Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Finkel, Sebastian
    et al.
    Veit, Ralf
    Lotze, Martin
    Friberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Vuust, Peter
    Soekadar, Surjo
    Birbaumer, Niels
    Kleber, Boris
    Intermittent theta burst stimulation over right somatosensory larynx cortex enhances vocal pitch‐regulation in nonsingers2019In: Human Brain Mapping, ISSN 1065-9471, E-ISSN 1097-0193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the significance of auditory cortical regions for the development and maintenance of speech motor coordination is well established, the contribution of somatosensory brain areas to learned vocalizations such as singing is less well understood. To address these mechanisms, we applied intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS), a facilitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) protocol, over right somatosensory larynx cortex (S1) and a nonvocal dorsal S1 control area in participants without singing experience. A pitch‐matching singing task was performed before and after iTBS to assess corresponding effects on vocal pitch regulation. When participants could monitor auditory feedback from their own voice during singing (Experiment I), no difference in pitch‐matching performance was found between iTBS sessions. However, when auditory feedback was masked with noise (Experiment II), only larynx‐S1 iTBS enhanced pitch accuracy (50–250 ms after sound onset) and pitch stability (>250 ms after sound onset until the end). Results indicate that somatosensory feedback plays a dominant role in vocal pitch regulation when acoustic feedback is masked. The acoustic changes moreover suggest that right larynx‐S1 stimulation affected the preparation and involuntary regulation of vocal pitch accuracy, and that kinesthetic‐proprioceptive processes play a role in the voluntary control of pitch stability in nonsingers. Together, these data provide evidence for a causal involvement of right larynx‐S1 in vocal pitch regulation during singing.

  • 2.
    Zamovaro, A. M:
    et al.
    Research Institute on Health Sciences, University of Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.
    Zatorre, R. J.
    International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound research (BRAMS), Montreal, Canada.
    Vuust, Peter
    Friberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Birbaumer, Niels
    Wyss Center for Bio and Neuroengeneering, Chenin de Mines 9, 1202, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Kleber, Boris
    Center for Music in the Brain, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, & The Royal Academy of Music Aarhus/Aalborg, Denmark.
    Enhanced insular connectivity with speech sensorimotor regions in trained singers – a resting-state fMRI studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The insula contributes to the detection and integration of salient events during goaldirected behavior and facilitates the interaction between motor, multisensory, and cognitive networks. Task-fMRI studies have suggested that experience with singing can enhance access to these resources. However, the long-term effects of vocal motor training on insula-based networks are currently unknown. In thisstudy, we used restingstate fMRI to explore experience-dependent differences in insula co-activation patterns between conservatory-trained singers and non-singers. We found enhanced insula connectivity in singers compared to non-singers with constituents of the speech sensorimotor network, including the cerebellum (lobule VI, crus 2), primary somatosensory cortex, the parietal lobes, and the thalamus. Moreover, accumulated singing training correlated positively with increased co-activation in bilateral primary sensorimotor cortices in the somatotopic representations of the larynx (left dorsal anterior insula, dAI) and the diaphragm (bilateral dAI)—crucial regions for motorcortical control of complex vocalizations—together with the thalamus (bilateral posterior insula/left dAI) and the left putamen (left dAI). The results of this study support the view that the insula plays a central role in the experience-dependent modulation of sensory integration within the vocal motor system, possibly by optimizing conscious and non-conscious aspects of salience processing associated with singing-related bodily signals.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf