transcriptomics data additionally to inform on underlying mechanisms. Results: Analysis of the sputum proteome resulted in 10 clusters (ie, proteotypes) based on similarity in proteomic features, representing discrete molecular subphenotypes of asthma. Overlaying granulocyte counts onto the 10 clusters as metadata further defined 3 of these as highly eosinophilic, 3 as highly neutrophilic, and 2 as highly atopic with relatively low granulocytic inflammation. For each of these 3 phenotypes, logistic regression analysis identified candidate protein biomarkers, and matched transcriptomic data pointed to differentially activated underlying mechanisms. Conclusion: This study provides further stratification of asthma currently classified based on quantification of granulocytic inflammation and provided additional insight into their underlying mechanisms, which could become targets for novel therapies.

  • 42.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andersson, Eni
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hellström, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    High-density antigen microarrays for the assessment of antibody selectivity and off-target binding2018In: Epitope Mapping Protocols, Humana Press Inc. , 2018, p. 231-238Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increasing availability of collections of antibodies, their evaluation in terms of binding selectivity becomes an important but challenging task. Planar antigen microarrays are very suitable tools to address this task and provide a powerful proteomics platform for the characterization of the binding selectivity of antibodies toward thousands of antigens in parallel. In this chapter, we describe our in-house developed procedures for the generation of high-density planar antigen microarrays with over 21,000 features. We also provide the details of the assay protocol, which we routinely use for the assessment of binding selectivity of the polyclonal antibodies generated within the Human Protein Atlas. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018.

  • 43. Thelin, Eric Peter
    et al.
    Just, David
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Frostell, Arvid
    Häggmark-Månberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Risling, Mårten
    Svensson, Mikael
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bellander, Bo-Michael
    Protein profiling in serum after traumatic brain injury in rats reveals potential injury markers2018In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 340, p. 71-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The serum proteome following traumatic brain injury (TBI) could provide information for outcome prediction and injury monitoring. The aim with this affinity proteomic study was to identify serum proteins over time and between normoxic and hypoxic conditions in focal TBI. Material and methods: Sprague Dawley rats (n = 73) received a 3 mm deep controlled cortical impact ("severe injury"). Following injury, the rats inhaled either a normoxic (22% O-2) or hypoxic (11% O-2) air mixture for 30 min before resuscitation. The rats were sacrificed at day 1, 3, 7, 14 and 28 after trauma. A total of 204 antibodies targeting 143 unique proteins of interest in TBI research, were selected. The sample proteome was analyzed in a suspension bead array set-up. Comparative statistics and factor analysis were used to detect differences as well as variance in the data. Results: We found that complement factor 9 (C9), complement factor B (CFB) and aldolase c (ALDOC) were detected at higher levels the first days after trauma. In contrast, hypoxia inducing factor (HIF)1 alpha, amyloid precursor protein (APP) and WBSCR17 increased over the subsequent weeks. S100A9 levels were higher in hypoxic-compared to normoxic rats, together with a majority of the analyzed proteins, albeit few reached statistical significance. The principal component analysis revealed a variance in the data, highlighting clusters of proteins. Conclusions: Protein profiling of serum following TBI using an antibody based microarray revealed temporal changes of several proteins over an extended period of up to four weeks. Further studies are warranted to confirm our findings.

  • 44.
    Thomas, Cecilia Engel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Häussler, Ragna S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Raverdy, V.
    Ctr Hosp Reg Univ Lille 2, Lille, France..
    Dale, Matilda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Vinuela, A.
    Univ Geneva, Dept Genet Med & Dev, Sch Med, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Canouil, M.
    Univ Lille, CNRS, Inst Pasteur Lille, Lille, France..
    Dermitzakis, E. T.
    Univ Geneva, Dept Genet Med & Dev, Sch Med, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Froguel, P.
    Univ Lille, CNRS, Inst Pasteur Lille, Lille, France..
    Brunak, S.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Dept Bio & Hlth Informat, Lyngby, Denmark..
    Pattou, F.
    Ctr Hosp Reg Univ Lille 2, Lille, France..
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Individual effects of gastric bypass surgery on longitudinal blood protein profiles: an IMI DIRECT study2019In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 62, p. S271-S271Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Wang, Damao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Li, Jing
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Wong, Ann C. Y.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Aachmann, Finn L.
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    A colorimetric assay to rapidly determine the activities of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases2018In: Biotechnology for Biofuels, ISSN 1754-6834, E-ISSN 1754-6834, Vol. 11, no 215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMOs) are enzymes that catalyze the breakdown of polysaccharides in biomass and have excellent potential for biorefinery applications. However, their activities are relatively low, and methods to measure these activities are costly, tedious or often reflect only an apparent activity to the polysaccharide substrates. Here, we describe a new method we have developed that is simple to use to determine the activities of type-1 (C1-oxidizing) LPMOs. The method is based on quantifying the ionic binding of cations to carboxyl groups formed by the action of type-1 LPMOs on polysaccharides. It allows comparisons to be made of activities under different conditions.

  • 46. Wilman, H. R.
    et al.
    Parisinos, C. A.
    Atabaki-Pasdar, N.
    Kelly, M.
    Thomas, E. L.
    Neubauer, S.
    Jennison, C.
    Ehrhardt, B.
    Baum, P.
    Schoelsch, C.
    Freijer, J.
    Grempler, R.
    Graefe-Mody, U.
    Hennige, A.
    Dings, C.
    Lehr, T.
    Scherer, N.
    Sihinecich, I.
    Pattou, F.
    Raverdi, V.
    Caiazzo, R.
    Torres, F.
    Verkindt, H.
    Mari, A.
    Tura, A.
    Giorgino, T.
    Bizzotto,
    Froguel, P.
    Bonneford, A.
    Canouil, M.
    Dhennin, V.
    Brorsson, C.
    Brunak, S.
    De Masi, F.
    Gudmundsdóttir, V.
    Pedersen, H.
    Banasik, K.
    Thomas, C.
    Sackett, P.
    Staerfeldt, H. -H
    Lundgaard, A.
    Nilsson, B.
    Nielsen, A.
    Mazzoni, G.
    Karaderi, T.
    Rasmussen, S.
    Johansen, J.
    Allesøe, R.
    Fritsche, A.
    Thorand, B.
    Adamski, J.
    Grallert, H.
    Haid, M.
    Sharma, S.
    Troll, M.
    Adam, J.
    Ferrer, J.
    Eriksen, H.
    Frost, G.
    Häussler, Ragna S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nicolay, C.
    Pavo, I.
    Steckel-Hamann, B.
    Thomas, M.
    Adragni, K.
    Wu, H.
    Hart, L.
    Roderick, S.
    van Leeuwen, N.
    Dekkers, K.
    Frau, F.
    Gassenhuber, J.
    Jablonka, B.
    Musholt, P.
    Ruetten, H.
    Tillner, J.
    Baltauss, T.
    Bernard Poenaru, O.
    de Preville, N.
    Rodriquez, M.
    Arumugam, M.
    Allin, K.
    Engelbrechtsen, L.
    Hansen, T.
    Forman, A.
    Jonsson, A.
    Pedersen, O.
    Dutta, A.
    Vogt, J.
    Vestergaard, H.
    Laakso, M.
    Kokkola, T.
    Kuulasmaa, T.
    Franks, P.
    Giordano, N.
    Pomares-Millan, H.
    Fitipaldi, H.
    Mutie, P.
    Klintenberg, M.
    Bergstrom, M.
    Groop, L.
    Ridderstrale, M.
    Atabaki Pasdar, N.
    Deshmukh, H.
    Heggie, A.
    Wake, D.
    McEvoy, D.
    McVittie, I.
    Walker, M.
    Hattersley, A.
    Hill, A.
    Jones, A.
    McDonald, T.
    Perry, M.
    Nice, R.
    Hudson, M.
    Thorne, C.
    Dermitzakis, E.
    Viñuela, A.
    Cabrelli, L.
    Loftus, H.
    Dawed, A.
    Donnelly, L.
    Forgie, I.
    Pearson, E.
    Palmer, C.
    Brown, A.
    Koivula, R.
    Wesolowska-Andersen, A.
    Abdalla, M.
    McRobert, N.
    Fernandez, J.
    Jiao, Y.
    Robertson, N.
    Gough, S.
    Kaye, J.
    Mourby, M.
    Mahajan, A.
    McCarthy, M.
    Shah, N.
    Teare, H.
    Holl, R.
    Koopman, A.
    Rutters, F.
    Beulens, J.
    Groeneveld, L.
    Bell, J.
    Thomas, L.
    Whitcher, B.
    Hingorani, A. D.
    Patel, R. S.
    Hemingway, H.
    Franks, P. W.
    Bell, J. D.
    Banerjee, R.
    Yaghootkar, H.
    Genetic studies of abdominal MRI data identify genes regulating hepcidin as major determinants of liver iron concentration2019In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 71, no 3, p. 594-602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background &amp; Aims: Excess liver iron content is common and is linked to the risk of hepatic and extrahepatic diseases. We aimed to identify genetic variants influencing liver iron content and use genetics to understand its link to other traits and diseases. Methods: First, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 8,289 individuals from UK Biobank, whose liver iron level had been quantified by magnetic resonance imaging, before validating our findings in an independent cohort (n = 1,513 from IMI DIRECT). Second, we used Mendelian randomisation to test the causal effects of 25 predominantly metabolic traits on liver iron content. Third, we tested phenome-wide associations between liver iron variants and 770 traits and disease outcomes. Results: We identified 3 independent genetic variants (rs1800562 [C282Y] and rs1799945 [H63D] in HFE and rs855791 [V736A] in TMPRSS6) associated with liver iron content that reached the GWAS significance threshold (p &lt;5 × 10−8). The 2 HFE variants account for ∼85% of all cases of hereditary haemochromatosis. Mendelian randomisation analysis provided evidence that higher central obesity plays a causal role in increased liver iron content. Phenome-wide association analysis demonstrated shared aetiopathogenic mechanisms for elevated liver iron, high blood pressure, cirrhosis, malignancies, neuropsychiatric and rheumatological conditions, while also highlighting inverse associations with anaemias, lipidaemias and ischaemic heart disease. Conclusion: Our study provides genetic evidence that mechanisms underlying higher liver iron content are likely systemic rather than organ specific, that higher central obesity is causally associated with higher liver iron, and that liver iron shares common aetiology with multiple metabolic and non-metabolic diseases. Lay summary: Excess liver iron content is common and is associated with liver diseases and metabolic diseases including diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease. We identified 3 genetic variants that are linked to an increased risk of developing higher liver iron content. We show that the same genetic variants are linked to higher risk of many diseases, but they may also be associated with some health advantages. Finally, we use genetic variants associated with waist-to-hip ratio as a tool to show that central obesity is causally associated with increased liver iron content.

1 - 46 of 46
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