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  • 1.
    Abid, Hamza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Thakur, Jagruti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Khatiwada, Dilip
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Bauner, David
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability, Industrial Dynamics & Entrepreneurship. Renetech AB, Sweden.
    Energy storage integration with solar PV for increased electricity access: A case study of Burkina Faso2021In: Energy, E-ISSN 0360-5442, Vol. 230, no 120656, p. 120656-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electricity access remains a challenge for the majority of the West African countries, wherein 5 out of 16 have an electrification rate of less than 25%, with Burkina Faso having only 9% of the rural population with electricity access in 2017. This study presents a techno-economic feasibility analysis of solar PV system integration with conceptualized Pumped Hydro Storage (PHS) and electric batteries for Burkina Faso. The study explores two cases (a) an off-grid PV with a storage system for rural areas and (b) a grid-connected PV system for an urban location. The least-cost configuration of PV with feasible storage is investigated using HOMER. The results show that Solar PV with PHS remains the optimal system configuration for both rural and urban cases even when the construction costs of lower and upper reservoirs are considered. Battery energy storage systems remain an economically expensive solution even when the added costs of pumped hydro storage are included, owing to the low lifetime and high capital costs of battery storage. The capital cost of PV remains to be the most dominating factor for both cases, signifying the importance of policy interventions for cost reduction of PV for increased green electrification in West African countries.

  • 2.
    Agrawal, Tarun Kumar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Thakur, Jagruti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development, Avancerad underhållsteknik och produktionslogistik.
    Kalaiarasan, Ravi
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development, Avancerad underhållsteknik och produktionslogistik.
    Enabling circularity of electric vehicle batteries-the need for appropriate traceability2021In: 2021 IEEE International Conference on Technology Management, Operations and Decisions, ICTMOD 2021, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) , 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increased electrification of transportation, there is a growth in the number of electric vehicles (EV) in use, and hence also discarded EV batteries. It is critical to trace the batteries so that the policy of electrification does not lead to a negative impact on sustainability. To achieve the goals of circular economy, it is necessary to consider the sustainable extended life cycle strategies of reduce, reuse and recycle. Information gathering and sharing through the supply chain is the key driver for enabling the tracking and tracing of materials and services needed. Traceability indicators across the value chain may enable the creation of a comprehensive database that aids the circular economy goals. In this study, we discuss three different circular economy business models and identify the key traceability indicators for enabling circularity in the lithium-ion battery application in the automotive sector. Insights are used to develop a framework for viable EV battery circularity, capturing three key circular economy elements and four traceability characteristics for different circularity types.

  • 3.
    Akay, Haluk
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, KTH Climate Action Centre, CAC. MIT, Dept Mech Engn, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Lee, Sang Hyun
    Hyundai Motor Grp, Res & Dev Div, Gyeonggi, South Korea.;Sungkyunkwan Univ, Sch Mech Engn, Gyeonggi, South Korea..
    Kim, Sang -Gook
    MIT, Dept Mech Engn, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA..
    Push-pull digital thread for digital transformation of manufacturing systems2023In: CIRP annals, ISSN 0007-8506, E-ISSN 1726-0604, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 401-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current digitalized manufacturing systems do not yet achieve the goal of smart manufacturing: precise con-trol and agility under unexpected disruptions. Push-Pull Digital Thread is a solution concept to enable contex-tual data and knowledge exchange across operational and functional units in a manufacturing enterprise. The extraction of decision reasoning and functional information can be facilitated by Large Language Models proc-essing information obtained from a decision maker at the point of decision. This concept shows a potential to address critical limitations in previous endeavours for smart manufacturing systems by building a semanti-cally searchable and sharable knowledge base in manufacturing systems and beyond.

  • 4.
    Allington, Lucy
    et al.
    Loughborough Univ, STEER Ctr, Dept Geog & Environm, Loughborough, Leics, England..
    Cannone, Carla
    Loughborough Univ, STEER Ctr, Dept Geog & Environm, Loughborough, Leics, England..
    Pappis, Ioannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Usher, William
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Taliotis, Constantinos
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology. Cyprus Inst, Nicosia, Cyprus..
    Sundin, Caroline
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Sridharan, Vignesh
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Ramos, Eunice
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Rogner, Hans-Holger
    To, Long Seng
    Loughborough Univ, STEER Ctr, Dept Geog & Environm, Loughborough, Leics, England..
    Selected 'Starter kit' energy system modelling data for selected countries in Africa, East Asia, and South America (#CCG, 2021)2022In: Data in Brief, E-ISSN 2352-3409, Vol. 42, p. 108021-, article id 108021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy system modeling can be used to develop internally consistent quantified scenarios. These provide key insights needed to mobilise finance, understand market development, infrastructure deployment and the associated role of institutions, and generally support improved policymaking. However, access to data is often a barrier to starting energy system modeling, especially in developing countries, thereby causing delays to decision making. Therefore, this article provides data that can be used to create a simple zero-order energy system model for a range of developing countries in Africa, East Asia, and South America, which can act as a starting point for further model development and scenario analysis. The data are collected entirely from publicly available and accessible sources, including the websites and databases of international organisations, journal articles, and existing modeling studies. This means that the datasets can be easily updated based on the latest available information or more detailed and accurate local data. As an example, these data were also used to calibrate a simple energy system model for Kenya using the Open Source Energy Modeling System (OSeMOSYS) and three stylized scenarios (Fossil Future, Least Cost and Net Zero by 2050) for 2020-2050. The assumptions used and the results of these scenarios are presented in the appendix as an illustrative example of what can be done with these data. This simple model can be adapted and further developed by in-country analysts and academics, providing a platform for future work.

  • 5.
    Almulla, Youssef
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Energy-Water and Agriculture Nexus to Support the Sustainable Management of Shared Water Resources2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout history, major rivers and shared water bodies have allowed civilizations to flourish, and the effective management of shared water bodies has always been a priority for societies and nations. Today, about 40% of the world’s population lives in proximity to the 286 transboundary river and lake basins that supply 60% of the world’s freshwater flows and make up about half of the Earth’s land area. Moreover, around 2 billion people in the world depend on groundwater sources, which include over 460 transboundary aquifer systems.

    The mismanagement of water resources can result in catastrophic disasters that are often exacerbated by a domino effect so that the impacts of poor water management often extend beyond the water system. The interdependency of the water system with other systems such as energy and food, or with land-use, highlights the importance of ”systems thinking and planning” in resource management. Such a concept is not easily encapsulated into policy-making processes in many parts of the world because consideration of the resource systems in isolation as individual entities and ‘silo” thinking still dominate. Climate change adds another layer of complexity and exacerbates the issue of water management. Another important factor is geographical location because precipitation varies among and within continents. This results in some regions suffering from water shortages and some regions facing the risks of water redundancy and floods. 

    The concept of the Water-Energy-Food (WEF) nexus was introduced in 2011 as a response to help address some of the issues mentioned above. Over the last decade, research on the WEF nexus has gained momentum in both the policy and academic areas and several methods have been introduced to operationalize the nexus in different contexts. One of the flagship methodologies is the Transboundary Basins Nexus Approach (TBNA) introduced by the United Nations Economic Commission of Europe (UNECE) in 2015 and designed to assess the nexus in shared (transboundary) water basins.

    The aim of this thesis is to support shared water management by using the WEF-nexus approach to quantify the benefits of coordinated management, motivate cooperation, and identify trade-offs in the optimal use of resources. To achieve this aim, four research questions are explored over the course of four academic publications.  

    The first question explores the role of the energy sector in motivating shared water cooperation. The second question studies the risks and opportunities emerging from the interplay between climate and renewable energy in shared basins. The third question focuses on groundwater management and explores what benefits the consideration of the energy-water-agriculture nexus could bring to shared groundwater management in water-scarce areas. The fourth question examines how consideration of the energy-water-agriculture nexus could accelerate the low-carbon transition in the agricultural sector. 

    These research questions are examined in two different, yet complementing, geographic locations. One is the Balkans in Southeastern Europe, which faces water redundancy and flood issues and the other is the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region which suffers from water scarcity. In the first region, the Drina and the Drin River Basins represent the characteristics of Southeastern Europe while the North Western Sahara Aquifer System (NWSAS) and the Souss-Massa basin represent the characteristics of the MENA region. Three of the case applications are transboundary (Drina, Drin and NWSAS) while the last application (Souss-Massa Basin) is a subnational basin.  

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  • 6.
    Almulla, Youssef
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Ramirez Gomez, Camilo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Joyce, Brian
    Stockholm Environm Inst, SEI US, Boston, MA USA..
    Huber-Lee, Annette
    Stockholm Environm Inst, SEI US, Boston, MA USA..
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    From participatory process to robust decision-making: An Agriculture-water-energy nexus analysis for the Souss-Massa basin in Morocco2022In: Energy for Sustainable Development, ISSN 0973-0826, E-ISSN 2352-4669, Vol. 70, p. 314-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Water-Energy-Food (WEF) framework is widely used to address sustainability and resource management questions. However, many WEF methods miss engaging with stakeholders in the process. In this study, we intro-duce a stakeholder-driven and model-supported robust nexus decision-making framework. This methodology is exemplified by a case study in the Souss-Massa basin (SMB) which has significant importance for the agricultural sector in Morocco. However, the water scarcity exacerbated by climate change, overexploitation of groundwater and heavy use of fossil fuels for pumping is threatening the future of this fertile land. An integrated agriculture, water and energy model was developed to explore various potential solutions or scenarios such as desalination, wastewater reuse and improved water productivity. The analysis revealed that engaging with stakeholders and developing common robust nexus decision metrics is essential to establishing a shared and transparent approach to address the complicated nexus challenges. It also showed that no one solution can address all nexus challenges and highlighted the need for an integrated strategy that stimulates the contributions from different sectors. Fi-nally, the transition from fossil fuel groundwater pumping to solar pumping is shown to be economically and en-vironmentally viable.

  • 7.
    Almulla, Youssef
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Zaimi, Klodian
    Polytechnic University of Tirana (UPT).
    Fejzic, Emir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Sridharan, Vignesh
    Imperial College London.
    De Strasser, Lucia
    UNECE.
    Gardumi, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Hydropower and Climate Change, insights from the Integrated Water-Energy modelling of the Drin Basin.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding of the transboundary impact of Climate Change on hydropower is not well-established in the literature, where few studies take a system perspective to understand the relative roles of different technological solutions for coordinated water and energy management. This study contributes to addressing this gap by introducing an open-source, long-term, technologically-detailed water and energy resources cost-minimisation model for the Drin River Basin, built in OSeMOSYS. 

    The analysis shows that climate change results in a 15-52% annual decline in hydro generation from the basin by mid-century. Albania needs to triple its investments in solar and wind to mitigate the risk of climate change. Changing the operational rules of hydropower plants has a minor impact on the electricity supply. However, it can spare significant storage volume for flood control. 

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  • 8.
    Almulla, Youssef
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Zaimi, Klodian
    Polytech Univ Tirana UPT, Blvd Deshmoret & Kombit 4, Tirana, Albania..
    Fejzic, Emir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Sridharan, Vignesh
    Imperial Coll London, Chem Engn Dept, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    de Strasser, Lucia
    United Nations Econ Commiss Europe UNECE, Bur S411, CH-1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland..
    Gardumi, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Hydropower and climate change, insights from the integrated water-energy modelling of the Drin Basin2023In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 48, article id 101098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding of the transboundary impact of Climate Change on hydropower is not well-established in the literature, where few studies take a system perspective to understand the relative roles of different technological solutions for coordinated water and energy management. This study contributes to addressing this gap by introducing an open-source, long-term, technologically-detailed water and energy resources cost-minimisation model for the Drin River Basin, built in OSeMOSYS.The analysis shows that climate change results in a 15-52% annual decline in hydro generation from the basin by mid-century. Albania needs to triple its investments in solar and wind to mitigate the risk of climate change. Changing the operational rules of hydropower plants has a minor impact on the electricity supply. However, it can spare significant storage volume for flood control.

  • 9.
    Ambhore, Dhairysheel Shivaji
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Navigating Industry 4.0 to Industry 5.0: Challenges and Strategies for Workforce Transition and its Relation to SDGs2024Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Fourth Industrial Revolution, known as Industry 4.0, has ushered in a new era of technological advancement and disruption across Manufacturing Industries. As organizations embrace digital technologies, artificial intelligence, and automation, the workforce faces profound changes in job roles, skill requirements, and training needs. Several challenges are faced by industries during this Industrial transformation. This research begins by focusing on Industry 4.0 and Industry 5.0, understanding there evolving concept. Through comprehensive literature review, the challenges and practices faced during this Industrial transformation and SDGs are discussed. Following the literature review, survey and interview questions were drafted trying to dug deeper into aspects that the literature could not fully capture. Furthermore, the relation between this Industrial Transformation and SDGs were established. This research contributes to a deeper understanding of the dynamic relationship between technology, the workforce, and sustainable development. This thesis report serves as a valuable resource for policymakers, business leaders, educators, and researchers seeking to navigate the transformative landscape of Industrial Transformation and its implications for a rapidly evolving workforce and sustainabledevelopment.

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  • 10.
    Atarian, Pegah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    A Climate, Land, Energy, and Water Nexus Assessment of Ethiopia2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Ethiopia is a landlocked country located in northeast Africa with a predominantly rural population dependent on rainfed agriculture and traditional biomass. The Ethiopian economy is growing fast and as it continues to grow, so does the demand for water, food, and energy. Ethiopia is already facing food, energy, and water scarcity issues, and climate change's impacts have been increasing the strain on these resources. The country has great renewable energy resource potential, which is largely unexploited. The Ethiopian government aims to improve the water, and energy systems, and make them more resilient to climate change. The water, energy and land resources are not unlimited and sustainable management of these resources is therefore important. This thesis examines Ethiopia's energy, land, and water systems to identify cross-system challenges and their impact on Ethiopian food, water, and energy security. Furthermore, the food, water, and energy systems' vulnerability to climate change is also investigated. This integrated assessment is done by creating a Climate, Land, Energy, and Water systems (CLEWs) model of Ethiopia with the open-source energy modelling tool OSeMOSYS.The study showed that a development and transformation of the agricultural sector, from a predominantly rainfall-dependent agriculture to an agricultural sector with a greater share of irrigation, had both beneficial and negative effects on the resource systems. The development of the agricultural sector increases the yield per hectare and creates a more climate-resilient agriculture, increasing food security. However, irrigated agriculture is more expensive, with a larger water and electricity demand, which in turn could harm water and energy security. The study also showed that climate change could impact electricity generation in Ethiopia; however, the climate resilience of the energy system can be improved by investing in more biomass, wind, and solar PV.

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  • 11.
    Beltramo, Agnese
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Ramos, Eunice
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Taliotis, Constantinos
    Howells, Mark I.
    Usher, William
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    The Global Least-cost User-friendly CLEWs Open-Source Exploratory model2021In: Environmental Modelling & Software, ISSN 1364-8152, E-ISSN 1873-6726, Vol. 143, article id 105091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) are important tools to analyse cross-sectoral interdependencies and the use of global resources. Most current tools are highly detailed and require expert knowledge and proprietary software to generate scenarios and analyse their insights. In this paper, the complementary Global Least-cost User-friendly CLEWs Open-Source Exploratory (GLUCOSE) model is presented as a highly-aggregated global IAM, open and accessible from source to solver and using the OSeMOSYS tool and the CLEWs framework. The model enables the exploration of policy measures on the future development of the integrated resource system. Thanks to its relatively simple structure, it requires low computational resources allowing for the generation of a large number of scenarios or to quickly conduct preliminary investigations. GLUCOSE is targeted towards education and training purposes by a range of interested parties, from students to stakeholders and decision-makers, to explore possible future pathways towards the sustainable management of global resources.

  • 12.
    Cannone, Carla
    et al.
    Department of Geography and Environment, Loughborough University, Loughborough, LE11 3TU, UK; Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London, London, SW7 1NE, UK.
    Hoseinpoori, Pooya
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK.
    Martindale, Leigh
    Department of Geography and Environment, Loughborough University, Loughborough, LE11 3TU, UK; Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London, London, SW7 1NE, UK.
    Tennyson, Elizabeth M.
    Centre for Global Equality, Cambridge, CB2 1SJ, UK; Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0AS, UK.
    Gardumi, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Somavilla Croxatto, Lucas
    Department of Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy, University College London, London, WC1E 6JA, UK.
    Pye, Steve
    UCL Energy Institute, University College London, London, WC1H 0NN, UK.
    Mulugetta, Yacob
    Department of Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy, University College London, London, WC1E 6JA, UK.
    Vrochidis, Ioannis
    TUM School of Engineering and Design, Technical University of Munich, Garching b. München, 85748, Germany.
    Krishnamurthy, Satheesh
    School of Engineering and Innovation, The Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK.
    Niet, Taco
    School of Sustainable Energy Engineering, Simon Fraser University, Surrey, BC, V3T 0N1, Canada.
    Harrison, John
    Department of Geography and Environment, Loughborough University, Loughborough, LE11 3TU, UK.
    Yeganyan, Rudolf
    Department of Geography and Environment, Loughborough University, Loughborough, LE11 3TU, UK.
    Mutembei, Martin
    Strathmore Energy Research Centre (SERC), Strathmore University, Madaraka Campus, Nairobi, 00200, Kenya, Madaraka Campus.
    Hawkes, Adam
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK.
    Petrarulo, Luca
    Milan, 20124, Italy.
    Allen, Lara
    Centre for Global Equality, Cambridge, CB2 1SJ, UK; Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0AS, UK.
    Blyth, Will
    Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office, London, SW1A 2AH, UK.
    Howells, Mark
    Department of Geography and Environment, Loughborough University, Loughborough, LE11 3TU, UK; Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London, London, SW7 1NE, UK.
    Addressing Challenges in Long-Term Strategic Energy Planning in LMICs: Learning Pathways in an Energy Planning Ecosystem2023In: Energies, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 16, no 21, article id 7267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an innovative approach to addressing critical global challenges in long-term energy planning for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The paper proposes and tests an international enabling environment, a delivery ecosystem, and a community of practice. These components are integrated into workflows that yield four self-sustaining capacity-development outcomes. Planning long-term energy strategies in LMICs is particularly challenging due to limited national agency and poor international coordination. While outsourcing energy planning to foreign experts may appear to be a viable solution, it can lead to a reduction in government agency (the ability of a government to make its own informed analysis and decisions). Additionally, studies commissioned by external experts may have conflicting terms of reference, and a lack of familiarity with local conditions can result in misrepresentations of on-the-ground realities. It is argued here that enhancing national agency and analytical capacity can improve coordination and lead to more robust planning across line ministries and technical assistance (TA) providers. Moreover, the prevailing consulting model hampers the release and accessibility of underlying analytics, making it difficult to retrieve, reuse, and reconstruct consultant outputs. The absence of interoperability among outputs from various consultants hinders the ability to combine and audit the insights they provide. To overcome these challenges, five strategic principles for energy planning in LMICs have been introduced and developed in collaboration with 21 international and research organizations, including the AfDB, IEA, IRENA, IAEA, UNDP, UNECA, the World Bank, and WRI. These principles prioritize national ownership, coherence and inclusivity, capacity, robustness, transparency and accessibility. In this enabling environment, a unique delivery ecosystem consisting of knowledge products and activities is established. The paper focuses on two key knowledge products as examples of this ecosystem: the open-source energy modeling system (OSeMOSYS) and the power system flexibility tool (IRENA FlexTool). These ecosystem elements are designed to meet user-friendliness, retrievability, reusability, reconstructability, repeatability, interoperability, and audibility (U4RIA) goals. To ensure the sustainability of this ecosystem, OpTIMUS is introduced—a community of practice dedicated to maintaining, supporting, expanding, and nurturing the elements within the ecosystem. Among other ecosystem elements, training and research initiatives are introduced, namely the Energy Modelling Platform for Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Asia-Pacific as well as the ICTP Joint Summer School on Modelling Tools for Sustainable Development. Once deployed via workflows, the preliminary outcomes of these capacity-development learning pathways show promise. Further investigation is necessary to evaluate their long-term impacts, scalability, replication, and deployment costs.

  • 13. Chiriboga, Gonzalo
    et al.
    Chamba, Rommel
    Garcia, Andrés
    Heredia Fonseca, Roberto
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Montero- Calderón, Carolina
    Carvajal C, Ghem
    Useful energy is a meaningful approach to building the decarbonization: A case of study of the Ecuadorian transport sector2023In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 132, p. 76-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we propose the first useful energy balance of Ecuadorian transport. Then we model the energy demand up to 2050 through three prospective scenarios developed in LEAP to assess significant sector decarbonization. The aim is to determine the reduction of final energy by replacing fossil fuels with electricity and applying sustainable policies in the whole sector.

    The analysis for the base year (2018) indicates that transport consumes 62 587 ± 7441 and 14 001 ± 1744 GWh for final and useful energy, respectively, corresponding to 22.37% of conversion. Therefore, by 2050 Ecuador will require between 21 783 (optimistic scenario) and 28 241 (pessimistic scenario) GWh of useful energy. The conversion in the first scenario was 30.71%, whereas it decreased to 22.02% in the second scenario, showing the beneficial effect of greener policies.

    The model presents a significant decarbonization of the total fleet from 0.002% to 40%, corresponding to 28 371 GWh of useful energy by 2050. To validate this finding, we evaluated the renewable electric potential of Ecuador, considering the functioning and feasible future generation projects. As a result, we calculated that this goal could be achieved with 23.9% of the total capacity. Therefore, future studies can focus on the possibility of total decarbonization of the sector employing the global efficiencies presented here.

  • 14.
    Cording, Enzo
    et al.
    KTH.
    Thakur, Jagruti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    FleetRL: Realistic reinforcement learning environments for commercial vehicle fleets2024In: SoftwareX, E-ISSN 2352-7110, Vol. 26, article id 101671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reinforcement Learning for EV charging optimization has gained significant academic attention in recent years, due to its ability to handle uncertainty, non-linearity, and real-time problem-solving. While the number of articles published on the matter has surged, the number of open-source environments for EV charging optimization remains small, and a research gap still exists when it comes to customizable frameworks for commercial vehicle fleets. To bridge the gap between research and real-world deployment of RL-based charging optimization, this paper introduces FleetRL as the first customizable RL environment for fleet charging optimization. Researchers and fleet operators can easily adapt the framework to fit their use-cases, and assess the impact of RL-based charging on economic feasibility, battery degradation, and operations.

  • 15.
    Curiel, Jose Adrian Rama
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Thakur, Jagruti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems. KTH, Dept Energy Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    A novel approach for Direct Load Control of residential air conditioners for Demand Side Management in developing regions2022In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 258, p. 124763-, article id 124763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid growth of air conditioners (ACs) in developing regions exacerbates some of the issues present in their electricity systems. Direct Load Control strategies can manage peak loads for optimizing energy usage for users and utilities. When applied to air conditioning, these strategies can be used for Demand Side Management which has not been fully explored for developing regions. In this paper a novel Direct Load Control mechanism is proposed, wherein control is based on technical constraints (generation capacity). To determine the effects of the proposed mechanism, a case study of the Indian State of Karnataka is carried out. The results indicate 0.88% energy savings and a reduction of almost 2% in regional peak loads in a state where only around 5% of all households have AC units. The case study shows that an AC Direct Load Control can have significant economic and environmental impacts, and can help improve current energy, water and climate issues. Continuous improvements in both energy access and economic conditions of developing regions are leading to a larger number of AC???s installed, meaning that a mechanism that enables sustainable AC consumption could be of great use for all the stakeholders in the developing countries??? electricity sectors.

  • 16.
    de Almeida, Constanca Martins Leite
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Silveira, Semida
    Sustainable Vis Global Ventures AB, S-18131 Lidingo, Sweden..
    Jenelius, Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Transport planning.
    Fuso Nerini, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Using the Sustainable Development Goals to Evaluate Possible Transport Policies for the City of Curitiba2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 21, article id 12222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities across the world are becoming more engaged in tackling climate change and contributing to the achievement of international agreements. The city of Curitiba in Brazil is no exception. In December 2020, the city published PlanClima (Plano Municipal de Mitigacao e Adaptacao as Mudancas Climaticas), a climate plan developed with local and international organizations. PlanClima aims to guide policies and actions to mitigate and adapt to climate change. This study focuses on selecting and qualitatively evaluating transport policies that contribute to the city's 2030 climate and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). With PlanClima's analysis for the transport sector in mind, nine targets for 2030 are identified and connected to different transport policies. To evaluate the possible interactions between the policies and the different dimensions of the SDGs, four types of linkages were designed: essential, uncertain, limited, and opposite. These categories were developed to evaluate the several dimensions in which a policy can have a positive or negative impact. The results show that the implementation of zero emission zones/low emission zones, green public procurement, subsidy schemes for the uptake of clean vehicle technology, and the digitalization of the transport system through smarter public transport and digital platforms that couple bike sharing, taxis, and public transport are some of the measures that can contribute to the achievement of Curitiba's targets and ensure a positive impact on the sustainable development of the city. The study highlights how different policy instruments can contribute to achieve the city's targets, thus providing guidance to policymakers.

  • 17.
    Devendran, Aarthi Aishwarya
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Built Environm & Energy Technol, S-35195 Växjö, Sweden..
    Mainali, Brijesh
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Built Environm & Energy Technol, S-35195 Växjö, Sweden..
    Khatiwada, Dilip
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Golzar, Farzin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Mahapatra, Krushna
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Built Environm & Energy Technol, S-35195 Växjö, Sweden..
    Toigo, Camila H. H.
    Pontificia Univ Catol Rio Grande, Business Sch, Econ Dept, BR-90619900 Porto Alegre, Brazil..
    Optimization of Municipal Waste Streams in Achieving Urban Circularity in the City of Curitiba, Brazil2023In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 15, no 4, article id 3252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The municipal solid waste (MSW) remains a great challenge in most cities of developing countries, as the majority of the generated waste is either not collected or is dumped in open uncontrolled non-engineered landfill sites, creating significant pollution due to the leakage of landfill leachate in the surrounding environment. In developing countries, a complete transition to a zero-landfill scenario is less likely to happen in the near future due to various socio-economic challenges. Therefore, the existing landfills in developing countries need holistic waste management thinking with more efforts on waste to energy conversions. This study highlights the challenges with existing MSW management practices of Curitiba, Brazil, and suggests some holistic and sustainable landfill management techniques. This is accomplished through the (i) identification of the suitable sites for setting up transfer stations (TSs), (ii) route optimization for MSW transportation, and (iii) analysis of the life expectancy of the existing landfill with waste valorization techniques for enhancing circularity of MSW of the city. The study has identified six potential TSs, making use of various geological criteria and constraints as suggested by the United States Environmental Protection Agency using GIS-based spatial analysis, which could save fuel cost of approximately 1.5 million Brazilian Real (BRL) per year for the solid waste transportation (from the source to the landfill site). This research has also made a value addition in this specific field with the preparation of a digitized road network map of the study region. Further, the sensitivity-based scenario analysis highlights that the lifespan of the existing landfill (until 2030) might be extended to 2058 if the city achieves the targeted recycling rate of 85% compared with the current rate of 23%. The results would be useful for policy-makers to adopt the crucial MSW scenario to achieve a circular economy in the waste management of the city of Curitiba.

  • 18.
    Elberry, Ahmed M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems. Aalto Univ, Sch Engn, Res Grp Energy Convers, Espoo, Finland..
    Thakur, Jagruti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Santasalo-Aarnio, Annukka
    Aalto Univ, Sch Engn, Res Grp Energy Convers, Espoo, Finland..
    Larmi, Martti
    Aalto Univ, Sch Engn, Res Grp Energy Convers, Espoo, Finland..
    Large-scale compressed hydrogen storage as part of renewable electricity storage systems2021In: International journal of hydrogen energy, ISSN 0360-3199, E-ISSN 1879-3487, Vol. 46, no 29, p. 15671-15690Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Storing energy in the form of hydrogen is a promising green alternative. Thus, there is a high interest to analyze the status quo of the different storage options. This paper focuses on the large-scale compressed hydrogen storage options with respect to three categories: storage vessels, geological storage, and other underground storage alternatives. In this study, we investigated a wide variety of compressed hydrogen storage technologies, discussing in fair detail their theory of operation, potential, and challenges. The analysis confirms that a techno-economic chain analysis is required to evaluate the viability of one storage option over another for a case by case. Some of the discussed technologies are immature; however, this does not rule out these technologies; rather, it portrays the research opportunities in the field and the foreseen potential of these technologies. Furthermore, we see that hydrogen would have a significant role in balancing intermittent renewable electricity production. (c) 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Hydrogen Energy Publications LLC. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  • 19.
    Elberry, Ahmed M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Thakur, Jagruti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Veysey, Jason
    Stockholm Environm Inst, 11 Curtis Ave, Somerville, MA 02144 USA..
    Seasonal hydrogen storage for sustainable renewable energy integration in the electricity sector: A case study of Finland2021In: Journal of Energy Storage, ISSN 2352-152X, E-ISSN 2352-1538, Vol. 44, article id 103474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wind power is rapidly growing in the Finnish grid, and Finland's electricity consumption is low in the summer compared to the winter. Hence, there is a need for storage that can absorb a large amount of energy during summer and discharge it during winter. This study examines one such storage technology, geological hydrogen storage, which has the potential to store energy on a GWh scale and also over longer periods of time. Finland's electricity generation system was modelled with and without hydrogen storage using the LEAP-NEMO modeling toolkit. The results showed about 69% decline in carbon dioxide emissions as well as a decline in the fossil fuel-based power accompanied with a higher capability to meet demand with less imports in both scenarios. Finally, a critical analysis of the Finnish electricity mix with and without hydrogen storage is presented.

