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  • 1.
    Dong, Lin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Sugunan, Abhilash
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Hu, Jun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Zhou, Sicheng
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Li, Shanghua
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Friberg, Ari T.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Photoluminescence from quasi-type-II spherical CdSe-CdS core-shell quantum dots2013In: Applied Optics, ISSN 1559-128X, E-ISSN 2155-3165, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 105-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spherical CdSe-CdS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) are found to be flexible in the transition between the type-I regime and the type-II regime with different core/shell dimensions. The quasi-type-II feature of the colloidal dots is confirmed with time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Two recombination paths of the excitons with significantly different decay rates are observed and analyzed. The spherical CdSe-CdS core-shell QDs are numerically simulated to investigate the carrier separation. A relatively long radiative lifetime and high degree of spatial carrier separation provide good potential to achieve lasing under continuous-wave excitation. Amplified spontaneous emission at room temperature is detected from the QDs embedded in the polymer matrix. It is shown that a larger shell thickness results in a lower pumping threshold, while a smaller shell thickness leads to higher PL efficiency.

  • 2.
    Li, Shanghua
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Meng Lin, Meng
    Toprak, Muhammet S
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Kim, Do Kyung
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Nanocomposites of polymer and inorganic nanoparticles for optical and magnetic applications2010In: Nano reviews, ISSN 2000-5121, Vol. 1, p. 5214-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides an up-to-date review on nanocomposites composed of inorganic nanoparticles and the polymer matrix for optical and magnetic applications. Optical or magnetic characteristics can change upon the decrease of particle sizes to very small dimensions, which are, in general, of major interest in the area of nanocomposite materials. The use of inorganic nanoparticles into the polymer matrix can provide high-performance novel materials that find applications in many industrial fields. With this respect, frequently considered features are optical properties such as light absorption (UV and color), and the extent of light scattering or, in the case of metal particles, photoluminescence, dichroism, and so on, and magnetic properties such as superparamagnetism, electromagnetic wave absorption, and electromagnetic interference shielding. A general introduction, definition, and historical development of polymer-inorganic nanocomposites as well as a comprehensive review of synthetic techniques for polymer-inorganic nanocomposites will be given. Future possibilities for the development of nanocomposites for optical and magnetic applications are also introduced. It is expected that the use of new functional inorganic nano-fillers will lead to new polymer-inorganic nanocomposites with unique combinations of material properties. By careful selection of synthetic techniques and understanding/exploiting the unique physics of the polymeric nanocomposites in such materials, novel functional polymer-inorganic nanocomposites can be designed and fabricated for new interesting applications such as optoelectronic and magneto-optic applications.

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  • 3.
    Li, Shanghua
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Zhang, Shuo
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    He, Zeming
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Stiewe, Christian
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Mueller, Eckhard
    Novel Solution Route Synthesis of Low Thermal Conductivity Nanocrystalline Bismuth Telluride2010In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 7658-7662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel synthesis approach based on a solution route has been developed for the fabrication of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride. The method consists of dissolving both bismuth and tellurium into the same organic solvent with the assistance of complexing agents and one-step coprecipitation of bismuth telluride. The synthesized nanocrystalline bismuth telluride powders possess rhombohedral crystal structure and are nanosheet/nanorod-like with an average size of between 30 and 40 nm. The thermal conductivity of the hot-pressed compact consolidated from the as-synthesized nanopowders is 0.39-0.45 Wm(-1)K(-1) in the temperature range of 323 to 523 K, which is at most one third of that of bulk bismuth telluride-based materials reported in the literature. Such low thermal conductivity of the investigated bismuth telluride is mainly attributed to substantially high concentration of grain boundaries provided by nanostructuring to scatter phonons intensively.

  • 4. Lin, Meng Meng
    et al.
    Li, Shanghua
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Kim, Hyung-Hwan
    Kim, Hyuck
    Lee, Hyung Bock
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Kim, Do-Kyung
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Complete separation of magnetic nanoparticles via chemical cleavage of dextran by ethylenediamine for intracellular uptake2010In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, ISSN 0959-9428, E-ISSN 1364-5501, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 444-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Completely water dispersible and highly monodispersed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were prepared. The surface of SPIONs was modified with dual-crosslinked amine activated dextran (AMD) and chemical cleavage of AMD on SPIONs was carried out by ethylenediamine hydrochloride (EDA). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that individual SPIONs were completely separated in water and the average diameter of resulting nanoparticles was 4.4 nm.

  • 5.
    Ma, Ying
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Wang, Xiaodi
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Li, Shanghua
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Samarium-doped ceria nanowires: Novel synthesis and application in low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells2010In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 22, no 14, p. 1640-1644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Samarium-doped ceria (SDC) nanowires are synthesized by a novel, template-, surfactant-free and cost-effective method, using citric acid as precipitating/complexing agent for formation of citrate precursor nanowires. The single SOFC based on SDC nanowires/Na2CO3 nanocomposites as electrolyte is fabricated and the maximum power densities of 417 and 522 mW cm-2 at 550 and 600°C are achieved, showing great potential for low-temperature SOFCs.

  • 6.
    Nikkam, Nader
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Li, Shangua
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Bitaraf Haghighi, Ehsan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Palm, Björn E
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Novel Nanofluids Based on Mesoporous Silica for Enhanced Heat Transfer2011In: Journal of nanoparticle research, ISSN 1388-0764, E-ISSN 1572-896X, Vol. 13, no 11, p. 6201-6206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanofluids, which are liquids with engineered nanometer-sized particles suspensions, have drawn remarkable attraction from the researchers because of their enormous potential to enhance the efficiency in heat-transfer fluids. In the present study, water-based calcined mesoporous silica nanofluids were prepared and characterized. The commercial mesoporous silica (MPSiO2) nanoparticles were dispersed in deionized water by means of pH adjustment and ultrasonic agitation. MPSiO2 nanoparticles were observed to have an average particle size of 350 ± 100 nm by SEM analysis. The concentration of MPSiO2 was varied between 1 and 6 wt%. The physicochemical properties of nanofluids were characterized using various techniques, such as particle size analyzer, zeta-potential meter, TEM, and FT-IR. The thermal conductivity was measured by Transient Plane Source (TPS) method, and nanofluids showed a higher thermal conductivity than the base liquid for all the tested concentrations.

  • 7.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Li, Shanghua
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Ma, Ying
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Wang, Xiaodi
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Nikkam, Nader
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Haghighi, Ehsan Bitaraf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Palm, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Ceria Nanofluids for Efficient Heat Management2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Li, Shanghua
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Johnsson, Mats
    Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Fabrication and Spark Plasma Sintering of Nanostructured Bismuth Telluride (Bi2Te3)2012In: 9Th European Conference On Thermoelectrics (ECT2011), American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2012, p. 115-118Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermoelectric (TE) devices can harvest residual low-grade waste heat energy. Bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) and its alloys are mostly used TE materials in the bulk form for making TE modules. We report a simple, fast and very high yield synthetic process for the bulk Bi2Te3 nanopowders with hexagonal plate like morphology. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) process has been optimized in order to preserve nanostructure while achieving a high compaction density of the pellets. Electron microscopy analysis was used to determine the effect of SPS parameters during compaction on the grain growth. Optimal conditions for the fabricated nanopowder was determined as 673 K, 70 MPa pressure with no holding time, which resulted in average lateral grain size in the range of 165-190 nm for a compact density of 98%. About 50% reduction of thermal conductivity was observed as compared to its bulk counterparts, revealing the feasibility of suggested route in the preservation of nanostructure and enhanced phonon scattering.

  • 9.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Li, Shanghua
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Johnsson, Mats
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Synthesis, processing, and thermoelectric properties of bulk nanostructured bismuth telluride (Bi(2)Te(3))2012In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, ISSN 0959-9428, E-ISSN 1364-5501, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 725-730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bismuth telluride (Bi(2)Te(3)) is the best-known commercially used thermoelectric material in the bulk form for cooling and power generation applications at ambient temperature. However, its dimensionless figure-of-merit-ZT around 1 limits the large-scale industrial applications. Recent studies indicate that nanostructuring can enhance ZT while keeping the material form of bulk by employing an advanced synthetic process accompanied with novel consolidation techniques. Here, we report on bulk nanostructured (NS) undoped Bi(2)Te(3) prepared via a promising chemical synthetic route. Spark plasma sintering has been employed for compaction and sintering of Bi(2)Te(3) nanopowders, resulting in very high densification (>97%) while preserving the nanostructure. The average grain size of the final compacts was obtained as 90 +/- 5 nm as calculated from electron micrographs. Evaluation of transport properties showed enhanced Seebeck coefficient (-120 mu V K(-1)) and electrical conductivity compared to the literature state-of-the-art (30% enhanced power factor), especially in the low temperature range. An improved ZT for NS bulk undoped Bi(2)Te(3) is achieved with a peak value of similar to 1.1 at 340 K.

  • 10.
    Sugunan, Abhilash
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Zhao, Yichen
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Mitra, Somak
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Dong, Lin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Li, Shanghua
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Marcinkevicius, Saulius
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Synthesis of tetrahedral quasi-type-II CdSe-CdS core-shell quantum dots2011In: Nanotechnology, ISSN 0957-4484, E-ISSN 1361-6528, Vol. 22, no 42, p. 425202-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals of II-VI semiconductor materials has been refined in recent decades and their size dependent optoelectronic properties have been well established. Here we report a facile synthesis of CdSe-CdS core-shell heterostructures using a two-step hot injection process. Red-shifts in absorption and photoluminescence spectra show that the obtained quantum dots have quasi-type-II alignment of energy levels. The obtained nanocrystals have a heterostructure with a large and highly faceted tetrahedral CdS shell grown epitaxially over a spherical CdSe core. The obtained morphology as well as high resolution electron microscopy confirms that the tetrahedral shell have a zinc blende crystal structure. A phenomenological mechanism for the growth and morphology of the nanocrystals is discussed.

  • 11.
    Toprak, Muhammet
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Li, Shangua
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI).
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI).
    Fabrication routes for nanostructured TE material architectures2017In: Materials, Preparation, and Characterization in Thermoelectrics, CRC Press , 2017, p. 17-1-17-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanomaterials have been an emerging œeld of research due to the novel properties exhibited when the size of building blocks is reduced below 100 nm. Several size-dependent phenomena make nanomaterials attractive in terms of potential applicability compared to their larger-sized counterparts, justifying the importance and attention of this research.1-3 For thermoelectric research, nanomaterials are of great interest due to the possibility of decoupling electrical and thermal transport properties which may help attain higher ZT values for the currently available materials.4,5 še commonly accepted nomenclature of nanomaterials is based on the number of degrees of freedom of charge carriers for the description of their dimensionalities. šus, a thin œlm or superlattice is conœned in one dimension, but is a 2D nanomaterial. Similarly, a nanowire is conœned in two dimensions, hence is a 1D nanomaterial, and œnally a nanoparticle is conœned in three dimensions and is therefore a 0D nanomaterial. In the case of larger nanocrystals (not quantum conœned), the size and shape of the nanocrystals also affect their properties due to differences in surface-to-volume ratio. Bulk nanostructured (NS) TE materials are fabricated using a bulk process rather than a nanofabrication process, which has the important advantage of being produced in large quantities and in a form that is compatible with commercially available devices.6 šey are different from the advanced low-dimensional TE materials as they are consolidated under high T and P, resulting in larger-sized (40-200 nm) grains. še advanced low-dimensional TE materials are usually in quantum size and have well-deœned shapes such as rod-like or tube-like structures. še nanoeffects of bulk NS TE materials will not be as strong as in the case of advanced low-dimensional TE materials, but since the material is closer to bulk material, it can be easily handled the same way as bulk TE materials using conventional TE module/device technology for further steps toward direct applications. So far, of all the NS materials, only bulk NS materials have been produced in enough quantity to be used in this manner. 

  • 12.
    Wang, Xiaodi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Ma, Ying
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Li, Shanghua
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Kashyout, Abdel-Hady
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Ceria-based nanocomposite with simultaneous proton and oxygen ion conductivity for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells2011In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 196, no 5, p. 2754-2758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The samarium doped ceria-carbonate (SDC/Na2CO3) nanocomposite systems have shown to be excellent electrolyte materials for low-temperature SOFCs, yet, the conduction mechanism is not well understood. In this study, a four-probe d.c. technique has been successfully employed to study the conduction behavior of proton and oxygen ion in SDC/Na2CO3 nanocomposite electrolyte. The results demonstrated that the SDC/Na2CO3 nanocomposite electrolyte possesses unique simultaneous proton and oxygen ion conduction property, with the proton conductivity 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than the oxygen ion conductivity in the temperature range of 200-600 degrees C, indicating the proton conduction in the nanocomposite mainly accounts for the enhanced total ionic conductivity. It is suggested that the interface in composite electrolyte supplies high conductive path for proton, while oxygen ions are probably transported by the SDC grain interiors. An empirical "Swing Model" has been proposed as a possible mechanism of superior proton conduction. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Wang, Xiaodi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Ma, Ying
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Li, Shanghua
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    SDC/Na2CO3 nanocomposite: New freeze drying based synthesis and application as electrolyte in low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells2012In: International journal of hydrogen energy, ISSN 0360-3199, E-ISSN 1879-3487, Vol. 37, no 24, p. 19380-19387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key issue to develop low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (LTSOFCs) is to develop new electrolyte materials with enhanced ionic conductivity. Recently, SDC/Na2CO3 nanocomposite, as a proton and oxide co-ion conductor, has been developed as promising electrolyte candidates for LTSOFCs, where Na2CO3 as the secondary phase performs several crucial functions. However, it's difficult to control the homogeneity of Na 2CO3 phase in the composite by the current methods for composite fabrication. In this study, we report a new freeze drying technique to fabricate SDC/Na2CO3 nanocomposites with different content of Na2CO3. Structural and morphological study confirmed that the homogeneity of both SDC and Na2CO3 phases in the nanocomposite is well controlled by the freeze drying technique. The effect of Na2CO3 content on proton and oxygen ion conductivities of SDC-carbonate samples were investigated by the four-probe d.c. measurement. Proton conductivity transformation around 350 °C has been observed for all the SDC/Na2CO3 nanocomposites due to the glass transition of amorphous Na2CO3 phase, and the proton conductivity is dependent on Na2CO3 content. While oxygen ion conductivity deceases with the increasing of Na2CO3 volume fraction in the nanocomposite. Finally, SOFCs were fabricated using SDC/Na2CO3 nanocomposite samples and tested for electrochemical performances. The excellent performance of SOFCs using SDC/Na2CO3 nanocomposite electrolyte verifies that nanocomposite approach is an effective way to fabricate electrolyte with enhanced ionic conductivity for LTSOFCs.

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