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  • 1.
    Almqvist Gref, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sonification as Catalyst in Training Manual Wheelchair Operation for Sports and Everyday Life2016In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2016, Sound and Music Computing , 2016, p. 9-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a study on sonification of manual wheelchair movements is presented. The aim was to contribute to both rehabilitation contexts and in wheelchair sports contexts, by providing meaningful auditory feedback for training of manual wheelchair operation. A mapping approach was used where key parameters of manual wheelchair maneuvering were directly mapped to different sound models. The system was evaluated with a qualitative approach in experiments. The results indicate that there is promise in utilizing sonification for training of manual wheelchair operation but that the approach of direct sonification, as opposed to sonification of the deviation from a predefined goal, was not fully successful. Participants reported that there was a clear connection between their wheelchair operation and the auditory feedback, which indicates the possibility of using the system in some, but not all, wheelchair training contexts.

  • 2.
    Askenfelt, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Granqvist, Svante
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hellmer, Kahl
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Orlarey, Y.
    Fober, D.
    Perifanos, K.
    Tambouratzis, G.
    Makropoulo, E.
    Chryssafidou, E.
    Arnaikos, L.
    Rattasepp, K.
    Dima, G.
    VEMUS, Virtual European Music School or A young person's interactive guide to making music2008In: Proceedings of the 28th ISME World Conference, 2008, p. 218-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Askenfelt, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Friberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Ternström, Sten
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Sound and Music Computing at KTH2012In: Trita-TMH, ISSN 1104-5787, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 33-35Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The SMC Sound and Music Computing group at KTH (formerly the Music Acoustics group) is part of the Department of Speech Music and Hearing, School of Computer Science and Communication. In this short report we present the current status of the group mainly focusing on its research.

  • 4.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Månsson, Lisa
    Tardat, Bruno
    Musikcyklarna/Music bikes: An installation for enabling children to investigate the relationship between expressive music performance and body motion2014In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Sweden Conference 2014, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2014, p. 1-2Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Dahl, Sofia
    The Radio Baton as configurable musical instrument and controller2003In: Proc. Stockholm Music Acoustics Conference, 2003, Vol. 2, p. 689-691Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Max Mathews radio baton (RB) has been produced in about 40 pieces until today. It has usually been applied as an orchestra conducting system, as interactive music composition controller using typical percussionist gestures, and as a controller for sound synthesis models. In the framework of the Sounding Object EU founded project, the RB has found new applications scenarios. Three applications were based on this controller. This was achieved by changing the gesture controls. Instead of the default batons, a new radio sender that fits the fingertips was developed. This new radio sender allows musicians’ interaction based on hand gestures and it can also fit different devices. A Pd model of DJ scratching techniques (submitted to SMAC03) was controlled with the RB and the fingertip radio sender. This controller allows DJs a direct control of sampled sounds maintaining hand gestures similar to those used on vinyl. The sound model of a bodhran (submitted to SMAC03) was controlled with a traditional playing approach. The RB was controlled with a traditional bodhran double beater with one fingertip radio sender at each end. This allowed detection of the beater position on the RB surface, the surfaced corresponding to the membrane in the sound model. In a third application the fingertip controller was used to move a virtual ball rolling along the elastic surface of a box placed over the surface of the RB. The DJ console and the virtual bodhran were played in concerts.

  • 6.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Dahl, Sofia
    Rath, Mathias
    Marshall, Mark
    Moynihan, Breege
    Devices for manipulation and control of sounding objects: the Vodhran and the Invisiball2003In: The Sounding Object / [ed] Rocchesso, Davide; Fontana, Federico, Mondo Estremo , 2003, p. 271-295Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Karjalainen, Matti
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Mäki-Patola, Teemu
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Kanerva, Aki
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Huovilainen, Antti
    Helsinki University of Technology.
    Jordá, Sergi
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Kaltenbrunner, Martin
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Geiger, Günter
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    Bencina, Ross
    University Pompeu Fabra.
    de Götzen, Amalia
    University of Padua.
    Rocchesso, Davide
    IUAV University of Venice.
    Controlling sound production2008In: Sound to Sense, Sense to Sound: A state of the art in Sound and Music Computing / [ed] Polotti, Pietro; Rocchesso, Davide, Berlin: Logos Verlag , 2008, p. 447-486Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Dravins, Christina
    et al.
    The National Agency for Special Needs Education and Schools.
    van Besouw, Rachel
    ISVR, University of Southampton.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Kuske, Sandra
    Latvian Children's Hearing Centre.
    Exploring and enjoying non-speech sounds through a cochlear implant: the therapy of music2010In: 11th International Conference on Cochlear Implants and other Implantable Technologies, Karolinska University Hospital, 2010, p. 356-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cochlear implant technology was initially designed to promote reception ofspeech sounds; however, music enjoyment remains a challenge. Music is aninfluential ingredient in our well-being, playing an important role in ourcognitive, physical and social development. For many cochlear implantrecipients it is not feasible to communicate how sounds are perceived, andconsequently the benefits of music listening may be reduced. Non-speechsounds may also be important to persons with multiple functional deficitsthat relay on information additional to verbatim for participating incommunication. Deaf-born children with multiple functional deficitsconstitute a special vulnerable group as lack of reaction to sound oftenis discouraging to caregivers. Individually adapted tools and methods forsound awareness may promote exploration and appreciation of theinformation mediated by the implant.Two current works involving habilitation through sound production andmusic will be discussed. First, the results from a pilot study aiming atfinding musical toys that can be adapted to help children explore theirhearing with engaging sounds and expressive interfaces will be presented.The findings indicate that children with multiple functional deficits canbe more inclined to use the auditory channel for communication and playthan the caregivers would anticipate.Second, the results of a recent questionnaire study, which compared themusic exposure and appreciation of preschool cochlear implant recipientswith their normally hearing peers will be presented. The data from thisstudy indicate that preschool children with cochlear implants spendroughly the same amount of time interacting with musical instruments athome and watching television programmes and DVDs which include music.However, the data indicate that these children receive less exposure torecorded music without visual stimuli and show less sophisticatedresponses to music. The provision and supported use of habilitationmaterials which encourage interaction with music might therefore bebeneficial.

  • 9.
    Dubus, Gaël
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    An overview of sound and music applications for Android available on the market2012In: Proceedings of the 9th Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2012 / [ed] Serafin, Stefania, Sound and music Computing network , 2012, p. 541-546Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a database of sound-based applications running on the Android mobile platform. The longterm objective is to provide a state-of-the-art of mobile applications dealing with sound and music interaction. After exposing the method used to build up and maintain the database using a non-hierarchical structure based on tags, we present a classification according to various categories of applications, and we conduct a preliminary analysis of the repartition of these categories reflecting the current state of the database.

  • 10.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    NIME Design and Contemporary Music Practice: Benefits and Challenges2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the question of how the developmentof new musical artifacts can benet from deeply engagingwith contemporary musical practice. With the novel ideasproduced by the NIME community manifested in musicalinstruments in continuous use, new research questions canbe answered and new sources of knowledge can be explored.This can also be very helpful in evaluation, as it is possi-ble to evaluate the qualities of an instrument in a speciedcontext, rather than evaluating a prototyped instrument onthe basis of its unrealised potential. The information fromsuch evaluation can then be fed back into the developmentprocess, allowing researchers to probe musical practice itselfwith their designs.

  • 11.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    university College of Opera, Sweden.
    Artistically directed prototyping in development and in practice2012In: Journal of New Music Research, ISSN 0929-8215, E-ISSN 1744-5027, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 377-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of technology in artistic contexts presents interestingchallenges regarding the processes in which engineers, artists andperformers work together. The artistic intent and goals of the participantsare relevant both when shaping the development practice, and in definingand refining the role of technology in practice. In this paper wepresent strategies for structuring the development process, basedon iterative design and participatory design. The concepts are describedin theory and examples are given of how they have been successfullyapplied. The cases make heavy use of different types of prototypingand this practice is also discussed. The development cases all relateto a single artifact, a gestural voice processing instrument calledThe Throat. This artifact has been in use since it was developed,and from that experience, three cases are presented. The focus ofthese cases is on how artistic vision through practice can recontextualizetechnology, and, without rebuilding it, redefine it and give it anew role to play.

  • 12.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    University College of Opera, France .
    Exploring the design space: Prototyping "The Throat V3"for the elephant man opera2011In: Proceedings of the 8th Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2011, Padova, Italy: Padova University Press , 2011, p. 141-147Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing new technology for artistic practice requires other methods than classical problem solving. Some of the challenges involved in the development of new musical instruments have affinities to the realm of wicked problems. Wicked problems are hard to define and have many different solutions that are good or bad (not true or false). The body of possible solutions to a wicked problem can be called a design space and exploring that space must be the objective of a design process.In this paper we present effective methods of iterative design and participatory design that we have used in a project developed in collaboration between the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) and the University College of Opera, both in Stockholm. The methods are outlined, and examples are given of how they have been applied in specific situations.The focus lies on prototyping and evaluation with user participation. By creating and acting out scenarios with the user, and thus asking the questions through a prototype and receiving the answers through practice and exploration, we removed the bottleneck represented by language and allowed communication beyond verbalizing. Doing this, even so-called tacit knowledge could be activated and brought into the development process.

  • 13.
    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    The acoustics and performance of DJ scratching, Analysis and modelling2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the analysis and modeling of scratching, in other words, the DJ (disk jockey) practice of using the turntable as a musical instrument. There has been experimental use of turntables as musical instruments since their invention, but the use is now mainly ascribed to the musical genre hip-hop and the playing style known as scratching. Scratching has developed to become a skillful instrument-playing practice with complex musical output performed by DJs. The impact on popular music culture has been significant, and for many, the DJ set-up of turntables and a mixer is now a natural instrument choice for undertaking a creative music activity. Six papers are included in this thesis, where the first three approach the acoustics and performance of scratching, and the second three approach scratch modeling and the DJ interface. Additional studies included here expand on the scope of the papers.

    For the acoustics and performance studies, DJs were recorded playing both demonstrations of standard performance techniques, and expressive performances on sensor-equipped instruments. Analysis of the data revealed that there are both differences and commonalities in playing strategies between musicians, and between expressive intentions. One characteristic feature of scratching is the range of standard playing techniques, but in performances it seems DJs vary the combination of playing techniques more than the rendering of these techniques. The third study describes some of the acoustic parameters of typical scratch improvisations and looks at which musical parameters are typically used for expressive performances. Extracted acoustic and performance parameters from the data show the functional ranges within which DJs normally play.

    Unlike traditional musical instruments, the equipment used for scratching was not intended to be used for creating music. The interface studies focus on traditional as well as new interfaces for DJs, where parameter mappings between input gestures and output signal are described. Standard performance techniques have been modeled in software called Skipproof, based on results from the first papers. Skipproof was used for testing other types of controllers than turntables, where complex DJ gestures could be manipulated using simplified control actions, enabling even non-experts to play expressively within the stylistic boundaries of DJ scratching. The last paper describes an experiment of using an existing hardware platform, the Reactable, to help designing and prototyping the interaction between different sound models and instrument interfaces, including scratching and Skipproof.

    In addition to the included papers, studies were conducted of expressivity, description of the emotional contents of scratching, DJ playing activities, and the coupling between playing techniques and sample. The physical affordances of the turntable, mixer and samples, as well as genre conventions of hip-hop, are assumed to explain some of the findings that distinguish scratching from other instrumental sounds or practices.

  • 14. Fober, D.
    et al.
    Letz, S.
    Orlarey, Y.
    Askenfelt, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Schoonderwaldt, Erwin
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Speech, Music and Hearing.
    IMUTUS: an interactive music tuition system2004In: Proc. of the Sound and Music Computing Conference (SMC 04), October 20-22, 2004, IRCAM, Paris, France, 2004, p. 97-103Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Friberg, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Fabiani, Marco
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Enabling emotional expression and interaction with new expressive interfaces2009In: Front. Hum. Neurosci. Conference Abstract: Tuning the Brain for Music, 2009, Vol. 9Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    DJs and turntablism2015In: The Cambridge Companion to Hip-hop / [ed] Williams, Justin A., Cambridge University Press, 2015, p. 42-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Expressivity and musical shape in turntablism: Response to Greasley and Prior2013In: Empirical Musicology Review, ISSN 1559-5749, E-ISSN 1559-5749, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 44-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This commentary to Greasley and Prior’s paper “Mixtapes and turntablism: DJs’ perspective on musical shape” extends the findings of the study by looking at the turntablism perspective. First, a general discussion on the study’s method and background is given. Then, the role of turntables as musical instruments in creating musical shape is outlined. Finally, some relationships between turntablism techniques, expressive performances and musical shape are presented. In general, the findings in the study support previously published studies in this insufficiently researched area.

  • 18.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Music Besides Grooves2002In: Pitch - Mutating Turntables: Argos Festival Catalogue 2002 / [ed] Depraetere, Frie; Willemsen, Paul, Argos Editions , 2002, p. 136-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Musical structure: A translation of István Ipolyi: Innføring i Musikkspråkets Opprinnelse og Struktur (1952)2006In: TMH-QPSR, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 35-43Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an abbreviated and commented translation of Istv´an Ipolyi’s monogram on the origins and structure of the language of music. Theories of structure in music, based on musical analysis, support assumptions that the origins of music lie in our early and primitive forms of expression, as observed in both infants and animals. Several models of musical structure are presented, which can improve our understanding of expression in music. The monogram was written in Norwegian in 1952 and published by J. W. Eides Forlag in Bergen, Norway. The translator is a native Norwegian speaker.

  • 20.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Playing the turntable: An introduction to scratching2001In: KTH Speech, Music and Hearing Quarterly Progress and Status Report, Vol. 42, p. 69-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the popular and rarely studied art form of manipulating a vinyl record by rhythmically dragging and pushing it, commonly labelled “scratching”. With sufficient practise, a Disc Jockey (DJ) can have great control over the sounds and treat the turntable as an expressive musical instrument. Even though a digital-based model of scratching might seem preferable to the vulnerable vinyl record, the acoustical behaviour of the scratch has not been formally studied until now. To gain information of this behaviour a DJ was asked to perform some typical scratching patterns. These common playing techniques and the corresponding sounds have been analysed. Since the focus of the article is on the basics of how the instrument works, an overview on standardized equipment and alternative equipment is given.

  • 21.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    The basics of scratching2002In: Journal of New Music Research, ISSN 0929-8215, E-ISSN 1744-5027, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 357-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the popular and rarely studied art form of manipulating a vinyl record by rhythmically dragging and pushing it, commonly labelled “scratching.” With sufficient practice, a Disc Jockey (DJ) can have great control over the sound produced and treat the turntable as an expressive musical instrument. Even though a digital-based model of scratching might seem preferable to the vulnerable vinyl record, and such models are being manufactured today, the acoustical behaviour of the scratch has not been formally studied until now. To gain information of this behaviour, a DJ was asked to perform some typical scratching patterns. These common playing techniques and the corresponding sounds have been analysed. Since the focus of the article is on the basics of how the instrument works, an overview on standardized equipment and alternative equipment is also given.

  • 22.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Södertörn University.
    The turntable: The instrument of hip-hop2015In: The Cambridge Companion to Hip-Hop / [ed] Williams, Justin A., Cambridge University Press , 2015, p. 42-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Turntable Music2000In: Musikklidenskapelig Årbok 2000 / [ed] Jonsson, Leif; Oversand, Kjell; Breivik, Magnar, Department of Music, Norwegian University of Science and Technology , 2000, p. 145-160Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Alonso, Marcos
    More DJ techniques on the reactable2008In: Proc. of the Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, Genova, Italy: Infomus, Casa Paganini , 2008, p. 207-210Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a project started for implementing DJ scratching techniques on the reactable. By interacting withobjects representing scratch patterns commonly performedon the turntable and the crossfader, the musician can playwith DJ techniques and manipulate how they are executedin a performance. This is a novel approach to the digital DJapplications and hardware. Two expert musicians practisedand performed on the reactable in order to both evaluate the playability and improve the design of the DJ techniques.

  • 25.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Alonso, Marcos
    Dimitrov, Smilen
    Combining DJ Scratching, Tangible Interfaces And A Physics-Based Model of Friction Sounds2007In: Proc. of the International Computer Music Conference, San Francisco: International Computer Music Association, 2007, p. 45-48Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on two Short-Term Scientific Missions (STSM) in the ConGAS European Cost Action. Several sound models and (musical instrument) interfaces were combined to study how DJ gestures of scratching can be applied to new situations. In one experiment, the gestures were used to control a physics-based model of friction sounds, for instance to simulate the sound of a bowed violin string. In the other experiment, DJ gestures from the program Skipproof were adapted to the Reactable framework, allowing users to perform the complicated DJ gestures with ease. This paper describes each model and the adaption and implementation of the models.

  • 26.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Atienza, Ricardo
    Ljungdahl Eriksson, Martin
    Large-scale interaction with a sound installation as a design tool2017In: AM '17 Proceedings of the 12th International Audio Mostly Conference on Augmented and Participatory Sound and Music Experiences, ACM Press, 2017, Vol. Part F131930, article id a35Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present an installation done in collaboration with Volvo Cars® for the international motor shows in Geneva, New York, and Shanghai during spring 2017. To envision and produce a future car sound for silent vehicles, users were given high-level control of a sophisticated synthesizer through playing with an attainable and inviting “color book”-inspired interface. The synthesizer algorithm was designed to dynamically create a rich mix of looped sounds that could blend with a sonic background scenery that had ecoacoustic validity, and that could metaphorically align with the visual elements. The installation ran faultlessly for around thirty days and with tens of thousands recorded sessions.

  • 27.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Analysis of a genuine scratch performance2004In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349, Vol. 2915, p. 477-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The art form of manipulating vinyl records done by disc jockeys (DJs) is called scratching, and has become very popular since its start in the seventies. Since then turntables are commonly used as expressive musical instruments in several musical genres. This phenomenon has had a serious impact on the instrument-making industry, as the sales of turntables and related equipment have boosted. Despite of this, the acoustics of scratching has been barely studied until now. In this paper, we illustrate the complexity of scratching by measuring the gestures of one DJ during a performance. The analysis of these measurements is important to consider in the design of a scratch model.

  • 28.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Complex gestural audio control: The case of scratching2003In: The Sounding Object / [ed] Rocchesso, Davide; Fontana, Federico, Mondo Estremo , 2003, p. 221-269Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    DJ scratching performance techniques: Analysis and synthesis2003In: Proc. Stockholm Music Acoustics Conference, 2003, Vol. 2, p. 693-696Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scratching is a popular way of making music, turning the DJ into a musician. Normally scratching is done using a vinyl record, a turntable and a mixer. Vinyl manipulation is built up by a number of specialized techniques that have been analysed in a previous study. The present study has two main objectives. First is to better understand and model turntable scratching as performed by DJs. Second is to design a gesture controller for physical sound models, i.e. models of friction sounds. We attached sensors to a DJ equipment set-up. Then a DJ was asked to perform typical scratch gestures both isolated and in a musical context, i.e. as in a real performance. He also was asked to play with different emotions: sad, angry, happy and fearful. A model of the techniques used by the DJ was built based on the analysis of the collected data. The implementation of the model has been done in pd. The Radio Baton, with specially adapted gesture controllers, has been used for controlling the model. The system has been played by professional DJs in concerts.

  • 30.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Mapping strategies in DJ scratching2006In: Proc. of the Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, IRCAM , 2006, p. 188-191Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For 30 years Disc Jockeys have been expressing their musical ideas with scratching. Unlike many other popular instruments, the equipment used for scratching is not built as one single unit, and it was not intended to be a musical instrument. This paper gives an overview of how DJs use their turntable, vinyl record and audio mixer in junction to produce scratch music. Their gestural input to the instrument is explained by looking at the mapping principles between the controller parameters and the audio output parameters. Implications are discussed for the design of new interfaces with examples of recent innovations and experiments in the field.

  • 31.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Sonification of distance between stations in train journeys2012In: TMH-QPSR special issue: Proceedings of SMC Sweden 2012 Sound and Music Computing, Understanding and Practicing in Sweden, ISSN 1104-5787, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 13-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    The Skipproof virtual turntable for high-level control of scratching2010In: Computer music journal, ISSN 0148-9267, E-ISSN 1531-5169, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 39-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A background on scratching and disc jockey (DJ) interfaces is presented, Skipproof application is described, performance situations where Skipproof is used are presented, and current implementations and possible future uses of Skipproof are discussed. DJing has grown from record players, turntables, and vinyl records to the use of product catalog of commercial physical controllers with other sound formats and sequencer-based interfaces with non-real-time interaction. Skipproof provides the main functionality of a turntable and a mixer, allowing a user to play different sound samples and alter the speed and amplitude manually. Skipproof is used in GUI and visual feedback, sensor and parameter mapping, and audio. The use of radio Baton as the turntable controller in a public performance featuring the Skipproof software showed problems due to the lack of beat synchronization of the scratch techniques and the impossibility of setting a general tempo.

  • 33.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Use of soundscapes for providing information about distance left in train journeys2012In: Proceedings of the 9th Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2012, Sound and music Computing network , 2012, p. 79-84Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study in the framework of the ISHT - Interior sound design of high-speed trains project. During a train journey between the cities of Stockholm and Gävle, Sweden, 9 travellers participated in a listening experiment to evaluate the use of sonification to convey nonspeech based information about the travel. We tested sonification for communicating the distance between two stations in the train journey. The participants could activate an iconographic representation of the sound in the landscape outside and listen to it through headphones in three conditions: with music, with a soundscape or with silence. Their interaction was logged, and ratings of their stated sense of knowing where the train was between the departure and arrival stations were recorded. Preliminary results show that our sonification helped participants to get an idea of the distance left for reaching the next station, and also that listening to the sonification was experienced as an engaging and pleasant activity.

  • 34.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Verbal Description of DJ Recordings2008In: Proc. of the 10th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, Sapporo, 2008, p. 20-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent pilot study, DJs were asked to perform the same composition using different intended emotional expression (happiness, sadness etc). In a successive test, these intentions could not be matched by listeners' judgement. One possible explanation is that DJs have a different vocabulary when describing expressivityin their performances. We designed an experiment to understand how DJs and listeners describe the music. The experiment was aimed at identifying a set of descriptors used mainly with scratch music, but possibly also with other genres. In a web questionnaire, subjects were presented with sound stimuli from scratch music recordings. Each participant described the music with words, phrases and terms in a free labelling task. The resulting list of responses was analyzed in several steps and condensed to a set of about 10 labels. Important differences were found between describing scratch music and other Western genres such as pop, jazz or classical music. For instance, labels such as cocky, cool, amusement and skilled were common. These specific labels seem mediated from the characteristic hip-hop culture. The experiment offered some explanation to the problem of verbally describing expressive scratch music. The set of labels found can be used for further experiments, for example when instructing DJs in performances.

  • 35.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Friberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Describing the emotional content of hip-hop DJ recordings2008In: The Neurosciences and Music III, Montreal: New York Academy of Sciences, 2008, p. 565-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Friberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Principles for expressing emotional content in turntable scratching2006In: Proc. 9th International Conference on Music Perception & Cognition / [ed] Baroni, M.; Addessi, A. R.; Caterina, R.; Costa, M., Bologna: Bonomia University Press , 2006, p. 532-533Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Scratching is a novel musical style that introduces the turntable as a musical instrument. Sounds are generated by moving vinyl records with one or two hands on the turntable and controlling amplitude with the crossfader with one hand. With this instrument mapping, complex gestural combinations that produce unique 'tones' can be achieved. These combinations have established a repertoire of playing techniques, and musicians (or DJs) know how to perform most of them. Scratching is normally not a melodically based style of music. It is very hard to produce tones with discrete and constant pitch. The sound is always strongly dependent on the source material on the record, and its timbre is not controllable in any ordinary way. However, tones can be made to sound different by varying the speed of the gesture and thereby creating pitch modulations. Consequently timing and rhythm remain as important candidates for expressive playing when compared to conventional musical instruments, and with the additional possibility to modulate the pitch.Aims: The experiment presented aims to identify acoustical features that carry emotional content in turntable scratching performances, and to find relationships with how music is expressed with other instruments. An overall aim is to investigate why scratching is growing in popularity even if it a priori seems ineffective as an expressive interface.Method: A number of performances by experienced DJs were recorded. Speed of the record, mixer amplitude and the generated sounds were measured. The analysis focuses on finding the underlying principles for expressive playing by examining musician's gestures and the musical performance. The found principles are compared to corresponding methods for expressing emotional intentions used for other instruments.Results: The data analysis is not completed yet. The results will give an indication of which acoustical features DJs use to play expressively on their instrument with musically limited possibilities. Preliminary results show that the principles for expressive playing are in accordance with current research on expression.Conclusions: The results present some important features in turntable scratching that may help explain why it remains a popular instrument despite its rather unsatisfactory playability both melodically and rhythmically.

  • 37.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Dimitrov, Smilen
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Using the Reactable as experimental interface for instrument design prototypingIn: Organised Sound, ISSN 1355-7718, E-ISSN 1469-8153Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes an experiment of using an existing hardware platform, the Reactable, to help designing the interaction between three different sound models and instrument interfaces. The aim was to test if prototyping could be facilitated by interacting with models of control actions derivedfrom performance gestures on an intermediate interface. The Reactable isa tangible table-top electronic musical instrument, and the software models include a DJ scratch interface, a virtual turntable, a physics-based sound model representing a bow-and-string interaction, and a physics-based friction sound model for sonification of the user gestures. The interaction was evaluated by two experts: one Reactable musician and one DJ. Their task was to practice expressive, musical performances. Data from the performers were collected through questionnaires and video recordings. The advantages of usinga single, versatile, hardware setup as a designer tool for various interface tasks are discussed. It is suggested how this hardware can be described as an alternative mapping layer.

  • 38.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Dravins, Christina
    Riga Stradiņs University, Latvia.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Active Listening and Expressive Communication for Children with Hearing Loss Using Getatable Environments for Creativity2012In: Journal of New Music Research, ISSN 0929-8215, E-ISSN 1744-5027, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 365-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a system for accommodating active listening for persons with hearing aids or cochlear implants, with a special focus on children at an early stage of cognitive development and with additional physical disabilities. A system called the Soundscraper is proposed and consists of a software part in Pure data and a hardware part using an Arduino microcontroller with a combination of sensors. For both the software and hardware development it was important to always ensure that the system was flexible enough to cater for the very different conditions that are characteristic of the intended user group.The Soundscraper has been tested with 25 children with good results. An increased attention span was reported, as well as positively surprising reactions from children where the caregivers were unsure whether they could hear at all. The sound synthesis methods, the gesture sensors and the employed parameter mapping were all simple, but they provided a controllable and sufficiently complex sound environment even with limited interaction. A possible future outcome of the application is the adoption of long-time analysis of sound preferences as opposed to traditional audiological investigations.

  • 39.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Dravins, Christina
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Ljudskrapan/The Soundscraper: Sound exploration for children with complex needs, accommodating hearing aids and cochlear implants2011In: Proceedings of the 8th Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2011 / [ed] Zanolla, Serena; Avanzini, Federico; Canazza, Sergio; de Götzen, Amalia, Sound and Music Computing Network , 2011, p. 70-76Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a system for accommodating active listening for persons with hearing aids or cochlear implants, with a special focus on children with complex needs, for instance at an early stage of cognitive development and with additional physical disabilities. The system is called Ljudskrapan (or the Soundscraper in English) and consists of a software part in Pure data and a hardware part using an Arduino microcontroller with a combination of sensors. For both the software and hardware development, one of the most important aspects was to always ensure that the system was flexible enough to cater for the very different conditions that are characteristic of the intended user group.The Soundscraper has been tested with 25 children with good results. An increased attention span was reported, as well as surprising and positive reactions from children where the caregivers were unsure whether they could hear at all. The sound generating models, the sensors and the parameter mapping were simple, but provided a controllable and complex enough sound environment even with limited interaction.

  • 40.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Dubus, Gaël
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Using modern smartphones to create interactive listening experiences for hearing impaired2012In: TMH-QPSR special issue: Proceedings of SMC Sweden 2012 Sound and Music Computing, Understanding and Practicing in Sweden, ISSN 1104-5787, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 42-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Fabiani, Marco
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Analysis of the acoustics and playing strategies of turntable scratching2011In: Acta Acoustica united with Acustica, ISSN 1610-1928, E-ISSN 1861-9959, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 303-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scratching performed by a DJ (disk jockey) is a skillful style of playingthe turntable with complex musical output. This study focuses on the description of some of the acoustical parameters and playing strategies of typical scratch improvisations, and how these parameters typically are used for expressive performance. Three professional DJs were instructed to express different emotions through improvisations, and both audio and gesturaldata were recorded. Feature extraction and analysis of the recordings are based on a combination of audio and gestural data, instrument characteristics, and playing techniques. The acoustical and performance parameters extracted from the recordings give a first approximation on the functional ranges within which DJs normally play. Results from the analysis show that parameters which are important for other solo instrument performances, suchas pitch, have less influence in scratching. Both differences and commonalities between the DJs’ playing styles were found. Impact that the findings of this work may have on constructing models for scratch performances arediscussed.

  • 42.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hiraga, R.
    Li, Zheng
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Wang, Hua
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Music Puzzle: An audio-based computer game that inspires to train listening abilities2013In: Advances in Computer Entertainment: 10th International Conference, ACE 2013, Boekelo, The Netherlands, November 12-15, 2013. Proceedings / [ed] Dennis Reidsma, Haruhiro Katayose, Anton Nijholt, Springer, 2013, p. 540-543Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Music Puzzle is a computer game for tablets and smartphones using sounds for the gameplay. Just like an original picture is reconstructed from pieces with jigsaw puzzle, an original sound is reconstructed from musical segments with Music Puzzle. Each segment is distorted by shifting the pitch and equalization. To finish the game, the user listens to each segment visualized as pieces on the screen, reorders them, and corrects their pitch and equalization. The game has a possibility for deaf and hard of hearing people to improve their residual hearing ability since the observation shows their concentrating the game with sounds and preference for music.

  • 43.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Hiraga, Rumi
    Industrial Technology Department, Tsukuba University of Technology.
    The Effects of Musical Experience and Hearing Loss on Solving an Audio-Based Gaming Task2017In: Applied Sciences, ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 7, no 12, article id 1278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conducted an experiment using a purposefully designed audio-based game called the Music Puzzle with Japanese university students with different levels of hearing acuity and experience with music in order to determine the effects of these factors on solving such games. A group of hearing-impaired students (n = 12) was compared with two hearing control groups with the additional characteristic of having high (n = 12) or low (n = 12) engagement in musical activities. The game was played with three sound sets or modes; speech, music, and a mix of the two. The results showed that people with hearing loss had longer processing times for sounds when playing the game. Solving the game task in the speech mode was found particularly difficult for the group with hearing loss, and while they found the game difficult in general, they expressed a fondness for the game and a preference for music. Participants with less musical experience showed difficulties in playing the game with musical material. We were able to explain the impacts of hearing acuity and musical experience; furthermore, we can promote this kind of tool as a viable way to train hearing by focused listening to sound, particularly with music.

  • 44.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Li, Zheng
    Wang, Hua
    A music puzzle game application for engaging in active listening2012In: Proceedings of 97th Information Science and Music (SIGMUS) Research Conference, Tokyo: Information Processing Society of Japan, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    InthispaperweintroduceanapplicationfortabletdeviceswithAndroidoperatingsystemcalledTheMusic Puzzle. This work is part of an ongoing projectcalled The Soundpark—Using modern smartphones to create interactive listening experiences for hearing impaired. In the Soundpark, we intend to provide different experimental applications for interacting with sound.The aim of the presented study was to create interactive and game-inspired listening experiences for persons with hearing impairments (and possibly using hearing aids or having cochlea implants). Audio-based programs constitute a significant part of the Android Market, but the scopes of existing applications are limited. Modern smart devices open up new possibilities both in terms of using external information as input and providing real-time audio feedback to the user, and the Music Puzzle has a novel approach that explores the new possibilities.

  • 45.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Södertörn University.
    Normark, Maria
    Södertörn University.
    Tutored academic writing as motivation and a formative assessment for learning2015In: KTH Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Stockholm, 2015, p. 31-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Thordarson, Hilmar
    Karlsson, Haraldur
    How interactive are interactive installations?: How musical are musical interfaces? Testing interactivity and playability in students' projects2006In: Proceedings of NoMute / [ed] Tro, Jan, Trondheim, Norway, 2006, p. 23-27Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the results and experiences from an experiment at The Tone and Video Lab at Listaháskóli Íslands sponsored by ConGAS, European cost action 287. Emphasis was to look at interactive interfaces, and the research aimed at finding a correspondence between how the interaction with an art piece looked, its potential for allowing interaction and expressive communication, and its appeal. Questionnaires were used to study aspects such as expressivity and playability. Most artists have a quite good appreciation on how their piece will be experienced. The results show some tendencies with regards to how easy it is to interact compared to the potential for practising skilled performances. How attractive the interaction looks seems to be of less importance.

  • 47. Herrera, Mikael
    et al.
    Schierbeck, Georg
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Disadvantages of using non-linear video in shallow learning situations – a critical perspective on current trends2017In: KTH Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, KTH ECE , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Video learning material is becoming more expected in education with its reported benefits to in-person lectures and knowledge transfer [1, 2]. Modern educational methods such as flipped classroom and MOOCs implement video as a learning resource. Furthermore, traditional linear (although asynchronous) video has long been challenged by nonlinear video, both in terms of having interactive material [3] and sectioned, indexed contents. Non-linear video has advantages: interactive transcript functions and searchability contribute to non-linear operation, which in turn streamline access to information [4]. Video material can arguably be seen as accommodating shallow learning and an intermediary to be processed in further teaching activities. While nonlinear video is being adopted by learning platforms, we argue that it is important to discuss its capacity for knowledge transfer. We investigated the non-linear way of using video with a critical approach [5]; in particular whether non-linear video streamlines the retrieval of information. The study highlights what might affect the learning negatively. In an observational experiment, the same video was presented to ten participants divided equally into two groups, receiving, respectively, linear video and non-linear video. To observe the efficacy and differences between the groups, subjects were in a controlled environment presented with questions that could only be answered from having seen the video. Participants were given 12 minutes to use video the contents and answer ten questions. The linear group correctly answered 72% of the questions whereas the non-linear answered 64%. The difference between the groups’ interactions has a p-value of 0.061 on a two-tailed t-test, and we therefore suggest that the amount of interactions can to some extent explain the inferior results of the non-linear group. References [1] Bishop JL, and Verleger MA (2013). The flipped classroom: A survey of the research. In: ASEE National Conference, Paper ID #6219. [2] Kim J, (2013). Toolscape: enhancing the learning experience of how-to videos. In: CHI 2013, pp. 2707-2712. [3] Zhang D, Zhou L, Briggs RO, and Nunamaker Jr. JF. (2006). Instructional video in e-learning: Assessing the impact of interactive video on learning effectiveness. Information & Management, 43:1, pp. 15-27. [4] Pavel A, Reed C, Hartmann B, and Agrawala M (2014). Video digests: A browsable, skimmable format for informational lecture videos. In: ACM UIST symposium, pp. 573-582. [5] Bardzell, J & Bardzell, S. (2013). What is ”Critical” about Critical Design? In: CHI 2013, pp. 3297-3306.

  • 48. Hiraga, Rumi
    et al.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Sound Preferences of Persons with Hearing Loss Playing an Audio-Based Computer Game2013In: Proceedings of the 3rd ACM international workshop on Interactive multimedia on mobile & portable devices, New York: ACM Digital Library, 2013, p. 25-30Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We performed an experiment to investigate differences between persons with and without hearing losses when playing a novel audio-based game on a tablet computer, and how persons with hearing losses appreciated the game when they played it with three different types of sound material - speech, music, or mixed speech and music. We analyzed game log files and participants' self-assessments and obtained results showing that there were significant differences between the two participant groups in terms of whether they completed the game. Moreover, the hearing loss group showed a preference for music among the three types of sounds and for the game itself. The two groups listened to music in different ways: hearing participants worked with the music material differently compared with other two types of material, implying that music is the most difficult among the three types. The hearing loss group showed preference for the music only-condition, which is consistent with the results from preliminary experiments we have done. We suggest that this novel game has the potential to improve the listening ability of persons with a hearing loss.

  • 49. Hiraga, Rumi
    et al.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kano, Naoya
    Matsubara, Masaki
    Terasawa, Hiroko
    Tabuchi, Keiji
    Music perception of hearing-impaired persons with focus on one test subject2015In: Proceedings of 2015 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, IEEE , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We previously investigated how hearing-impaired people perceive music in several types of musical experiments. By following-up on the results of some of these experiments with a single test subject Sd, we found that the ability of the subject to perceive music was high and that she appreciated music in a way that was different from that of hearing people. In this paper, we describe three musical experiments with hearing-impaired subjects, their results, and Sd’s music perception through the experiments. The three experiments involved the Music Puzzle game, the appreciation of harmony, and tempo perception. Music Puzzle is a music game we made that is played on a tablet and is intended to be used by hearing-impaired persons as a serious game with which they can improve their hearing ability by continuously playing it. The experiment on appreciation of harmony was conducted with three subject groups, and the result showed that experience with music affected the appreciation of music accompanied with the tonal code. Tempo perception was investigated with a simple game in which the subjects tapped along with the tempo of the music. By examining the subjects’ hearing acuity in standard medical hearing tests and crossing over the results of these musical experiments, we observed that hearing acuity is not necessarily related to the perception and understanding of music.

  • 50. Hiraga, Rumi
    et al.
    Matsubara, Masaki
    Terasawa, Hiroko
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Promote active listening with music games2016In: Proceedings of the first international Music & CI Symposium, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
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