  • 20.
    Elsamadony, Mohamed
    et al.
    Tokyo Inst Technol, Sch Environm & Soc, Civil & Environm Engn Dept, Meguro Ku, Tokyo 1528552, Japan.;Tanta Univ, Fac Engn, Dept Publ Works Engn, Tanta 31521, Egypt..
    Fujii, Manabu
    Tokyo Inst Technol, Sch Environm & Soc, Civil & Environm Engn Dept, Meguro Ku, Tokyo 1528552, Japan..
    Ryo, Masahiro
    Leibniz Ctr Agr Landscape Res ZALF, Muncheberg, Germany.;Brandenburg Univ Technol Cottbus Senftenberg, Cottbus, Germany..
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems. KTH Royal Inst Technol, KTH Climate Act Ctr, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kakinuma, Kaoru
    Shanghai Univ, Asian Demog Res Inst, Shanghai, Peoples R China..
    Kanae, Shinjiro
    Tokyo Inst Technol, Sch Environm & Soc, Civil & Environm Engn Dept, Meguro Ku, Tokyo 1528552, Japan..
    Preliminary quantitative assessment of the multidimensional impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Sustainable Development Goals2022In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 372, p. 133812-, article id 133812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intersectoral impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on humanity raises concerns about its implications for sustainable development. Here, we examine a global quantitative impact of COVID-19 pandemic on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) across all 17 goals using 65 proxy indicators across 72 countries collected from April 2020 to February 2021. Our data-driven analysis indicated that adverse impacts of the pandemic have been particularly concerned on gender equality (Goal 5), affordable and clean energy (Goal 7), decent work and economic growth (Goal 8), sustainable cities and communities (Goal 11), and responsible consumption and production (Goal 12) with global scores estimated to be-0.38,-0.21,-0.28,-0.22 and-0.16, respectively. Country income level was a variable that strongly differentiates the responses to the pandemic (e.g., lower in-comes had 14 negative goals compared to 11 and 4 negative goals assigned to middle-and high-income coun-tries, respectively). However, Goals 5 and 8 were highly impacted worldwide regardless of income status. Furthermore, countries that had already higher performance in SDGs were less impacted by the pandemic, highlighting the importance of progress on the SDGs in increasing societal resilience to pandemics. The findings provide insights into the reinforcement of recovery policies (e.g., protecting vulnerable groups and transitioning to a green economy) and a basis for a quantitative discussion on the sectors to be prioritized.

  • 21.
    Engström, Rebecka Ericsdotter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems. KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Exploring cross-resource impacts of urban sustainability measures: an urban climate-land-energy-water nexus analysis2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In an increasingly urban world, cities' global resource uses grow. Two fundamental resources for making cities liveable are water and energy. These resources are also closely interlinked – systems that convert and deliver energy to cities require water, and urban water systems use energy. In addition, these two resource systems affect and are affected by land use and climate change. This ‘nexus’ between climate, land use, energy and water (CLEW) systems has been extensively studied in the past decade, mainly with a focus on national and transboundary CLEW systems. This doctoral thesis develops the CLEW nexus research from an urban perspective.

    Two quantitative analyses examine how different types of sustainability measures in cities affect intended and unintended CLEW systems. First, the CLEW impacts of a set of sustainability measures in New York City are assessed - from water conservation to emission reductions. Results show that every measure affects (to varying degrees) all studied sustainability dimensions - water, energy and climate - and that the impacts can be quantified through a reference-resource-to-service-system (RRSS).

    The second quantitative study focuses on how CLEW impacts from a city's sustainability efforts spread beyond local and international borders. It investigates how global water and land use are affected in alternative scenarios to achieve climate neutrality in 2030 in the town of Oskarshamn, Sweden, using an energy systems simulation model. The study finds that both the magnitude and the geographical distribution of land and water requirements vary between scenarios. A strategy to achieve climate neutrality that invests in electrification leads to increased national water use, while a strategy that relies on biofuels has a greater impact on water and land use internationally. When results are translated to interactions between the UN's sustainable development goals (SDGs), they reveal that SDG synergies and trade-offs are 'strategy-dependent': different options for achieving SDGs on energy, sustainable cities and climate action have varying consequences for the advancement of SDGs on sustainable water, food production and biodiversity.

    To shed light on how data challenges affect quantitative urban nexus studies, uncertainty assessments of selected thesis’ results are conducted and complemented with a thematic analysis of a set of recently published urban nexus papers. Together, they indicate that analytical choices, uncertainties in results and - as a consequence - research foci are influenced by data limitations in both this thesis and in other urban nexus studies.

    Lastly, the finding from the Oskarshamn analysis – that SDG interactions are strategy-dependent – is deliberated with experts within sustainability sciences and SDG interaction research. From this, a research agenda is proposed with measures to make SDG 'spillovers' visible in local level decision-making.

    Taken together, the thesis contributes to filling several knowledge gaps on how urban sustainability measures within the CLEW systems interact within and beyond city limits, and proposes analytical approaches to quantify these interactions. It further points out how current data challenges constrain quantitative urban nexus analyses and highlights research needs to improve data management as well as other key efforts to enable consideration of nexus interactions, including SDG 'spillovers', in cities' sustainability work.

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    Rebecka Engström PhD thesis - comprehensive summary
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    Errata
  • 22.
    Engström, Rebecka Ericsdotter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Collste, David
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden ; Centre d’Études et de Recherches sur le Développement International, CERDI, Université Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Cornell, Sarah E.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johnson, Francis X.
    Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlsen, Henrik
    Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jaramillo, Fernando
    Department of Physical Geography, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Department of Physical Geography, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Howells, Mark
    Department of Geography, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom ; Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Weitz, Nina
    Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Palm, Viveka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management. Department for Regions and Environment, Statistics Sweden, SCB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Succeeding at home and abroad: accounting for the international spillovers of cities’ SDG actions2021In: npj Urban Sustainability, E-ISSN 2661-8001, Vol. 1, no 1, article id 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities are vital for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), but different local strategies to advance on the same SDG may cause different ‘spillovers’ elsewhere. Research efforts that support governance of such spillovers are urgently needed to empower ambitious cities to ‘account globally’ when acting locally on SDG implementation strategies.

  • 23.
    Engström, Rebecka Ericsdotter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Fuso-Nerini, Francesco
    Cassen, Christophe
    Luh, Sandro
    Viguié, Vincent
    Kober, Tom
    Deane, Paul
    Hamdi-Chérif, Meriem
    Research and Innovation Needs to Decarbonise European Cities: DEEDS Policy Brief Number 42020Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable and inclusive decarbonisation of European cities is a pre-requisite for achieving carbon neutrality at the EU level. As melting pots and demand hubs, cities are responsible for a majority of greenhouse gas emissions. For a transition towards zero-carbon cities, in the EU as elsewhere, a holistic approach and extensive collaboration is needed that can move city action beyond simply increasing the number of localized low-carbon solutions. This DEEDS Policy Brief outlines key features of EU research and innovation needs and proposes policy measures to promote zero-carbon European cities.

    Download full text (pdf)
    DEEDS Policy Brief on Cities
  • 24.
    Engström, Rebecka Ericsdotter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems. Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Destouni, G.
    Bhatt, V.
    Bazilian, Morgan
    KTH.
    Rogner, Hans-Holger
    KTH. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria.
    Corrigendum to “Connecting the resource nexus to basic urban service provision – with a focus on water-energy interactions in New York City” [31 (May) (2017) 83–94] (Sustainable Cities and Society (2017) 31 (83–94), (S2210670716305947), (10.1016/j.scs.2017.02.007))2021In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 72, p. 103002-, article id 103002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors regret two instances of misinterpretation of input data and one formatting error in the previously published paper as titled above. First, the numerical estimates for water use in NYC electricity and natural gas supply were found to be incorrect due to a conversion error in a data file. This error has now been corrected and the estimates have been changed to correctly correspond to the references on which they are based on. These changes have led to a recalculation of indirect water use reduction potentials in the interventions studied in the paper. Second, two errors due to primary data misinterpretation related to the studied green roof intervention have been found and corrected. The first led to an overestimation of the green roofs’ energy use reduction potential in the previously published paper. The second led to an underestimation of their installation cost. These errors have also been corrected and all numerical results for the green roof intervention have been recalculated. In the updated sections 3 and 4 of the original publication (below), Table 2, Table 3, Fig. 2 and Fig. 3 are updated with the new results related to both indirect water use reductions and green roof performance and costs. The text in the below sections have been given minor adjustments to clarify this update. These changes make green roofs a less economically favourable intervention in comparison to the previously published results. It also makes indirect water use reductions relatively smaller compared to direct water use reductions. All other results as well as the conclusions of this paper are still valid and unchanged. Lastly, a typo in writing of Eq. (7) in the manuscript text has been corrected. There was no error in the equation used in the analysis; hence, no numerical results have been effected by this correction. The authors would like to apologise for any inconvenience caused. Corrected writing of Eq. (7), section 2.3.1: [Formula presented] Updated sections of the original publication.

  • 25.
    Fourniols, Batiste
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    The Role of Technology Shifts in Urban Decarbonization Modelling: Scenario creation and implementation2024Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work includes modelling of decarbonization scenarios at the scale of an urban area, providing policy insights and a methodology focusing on introducing district heating and maintaining the existing gas distribution network in a case study. With a focus on reducing gas consumption in the residential and tertiary sectors, the research integrates scenario developments giving a methodology to develop district heating, requiring a careful balance in selecting the optimal scale for city-wide analysis. The study assesses the fate of existing gas networks. The development of district heating can affect the use of gas, particularly in residential or tertiary buildings. This thesis assesses potential use cases of existing gas networks by identifying certain criteria. Among them are industrial, tertiary or residential consumption, the presence of a district heating network, or the number of homes using individual gas heating. These criteria make it possible to define areas where the question of removing the gas distribution network can be raised, and other areas where the gas distribution network must be retained even if gas consumption falls sharply between 2019 and 2050. By reviewing the relevant literature, detailing the research questions and presenting a comprehensive methodology of scenario modelling, the thesis provides policy insights and a methodology to develop district heating at the scale of an urban area while addressing the future of existing gas infrastructure.

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    fulltext
  • 26.
    Fuldauer, Lena I.
    et al.
    Univ Oxford, Environm Change Inst, South Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3QY, England..
    Adshead, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems. Univ Oxford, Environm Change Inst, South Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3QY, England..
    Thacker, Scott
    Univ Oxford, Environm Change Inst, South Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3QY, England..
    Gall, Sarah
    Univ Oxford, Environm Change Inst, South Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3QY, England..
    Hall, Jim W.
    Univ Oxford, Environm Change Inst, South Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3QY, England..
    Evaluating the benefits of national adaptation to reduce climate risks and contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals2022In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 76, p. 102575-, article id 102575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scaling up national climate adaptation under the Paris Agreement is critical not only to reduce risk, but also to contribute to a nation's development. Traditional adaptation assessments are aimed at evaluating adaptation to cost-effectively reduce risk and do not capture the far-reaching benefits of adaptation in the context of devel-opment and the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). By grounding adaptation planning in an SDG vision, we propose and demonstrate a methodological process that for the first time allows national decision -makers to: i) quantify the adaptation that is needed to safeguard SDG target progress, and ii) evaluate strate-gies of stakeholder-driven adaptation options to meet those needs whilst delivering additional SDG target co -benefits. This methodological process is spatially applied to a national adaptation assessment in Ghana. In the face of the country's risk from floods and landslides, this analysis identifies which energy and transport assets to prioritise in order to make the greatest contribution to safeguarding development progress. Three strategies ('built', 'nature-based', 'combined SDG strategy') were formulated through a multi-stakeholder partnership involving government, the private sector, and academia as a means to protect Ghana's prioritised assets against climate risk. Evaluating these adaptation strategies in terms of their ability to deliver on SDG targets, we find that the combined SDG strategy maximises SDG co-benefits across 116 targets. The proposed methodological process for integrating SDG targets in adaptation assessments is transferable to other climate-vulnerable nations, and can provide decision-makers with spatially-explicit evidence for implementing sustainable adaptation in alignment with the global agendas.

  • 27.
    Fuldauer, Lena I.
    et al.
    Univ Oxford, Environm Change Inst, South Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3QY, England..
    Thacker, Scott
    Univ Oxford, Environm Change Inst, South Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3QY, England..
    Haggis, Robyn A.
    Univ Oxford, Environm Change Inst, South Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3QY, England..
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Nicholls, Robert J.
    Univ East Anglia, Tyndall Ctr Climate Change Res, Norwich NR4 7TJ, Norfolk, England..
    Hall, Jim W.
    Univ Oxford, Environm Change Inst, South Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3QY, England..
    Targeting climate adaptation to safeguard and advance the Sustainable Development Goals2022In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 3579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The international community has committed to achieve 169 Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets by 2030 and to enhance climate adaptation under the Paris Agreement. Despite the potential for synergies, aligning SDG and climate adaptation efforts is inhibited by an inadequate understanding of the complex relationship between SDG targets and adaptation to impacts of climate change. Here we propose a framework to conceptualise how ecosystems and socio-economic sectors mediate this relationship, which provides a more nuanced understanding of the impacts of climate change on all 169 SDG targets. Global application of the framework reveals that adaptation of wetlands, rivers, cropland, construction, water, electricity, and housing in the most vulnerable countries is required to safeguard achievement of 68% of SDG targets from near-term climate risk by 2030. We discuss how our framework can help align National Adaptation Plans with SDG targets, thus ensuring that adaptation advances, rather than detracts from, sustainable development. Without targeted climate adaptation, impacts of climate change threaten achievement of all 169 SDG targets. Fuldauer et al. provide an actionable framework to assess these impacts and help systematically align national adaptation plans with the SDGs.

  • 28.
    Gardumi, Francesco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Keppo, I.
    Howells, M.
    Pye, S.
    Avgerinopoulos, Georgios
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Lekavičius, V.
    Galinis, A.
    Martišauskas, L.
    Fahl, U.
    Korkmaz, P.
    Schmid, D.
    Montenegro, R. Cunha
    Syri, S.
    Hast, A.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Balyk, O.
    Karlsson, K.
    Pang, Xi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Mozgeris, G.
    Trubins, R.
    Jakšić, D.
    Turalija, I.M.
    Mikulić, M.
    Carrying out a multi-model integrated assessment of European energy transition pathways: Challenges and benefits2022In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 258, p. 124329-124329, article id 124329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the publication of the European Green Deal, the European Union has committed to reaching carbon neutrality by 2050. The envisaged reductions of direct greenhouse gases emissions are seen as technically feasible, but if a wrong path is pursued, significant unintended impacts across borders, sectors, societies and ecosystems may follow. Without the insights gained from an impact assessment framework reaching beyond the techno-economic perspective, the pursuit of direct emission reductions may lead to counterproductive outcomes in the long run. We discuss the opportunities and challenges related to the creation and use of an integrated assessment framework built to inform the European Commission on the path to decarbonisation. The framework is peculiar in that it goes beyond existing ones in its scope, depth and cross-scale coverage, by use of numerous specialised models and case studies. We find challenges of consistency that can be overcome by linking modelling tools iteratively in some cases, harmonising modelling assumptions in others, comparing model outputs in others. We find the highest added value of the framework in additional insights it provides on the technical feasibility of decarbonisation pathways, on vulnerability aspects and on unintended environmental and health impacts on national and sub-national scale.

  • 29.
    Gil Ribeiro, Carolina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Silveira, Semida
    Systems Engineering Program, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.
    The impact of financial incentives on the total cost of ownership of electric light commercial vehicles in EU countries2024In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 179, article id 103936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many EU countries have used financial incentives to promote electric light commercial vehicles and decarbonise urban freight transport. However, the high costs of electric light commercial vehicles still pose a significant adoption barrier. This paper evaluates the impact of financial incentives on the total cost of ownership of electric light commercial vehicles in the European Union and their role in achieving the cost-competitiveness of electric vehicles. A pairwise comparison is performed for three weight categories of electric and diesel vehicles in twelve countries. Our analysis shows that financial incentives have a high impact on the total cost of ownership and have proven necessary to achieve electric vehicles' cost-competitiveness in most cases. However, in specific cases, financial incentives may no longer be needed as the cost of electric vehicles' ownership would have been lower than diesel vehicles even without them. This paper demonstrates the importance of adjusting government incentives to avoid unnecessary funding allocations while promoting the decarbonisation of light commercial vehicles, particularly as the number of incentives does not directly correlate with electric vehicles penetration.

  • 30.
    Giunta, Fabio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Techno-economic assessment of CO2 refrigeration systems with geothermal integration: a field measurements and modelling analysis2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Several CO2 transcritical booster systems in supermarkets use the potential of integrating geothermal storage, enabling subcooling during warm climate conditions as well as being a heat source during cold climate conditions. First of all, field measurements of one of these systems located in Sweden were analysed with particular focus on the heat-recovery performance. The best theoretical operational strategy was compared to the one really implemented and the differences in the annual energy usage were assessed through modelling. The results show that an alternative to the best theoretical operational strategy exists; heat can be extracted from the ground while low-temperature heat is rejected by the gas cooler. Such an alternative strategy has important technical advantages with a negligible increment of the energy usage. In the second part of this work, the benefits of geothermal subcooling were evaluated. Applying the BIN hours method, it was demonstrated that this system is expected to save on average roughly 5% of the total power consumption, in Stockholm’s climate. The models utilized for the winter and summer season were combined to find the relationship between geothermal storage size and annual energy savings. In this way, it was possible to calculate the present value of the operational savings for the study case. Furthermore, a general methodology for assessing the economic feasibility of this system solution is presented. Finally, several scenarios were investigated to produce parametric curves and to perform a sensitivity analysis. Comparing the results with the typical Swedish prices for boreholes, the cases where this system solution is economically justified were identified. These are supermarkets with a Heat Recovery Ratio (HRR) higher than the average. For examples, supermarkets supplying heat to the neighbouring buildings (considering the Stockholm’s climate, systems with an annual average HRR of at least 70%). Relying only on savings from subcooling was found to be not enough to justify a geothermal storage, a not-negligible amount of heat must be extracted in winter. Finally, some interesting concepts and alternatives to a geothermal integration are presented to point out relevant future work.

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  • 31.
    Godinez-Zamora, Guido
    et al.
    Univ Costa Rica, Sch Elect Engn, San Jose, Costa Rica..
    Victor-Gallardo, Luis
    Univ Costa Rica, Sch Elect Engn, San Jose, Costa Rica..
    Angulo-Paniagua, Jam
    Univ Costa Rica, Sch Elect Engn, San Jose, Costa Rica..
    Ramos, Eunice
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Howells, Mark
    Loughborough Univ, Sch Social Sci, Dept Geog, Epinal Way, Loughborough LE11 3TU, Leics, England.;Imperial Coll London, Ctr Environm Policy, London SW7 2BU, England..
    Usher, William
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    De Leon, Felipe
    Minist Environm & Energy, Climate Change Directorate, San Jose, Costa Rica..
    Meza, Andrea
    Minist Environm & Energy, Climate Change Directorate, San Jose, Costa Rica..
    Quiros-Tortos, Jairo
    Univ Costa Rica, Sch Elect Engn, San Jose, Costa Rica..
    Decarbonising the transport and energy sectors: Technical feasibility and socioeconomic impacts in Costa Rica2020In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 32, article id 100573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compliance with the Paris Agreement requires the transformation of national economies to meet net-zero carbon dioxide emissions by mid-century. To accomplish this, countries need to define long-term decarbonisation strategies with near- and mid-term actions to determine their ideal future scenario while maximizing socioeconomic benefits. This paper describes the process followed to support the creation of the decarbonisation pathway for the transport and energy sectors presented in Costa Rica's National Decarbonisation Plan. We discuss in detail the technological pathway of a deep-decarbonisation future that supports reaching net-zero emissions by 2050. Compared to a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, our results show that the decarbonisation pathway can lead to emissions' reduction of 87% in the transport and energy sectors by 2050. Energy efficiency, the adoption of electromobility, modal-shift towards public transport and active mobility, as well as reduced demand due to digitalisation and teleworking, are found to be key drivers towards the deep-decarbonisation. These measures combined enable a 25% reduction of primary energy production by 2050. The results highlight that the decarbonisation scenario requires installing 4.4 GW more of renewable power plants by 2050, compared to the BAU scenario (80%). We also show that additional investments for the deep-decarbonisation are compensated with the reduced operating cost. Crucially, we found that the National Decarbonisation Plan results in a lower total discounted cost of about 35% of current Costa Rica's GDP, indicating that a deep decarbonisation is technically feasible and is coupled to socioeconomic benefits.

  • 32.
    Golzar, Farzin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Silveira, Semida
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems. Sustainable Vision – Global Ventures AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Impact of wastewater heat recovery in buildings on the performance of centralized energy recovery – a case study of Stockholm2021In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, Vol. 297, article id 117141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New concepts and technologies are needed to upgrade conventional energy systems and cope with environmental challenges. However, while emerging new technologies may serve to improve energy efficiency at the local level, they might also have disruptive effects at the system level. This paper investigates the potentially disruptive impacts of upscaling local wastewater heat recovery at the building level on the performance of the wastewater treatment and district heating systems in Stockholm. A hybrid model based on data-driven and process-driven mathematical models was developed to simulate the performance of the wastewater system and interlinkages among different actors. Two types of technologies (heat exchanger and heat pump) and different technology penetration scenarios (10%, 20%, and 40%) are considered for heat recovery in buildings. If 20% of the buildings install heat exchangers, the amount of heat demand in buildings decreases by 3% and total heat losses in the sewerage network decreases by 2%. In the case of local heat recovery using heat pumps in 20% of the buildings, there is a 4% reduction in the heat demand in buildings and 3% decrease in total heat losses in the network. Meanwhile, the heat demand in the wastewater treatment plant increases by 2% (with heat exchangers) or 4% (with heat pumps). Moreover, the district heating company recovers 5% and 9% less heat from the wastewater treatment plant, respectively, as compared to current conditions. These findings indicate that enhanced heat recovery in buildings could have disruptive impacts on currently centralized energy and water service provision over time. This justifies closer consideration of the balance between local and system-level solutions as policymakers define goals for energy efficiency, and evaluate potential societal and economic implications of different alternatives.

  • 33.
    Groppi, Daniele
    et al.
    Univ Tuscia, Dept Econ Engn Soc & Business Org DEIM, Via Paradiso 47, I-01100 Viterbo, Italy..
    Kumar, Shravan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Gardumi, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Garcia, Davide Astiaso
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Dept Planning Design & Technol Architecture, Rome, Italy..
    Optimal planning of energy and water systems of a small island with a hourly OSeMOSYS model2023In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 276, p. 116541-, article id 116541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Islands all over the world face common challenges connected to energy costs and greenhouse gas emissions. Thus, islands have been identified as perfect sites for implementing and testing innovative solutions to boost the green energy transition towards a sustainable and clean energy system. The supply of clean water is a major issue that affects small islands, and desalination, particularly Reverse Osmosis, represents a valid solution to this challenge. In this research, an energy system model is used to analyse long-term water and energy supply strategies of the tourist island of Favignana, Italy. The model is built with the Open Source long-term energy modelling tool OSeMOSYS at an hourly resolution. It considers both the potential synergies offered by Reverse Osmosis Desalination and the use of water storage to store the excess electricity when needed. The indirect emissions for the maritime transportation of goods and fuels (i.e., water and diesel) to the island are also accounted for. Different energy policies are compared to understand how a carbon tax, a limit on emissions and no policy would impact the long-term energy strategy of the island. The results show that a carbon tax that covers also the maritime transportation sector would lead to the lowest overall cumulative emissions. They additionally reveal that the contribution of emissions for maritime transportation of goods and fuels is relevant and cannot be neglected if a full decarbonisation has to be achieved. On the technological side, investment in a desalination plant is the most viable option in all cases. Finally, for the first time, OSeMOSYS is applied with hourly resolution and the results are compared with those obtained with lower time resolution showing that inaccuracies are found both for overall values and for the dispatching strategies.

  • 34.
    Gupta, Akash Som
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems. Accenture Strategy & Consulting, 1st Floor, Building 8C, DLF Cyber City, Gurugram, 122010, India.
    Khatiwada, Dilip
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Investigating the sustainability of biogas recovery systems in wastewater treatment plants- A circular bioeconomy approach2024In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 199, article id 114447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advanced wastewater treatment options offer a unique opportunity to recover valuable resources such as energy (biogas), nutrients, and minerals embedded in the wastewater streams. However, considerable challenges remain when designing and planning sustainable wastewater treatment systems. This study aims to evaluate the sustainability of waste-to-energy (WtE) recovery in the form of biogas in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The study investigates the performance of a biogas recovery system in different scenarios and applications from 2018 to 2040, considering the city of Tbilisi in Georgia. The study results reveal a significant biogas production potential, with an average annual energy (heat and power) generation of 137 GWh when biogas is recovered from the wastewater (WW) and sewage sludge (SS). The WWTP-based WtE systems can avoid up to 38,500 tCO2eq emissions every year. The combined recovery (from WW and SS) scenario is financially feasible with a net present value of 14.88 million EUR and a levelized cost of biogas of 0.08 EUR/m³. Recovered biogas can help avoid the usage of 172.34 million m³ of natural gas worth 42.4 million EUR. Sensitivity analysis shows that the quality of wastewater, price of energy, and capital cost of the anaerobic digestion plant are the key factors in determining the economics of WtE recovery systems. This research also demonstrates the interlinkages between sustainable development goals and various benefits of resource recovery systems. This study could be helpful for decision-makers involved in planning and deploying resource recovery systems in a circular bioeconomy approach in WWTPs globally.

  • 35.
    Gupta, S.
    et al.
    Bonn Alliance for Sustainability Research/Innovation Campus Bonn (ICB), University of Bonn, Bonn D-53113, Germany.
    Langhans, S. D.
    Basque Centre for Climate Change (BC3), Leioa 48940, Spain.
    Domisch, S.
    Department of Ecosystem Research, Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Müggelseedamm 310, Berlin 12587, Germany.
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Felländer, A.
    I Sustainability Center, Stockholm SE-114 34, Sweden.
    Battaglini, Manuela
    Transparent Internet, Tårup Bygade 30 Mesinge, DK-5370, Denmark.
    Tegmark, Max
    Center for Brains, Minds and Machines, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States.
    Vinuesa, Ricardo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. AI Sustainability Center, Stockholm SE-114 34, Sweden.
    Assessing whether artificial intelligence is an enabler or an inhibitor of sustainability at indicator level2021In: Transportation Engineering, ISSN 2666-691X, Vol. 4, p. 100064-, article id 100064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the early phase of the artificial-intelligence (AI) era expectations towards AI are high, with experts believing that AI paves the way for managing and handling various global challenges. However, the significant enabling and inhibiting influence of AI for sustainable development needs to be assessed carefully, given that the technology diffuses rapidly and affects millions of people worldwide on a day-to-day basis. To address this challenge, a panel discussion was organized by the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, the AI Sustainability Center and MIT Massachusetts Institute of Technology, gathering a wide range of AI experts. This paper summarizes the insights from the panel discussion around the following themes: The role of AI in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); AI for a prosperous 21st century; Transparency, automated decision-making processes, and personal profiling; and Measuring the relevance of Digitalization and Artificial Intelligence (D&AI) at the indicator level of SDGs. The research-backed panel discussion was dedicated to recognize and prioritize the agenda for addressing the pressing research gaps for academic research, funding bodies, professionals, as well as industry with an emphasis on the transportation sector. A common conclusion across these themes was the need to go beyond the development of AI in sectorial silos, so as to understand the impacts AI might have across societal, environmental, and economic outcomes. The recordings of the panel discussion can be found at: https://www.kth.se/en/2.18487/evenemang/the-role-of-ai-in-achieving-the-sdgs-enabler-or-inhibitor-1.1001364?date=2020–08–20&length=1&orglength=185&orgdate=2020–06–30 Short link: https://bit.ly/2Kap1tE

  • 36.
    Hallin, Matilda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Eriksson, Cornelia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Storskalig elektrifiering av bilar och dess påverkan på Sveriges elnät2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    One of the goals in Sweden's climate action plan is to reduce the transport sector's greenhouse gas emissions by at least 70 percent by 2030 compared to 2010. An important measure for this is the electrification of vehicles. The purpose of this report is to investigate how electrification of the vehicle fleet can affect Sweden's electricity network. This is done by studying what Sweden's electricity network looks like today, what challenges Sweden's electricity supply faces, what would happen if the electrification of the vehicle fleet took place immediately, and whether the conditions for electrification differ between northern and southern Sweden. One likely development is that electricity consumption will increase significantly in the coming years because of extensive electrification. Rechargeable vehicles in traffic have increased steadily over the past ten years. This rapid development shows a need for an understanding ofhow a rapid conversion of the vehicle fleet can affect the electricity grid. This is investigated using a model of the power grid created in Excel. The model is used to find out what the powersupply would have been if all fossil-fueled passenger cars in Sweden in 2020 were replaced with electric cars. The results of the study show that the power demand due to electrification of the vehicle fleet would be significantly greater in southern than in northern Sweden. During the simulated electrification, the import demand in southern Sweden increased considerably, even though there was a large import demand even before electrification. Net exports in northern Sweden decreased slightly due to the electrification. However, the change was much smaller in the north than in the south. Both before and after electrification, Sweden net exported electricity, but exports decreased by just over 13 TWh due to the transition. Furthermore, the import demand could be covered in all bidding zones except SE4, where power shortages would occur during 77 hours of the year. If the power reserve is also used, this figure is reduced to 62 hours. This result does not include imports from Germany, Poland, and Lithuania. At maximum utilized transmission capacity from these countries, the power shortage time drops to 18 hours. During many of the hours that power shortages occur in SE4, the transmission capacity in the average between SE2 and SE3 is fully utilized. To reduce the risk of power shortages, one solution would be to increase this capacity in order to be able to import more electricity from northern Sweden where a large part of the electricity production takes place. An additional measure may be increased electricity production in southern Sweden.

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  • 37.
    Harahap, Fumi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Mohammed, Hasan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Henrysson, Maryna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Franco, Joaquin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Transport planning.
    Jenelius, Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Transport planning.
    Policy Tools for Electric Vehicle Adoption in Curitiba City2023In: Proceedings of the International Conference “Sustainable Built Environment and Urban Transition”, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of electric vehicles (EVs) in more sustainable cities is widely recognized, with their adoption increasing rapidly. Most governments have targets for continued EV adoption rate growth, and some plan to ban fossil-fuelled vehicles altogether. Yet, in most countries, including Brazil, the proportion of EVs among new vehicles sold remains low. EV adoption poses multiple technological, economic and social challenges that require targeted policy mechanisms. This study assesses policy measures to expedite EV adoption for road transport decarbonisation and sheds light on the critical role of EVs in sustainable urban development. We explore electric mobility challenges in urban areas, focusing on the case of Curitiba City in Brazil. We investigate existing challenges and barriers to policy implementation in Curitiba and successful interventions in cities worldwide to identify suitable policies for Curitiba. The study uses in-depth interviews with relevant stakeholders to examine policy tools, including financial, legal, knowledge-based, and societal instruments. The study recommends complementary instruments and measures to accelerate their adoption in Curitiba. Overall, the study's results, which identify criteria for policy design and implementation towards complete transport decarbonisation, should be valuable for decision-making in transport and mobility planning.

  • 38. Hendrickson, Cary
    et al.
    Henrysson, Maryna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Theories of Change and results-based management for the sustainable development agenda2023In: Strategic Thinking, Design and the Theory of Change: A Framework for Designing Impactful and Transformational Social Interventions / [ed] Luca Simeone, David Drabble, Nicola Morelli, Amalia de Götzen, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. , 2023, p. 56-75Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Henke, Hauke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Gardumi, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Howells, Mark I.
    Loughborough University, Epinal Way, Loughborough, LE11 3TU, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.
    The Open Source electricity Model Base for Europe - An engagement framework for open and transparent European energy modelling2021In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 239, article id 121973Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition to a low carbon energy system as laid out in the Paris Agreement and the European GreenDeal presents challenges that involve society at all levels from planners to consumers. A key challenge isthe communication across these levels. Tools to foster engagement and discussion between the differentactors are open-source models with a low threshold for uptake. This paper presents the Open-Sourceelectricity Model Base for Europe an electricity sector engagement model covering all member statesof the EU, Norway, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Built in OSeMOSYS and available on GitHub, themodel provides a starting point into energy systems modelling and can be further developed in acollaborative manner. It enables non-experts to develop an understanding of energy systems models andenergy planning. Thereby, it can serve as an engagement tool to carry the debate on the future of theEuropean power system beyond the academy, which might contribute to finding societal consensus onhow to decarbonise our energy system. The model allows dynamic power sector expansion analysis ofthe European power system till 2050. It can be used for scenario analysis and is expandable to othersectors to analyse the benefits of sector coupling.

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  • 40.
    Henrysson, Maryna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Transforming the governance of energy systems: the politics of ideas in low-carbon infrastructure development in Mexico and Vietnam2020In: Climate and Development, ISSN 1756-5529, E-ISSN 1756-5537, ISSN 1756-5529, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transforming energy systems is increasingly recognized as a societal response to mitigating climate change, with potential to catalyse a paradigmatic shift towards decarbonization. The article looks at the diversity of claims presented to ascribe meaning to policy problems (i.e. structural conditions, contextual technical or ideational appeals to values), and framed within wider institutional perspectives for reform, development, and strategies for addressing climate change in Mexico and Vietnam. The findings suggest both governments maintain a more exclusive than inclusive form of energy governance and retain centralized power over renewable energy and climate change mitigation responses. This is not only because of technological infrastructural lock-ins, but also because they maintain a more exclusive than inclusive form of energy governance that is justified and legitimized by the need for energy supply and access security, and green growth as a source of continuous economic growth. Framing broader energy reforms as part of climate change mitigation goals allow for incumbent actors to further legitimise a conservative neoliberal agenda. These two cases offer insights into how newly emerging economies are facing energy sector reforms while being confronted with energy sector transformations dictated by the climate change mitigation agenda.

    KEYWORDS: Low-carbon electricity infrastructure, development discourse, energy systems, transformational change, discursive institutionalism

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    HenryssonHendrickson
  • 41.
    Henrysson, Maryna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Hendrickson, Cary
    Department of Methods and Models for Economics, Territory and FinanceUniversità Di Roma “La Sapienza”RomeItaly.
    Scope for Circular Economy Model in Urban Agri-Food Value Chains2021In: Sustainable Consumption and Production, Volume II: Circular Economy and Beyond / [ed] Ranjula Bali Swain and Susanne Sweet, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, 1, p. 75-97Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we discuss why in food waste and loss and energy debate community-led initiatives and alternative economies deserve to be looked at more seriously when considering support to circular economy approaches, modelling, and adaptation in the urban context. We focus on the emergence of two types of community-led initiatives in the energy and agri-food sectors. We draw parallels between their role in bringing variety to experimentation when applying circular economy principles in practice. To better understand the potential of combining alternative urban agri-food networks with community-led energy initiatives in sustainable transformation of urban production and consumption systems, it is important to recognize that the uptake of visions or strategies of circularity is affected by the availability and strength of social networks, driving forces behind their emergence and persistence, and technological solutions within and for these grassroots initiatives. We recognize three conditions to building resilient sustainable urban food networks: understanding of multiple urban flows from a coupled systems-perspective, the diversification of knowledge, and overcoming structural and cultural resistance to change. Different framings, such as in narrow terms of innovations focused on technological optimisation, can slow down recognition and reaping benefits from interdependencies of food and energy infrastructures, networks, and institutions. We argue that there is a need for better understanding of how can measures directed at minimizing food waste and loss and wider uptake of sustainable energy systems be coupled and complementary in a more circular urban economy.

  • 42.
    Henrysson, Maryna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    The Role of Institutions in Creating Circular Economy Pathways for Regional Development2021In: Journal of Environment and Development, ISSN 1070-4965, E-ISSN 1552-5465, no 2, p. 127-148, article id 107049652199187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past decade, the circular economy has gained attention as a mechanism of transition toward a regenerative, low carbon, and resource-efficient society. As the history of previous radical transformations shows, successful transition toward the circular economy cannot take place without understanding the institutional features of industrial transformations. This article highlights the significance of institutions by placing the circular economy model in the context of the natural resource–based sector and discusses the importance of institutions in regional path development. The article identifies three institutional determinants of both endogenous and directed transformation toward the circular economy model in the regional context: (i) proximity of physical flows and assets, (ii) maturation and diversity of market networks, and (iii) inherent values and patterns of cooperation. This article offers a starting point for future studies of circular economy transitions and the role of institutions as en- abling, as well as at times obstructing transition environments.

  • 43.
    Henrysson, Maryna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Papageorgiou, Asterios
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Vanhuyse, Fedra
    Sinha, Rajib
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Monitoring progress towards a circular economy in urban areas: An application of the European Union circular economy monitoring framework in Umeå municipality2022In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 87, p. 104245-104245, article id 104245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As cities worldwide implement strategies to accelerate the transition toward a circular economy (CE), there is an increasing need for tools to monitor progress. However, a standardised metric for CE monitoring in urban areas is lacking. This study examines the potential of the EU Circular Economy Monitoring Framework (CEMF), an established indicator-based framework for measuring national- and EU-level circularity performance, as a monitoring tool for urban areas. For this purpose, available data sources that can support the framework's application at the urban level are mapped, and data quality is assessed following the pedigree matrix approach. Next, the CEMF indicators are computed for the urban area of Umeå, Sweden. The mapping showed limited availability of urban-level data, necessitating the downscaling of national-level data using proxy factors. Most available urban-level data are of high quality, while the quality of national-level data is reduced when used to compute indicators at the urban level. The application of the CEMF in Umeå indicates that there are areas where the municipality performs well, though further improvements are needed. We conclude that the CEMF has potential as a monitoring tool for urban areas. However, improvements in CEMF...s scope and data availability are recommended.

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  • 44.
    Heredia Fonseca, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Gardumi, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Assessing the impact of applying individual discount rates in power system expansion of Ecuador using OSeMOSYS2022In: International Journal of Sustainable Energy Planning and Management, E-ISSN 2246-2929Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of the electricity supply sector needs data and energy system models to aid government instances to achieve optimal decision-making. Since 2006, Ecuador has faced gradual changes in the electricity sector and invested more than 11 billion dollars in expanding the generation. We use an open-source model generator in the present study and develop the first long-term generation expansion model for Ecuador. We select specific social and hurdle rates to represent the government's decision to mobilize private energy infrastructure investments. We build scenarios for social and hurdle rates to evaluate the sensitivity of renewable and conventional generation technologies to such rates. Results show that medium and large hydropower have a low sensitivity to discount rates. Medium and large hydropower plays a significant role in the energy mix in the mid and long-term, regardless of the discount rate. Results from this model find no significant contribution of non-hydro renewables. Among these, only geothermal reaches around 160 MW for all scenarios. Installing geothermal and hydropower minimizes generation from conventional technologies until 2034; then, CCGT installations increase CO2 emissions above 2020 levels.

  • 45.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Dreborg, Karl Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Engström, Rebecka Ericsdotter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Experiences of the development and use of scenarios for evaluating Swedish environmental quality objectives2011In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 498-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents and evaluates a method for encouraging long-term thinking and for considering a variety of scenarios in environmental policy processes. The Swedish environmental policy is based on 16 environmental quality objectives (EQOs) that national authorities are obliged to observe. These objectives are reviewed annually and evaluated in depth every four years. Here we describe and explore a futures study project for introducing more long-term thinking into work on the EQOs, which we tested in the in-depth evaluation in 2008. We found it difficult to design a collective scenario for a case with a wide variety of objectives and individuals with different backgrounds. However, this difficulty makes it even more important to incorporate futures studies into the work of the relevant authorities. Scenario work is often subcontracted, leading to a constant lack of futures studies expertise and thinking within authorities. Despite the difficulties, we found that experts within the authorities did begin to recognise the opportunities provided by futures studies. The project revealed an interest and need for futures studies within the authorities in charge of Swedish environmental quality objectives and our findings show that the authorities need to build up their own skills in futures studies.

  • 46.
    Khalid, Mutayab
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Thakur, Jagruti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Mothilal Bhagavathy, Sivapriya
    bPNDC, University of Strathclyde, United Kingdom.
    Topel, Monika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Impact of public and residential smart EV charging on distribution power grid equipped with storage2024In: Sustainable cities and society, ISSN 2210-6707, Vol. 104, article id 105272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The large-scale penetration of electric vehicles (EV) in road transport brings a challenging task to ensure the balance between supply and demand from urban districts. EVs, being shiftable loads can provide system flexibility. This work investigates the potential role of smart charging of EVs in mitigating the impact of the integration of a mix of residential and public EV charging infrastructure on power networks. Furthermore, the impact of integrating solar photo-voltaic (PV) and battery energy storage systems (BESS) has been explored where BESS improves PV self-consumption and helps in peak shaving during peak load hours. Annual losses, transformer congestion, and cost of electricity import assessment are detailed by considering the power network of Stockholm as a case study. Smart charging with loss-optimal and cost-optimal charging strategies are compared to uncoordinated charging. The cost-optimal charging strategy is more favorable as compared to the loss-optimal charging strategy as it provides more incentives to the DSOs. The loss-optimal charging strategy reduces 35.5 % of losses in the network can be reduced while the cost-optimal solution provides a 4.3 % reduction in the electricity cost. The combined implementation of smart charging, PV, and BESS considerably improves energy and economic performance and is more effective than EV smart charging alone.

  • 47.
    Khan, Zarrar
    et al.
    Pacific Northwest Natl Lab PNNL, Joint Global Change Res Inst JGCRI, College Pk, MD 20740 USA..
    Ramos, Eunice
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Yue, Qin
    Peking Univ, Coll Environm Sci & Engn, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Emerging Themes and Future Directions of Multi-Sector Nexus Research and Implementation2022In: Frontiers in Environmental Science, E-ISSN 2296-665X, Vol. 10, article id 918085Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water, energy, and food are all essential components of human societies. Collectively, their respective resource systems are interconnected in what is called the "nexus". There is growing consensus that a holistic understanding of the interdependencies and trade-offs between these sectors and other related systems is critical to solving many of the global challenges they present. While nexus research has grown exponentially since 2011, there is no unified, overarching approach, and the implementation of concepts remains hampered by the lack of clear case studies. Here, we present the results of a collaborative thought exercise involving 75 scientists and summarize them into 10 key recommendations covering: the most critical nexus issues of today, emerging themes, and where future efforts should be directed. We conclude that a nexus community of practice to promote open communication among researchers, to maintain and share standardized datasets, and to develop applied case studies will facilitate transparent comparisons of models and encourage the adoption of nexus approaches in practice.

  • 48.
    Khatiwada, Dilip
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Golzar, Farzin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Exploring Uncertainty In The Technoeconomic And Emissions Assessment Of Waste-To-Energy Systems In Cities – The Case Of Curitiba2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     The main aim of this paper is to perform the techno-economic and emissions analysis of energy generation from municipal solid waste (MSW) considering two alternative technological options: incineration (INC) and anaerobic digestion (AD). We identify the role of various parameters in estimating the techno-economic and climate change impact in the two scenarios. We explore the uncertainty in the estimation and identify the most influential parameters using Monte-Carlo simulation. A case study in the management of household solid waste in the city of Curitiba is evaluated. Energy and GHG emissions in single and hybrid pathways are explored. The results show that the incineration option can produce 170-430 GWh/year of electricity whereas AD plant will generate 10-70 GWh/year. Emissions are estimated at the range 38-150 millionkgCO2eq (INC) and 5-60 millionkgCO2eq (AD). The key influencing parameters are: organic fraction of MSW, non-biogenetic composition, electrical efficiency, methane leakage, and fraction of fossil carbon in waste. Even if the incineration option can produce more energy, the technology not only emits a significant amount of emissions but also nutrient and key resources will be lost. The levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) production from the INC and AD systems is estimated at 0.071-0.124 USD/kWh and 0.086-0.227 USD/kWh respectively. AD options will favor the circularity concept when the full potential of the resource is recovered. For this, better planning and logistics along with an innovative business model, are required. The model developed in the study can be used in other cities in the management of their MSW.

  • 49.
    Khatiwada, Dilip
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Golzar, Farzin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Mainali, Brijesh
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Built Environm & Energy Technol, S-35195 Växjö, Sweden..
    Devendran, Aarthi Aishwarya
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Built Environm & Energy Technol, S-35195 Växjö, Sweden..
    Circularity in the Management of Municipal Solid Waste - A Systematic Review2021In: Vides un Klimata Tehnologijas / Scientific Proceedings of Riga Technical University: Environmental and Climate Technologies, ISSN 1691-5208, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 491-507Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) management has emerged as one of the major environmental challenges globally. The consequences of inappropriate waste management are manifold and the trend would continue if immediate interventions are not taken for its reversion amid rapid urbanization and current consumption patterns of individuals. The concept of circular economy (CE) can contribute to a paradigm shift in the transformation of the traditional linear approach that does not favour reuse, recycle, recovery concept. Modern and proven waste management practices with collection systems, recycling facilities, sanitary landfills, and waste-to-energy (WtE) and nutrient recovery offer opportunities to improve urban environment through the valorization of waste and by-products in a CE. This study scrutinizes the existing literature on the assessment of circularity and helps to develop a unified circularity framework in the management of MSW in cities. Key aspects such as tools for measuring circularity, nexus and trade-offs, and conditions in promoting CE are discussed. Finally, this paper elucidates the need for circularity, including enablers and inhibitors for promoting circularity in the management of MSW with a case study in the city of Curitiba, Brazil.

  • 50.
    Khatiwada, Dilip
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems.
    Purohit, Pallav
    Air Quality and Greenhouse Gases (AIR) Program, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Schlossplatz 1, Laxenburg A-2361, Austria.
    Special Issue on Assessing the Modern Bioenergy Potential and Strategies for Sustainable Development: Transformations through Nexus, Policy, and Innovations2021In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 374-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern bioenergy is widely acknowledged as a potential substitute for fossil fuels to offset human dependence on fossil fuels for energy. It has the potential to make an important contribution towards sustainable development, from rural development and poverty alleviation to energy security and climate change mitigation. Bioenergy would play a key role in the sustainable transformation of energy systems, along with its decisive contribution in developing a low-carbon growth path while contributing to energy diversification and security. Nevertheless, there are concerns about the sustainability implications of large-scale production and use of bioenergy. In order to minimize the potential risks and challenges we need to understand interdisciplinary dimensions such as government policies, financing schemes, stakeholders’ engagement, and inter-sectoral linkages while devising sustainable bioenergy strategies. The nexus approach can be useful in understanding the synergies and trade-offs, capturing the interdependence between scarce resources (e. g. water, energy, land). It is also critically important to explore cross-cutting issues such as the socio-political, techno-economic, legal and environmental when it comes to the deployment of biofuels for sustainable development. Investment plans also need to be addressed considering transformations and complexities associated with biofuels. Innovation in the transition towards biofuel would only be possible if we consider a participatory approach considering people's behavior and societal needs. This special issue focus on assessing the modern bioenergy potential and strategies for sustainable development, biofuel water nexus, policy analysis, complexities of biofuel investment plans, and innovation framework.

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