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  • 1.
    Abitbol, Tiffany
    et al.
    Institute of Materials, School of Engineering, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland;Bioeconomy and Health, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, SE-114 28 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kubat, Mikaela
    Bioeconomy and Health, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, SE-114 28 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brännvall, Elisabet
    Bioeconomy and Health, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, SE-114 28 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kotov, Nikolay
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Johnson, C. Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Nizamov, Rustem
    Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Technology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku, Finland.
    Nyberg, Mikael
    Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Technology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku, Finland.
    Miettunen, Kati
    Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Technology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku, Finland.
    Nordgren, Niklas
    Bioeconomy and Health, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, SE-114 28 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stevanic, Jasna S.
    Bioeconomy and Health, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, SE-114 28 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Guerreiro, Maria Pita
    Bioeconomy and Health, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, SE-114 28 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Isolation of Mixed Compositions of Cellulose Nanocrystals, Microcrystalline Cellulose, and Lignin Nanoparticles from Wood Pulps2023In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 8, no 24, p. 21474-21484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a circular economyperspective, one-pot strategies for theisolation of cellulose nanomaterials at a high yield and with multifunctionalproperties are attractive. Here, the effects of lignin content (bleachedvs unbleached softwood kraft pulp) and sulfuric acid concentrationon the properties of crystalline lignocellulose isolates and theirfilms are explored. Hydrolysis at 58 wt % sulfuric acid resulted inboth cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and microcrystalline celluloseat a relatively high yield (>55%), whereas hydrolysis at 64 wt% gaveCNCs at a lower yield (<20%). CNCs from 58 wt % hydrolysis weremore polydisperse and had a higher average aspect ratio (1.5-2x),a lower surface charge (2x), and a higher shear viscosity (100-1000x).Hydrolysis of unbleached pulp additionally yielded spherical nanoparticles(NPs) that were <50 nm in diameter and identified as lignin bynanoscale Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and IR imaging.Chiral nematic self-organization was observed in films from CNCs isolatedat 64 wt % but not from the more heterogeneous CNC qualities producedat 58 wt %. All films degraded to some extent under simulated sunlighttrials, but these effects were less pronounced in lignin-NP-containingfilms, suggesting a protective feature, but the hemicellulose contentand CNC crystallinity may be implicated as well. Finally, heterogeneousCNC compositions obtained at a high yield and with improved resourceefficiency are suggested for specific nanocellulose uses, for instance,as thickeners or reinforcing fillers, representing a step toward thedevelopment of application-tailored CNC grades.

  • 2.
    Lopez-Guajardo, Ana
    et al.
    Univ Sheffield, Med Sch, Dept Oncol & Metab, Sheffield, England..
    Zafar, Azeer
    Univ Sheffield, Med Sch, Dept Oncol & Metab, Sheffield, England..
    Al Hennawi, Khairat
    Univ Sheffield, Med Sch, Dept Oncol & Metab, Sheffield, England..
    Rossi, Valentina
    IOV IRCCS, Veneto Inst Oncol, Immunol & Mol Oncol Diagnost, Padua, Italy..
    Alrwaili, Abdulaziz
    Univ Sheffield, Med Sch, Dept Oncol & Metab, Sheffield, England..
    Medcalf, Jessica D.
    Univ Sheffield, Med Sch, Dept Oncol & Metab, Sheffield, England..
    Dunning, Mark
    Univ Sheffield, Med Sch, Bioinformat Core, Sheffield, England..
    Nordgren, Niklas
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Bioecon & Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Estabrook, Ian D.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Phys & Astron, Sheffield, England.;Tech Univ Dresden, Ctr Adv Elect Dresden, Dresden, Germany..
    Hawkins, Rhoda J.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Phys & Astron, Sheffield, England.;African Inst Math Sci, Accra, Ghana..
    Gad, Annica K. B.
    Univ Sheffield, Med Sch, Dept Oncol & Metab, Sheffield, England.;Univ Madeira, Madeira Chem Res Ctr, Funchal, Portugal.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Regulation of cellular contractile force, shape and migration of fibroblasts by oncogenes and Histone deacetylase 62023In: Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, E-ISSN 2296-889X, Vol. 10, article id 1197814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The capacity of cells to adhere to, exert forces upon and migrate through their surrounding environment governs tissue regeneration and cancer metastasis. The role of the physical contractile forces that cells exert in this process, and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. We, therefore, aimed to clarify if the extracellular forces that cells exert on their environment and/or the intracellular forces that deform the cell nucleus, and the link between these forces, are defective in transformed and invasive fibroblasts, and to indicate the underlying molecular mechanism of control. Confocal, Epifluorescence and Traction force microscopy, followed by computational analysis, showed an increased maximum contractile force that cells apply on their environment and a decreased intracellular force on the cell nucleus in the invasive fibroblasts, as compared to normal control cells. Loss of HDAC6 activity by tubacin-treatment and siRNA-mediated HDAC6 knockdown also reversed the reduced size and more circular shape and defective migration of the transformed and invasive cells to normal. However, only tubacin-mediated, and not siRNA knockdown reversed the increased force of the invasive cells on their surrounding environment to normal, with no effects on nuclear forces. We observed that the forces on the environment and the nucleus were weakly positively correlated, with the exception of HDAC6 siRNA-treated cells, in which the correlation was weakly negative. The transformed and invasive fibroblasts showed an increased number and smaller cell-matrix adhesions than control, and neither tubacin-treatment, nor HDAC6 knockdown reversed this phenotype to normal, but instead increased it further. This highlights the possibility that the control of contractile force requires separate functions of HDAC6, than the control of cell adhesions, spreading and shape. These data are consistent with the possibility that defective force-transduction from the extracellular environment to the nucleus contributes to metastasis, via a mechanism that depends upon HDAC6. To our knowledge, our findings present the first correlation between the cellular forces that deforms the surrounding environment and the nucleus in fibroblasts, and it expands our understanding of how cells generate contractile forces that contribute to cell invasion and metastasis.

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