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  • 1.
    Rostami, Jowan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, 639798 Singapore.
    Maddalena, L.
    Avci, C.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ciftci, Göksu Cinar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. Material and Surface Design, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Stockholm, 11486 Sweden.
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Carosio, F.
    Akhtar, F.
    Tian, Weiqian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, Shandong, 266100 China.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Shaping 90 wt% NanoMOFs into Robust Multifunctional Aerogels Using Tailored Bio-Based Nanofibrils2022In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 34, no 38, article id 2204800Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are hybrid porous crystalline networks with tunable chemical and structural properties. However, their excellent potential is limited in practical applications by their hard-to-shape powder form, making it challenging to assemble MOFs into macroscopic composites with mechanical integrity. While a binder matrix enables hybrid materials, such materials have a limited MOF content and thus limited functionality. To overcome this challenge, nanoMOFs are combined with tailored same-charge high-aspect-ratio cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) to manufacture robust, wet-stable, and multifunctional MOF-based aerogels with 90 wt% nanoMOF loading. The porous aerogel architectures show excellent potential for practical applications such as efficient water purification, CO2 and CH4 gas adsorption and separation, and fire-safe insulation. Moreover, a one-step carbonization process enables these aerogels as effective structural energy-storage electrodes. This work exhibits the unique ability of high-aspect-ratio CNFs to bind large amounts of nanoMOFs in structured materials with outstanding mechanical integrity—a quality that is preserved even after carbonization. The demonstrated process is simple and fully discloses the intrinsic potential of the nanoMOFs, resulting in synergetic properties not found in the components alone, thus paving the way for MOFs in macroscopic multifunctional composites. 

  • 2.
    Rostami, Jowan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lillberg, Eric
    Vattenfall AB.
    Östmans, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    All-Cellulose Superabsorbent HeterostructuresManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Characterization and Utilization of Interactions in Wet and Dry Cellulose Nanofibrillar Networks2024Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Expanding our understanding of how cellulose fibers and fibrils interact with water and its effect on their inherent properties is needed to optimize their utilization in the making of novel bio-based materials, but also useful in more traditional products (pulp, paper, and packaging).

    The overall objective of the work in this thesis was to deepen the understanding of drying-induced structural changes and cellulose-water interactions using cellulosic model materials. Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) were employed as they present a distinct advantage with their defined geometry and controlled surface chemistry compared to macroscopic cellulose fibers.

    The first part considers the fundamental interactions of CNFs in contact with water and by water removal, and is devoted to identifying the molecular mechanisms behind the process known as hornification. This was done by studying the exposure of CNF sheets to different heat treatments to establish a connection between their reswelling properties, chemical and structural characteristics, and mechanical behavior. The findings indicate that hornification is governed by non-covalent interactions and that the diffusion of water back into a hornified CNF network is kinetically limited. Furthermore, the influence of fibril aspect ratio and chemical functionality on the mechanical properties of wet fibrillar networks was studied. Fibrils were prepared from fibers with different hemicellulose content. It was found that longer fibrils formed stiffer and more ductile materials, owing to a longer-range and more uniform distribution of stress transfer. Additionally, high aspect ratio fibrils form networks capable of holding larger amounts of water. It was also possible to elucidate the influence of aspect ratio on the network formation, where long and short fibrils form networks with different topologies. These results were integrated into a mechanical network model to present an improved elastoplastic description of the network properties.

    The second part of the thesis presents potential applications where control of the water uptake in the fibrillar networks is required. Anisotropic fibrillar hydrogels were prepared to function as actuators and superabsorbents. With the help of the knowledge built in the first part of the work, the water uptake in the fibrillar networks could be maximized. This resulted in CNF hydrogel actuators far surpassing conventional hydrogel used in actuation performance and integration of CNF sheets in a superabsorbent heterostructure, where the most strongly immobilized water can be retained at high pressures. 

  • 4.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 Singapore.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, 11486 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hornification of cellulose-rich materials: A kinetically trapped state2023In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 318, article id 121132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fundamental understanding concerning cellulose-cellulose interactions under wet and dry conditions remains unclear. This is especially true regarding the drying-induced association of cellulose, commonly described as an irreversible phenomenon called hornification. A fundamental understanding of the mechanisms behind hornification would contribute to new drying techniques for cellulose-based materials in the pulp and paper industry while at the same time enhancing material properties and facilitating the recyclability of cellulose-rich materials. In the present work, the irreversible joining of cellulose-rich surfaces has been studied by subjecting cellulose nanofibril (CNF) films to different heat treatments to establish a link between reswelling properties, structural characteristics as well as chemical and mechanical analyses. A heating time/temperature dependence was observed for the reswelling of the CNF films, which is related to the extent of hornification and is different for different chemical compositions of the fibrils. Further, the results indicate that hornification is related to a diffusion process and that the reswellability increases very slowly over long time, indicating that equilibrium is not reached. Hence, hornification is suggested to be a kinetically limited phenomenon governed by non-covalent reversible interactions and a time/temperature dependence on their forming and breaking.

  • 5.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Rostami, Jowan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Östmans, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cortes Ruiz, Maria F.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Stefan B.
    FSCN Research Center, Mid Sweden University, 851 70 Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Influence of Fibril Aspect Ratio and Chemical Functionality on the Mechanical Properties of Cellulose Nanofibril MaterialsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Östmans, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Unparalleled Performance of Uniaxial Nanofibril Hydrogel Actuators by Optimizing Fibril-Network RelationshipsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Heasman, Patrick
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping, 60174, Sweden.
    Rostami, Jowan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Linares, Mathieu
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping, 60174, Sweden.
    Li, Hailong
    Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, Stockholm, 10691, Sweden.
    Iakunkov, Artem
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Östmans, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hamedi, Mahiar Max
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Zozoulenko, Igor
    Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Norrköping, 60174, Sweden; Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Linköping University, 60174, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Dynamic Networks of Cellulose Nanofibrils Enable Highly Conductive and Strong Polymer Gel Electrolytes for Lithium-Ion Batteries2023In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 33, no 30, article id 2212806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tunable dynamic networks of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) are utilized to prepare high-performance polymer gel electrolytes. By swelling an anisotropically dewatered, but never dried, CNF gel in acidic salt solutions, a highly sparse network is constructed with a fraction of CNFs as low as 0.9%, taking advantage of the very high aspect ratio and the ultra-thin thickness of the CNFs (micrometers long and 2–4 nm thick). These CNF networks expose high interfacial areas and can accommodate massive amounts of the ionic conductive liquid polyethylene glycol-based electrolyte into strong homogeneous gel electrolytes. In addition to the reinforced mechanical properties, the presence of the CNFs simultaneously enhances the ionic conductivity due to their excellent strong water-binding capacity according to computational simulations. This strategy renders the electrolyte a room-temperature ionic conductivity of 0.61 ± 0.12 mS cm−1 which is one of the highest among polymer gel electrolytes. The electrolyte shows superior performances as a separator for lithium iron phosphate half-cells in high specific capacity (161 mAh g−1 at 0.1C), excellent rate capability (5C), and cycling stability (94% capacity retention after 300 cycles at 1C) at 60 °C, as well as stable room temperature cycling performance and considerably improved safety compared with commercial liquid electrolyte systems.

  • 8.
    Östmans, Rebecca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cortes Ruiz, Maria F.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Rostami, Jowan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Stefan B.
    FSCN Research Center, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall 851 Sweden.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 Singapore.
    Elastoplastic behavior of anisotropic, physically crosslinked hydrogel networks comprising stiff, charged fibrils in an electrolyte2023In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 19, no 15, p. 2792-2800Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fibrillar hydrogels are remarkably stiff, low-density networks that can hold vast amounts of water. These hydrogels can easily be made anisotropic by orienting the fibrils using different methods. Unlike the detailed and established descriptions of polymer gels, there is no coherent theoretical framework describing the elastoplastic behavior of fibrillar gels, especially concerning anisotropy. In this work, the swelling pressures of anisotropic fibrillar hydrogels made from cellulose nanofibrils were measured in the direction perpendicular to the fibril alignment. This experimental data was used to develop a model comprising three mechanical elements representing the network and the osmotic pressure due to non-ionic and ionic surface groups on the fibrils. At low solidity, the stiffness of the hydrogels was dominated by the ionic swelling pressure governed by the osmotic ingress of water. Fibrils with different functionality show the influence of aspect ratio, chemical functionality, and the remaining amount of hemicelluloses. This general model describes physically crosslinked hydrogels comprising fibrils with high flexural rigidity - that is, with a persistence length larger than the mesh size. The experimental technique is a framework to study and understand the importance of fibrillar networks for the evolution of multicellular organisms, like plants, and the influence of different components in plant cell walls.

  • 9.
    Östmans, Rebecca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Rosén, Tomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Advanced characterization of nanocelluloses and their dispersions - linked to final material properties2024Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
1 - 9 of 9
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