kth.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Jin, Yanghao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Liu, Sirui
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Shi, Ziyi
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Wang, Shule
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process. Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Biomass Energy and Materials, Institute of Chemical Industry of Forest Products, Chinese Academy of Forestry (CAF), No. 16, Suojin Five Village, Nanjing, 210042, China, No. 16, Suojin Five Village; International Innovation Center for Forest Chemicals and Materials, College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Longpan Road 159, Nanjing, 210037, China, Longpan Road 159.
    Wen, Yuming
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117585 Singapore.
    Zaini, Ilman Nuran
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Tang, Chuchu
    School of Design and Art, Hunan Institute of Technology, 421001 Hengyang, China; Program of Visual Arts, Faculty of Creative Arts, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Lu, Xincheng
    Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Biomass Energy and Materials, Institute of Chemical Industry of Forest Products, Chinese Academy of Forestry (CAF), No. 16, Suojin Five Village, Nanjing, 210042, China, No. 16, Suojin Five Village; International Innovation Center for Forest Chemicals and Materials, College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Longpan Road 159, Nanjing, 210037, China, Longpan Road 159.
    Kawi, Sibudjing
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117585 Singapore.
    Wang, Chi Hwa
    Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117585 Singapore.
    Jiang, Jianchun
    Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Biomass Energy and Materials, Institute of Chemical Industry of Forest Products, Chinese Academy of Forestry (CAF), No. 16, Suojin Five Village, Nanjing, 210042, China, No. 16, Suojin Five Village; International Innovation Center for Forest Chemicals and Materials, College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Longpan Road 159, Nanjing, 210037, China, Longpan Road 159.
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    A novel three-stage ex-situ catalytic pyrolysis process for improved bio-oil yield and quality from lignocellulosic biomass2024In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 295, article id 131029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to improve the quality and yield of bio-oil produced from ex-situ catalytic pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass (sawdust) using a combination of stage catalysts with Al-MCM-41, HZSM-5, and ZrO2. The research employed various methods, including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry, bench-scale experiments, and process simulations to analyze the kinetics, thermodynamics, products, and energy flows of the catalytic upgrading process. The introduction of ZrO2 enhances the yield of monoaromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) in heavy organics. Compared with the dual-catalyst case, the MAHs yield escalates by approximately 344% at a catalyst ratio of 1:3:0.25. Additionally, GC-MS data indicate that the incorporation of ZrO2 promotes the deoxygenation reaction of the guaiacol compound and the oligomerization reactions of PAHs. The integration of ZrO2 as the third catalyst enhances the yield of heavy organics significantly, achieving 16.85% at a catalyst ratio of 1:3:1, which increases by nearly 35.6% compared to the dual-catalyst case. Also, the addition of ZrO2 as the third catalyst enhanced the energy distribution in heavy organics. These findings suggest that the combination of these catalysts improves the fuel properties and yields of the bio-oil.

  • 2.
    Jin, Yanghao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Shi, Ziyi
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Han, Tong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Yang, Hanmin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Asfaw, Habtom Desta
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, POB 539,Lagerhyddsvagen 1, S-75121 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Gond, Ritambhara
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, POB 539,Lagerhyddsvagen 1, S-75121 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Younesi, Reza
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, POB 539,Lagerhyddsvagen 1, S-75121 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    From Waste Biomass to Hard Carbon Anodes: Predicting the Relationship between Biomass Processing Parameters and Performance of Hard Carbons in Sodium-Ion Batteries2023In: Processes, ISSN 2227-9717, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 764Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) serve as the most promising next-generation commercial batteries besides lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Hard carbon (HC) from renewable biomass resources is the most commonly used anode material in SIBs. In this contribution, we present a review of the latest progress in the conversion of waste biomass to HC materials, and highlight their application in SIBs. Specifically, the following topics are discussed in the review: (1) the mechanism of sodium-ion storage in HC, (2) the HC precursor's sources, (3) the processing methods and conditions of the HCs production, (4) the impact of the biomass types and carbonization temperature on the carbon structure, and (5) the effect of various carbon structures on electrochemical performance. Data from various publications have been analyzed to uncover the relationship between the processing conditions of biomass and the resulting structure of the final HC product, as well as its electrochemical performance. Our results indicate the existence of an ideal temperature range (around 1200 to 1400 degrees C) that enhances the formation of graphitic domains in the final HC anode and reduces the formation of open pores from the biomass precursor. This results in HC anodes with high storage capacity (>300 mAh/g) and high initial coulombic efficiency (ICE) (>80%).

  • 3.
    Jin, Yanghao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Yang, Hanmin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Guo, Shuo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Shi, Ziyi
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Han, Tong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Gond, Ritambhara
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, Struct Chem, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Carbon and H-2 recoveries from plastic waste by using a metal-free porous biocarbon catalyst2023In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 404, article id 136926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon and H2 recoveries from plastic waste enable high value-added utilizations of plastic waste while mini-mizing its GHG emissions. The objective of this study is to explore the use of a metal-free biocarbon catalyst for waste plastic pyrolysis and in-line catalytic cracking to produce H2-rich gases and carbon. The results show that the biocarbon catalyst exhibits a good catalytic effect and stability for various plastic wastes. Increasing the C/P ratio from 0 to 2, induce an increase in the conversion rate of C and H in plastics to carbon and H2 from 57.1% to 68.7%, and from 22.7% to 53.5%, respectively. Furthermore, a carbon yield as high as 580.6 mg/gplastic and an H2 yield as high as 68.6 mg/gplastic can be obtained. The hierarchical porous structure with tortuous channels of biocarbon extends the residence time of pyrolysis volatiles in the high-temperature catalytic region and thereby significantly promotes cracking reactions.

  • 4.
    Shi, Ziyi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Jin, Yanghao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Han, Tong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Yang, Hanmin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Gond, Ritambhara
    Department of Chemistry-Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 538, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, 75121, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Subasi, Yaprak
    Department of Chemistry-Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 538, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, 75121, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Asfaw, Habtom Desta
    Department of Chemistry-Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 538, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, 75121, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Younesi, Reza
    Department of Chemistry-Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 538, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, 75121, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Bio-based anode material production for lithium–ion batteries through catalytic graphitization of biochar: the deployment of hybrid catalysts2024In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 3966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Producing sustainable anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) through catalytic graphitization of renewable biomass has gained significant attention. However, the technology is in its early stages due to the bio-graphite's comparatively low electrochemical performance in LIBs. This study aims to develop a process for producing LIB anode materials using a hybrid catalyst to enhance battery performance, along with readily available market biochar as the raw material. Results indicate that a trimetallic hybrid catalyst (Ni, Fe, and Mn in a 1:1:1 ratio) is superior to single or bimetallic catalysts in converting biochar to bio-graphite. The bio-graphite produced under this catalyst exhibits an 89.28% degree of graphitization and a 73.95% conversion rate. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveals the dissolution–precipitation mechanism involved in catalytic graphitization. Electrochemical performance evaluation showed that the trimetallic hybrid catalyst yielded bio-graphite with better electrochemical performances than those obtained through single or bimetallic hybrid catalysts, including a good reversible capacity of about 293 mAh g−1 at a current density of 20 mA/g and a stable cycle performance with a capacity retention of over 98% after 100 cycles. This study proves the synergistic efficacy of different metals in catalytic graphitization, impacting both graphite crystalline structure and electrochemical performance.

