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  • 1.
    Cui, Yuxiao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Subramaniyam, Chandrasekar M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Han, Tong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Kang, Mina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Li, Jian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Zhao, Luyao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wei, Xin-Feng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Svagan, Anna Justina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hierarchical soot nanoparticle self-assemblies for enhanced performance as sodium-ion battery anodes2022In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, E-ISSN 2050-7496, Vol. 10, no 16, p. 9059-9066Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The drawbacks of amorphous hard carbon are its low conductivity and structural instability, due to its large volume change and the occurrence of side reactions with the electrolyte during cycling. Here, we propose a simple and rapid method to address these disadvantages; we used an emulsion solvent-evaporation method to create hierarchically structured microparticles of hard carbon nanoparticles, derived from soot, and multi-walled-carbon-nanotubes at a very low threshold of 2.8 wt%. These shrub-ball like microparticles have well-defined void spaces between different nanostructures of carbon, leading to an increased surface area, lower charge-resistance and side reactions, and higher electronic conductivity for Na+ insertion and de-insertion. They can be slurry cast to assemble Na+ anodes, exhibiting an initial discharge capacity of 713.3 mA h g(-1) and showing long-term stability with 120.8 mA h g(-1) at 500 mA g(-1) after 500 cycles, thus outperforming neat hard carbon nanoparticles by an order of magnitude. Our work shows that hierarchical self-assembly is attractive for increasing the performance of microparticles used for battery production.

  • 2.
    Melianas, Armantas
    et al.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, 94305, CA, United States; Exponent, 149 Commonwealth Dr, Menlo Park, 94025, CA, United States.
    Kang, Mina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    VahidMohammadi, Armin
    A. J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, 19104, PA, United States.
    Quill, Tyler James
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, 94305, CA, United States.
    Tian, Weiqian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Gogotsi, Yury
    A. J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, 19104, PA, United States.
    Salleo, Alberto
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, 94305, CA, United States.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    High-Speed Ionic Synaptic Memory Based on 2D Titanium Carbide MXene2022In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 32, no 12, p. 2109970-, article id 2109970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synaptic devices with linear high-speed switching can accelerate learning in artificial neural networks (ANNs) embodied in hardware. Conventional resistive memories however suffer from high write noise and asymmetric conductance tuning, preventing parallel programming of ANN arrays. Electrochemical random-access memories (ECRAMs), where resistive switching occurs by ion insertion into a redox-active channel, aim to address these challenges due to their linear switching and low noise. ECRAMs using 2D materials and metal oxides however suffer from slow ion kinetics, whereas organic ECRAMs enable high-speed operation but face challenges toward on-chip integration due to poor temperature stability of polymers. Here, ECRAMs using 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) MXene that combine the high speed of organics and the integration compatibility of inorganic materials in a single high-performance device are demonstrated. These ECRAMs combine the speed, linearity, write noise, switching energy, and endurance metrics essential for parallel acceleration of ANNs, and importantly, they are stable after heat treatment needed for back-end-of-line integration with Si electronics. The high speed and performance of these ECRAMs introduces MXenes, a large family of 2D carbides and nitrides with more than 30 stoichiometric compositions synthesized to date, as promising candidates for devices operating at the nexus of electrochemistry and electronics.

  • 3.
    Subramaniyam, Chandrasekar M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Kang, Mina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Li, Jian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Mohammadi, Armin Vahid
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Additive-free red phosphorus/Ti3C2TxMXene nanocomposite anodes for metal-ion batteries2022In: Energy Advances, E-ISSN 2753-1457, no 12, p. 999-1008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we report on scalable, environmentally benign, and additive-free, high-performance anodes for alkali-metal-ion batteries (MIBs, where M = Li+, Na+, K+). The intercalators in these anodes are the red phosphorus (RP) nanoparticles of uniform size (~40 nm), which are dispersible and blend with water-dispersed Ti3C2Tx MXene, forming a highly viscous aqueous slurry to fabricate additive-free nanocomposite electrodes. We further enhanced their performance using a very low weight percentage of various carbonaceous nanomaterials. Our RP-MWCNT/MXene nanocomposite anodes exhibited enhanced ion transport and low charge transfer resistance, delivering specific capacities of 1293.7 mA h g-1 at 500 mA g-1 and 263.3 mA h g-1 at 2600 mA g-1 for 10 000 cycles in Li+ cells, 371.6 mA h g-1 at 500 mA g-1 in Na+ cells, and 732.8 mA h g-1 at 50 mA g-1 in K+ cells. Our work shows a path towards fabricating nanoarchitectured electrodes using sustainable materials to eliminate inert polymer binders, toxic processing solvents, and rare earth elements from the battery fabrication process for next-generation alkali-metal-ion batteries.

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