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  • 1.
    Jansson, Niclas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for High Performance Computing, PDC.
    Karp, Martin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Perez, Adalberto
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics.
    Mukha, Timofey
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics.
    Ju, Yi
    Max Planck Computing and Data Facility, Garching, Germany.
    Liu, Jiahui
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Pall, Szilard
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for High Performance Computing, PDC.
    Laure, Erwin
    Max Planck Computing and Data Facility, Garching, Germany.
    Weinkauf, Tino
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Schumacher, Jörg
    Technische Universität Ilmenau, Ilmenau, Germany.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    Friedrich-Alexander-Universität (FAU) Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany.
    Markidis, Stefano
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Exploring the Ultimate Regime of Turbulent Rayleigh–Bénard Convection Through Unprecedented Spectral-Element Simulations2023In: SC '23: Proceedings of the International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2023, p. 1-9, article id 5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We detail our developments in the high-fidelity spectral-element code Neko that are essential for unprecedented large-scale direct numerical simulations of fully developed turbulence. Major inno- vations are modular multi-backend design enabling performance portability across a wide range of GPUs and CPUs, a GPU-optimized preconditioner with task overlapping for the pressure-Poisson equation and in-situ data compression. We carry out initial runs of Rayleigh–Bénard Convection (RBC) at extreme scale on the LUMI and Leonardo supercomputers. We show how Neko is able to strongly scale to 16,384 GPUs and obtain results that are not pos- sible without careful consideration and optimization of the entire simulation workflow. These developments in Neko will help resolv- ing the long-standing question regarding the ultimate regime in RBC. 

  • 2.
    Ju, Yi
    et al.
    Max Planck Computing and Data Facility, Max Planck Computing and Data Facility.
    Li, Mingshuai
    Technical University of Munich, Technical University of Munich.
    Perez, Adalberto
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics.
    Bellentani, Laura
    CINECA, Cineca.
    Jansson, Niclas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for High Performance Computing, PDC.
    Markidis, Stefano
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg.
    Laure, Erwin
    Max Planck Computing and Data Facility, Max Planck Computing and Data Facility.
    In-Situ Techniques on GPU-Accelerated Data-Intensive Applications2023In: Proceedings 2023 IEEE 19th International Conference on e-Science, e-Science 2023, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) , 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The computational power of High-Performance Computing (HPC) systems is constantly increasing, however, their input/output (IO) performance grows relatively slowly, and their storage capacity is also limited. This unbalance presents significant challenges for applications such as Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), which generate massive amounts of data for further visualization or analysis. At the same time, checkpointing is crucial for long runs on HPC clusters, due to limited walltimes and/or failures of system components, and typically requires the storage of large amount of data. Thus, restricted IO performance and storage capacity can lead to bottlenecks for the performance of full application workflows (as compared to computational kernels without IO). In-situ techniques, where data is further processed while still in memory rather to write it out over the I/O subsystem, can help to tackle these problems. In contrast to traditional post-processing methods, in-situ techniques can reduce or avoid the need to write or read data via the IO subsystem. They offer a promising approach for applications aiming to leverage the full power of large scale HPC systems. In-situ techniques can also be applied to hybrid computational nodes on HPC systems consisting of graphics processing units (GPUs) and central processing units (CPUs). On one node, the GPUs would have significant performance advantages over the CPUs. Therefore, current approaches for GPU-accelerated applications often focus on maximizing GPU usage, leaving CPUs underutilized. In-situ tasks using CPUs to perform data analysis or preprocess data concurrently to the running simulation, offer a possibility to improve this underutilization.

  • 3.
    Ju, Yi
    et al.
    Max Planck Comp & Data Facil, Garching, Germany..
    Perez Martinez, Adalberto
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics.
    Markidis, Stefano
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics.
    Laure, Erwin
    Max Planck Comp & Data Facil, Garching, Germany..
    Understanding the Impact of Synchronous, Asynchronous, and Hybrid In-Situ Techniques in Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications2022In: 2022 IEEE 18TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON E-SCIENCE (ESCIENCE 2022), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) , 2022, p. 295-305Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-Performance Computing (HPC) systems provide input/output (IO) performance growing relatively slowly compared to peak computational performance and have limited storage capacity. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) applications aiming to leverage the full power of Exascale HPC systems, such as the solver Nek5000, will generate massive data for further processing. These data need to be efficiently stored via the IO subsystem. However, limited IO performance and storage capacity may result in performance, and thus scientific discovery, bottlenecks. In comparison to traditional post-processing methods, in-situ techniques can reduce or avoid writing and reading the data through the IO subsystem, promising to be a solution to these problems. In this paper, we study the performance and resource usage of three in-situ use cases: data compression, image generation, and uncertainty quantification. We furthermore analyze three approaches when these in-situ tasks and the simulation are executed synchronously, asynchronously, or in a hybrid manner. In-situ compression can be used to reduce the IO time and storage requirements while maintaining data accuracy. Furthermore, in-situ visualization and analysis can save Terabytes of data from being routed through the IO subsystem to storage. However, the overall efficiency is crucially dependent on the characteristics of both, the in-situ task and the simulation. In some cases, the overhead introduced by the in-situ tasks can be substantial. Therefore, it is essential to choose the proper in-situ approach, synchronous, asynchronous, or hybrid, to minimize overhead and maximize the benefits of concurrent execution.

  • 4.
    Perez Martinez, Adalberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Örlü, Ramis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. Univ Bologna, Dipartimento Ingn Ind, I-47100 Forli, Italy..
    Talamelli, Alessandro
    Univ Bologna, Dipartimento Ingn Ind, I-47100 Forli, Italy..
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. .;Univ Bologna, Dipartimento Ingn Ind, I-47100 Forli, Italy.
    Appraisal of cavity hot-wire probes for wall-shear-stress measurements2022In: Experiments in Fluids, ISSN 0723-4864, E-ISSN 1432-1114, Vol. 63, no 9, article id 151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flush-mounted cavity hot-wire probes have emerged as an alternative to classical hot-wire probes mounted several diameters above the surface for wall-shear stress measurements. They aim at increasing the frequency response and accuracy by circumventing the well-known issue of heat transfer to the substrate that hot-wire and hot-film probes possess. Their use, however, depends on the assumption that the cavity does not influence the flow field. In this study, we show that this assumption does not hold, and that turbulence statistics are modified by the presence of the cavity with sizes that are practically in use. The mean velocity and fluctuations increase near the cavity while the shear stress decreases in its surroundings, all seemingly stemming from the fact that the no-slip condition is not present anymore and that flow reversal occurs. Overall, the energy spectra and the probability density function of the wall shear stress fluctuations indicate a change of nature of turbulence by the presence of the cavity.

  • 5.
    Stanly, Ronith
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Du, Shiyu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics.
    Xavier, Donnatella
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Perez Martinez, Adalberto
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Mukha, Timofey
    Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), 23955-6900 Thuwal, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
    Markidis, Stefano
    KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Rezaeiravesh, Saleh
    Department of Fluids and Environment, The University of Manchester, M139PL Manchester, UK.
    Schlatter, Philipp
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, Centres, SeRC - Swedish e-Science Research Centre. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics, Turbulent simulations laboratory. Institute of Fluid Mechanics (LSTM), Friedrich Alexander Universität Erlangen Nürnberg, DE-91058 Erlangen, Germany..
    Generating synthetic turbulence with vector autoregression of proper orthogonal decomposition time coefficientsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study introduces vector autoregression (VAR) as a linear procedure that can be used for synthetizing turbulence time series over an entire plane, allowing them to be imposed as efficient turbulent inflow conditions in simulations requiring stationary and cross-correlated turbulence time series. A VAR model is applied to the complex time coefficients derived from a Fourier-based proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of the velocity fields of the precursor simulation of a turbulent boundary layer at a momentum thickness based Reynolds number, Re_theta=790. VAR is a statistical tool for modelling and prediction of multivariate time series through capturing linear correlations between multiple time series. By performing POD, firstly a subset of the most energetic structures in space are extracted, and then a VAR model is fitted to their time coefficients. It is observed that VAR models constructed using time coefficients of 5 and 30 most energetic POD modes per wave number (corresponding to >40% and >90% of turbulent kinetic energy across all wave numbers, respectively), are able to make accurate predictions of the evolution of the velocity field at Re_theta=790 for infinite time. Moreover, the two-dimensional velocity fields from the low-order POD-VAR are used as a turbulent inflow condition and compared against other common inflow methods. Since the VAR model can produce an infinite number of velocity planes in time, this enables reaching statistical stationarity without having to run an extremely long precursor simulation or applying ad-hoc methods such as periodic time series. 

1 - 5 of 5
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