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  • 1.
    Beltran, Francisco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Jalkenäs, Frida
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Pomerancevs, Juris
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Fisher, Lesley
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Oliveira, Maria Cecilia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Mantilla, Weimar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Sustainable Tokyo 2040 - Minato Ward: Japan's Green Window to the World2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to improve the life quality of its inhabitants, show the world Japan's commitment to protect the environment, and position itself as a game changer in the global energy sector, what would be a better place where to start from than Minato City, in order to make it Japan’s Green Window to the World.

    Four different Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) are used to quantify the accomplishment of the objective of making Minato sustainable by 2040. Based on a qualitative system model for Minato, quantitative models were developed using both HOMER Pro® and the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP). For these models, three different scenarios are used: one representing a business as usual scenario, another showing what the future would look like if all the existing policies and goals were to be met, and the last one depicting what necessary improvements and investments should be made to achieve a sustainable Minato by 2040. A technical and economic analysis of the results of the models was made, resulting in what is thought to be the best proposal for Minato.

    The proposal consists in the installation of 3 195 MW of onshore wind power and 456 MW of solar PV, both to be constructed in three phases. From the 16 364,2 MW of expected necessary installed capacity in Minato for 2040, 61,1% will come from the grid, 19,5% from the wind turbines, 2,8% from solar PV, 11,1% from stored energy in batteries, 5,4% from Hydrogen, and the remaining 0,1% from the already existing incineration plant. The overall proposition has a NPV of ¥ 2,64 Trillion, and decreases emissions in Minato to 1,0 million tonnes of CO2. The final system has an efficiency of 70,5% and a renewable energy fraction of 59,1%. Even though the KPIs goals are not met with this proposal, a large part of the road is covered towards a sustainable city. The renewable energy fraction increases from 9,5% to 59,1%, the total primary energy supply (per year perperson) and the CO2 emissions are reduced by 66% and 86% respectively, and the crowdedness factor is brought down from 173% to 150%, all with regards to base year 2015. If compared to the goals set by the Japanese Government for 2030, (22-24% renewables in primary energy matrix, 26% emissions reduction and 24% self-sufficiency ratio) it can be seen that the values obtained for the Nokko scenario would largely exceed them.

  • 2.
    Beltran, Francisco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Sommerfeldt, Nelson
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Padovani, Filippo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Rolando, Davide
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Madani Larijani, Hatef
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Solar Heat Pumps and Self-Consumption Can (and should) electricity suppliers encourage thermal storage?2022In: 2022 BuildSim Nordic, BSN 2022, EDP Sciences , 2022, article id 06005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heat pumps and water tanks can be used to increase PV self-consumption in buildings without any additional equipment, but there is sometimes a lack of economic incentives to maximize it that limits economic gains. Therefore, pricing conditions need to change in order to make self-consumption strategies more interesting for prosumers. This study aims at determining what, if any, unsubsidized market conditions could lead to economically motivated self-consumption control strategies with solar heat pumps. A sensitivity analysis is used on multiple pricing models based on current market conditions for a solar PV and ground source heat pump system for a single-family house in Norrköping, Sweden. The results show that control strategies aimed at maximizing self-consumption have very little impact on net costs, regardless of pricing model or variation in price. Feed-in-bonus is the most important aspect when comparing different pricing schemes, and no other sensitivity comes close.

  • 3.
    Pourier, Christopher
    et al.
    KTH.
    Beltran, Francisco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Sommerfeldt, Nelson
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Solar photovoltaic/thermal (PVT) technology collectors and free cooling in ground source heat pump systems2024In: Solar Energy Advances, E-ISSN 2667-1131, Vol. 4, article id 100050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems offer a low carbon heating and cooling solution for the decarbonization of buildings. As global temperatures rise, the cooling requirements of buildings will grow, even in regions where cooling systems have been historically uncommon due to their colder climate, such as Sweden. The combination of free cooling (FC) with GSHPs seems like a natural way to meet the increasing cooling needs, since the heat extracted from the building during the summer months can be injected into the ground to potentially regenerate the borehole field and enhance heat pump performance. However, a technology that is generally integrated with GSHP systems for borehole regeneration are photovoltaic/thermal collectors. This study investigates the performance of a ground source heat pump system with free cooling for a multi-family building in Stockholm, Sweden, and the interference on the free cooling capabilities of the system when photovoltaic/thermal collectors are present. The results demonstrate that the integration of PVT and FC not only maintains the cooling supply but also enhances heat pump performance, all the while reducing borehole length and land area requirements.

  • 4.
    Sommerfeldt, Nelson
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Beltran, Francisco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Madani Larijani, Hatef
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    High Market Potential Applications for PVT with Heat Pumps2020In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ISES EUROSUN 2020 CONFERENCE - 13TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SOLAR ENERGY FOR BUILDINGS AND INDUSTRY / [ed] Charalambides, A Streicher, W Mugnier, D, International Solar Energy Society (ISES) , 2020, p. 551-557Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the heat pump sector, there are applications where photovoltaic/thermal (PVT) collectors can offer greater value with lower investment costs than the current alternatives. The first is ground source heat pumps (GSHP) with under dimensioned boreholes. The second is a solar source heat pump (SSHP) where the PVT collectors are a replacement for the traditional air heat exchanger in an air source heat pump (ASHP). Complete systems models for a multi-family house are simulated in TRNSYS to determine seasonal performance factors (SPF), which are then compared technically and economically to each respective alternative. A 156 m(2) PVT array is capable of improving the SPF of a degraded GSHP by 30%, the same gains as drilling additional boreholes but at a lower cost. The SSHP with a 235 m(2) PVT array can reach an SPF of 2.6, comparable to the performance of an ASHP, but has the cost of a GSHP. Already today, PVT can economically compete with borehole drilling for GSHP and the SSHP concept shows enough market potential to warrant investment and development towards broader adoption.

1 - 4 of 4
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