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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Wolrath Söderberg, Maria
    Södertörn.
    Wormbs, Nina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Exceptionalism and Evasion: How Scholars Reason About Air Travel2022In: Academic Flying and the Means of Communication / [ed] Kristian Bjørkdahl & Adrian Santiago Franco Duharte, Palgrave Macmillan, 2022, p. 159-183Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how scholars reason about their own flying habits is important when dealing with the problems of large emissions from academic air travel. This study is based on a travel habits survey with scholars at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. KTH has relatively high emissions from air travel, but at the same time, it has a high profile in matters of sustainability and a lot of research related to this theme. One can therefore assume a high degree of knowledge about the climate crisis and the climate impact of various actions. It is also plausible that KTH scholars meet special expectations to be role models and that practices in conflict with their teaching can have consequences for the public confidence in the university. In this study, we look at how scholars reason about how emissions from their flying could be reduced. Their responses display a spectrum of varying attitudes, from climate scepticism to a commitment to radical transformation, with the majority in between, either suggesting different types of concrete changes or invoking arguments to justify the status quo. The proposed interventions, several of which are ingenious and wise, can guide university managements to strategies that have support from employees. The more reluctant arguments point to cultural and discursive habits that must be understood and met in an empathetic way. 

  • 2. Wolrath Söderberg, Maria
    et al.
    Wormbs, Nina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Internal Deliberation Defending Climate-Harmful Behavior2022In: Argumentation: an international journal on reasoning, ISSN 0920-427X, E-ISSN 1572-8374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most people in countries with the highest climate impact per capita are well awareof the climate crisis and do not deny the science. They worry about climate and haveclimate engaged attitudes. Still, their greenhouse-gas emissions are often high. Howcan we understand acting contrary to our knowledge? A simple answer is that wedo not want to give up on benefits or compromise our quality of life. However, it ispainful to live with discrepancies between knowledge and action. To be able to avoidtaking the consequences of our knowledge, we deal with the gap by motivating toourselves that the action is still acceptable. In this article, we use topical analysisto examine such processes of motivation by looking at the internal deliberation of399 climate engaged people’s accounts of their reasoning when acting against theirown knowledge. We found that these topical processes can be described in at leastfour different ways which we call rationalization, legitimization, justification andimploration. By focusing on topoi we can make visible how individual forms of rea-soning interact with culturally developed values, habits and assumptions in creatingenthymemes. We believe that these insights can contribute to understanding the con-ditions for climate transition communication.

  • 3.
    Wormbs, Nina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Wolrath Söderberg, Maria
    Södertörn university college, Sweden.
    Flygskam / Flight shame: Shame and climate change with a focus on Sweden2023Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Although the word ‘flygskam’ or flight shame existed in Swedish previously, it was in the spring of 2018 that some Swedish journalists began writing about feelings of shame associated with flying due to its climate impact. This interest grew rapidly into a national debate spurred on by the ongoing discussion on climate change and mitigation. There were those who disliked framing flying as a moral issue. However, it seems that for those people that actually stopped flying for climate reasons, ethical considerations were crucial.

  • 4.
    Wormbs, Nina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Wolrath Söderberg, Maria
    Flygskam/Flightshame2023In: The New Nordic Lexicon, Aarhus: Nordics info , 2023Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Wormbs, Nina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Wolrath Söderberg, Maria
    Thinking structures of climate delay: internal deliberations among Swedes with sustainable ambitions2023In: Environment, Development and Sustainability, ISSN 1387-585X, E-ISSN 1573-2975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is important to understand how individuals in affluent societies reason around their own actions in relation to climate change. However, much of the research has focused on sceptics and those who have little interest in change. Studying those who want to contribute to a transition and why they fail is also of interest. This study is qualitative and deals with the internal reasoning of a self-selected sample of Swedes with sustainable values who argue in relation to a failed intention. Ca 400 responses were analysed. We used topos theory to identify thinking structures that guide the arguments used to deal with the cognitive dissonance that acting against knowledge and intention results in. The most common ways to argue were to imagine a climate account with possible deposits and withdrawals, or a budget which you strive to keep. Also common was to compare with something or someone that was ”worse”. Redirecting responsibility was also an argument, albeit complicating the issue of responsibility. The limits of reality were used as an excuse for action, whereas articulating the goal conflicts of a less emitting life made choices visible. Finally, the human condition of not always meeting your own standards was mentioned. These arguments only partly overlap common discourses of delay in the public sphere.

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