  • 5.
    Shi, Ziyi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Jin, Yanghao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Svanberg, Rikard
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Han, Tong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Minidis, Alexander B. E.
    RISE Res Inst Sweden Bioecon & Hlth, Chem Proc & Pharmaceut Dev, Forskargatan 20J, SE-15136 Södertälje, Sweden..
    Ann-Sofi, Kindstedt Danielsson
    RISE Res Inst Sweden Bioecon & Hlth, Chem Proc & Pharmaceut Dev, Forskargatan 20J, SE-15136 Södertälje, Sweden..
    Kjeldsen, Christian
    Topsoe AS, Haldor Topsoe Alle 1, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Continuous catalytic pyrolysis of biomass using a fluidized bed with commercial-ready catalysts for scale-up2023In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 273, article id 127288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) of biomass to produce high-quality bio-oils as potential substitutes for conventional fuels plays an essential role in the decarbonization of the world. In this study, continuous CFP tests of sawdust using three commercial-ready catalysts were performed. The overall objective is to screen appropriate catalysts and catalyst loading amounts for further commercialization and upgrading by evaluating the quality of the organic fraction bio-oils and clarifying the relationship between the hydrogen-to-carbon atomic effective (H/ Ceff) ratio and bio-oil yield. The results displayed that, owing to a cracking effect of the catalyst, all catalytic cases had higher H/Ceff ratios and larger relative area percentages of hydrocarbons determined by NMR. Thermogravimetric analysis reveals that, compared to non-catalytic bio-oils, catalytic bio-oils showed more distillates in the diesel range. Increasing the catalyst-loading amount also showed the same effect. Overall, all bio-oil products from catalytic cases had H/Ceff ratios higher than 0.6, indicating the production of promising oil for hydrodeoxygenation. By analyzing and fitting the data from this work and comparing with the literature, it could be concluded that its yield would decrease as the bio-oil product quality increases (the H/Ceff ratios increase).

  • 6.
    Wang, Shule
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering. Nanjing Forestry Univ, Coll Chem Engn, Jiangsu Coinnovat Ctr Efficient Proc & Utilizat Fo, Int Innovat Ctr Forest Chem & Mat, Nanjing 210037, Peoples R China.;Chinese Acad Forestry CAF, Inst Chem Ind Forest Prod, Jiangsu Prov Key Lab Biomass Energy & Mat, 16 Suojin F Village, Nanjing 210042, Peoples R China..
    Shi, Ziyi
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Jin, Yanghao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Zaini, Ilman Nuran
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Li, Yan
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Soil Sci, Key Lab Soil Environm & Pollut Remediat, Nanjing 210008, Peoples R China.;Wageningen Univ, Soil Chem & Chem Soil Qual Grp, POB 47, NL-6700 AA Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Tang, Chuchu
    Hunan Inst Technol, Sch Design & Art, Hengyang 421001, Peoples R China..
    Mu, Wangzhong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Structures.
    Wen, Yuming
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Jiang, Jianchun
    Nanjing Forestry Univ, Coll Chem Engn, Jiangsu Coinnovat Ctr Efficient Proc & Utilizat Fo, Int Innovat Ctr Forest Chem & Mat, Nanjing 210037, Peoples R China.;Chinese Acad Forestry CAF, Inst Chem Ind Forest Prod, Jiangsu Prov Key Lab Biomass Energy & Mat, 16 Suojin F Village, Nanjing 210042, Peoples R China..
    Jönsson, Pär Göran
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    A machine learning model to predict the pyrolytic kinetics of different types of feedstocks2022In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 260, p. 115613-, article id 115613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An in-depth knowledge of pyrolytic kinetics is vital for understanding the thermal decomposition process. Numerous experimental studies have investigated the kinetic performance of the pyrolysis of different raw materials. An accurate prediction of pyrolysis kinetics could substantially reduce the efforts of researchers and decrease the cost of experiments. In this work, a model to predict the mean values of model-free activation energies of pyrolysis for five types of feedstocks was successfully constructed using the random forest machine learning method. The coefficient of determination of the fitting result reached a value as high as 0.9964, which indicates significant potential for making a quick initial pyrolytic kinetic estimation using machine learning methods. Specifically, from the results of a partial dependence analysis of the lignocellulose-type feedstock, the atomic ratios of H/C and O/C were found to have negative correlations with the pyrolytic activation energies. However, the effect of the ash content on the activation energy strongly depended on the organic component species present in the lignocellulose feedstocks. This work confirms the possibility of predicting model-free pyrolytic activation energies by utilizing machine learning methods, which can improve the efficiency and understanding of the kinetic analysis of pyrolysis for biomass and fossil investigations.

