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  • 1.
    D'Amario, Sara
    et al.
    Department of Music Acoustics, mdw – University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna, Vienna, Austria; RITMO Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies in Rhythm, Time and Motion, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Musicology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Ternström, Sten
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Goebl, Werner
    Department of Music Acoustics, mdw – University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Bishop, Laura
    RITMO Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies in Rhythm, Time and Motion, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Musicology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Body motion of choral singers2023In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent investigations on music performances have shown the relevance of singers’ body motion for pedagogical as well as performance purposes. However, little is known about how the perception of voice-matching or task complexity affects choristers’ body motion during ensemble singing. This study focussed on the body motion of choral singers who perform in duo along with a pre-recorded tune presented over a loudspeaker. Specifically, we examined the effects of the perception of voice-matching, operationalized in terms of sound spectral envelope, and task complexity on choristers’ body motion. Fifteen singers with advanced choral experience first manipulated the spectral components of a pre-recorded short tune composed for the study, by choosing the settings they felt most and least together with. Then, they performed the tune in unison (i.e., singing the same melody simultaneously) and in canon (i.e., singing the same melody but at a temporal delay) with the chosen filter settings. Motion data of the choristers’ upper body and audio of the repeated performances were collected and analyzed. Results show that the settings perceived as least together relate to extreme differences between the spectral components of the sound. The singers’ wrists and torso motion was more periodic, their upper body posture was more open, and their bodies were more distant from the music stand when singing in unison than in canon. These findings suggest that unison singing promotes an expressive-periodic motion of the upper body.

  • 2.
    D'Amario, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics. RITMO, University of Oslo.
    Ternström, Sten
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Goebl, Werner
    mdw – University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna.
    Bishop, Laura
    University of Oslo, NO.
    Impact of singing togetherness and task complexity on choristers' body motion2023In: SMAC 2023: Proceedings of the Stockholm Music Acoustics Conference 2023 / [ed] D'Amario, S., Ternström, S., Friberg, A., Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2023, p. 146-150Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the impact of the perception of singing togetherness,as indexed by the spectral envelope of the sound, and task complexity on choristers’ body motion, as they performed in duo with a pre-recorded tune presented over a loudspeaker. Fifteen experienced choral singers first manipulated the spectral filter settings of the tune in order to identify the recordings they felt most and not at all together with. Then, they sang the tune in unison and canon along with the recordings featuring the chosen filter settings. Audio and motion capture data of the musicians' upper bodies during repeated performances of the same tune were collected. Results demonstrate that wrist motion was more periodic, singer posture more open, and the overall quantity of body motion higher when singing in unison than in canon; singing togetherness did not impact body motion. The current findings suggest that some body movements may support choral performance, depending on the complexity of the task condition.

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