  • 7.
    Wen, Yuming
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Wang, Shule
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process. Nanjing Forestry Univ, Coll Chem Engn, Jiangsu Coinnovat Ctr Efficient Proc & Utilizat F, Int Innovat Ctr Forest Chem & Mat, Longpan Rd 159, Nanjing 210037, Peoples R China.; Chinese Acad Forestry CAF, Inst Chem Ind Forest Prod, Jiangsu Prov Key Lab Biomass Energy & Mat, 16 Suojin Five Village, Nanjing 210042, Peoples R China.
    Shi, Ziyi
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Jin, Yanghao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Thomas, Jean-Baptiste
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Azzi, Elias Sebastian
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Franzén, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Gröndahl, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Martin, Andrew R.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Tang, Chuchu
    Hunan Inst Technol, Sch Design & Art, Hengyang 421001, Peoples R China..
    Mu, Wangzhong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Structures.
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Pyrolysis of engineered beach-cast seaweed: Performances and life cycle assessment2022In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 222, article id 118875Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The blooming of beach-cast seaweed has caused environmental degradation in some coastal regions. Therefore, a proper treating and utilizing method of beach-cast seaweed is demanded. This study investigated the potential of producing power or biofuel from pyrolysis of beach-cast seaweed and the effect of the ash-washing process. First, the raw and washed beach-cast seaweeds (RS and WS) were prepared. Thereafter, thermogravimetric analysis (TG), bench-scale pyrolysis experiment, process simulation, and life cycle assessment (LCA) were conducted. The TG results showed that the activation energies of thermal decomposition of the main organic contents of RS and WS were 44.23 and 58.45 kJ/mol, respectively. Three peak temperatures of 400, 500, and 600 degrees C were used in the bench-scale pyrolysis experiments of WS. The 600 degrees C case yielded the most desirable gas and liquid products. The bench-scale pyrolysis experiment of RS was conducted at 600 degrees C as well. Also, an LCA was conducted based on the simulation result of 600 degrees C pyrolysis of WS. The further process simulation and LCA results show that compare to producing liquid biofuel and syngas, a process designed for electricity production is most favored. It was estimated that treating 1 ton of dry WS can result in a negative cumulative energy demand of -2.98 GJ and carbon emissions of -790.89 kg CO2 equivalence.

  • 8.
    Yang, Hanmin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Cui, Yuxiao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Jin, Yanghao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Lu, Xincheng
    Institute of Chemical Industry of Forest Products, CAF, Jiangsu Province, Nanjing 210042, China, Jiangsu Province.
    Han, Tong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Sandström, Linda
    RISE Energy Technology Centre AB, Box 726, SE-941 28 Piteå, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Evaluation of Engineered Biochar-Based Catalysts for Syngas Production in a Biomass Pyrolysis and Catalytic Reforming Process2023In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 37, no 8, p. 5942-5952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biochar, originating from biomass pyrolysis, has been proven a promising catalyst for tar cracking/reforming with great coke resistance. This work aims to evaluate various engineered biochar-based catalysts on syngas production in a biomass pyrolysis and catalytic reforming process without feeding extra steam. The tested engineered biochar catalysts include physical- and chemical-activated, nitrogen-doped, and nickel-doped biochars. The results illustrated that the syngas yields were comparable when using biochar and activated biochar as catalysts. A relatively high specific surface area (SSA) and a hierarchical porous structure are beneficial for syngas and hydrogen production. A 2 h physical-activated biochar catalyst induced the syngas with the highest H2/CO ratio (1.5). The use of N-doped biochar decreased the syngas yield sharply due to the collapse of the pore structure but obtained syngas with the highest LHVgas (18.5MJ/Nm3). The use of Ni-doped biochar facilitated high syngas and hydrogen yields (78.2 wt % and 26 mmol H2/g-biomass) and improved gas energy conversion efficiency (73%). Its stability and durability test showed a slight decrease in performance after a three-time repetitive use. A future experiment with a longer time is suggested to determine when the catalyst will finally deactivate and how to reduce the catalyst deterioration.

  • 9.
    Yang, Hanmin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Wang, Yazhe
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Jin, Yanghao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Bolívar Caballero, José Juan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Chen, Shiwei
    Shi, Ziyi
    Sandström, Linda
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Yang, Weihong
    Han, Tong
    Syngas production from biomass pyrolysis followed by in-line biochar-catalytic reforming: the effect of space velocity, particle size, and morphologyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A syngas production based on a biomass pyrolysis followed by an in-line catalytic reforming process is a promising method to help curb greenhouse gas emissions. The use of biochar as the reforming catalyst is economically and technologically attractive. A continuous pyrolysis combined with an in-line biochar-catalytic reforming of the pyrolysis vapor was investigated in a comprehensive system consisting of an auger reactor and a downstream fixed-bed rector. The effect of the weight hourly space velocity (WHSV), particle size and morphology of biochar, and the pressure drop of the biochar bed on the catalytic performance were discussed. The results indicated that a higher syngas yield with a higher H2+CO proportion was obtained when using a lower WHSV, due to a longer residence time. The highest syngas and H2 yields were obtained when using biochar with the smallest particles sizes (0.6-1 mm), i.e. the highest bed pressure drops. The use of biochar particles, which are more spherical and rounded, resulted in higher syngas yields, H2 +CO proportions, and H2 yields due to the enhanced heat and mass transfer favored by the rounded shape. Up to 12 mmol H2/g-biomass was obtained, corresponding to a dry gas yield of 0.68 Nm3/kg , containing 39 vol. % H2 and 27 vol. % CO.  The use of biochar as a reforming catalyst showed a relatively stable catalytic performance after during a 100-minutes of running the experimentexperimental run-time.

  • 10.
    Yang, Hanmin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Zaini, Ilman Nuran
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Pan, Ruming
    School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001, Harbin, China.
    Jin, Yanghao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Wang, Yazhe
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bolívar Caballero, José Juan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Shi, Ziyi
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Subasi, Yaprak
    Department of Chemistry - Ångström Laboratory, Structural Chemistry, Uppsala University, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, 751 21, Uppsala, Sweden, Lägerhyddsvägen 1.
    Nurdiawati, Anissa
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability, Industrial Dynamics & Entrepreneurship.
    Wang, Shule
    International Innovation Center for Forest Chemicals and Materials, College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Longpan Road 159, 210037, Nanjing, China, Longpan Road 159; Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Biomass Energy and Materials, Institute of Chemical Industry of Forest Products, Chinese Academy of Forestry (CAF), No. 16, Suojin Five Village, 210042, Nanjing, China, No. 16, Suojin Five Village.
    Shen, Yazhou
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ, London, UK.
    Wang, Tianxiang
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials.
    Wang, Yue
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials.
    Sandström, Linda
    Department of Biorefinery and Energy, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden AB, Box 726, SE-941 28, Piteå, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Pär
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Han, Tong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Process.
    Distributed electrified heating for efficient hydrogen production2024In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 3868Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study introduces a distributed electrified heating approach that is able to innovate chemical engineering involving endothermic reactions. It enables rapid and uniform heating of gaseous reactants, facilitating efficient conversion and high product selectivity at specific equilibrium. Demonstrated in catalyst-free CH4 pyrolysis, this approach achieves stable production of H2 (530 g h−1 L reactor−1) and carbon nanotube/fibers through 100% conversion of high-throughput CH4 at 1150 °C, surpassing the results obtained from many complex metal catalysts and high-temperature technologies. Additionally, in catalytic CH4 dry reforming, the distributed electrified heating using metallic monolith with unmodified Ni/MgO catalyst washcoat showcased excellent CH4 and CO2 conversion rates, and syngas production capacity. This innovative heating approach eliminates the need for elongated reactor tubes and external furnaces, promising an energy-concentrated and ultra-compact reactor design significantly smaller than traditional industrial systems, marking a significant advance towards more sustainable and efficient chemical engineering society.

1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf