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  • 1.
    Björndal, Petra
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. ABB Corporate Research.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Artman, Henrik
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    From transactions to relationships: Making sense of user-centered perspectives in large technology-intensive companies2015In: 4th IFIP 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2015, Springer-Verlag New York, 2015, p. 114-124Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we analyze interviews from four technology-intensive companies, focused on service and service development. All companies have during the last two decades introduced interaction design units, and the corporations were selected due to their interest in also expanding the service share of their business. This service shift has been a top-down initiative. However in only two companies, the initiatives have led to the establishment of enterprise wide service development processes, and in the other two companies, the service development is more ad hoc. It is argued that even if interaction design has close theoretical relation to service design such combination has so far been limited. We discuss the shift from product to service view of the offerings within these companies, and relate this to user-centered perspectives. We argue there is a window of opportunity within technology-intensive and engineering focused industries to include user-centered design when formalizing service development.

  • 2.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Wangel, Josefin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    ICT practices in smart sustainable cities: In the intersection of technological solutions and practices of everyday life2015In: Proceedings of EnviroInfo and ICT for Sustainability 2015: Building the knowledge base for environmental action and sustainability / [ed] Vivian Kvist Johannsen, Stefan Jensen, Volker Wohlgemuth, Chris Preist, Elina Eriksson, Copenhagen: Atlantis Press , 2015, p. 317-324Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ICT, information and communications technology,has radically transformed our world and is now an inextricable partof what it means to live a normal life as a citizen, at least in highincomecountries. This has led to a situation where ICT has becomeso taken for granted that it has lost its visibility. While thisdevelopment to a large extent has been driven by businessopportunities, there is now also an increasing recognition of ICT as apossible solution to sustainability problems. There are however twomajor pitfalls of using ICT as a tool for sustainability that need to beaddressed for its potentials to be realized. The first pitfall isenvironmental impacts of ICT, as well as the risk of lock-in effectsand an increasing vulnerability. The second pitfall concerns theunderstanding of ICT as a neutral solution, rather than recognizingthat ICT, as all technology, carries implicit values. Taken together,these two pitfalls imply a need for replacing the atomized and technobiasedunderstandings of ICT with an approach that recognize thelarger socio-material, political and economic structure in which ICTis (thought to be) part. With the aim of contributing to such a shift,this paper proposes a practice-oriented perspective in order toexplore the potential of ICT to contribute to sustainability, using thesmart sustainable city discourse as our example. We define theconcept ICT practices and discuss it from an interdisciplinaryperspective and in relation to the sustainable smart city. We arguethat by using ICT practices as a conceptual starting-point foranalysis, both the technological and the socio-cultural components ofthe smart sustainable city discourse can become elicited, enabling amore explicit analysis of what assumptions this discourse rests on.

  • 3. Cajander, Å.
    et al.
    Janols, R.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    On the establishment of user-centred perspectives2014In: Proceedings of the NordiCHI 2014: The 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Fun, Fast, Foundational, 2014, p. 103-112Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the obstacles for and discusses possible solutions to successfully establishing a User Centred Perspective (UCP) in organisations. The analysis is made with the use of the theory Communities of Practice (CoP). The analysis is based on a cross case study based on two longitudinal action research projects. In these studies we identified four CoP considered important; users, core business managers, IT coordinators and system developers. The analysis shows in what ways the communities contribute to the difficulties for a successful establishment of UCP. One example is marginalising the IT coordinator community, and another is imperialism of the system developer community as well as the lack of boundary spanning skills. The results indicate that we need to influence all levels in organisations, with a focus on boundaries between communities, in order to successfully introduce a UCP. Boundary spanning objects need to be identified and knowledge sharing needs to be enhanced.

  • 4. Cajander, Å.
    et al.
    Larusdottir, M.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Nauwerck, G.
    Contextual personas as a method for understanding digital work environments2015In: 4th IFIP 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2015, Springer, 2015, p. 141-152Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of IT at the workplace has changed dramatically from being a tool within the work environment to include all aspects of social and private life. New workplaces emerge where IT becomes more and more divergent, embedded and pervasive. These new aspects of IT at work need to be addressed with new or adapted human centred activities. This paper present and discuss a modified version of personas called contextual personas developed to better address the new working life. The contextual personas were developed using contextual inquiry, and focus groups as well as argumentative design. From the process of developing the contextual personas we learned that they are indeed a promising tool to understand the new work situations, and especially the holistic view of IT at work as they bring the whole working-life of the personas into focus. Finally, we discuss in what way the contextual personas could give developers extended understanding of the users’ future office work environment.

  • 5.
    Cajander, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Eriksson, Elina
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Automation and E-government Services: A Widened Perspective2007In: DEGAS 2007: Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Design and Evaluation of e-Government Applications and Services / [ed] Marco Winckler, Monique Noirhomme-Fraiture, 2007, p. 3-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This short paper questions the focus on automation of egovernment processes, and efficiency in e-government, which is prevalent in both research and in practice in Swedish governments. We argue that this focus on automation and efficiency might cause unhealthy work for civil servants, and services that do not meet the demands or needs of the citizens. Hence, the role of the civil servant must be reconsidered, from a mere “overseer” of an automated process, to a highly skilled worker that provides complex services and works efficiently with information. Moreover, research on e-government should elaborate more on the changes that needs to be done in the services provided, as well as which services that are suitable for the Internet and other media.

  • 6.
    Cajander, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Eriksson, Elina
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Evaluating Procurement, Usability and Off-the-Shelf Office Software2007In: COST294-MAUSE Workshop Downstream Utility: The Good, the Bad, and the Utterly Useless Usability Evaluation Feeback / [ed] Effie L-C Law, Marta Kristín Lárusdóttir, Mie Nörgaard, 2007, p. 25-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Off-the-shelf office software has lately been receivingincreasing attention in Sweden. This experience reportillustrate different perspectives on a usability evaluation ofthe procurement process and the off-the-shelf softwaresystem. This study was part of a long-term action researchproject in a large government organization. Data wascollected through documents, interviews, and participatoryobservations. This paper describes how the usabilityevaluation was carried out, how the context of the usabilityevaluation changed during these weeks and finally discussand interpret why the stakeholders experienced theevaluation as useful. The usability evaluation was found tobe very useful by stakeholders from the organization,whereas the usability expert as well as our research grouphad difficulties in seeing the usefulness. Findings indicatean agenda that was revealed late in the project as one of themain reason for the importance of the evaluation. Also atrue belief in the perfection of the off-the-shelf officesoftware and a somewhat different view of what usability ismight explain the downstream utility.

  • 7.
    Cajander, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Towards a usability coaching method for institutionalizing usability in organisations2010In: Human-computer interaction: Second IFIP TC 13 Symposium, HCIS 2010, held as part of WCC 2010, Brisbane, Australia, September 20-23, 2010 : proceedings / [ed] Peter Forbrig, Fabio Paternó, Annelise Mark Pejtersen, New York: Springer, 2010, p. 86-97Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ideas related to user centred systems design are difficult to implement in organisations and usability is given low priority in in-house systemsdevelopment. This problem is multifaceted and complex and needs to be addressed with a method capable of adapting to situations, people and context. Inthis paper we outline a new method – usability coaching – that has the capability for dealing with the situated problems of introducing user centred systemsdevelopment in an organisations. The method is the results of a larger action research case study in which 9 individuals in an organization received usabilitycoaching. Our study indicates that the coaching program made coachees workmore actively with usability activities; hence the coaching program had a substantial effect on their actions and contributed to the organizational change.

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Elina
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Making Sense of Usability: Organizational Change and Sensemaking when Introducing User-Centred Systems Design in Public Authorities2009Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Eriksson, Elina
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Sensemaking and Knowledge Building in System Development2007In: Human-Computer Interaction - INTERACT 2007, Pt 2, Proceedings, 2007, p. 571-572Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    Situated Reflexive Change: User-Centred Design in(to) Practice2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology used in the Swedish workplace is perceived to be controlling, gener- ally still difficult to use, and with a low degree of usability. Even though the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) has been concerned with researching different ways of developing usable systems for at least half a century, there seem to be problems with the diffusion of the results into practice. One of the possible approaches to developing usable systems is user-centred design, and in this thesis I am concerned with the issue of introducing user-centred design and usability work in public authorities and institutions. I will present work done in two different research projects with a focus on change, where the aim has been to introduce or enhance usability work. Through a lens of social construction- ism and reflexivity I will explore the outcome of the projects and the implica- tions for the introduction of user-centred design in practice. Furthermore, I will explore whether the focus on the introduction of usability work might hinder the formation of a sustainable change in the organizations interested in devel- oping usable systems. The research question then becomes; can we introduce usability work in organizations?

    The answer to this question is no. Instead, we need to change our perspective from introduction to situated reflexive change: focusing on sensemaking and a situated process of ongoing change, where the stakeholders in the organization themselves must play an active and responsible part. This entails a shift from dualism to duality and a reconsideration of what our usability methods can con- tribute with. Furthermore, I will explore possible approaches to working with situated reflexive change with tools that are familiar in the field of HCI, but with an expanded scope. In particular I will discuss field studies conducted by system developers as a tool for making sense of usability issues, personas as a tool for inducing reflexivity in and on practice, and usability coaching as a sensemaking tool for both organizational stakeholders and researchers in order to understand and reflect upon change.

  • 11.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Artman, Henrik
    Swartling, Anna
    The secret life of a persona: when the personal becomes private2013In: CHI '13 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM , 2013, p. 2677-2686Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some organizations fail to involve users in systems development due to a widespread organization, high workload or secrecy issues. A remedy against this situation could be the persona method in which users and main stakeholders as represented as fictitious characters. Personas help eliciting user needs and requirements, facilitate design choices and are an overall communication aid where users cannot be present. An important part of the persona method, as portrayed in literature, is the personal details that make the personas trustworthy and alive. In this paper we present two cases in which personas have been developed and used, but where the personal is scarce or even non-existent because of a dispersed organisation, the organisational culture and secrecy issues. The paper describes how the personas were developed, used and received and how the method was altered in order to work in these special circumstances.

  • 12.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Engwall, Olov
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Öster, Anne-Marie
    Kjellström, Hedvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Design Recommendations for a Computer-Based Speech Training System Based on End User Interviews2005In: Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Speech and Computers, 2005, p. 483-486Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study has been performed in order to improve theusability of computer-based speech training (CBST) aids.The aim was to engage the users of speech training systemsin the first step of creating a new CBST aid. Speechtherapists and children with hearing- or speech impairmentwere interviewed and the result of the interviews ispresented in the form of design recommendations.

  • 13.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Hello World! - Experiencing Usability Methods without Usability Expertise2009In: HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION - INTERACT 2009, PT II, PROCEEDINGS, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009, p. 550-565Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do you do usability work when no usability expertise is available? What happens in an organization when system developers, with no previous HCI knowledge, after a 3-day course, start applying usability methods, and particularly field studies? In order to answer these questions qualitative data were gathered through participatory observations, a feed back survey, field study documentation and interviews from 47 system developers from a public authority. Our results suggest that field studies enhance the developer's understanding of the user perspective, and provide a more holistic overview of the use situation, but that some developers were unable to interpret their observations and see solutions to the users' problems. The field study method was very much appreciated and has now become standard operating procedure within the organization. However, although field studies may be useful, it does not replace the need for usability pro fes sion als, as their knowledge is essential for more complex observations, analysis and for keeping the focus on usability.

  • 14.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Introducing usability roles in public authorities2008In: NordiCHI 2008: Building Bridges - 5th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, ACM Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education, 2008, p. 113-122Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most common ways of introducing usability into development work in a public authority is by employing a usability professional. But how successful is this strategy when it comes to increasing focus on usability in the organization and how successful have these usability professionals been in introducing usability activities into the development work in their organizations?

    This paper is based on five case studies on the introduction of usability professionals in public authorities in Sweden. These different ways of introducing usability are discussed and analyzed. Based on this data we draw conclusions about what to consider in order to achieve a successful introduction of usability. Interviews with nine usability professionals were conducted all of which were recorded, analyzed and condensed into the case studies presented. One lesson learned from the case studies is the importance of a formal title as it shapes interpretations of what usability is about. Another issue discussed is the usefulness of a formal job description, and personal characteristics of the person working with usability. Based on the case studies we draw the conclusion that a senior usability professional is to be preferred since introduction of usability often implies organizational change as well as conflicts and discussions at a management level. Another conclusion that can be drawn from the studies is that usability work is more successful in the short perspective if it contributes directly to the design and program code instead of focusing on strategic levels such as policy, evaluation of existing systems and method development.

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Pargman, Daniel
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    ICT4S Reaching Out: Making sustainability relevant in higher education2014In: Proceedings of the 2014 conference ICT for Sustainability, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many media technology and computer science engineering students suffer from the preconceived opinion that sustainability is at best peripheral, and at worst irrelevant to their education. In this paper we discuss our experiences of integrating sustainability and ICT4S into a media technology engineering programme. An overarching tension has been in finding a balance between teaching about sustainability in general, and teaching about ICT4S in particular. Furthermore, what aspects of the wide and interdisciplinary area of ICT4S are most relevant to teach to media technology students, and how can the connection between ICT and sustainability be “refined”, clarified and expressed We explicate how we have gone about to shape the course in such a way that it becomes both relevant and possible for these students to relate to it, and we exemplify with choices made, of which one had been the implementation and adaption of the GaSuCo board game. While the results presented here are primarily relevant to media technology and computer science educations, we also conclude with recommendations to the larger ICT4S community. We argue that the ICT4S community does not only need to take part in developing education in this area, but also needs to conduct research on how to educate students in ICT4S.

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    On the inherent contradictions of teaching sustainability at a technical university2017In: Digital Technology and Sustainability: Engaging the Paradox, Taylor and Francis , 2017, p. 154-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On the necessity of rocking the boat Computers and digitalization have greatly shaped our world and are now an unavoidable part of modern society. Weiser’s (1991) vision of ubiquitous computing has in many respects not only been met but has in affluent parts of the world been surpassed (Bell & Dourish, 2007). Digital artifacts and devices surround us and have invisibly and seamlessly permeated everything we do. Our modern societies are however not sustainable. We have overstepped several planetary boundaries and risk overstepping several more (Steffen et al., 2015). We are about to reach limits as to the resources we can extract from the earth (Bardi, 2014), and the changes wreaked are by now so profound that they will likely last for a geological period of time (Steffen et al., 2007). In light of this, it is of utmost importance to strive towards a sustainable society, and this is a responsibility that falls on many disciplines and sectors. We believe that engineering students could be key drivers in this change since many will eventually enter positions of power from which they will make decisions that will shape our future society. 

  • 17.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Bates, Oliver
    Lancaster University.
    Maria, Normark
    Södertörns Högskola.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Anneroth, Mikael
    Ericsson.
    Berndtsson, Johan
    InUse.
    HCI and UN's Sustainable Development Goals: Responsibilities, Barriers and Opportunities2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite increasing interest, Sustainable HCI has been critiqued for doing too little, and perhaps also at times for doing the wrong things. Still, a field like Human-Computer Interaction should aim at being part of transforming our society into a more sustainable one. But how do we do that, and, what are we aiming for?

    With this workshop, we propose that HCI should start working with the new global Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) that were formally adopted by the UN in September 2015. How can Sustainable HCI be inspired by, and contribute to these goals? What should we in the field of HCI do more of, and what should we perhaps do less of? In what areas should we form partnerships in order to reach the Sustainable Development Goals and with whom should we partner? 

  • 18.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Kramers, Anna
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Sustainable development for ICT engineering students: “What’s in it for me”?2016In: / [ed] Mazijn, Bernard, Brugge, Belgium: Instituut vóór Duurzame Ontwikkeling vzw , 2016, p. 165-172Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of sustainable development (SD) is hardly possible to refute; however, sustainable development has been a relatively peripheral subject in computer-related engineering educations. Sustainability, with its global and potentially all-encompassing connotations, is still seen by many Information and Communication Technology (ICT) students as a topic of little relevance to their future careers. So how can teachers convince these students that sustainability is a topic that can be both relevant and interesting for them? From the point of view of the student; “What’s in it for me?”.

    In this paper we describe and compare our efforts to plan and teach three introductory courses on SD in three different ICT-related educational programmes at KTH Royal Institute of Technology. The courses were planned separately, but they will be analysed together. We discuss two dimensions that we have found to be imperative in our endeavour to engage our students. The first dimension is to handle the balance between sustainability on a general level versus sustainability as specifically related to ICT. The second dimension is to handle the tension between teaching facts versus an emphasis on students’ reflections and/or practicing skills. We argue that overcoming the challenge of making sustainability relevant to the students is central for successfully teaching these courses. 

  • 19.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Swartling, Anna
    UCD Guerrilla Tactics: A Strategy for Implementation of UCD in Sweden’s Military Defense Organizations2013In: Human Work Interaction Design: Work Analysis and HCI / [ed] Pedro Campos, Torkil Clemmensen, José Abdelnour Nocera, Dinesh Katre, Arminda Lopes, Rikke Ørngreen, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 112-123Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problem of how to implement user-centred design (UCD) is well established as a research topic within HCI. Yet there are unresolved issues in order for UCD to actually be used in practice. This paper will present a case study within Sweden ́s military defense organizations, concerning the introduc- tion of UCD. The overarching goal of the research was to bridge the gap be- tween work practices and systems development; focusing the efforts on intro- ducing usability work in the procurement process. We concluded early on that we needed to develop and formulate an approach that is probably common in practice but not described or used in research. We call this strategy UCD guer- rilla tactics, which entails to do the unexpected, to work pragmatically with change, and to use user centred methods to introduce UCD. Our main target group was future users and procurers of UCD methods. We aimed at demon- strating and involving them in the work through user centred activities. The tac- tics is also a reflexive and flexible approach based on continuous evaluation of what is feasible and potentially gives the largest outcome. This paper describes the guerrilla tactics, how it was applied in a case study and factors that should be considered when using it.

  • 20.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    Swartling, Anna
    UCD Guerrilla Tactics: A Strategy for Implementation of UCD in the Swedish Defence2012In: Human Work Interaction Design – HWID2012: Pre-conference proceedings of the 3rd IFIP TC 13.6 HWID working conference / [ed] Clemmensen, Torkil; Abdelnour-Nocera, Jose; Mark Pejtersen, Annelise; Lopes, Arminda; Katre, Dinesh; Campos, Pedro; Ørngreen, Rikke;, 2012, p. 116-126Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problem of how to implement user-centred design (UCD) is well established as a research topic within HCI. Yet there are unresolved issues in order for UCD to actually be used in practice. This paper will present a case study within the Swedish Defence, concerning the introduction of UCD. The overarching goal of the research was to bridge the gap between work practices and systems development; focusing the efforts on introducing usability in the procurement process. We concluded early on that we needed to develop and formulate an approach that is probably common in practice but not described or used in research. We call this strategy UCD guerrilla tactics. It is to do the unexpected, to introduce UCD through UCD and to choose change projects pragmatically. Our main target group was future users and procurers of UCD methods. We aimed at introducing UCD to them by demonstrating and involving them in the work through user centred activities. It is also a flexible approach based on continuous evaluation of what is feasible and potentially gives the largest outcome. This paper describes the guerrilla tactics, how it was applied in a case study and factors that should be considered when using it.

  • 21.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Meeting the future in the past-using counterfactual history to imagine computing futures2018In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The future is inherently hard to predict, yet we know there are various factors that will limit the future of computing (scarcity of materials, energy shortages and various biophysical limits) in both substantial and disruptive ways. When we look at the past and at mainstream projected computing futures, all we see is exponential growth. While it is easy to reject such trajectories, it is much harder to imagine and propose credible, preferable and evocative alternatives. Breaking away from default modes of thinking about computing is difficult but possible, and we here present a methodology-counterfactual history-that can help us imagine alternative scenarios for computing. We argue that by learning from counterfactual pasts ("what-if scenarios"), we can more easily liberate our ideas from various preconceptions that hamper them and box them in. This makes it possible to generate and entertain a more diverse "portfolio" of ideas about the future and help us better prepare for meeting future challenges.

  • 22. Gulliksen, Jan
    et al.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Eriksson, Elina
    Only Figures Matter?: If Measuring Usability and User Experience in Practice is Insanity or a Necessity2008In: Proc. International Workshop on Meaningful Measures: Valid Useful User Experience Measurement, Toulouse, France: Institute of Research in Informatics of Toulouse (IRIT) , 2008, p. 91-96Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala University.
    Eriksson, Elina
    Uppsala University.
    Sandblad, B.
    Uppsala University.
    Kavathatzopoulos, I.
    Uppsala University.
    User-Centred Systems Design as Organizational Change: A Longitudinal Action Research Project to Improve Usability and the Computerized Work Environment in a Public Authority2009In: International Journal of Technology and Human Interaction, ISSN 1548-3908, E-ISSN 1548-3916, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 13-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a longitudinal case study in which six Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) researchers worked extensively in an action research cooperation with a public authority over a period of four years. The purpose of the cooperation was to increase the focus on usability in the authority, and the main research question was how user centered systems design and increased awareness on work environment in relation to computer usage could promote organizational change in a public authority. The overarching research approach in this project has been action research and the data used in this paper is derived from an evaluation performed at the end of the project, as well as through our experiences from working with the project. The results involve aspects relating to organizational issues, management support, strategic documents and end-user participation. Moreover the results include methodological support for bringing users and developers closer together and individual and organizational attitudes to development. The purpose of this paper is to make some general conclusions on how to bring about change when approaching a large public authority with the purpose of introducing usability and user centered systems design.

  • 24.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Eriksson, Elina
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Understanding and Developing User Involvement at a Public Authority2006In: NordiCHI'06-Workshop: User involvement and representation in e-Government projects, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    User involvement is one of the major constituents of a user-centered systems design approach. However, involving real end users still seem to be one of the major obstacles to systems development projects in practice. This paper reports on our initial experiences in our cooperation with a public authority to increase their effectiveness of user involvement and discussing new ways of involving users. As a start we performed a workshop where we examined the attitudes towards user involvement and discussed the participants’ experiences in this respect. Following we will conduct a survey to capture quantitative data on the user involvement throughout the organization

  • 25.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing for Diverse Stakeholder Engagement in Resource-Intensive Practices2018In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite many contributions to Sustainable HCI stressing the importance of “moving beyond the individual”, a majority of HCI work is still targeted mainly at consumers or resource users. However, many stakeholders influence resource use and including such stakeholders in design work can open up new design opportunities for supporting sustainable practices. In this paper, we present results from a longitudinal study of practices related to energy improvement work in housing cooperatives. During the study, we discovered new opportunities for interactive technologies to support this work when we involved various stakeholders other than housing cooperatives. In addition, we discuss more general implications for design aiming to support diverse stakeholder engagement in practices related to resource use: which stakeholders and practices to include, temporal aspects of engagement, and opportunities for supporting shared responsibility for resource use.

  • 26.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Wangel, Josefin
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Broms, Loove
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Exploring Lost and Found in Future Images of Energy Transitions: Towards a Bridging practice of Provoking and Affirming Design2018In: DRS2018: Catalyst, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We need to transition our society in a more sustainable direction, for example through enormous cuts in carbon emissions. Yet this future is hard to envision and work towards. In this project, with a transition design posture, we have designed tools that we believe can be useful to initiate dialogues and reflections for the future. In particular we are interested in using the bridging between provocative and affirmative design as a way to explore and articulate what people see as the lost and found of such a transition. In this paper, we present a study where we used a practice lens to address one possible low carbon future through a provocation workshop. We present our methodology, the tentative tools we used during the workshop and the experiences as expressed by the workshop participants.

  • 27.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    A Car-free Year: Providing vehicles for change2015In: Design Ecologies: Challenging anthropocentrism in the design of sustainable futures, Nordes , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes an interventionist design research project called a Car-free Year, where three families substitute their cars for a fleet of light electric vehicles during one year. The aim is to study how this intervention changes the families’ everyday practices, as well as suggest how design can support and sustain such a change on a larger scale. If radically new paradigms are to be shaped, changes are needed both in what is considered normalities and in people’s everyday practices. We argue that design can play an important role in the transition towards more sustainable futures and new normalities.

  • 28.
    Ilstedt, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Sustainable lifestyles: How values affect sustainable practises2017In: Design + Power / [ed] Andrew Morrisson, Dagny Stuedahl, 2017, p. 1-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a project that explores how different values and lifestyle choices are related to sustainable practices. The goal has been to develop an understanding of both complexity in people’s everyday practices as well as patterns in this complexity to be used when designing interventions for sustainable lifestyles. In the project, we have used a mixed methods approach in order to develop a more comprehensive picture of both the larger patterns of the complexities of everyday practices as well as the particulars of sustainability engagement in Sweden. In this paper we present the initial results from a Swedish study of people with different values and their relations to sustainability, based on Schwartz Theory of Basic Human Values. In particular, we present their overall perspective on sustainability, their existing sustainable practices, and their needs for transitions towards more sustainable lifestyles.

  • 29. Knowles, B.
    et al.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Deviant and guilt-ridden: Computing within psychological limits2015In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1-1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this position paper we discuss a set of problems particular to computing within limits that draws on psychological and sociological barriers. The enormity of the predicaments we are facing, global climate change and resource scarcity, together with the social, cultural and national settings in which we are facing these predicaments, are seriously hampering our possibility to address them. We argue that without confronting the underlying psychology that perpetuates our current state of un-sustainability, there is little computing can hope to achieve. Furthermore, we also argue that these psychological limits to computing do not only concern the users of our systems, often portrayed as the people in need of behavioral change, but also ourselves, as researchers within computing. In this paper we start exploring what these psychological limits could be, what ideas computing for sustainability has tried but should now retire, and start discussing a way forward.

  • 30.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Time is of essence: Changing the horizon of travel planning2014In: Proceedings of the 2014 conference ICT for Sustainability, Atlantis Press , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth of ICT-services related to the transportation area, and for example Advanced Travel Information Services (ATIS) have been proposed as one means to achieve a decrease of environmental impacts of transportation through behavioural change. However, empirical studies have shown that travel planning in every day life is a fragmented, distributed and fluid process, that is not as enclosed in time and space, or delimited in its content, as today’s ICT-services for travel planning imply – in spite of smart and mobile solutions. Hence, in this paper we discuss the role of planning and coordination in the time-constrained travel-choices of everyday life, together with the question of which time horizons and what decisions that are part of today’s travel planning services. Furthermore we will also sketch how travel planners of tomorrow, linked with other ICT-services, could be designed in order to stretch the horizon of assistance so that they are better equipped to support travel planning processes in everyday life. We will also critically discuss the role of travel information services and ICT as being a part of the work for more sustainable mobility.

  • 31.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Travel information services and travel planning practice: Changing the horizon of assistanceIn: International Journal of Sustainable Transportation, ISSN 1556-8318, E-ISSN 1556-8334Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent decades have seen rapid growth in ICT services relating to transportation. Different types of travel information services have been proposed as a means to decrease the environmental impacts of transportation through behavioural change. However, empirical evidence shows that travel planning is a fragmented, distributed and fluid process that is not as enclosed in time and space or delimited in content, as existing ICT services for travel planning would imply, despite smart and mobile solutions. This paper examines the role of planning and coordination in the travel choices of everyday life and the time horizons and decisions that are part of current travel planning services. It also considers how travel information services of tomorrow, linked with other ICT services, could be designed to stretch the horizon of assistance, in order to better support travel planning processes in everyday life. Finally, it critically discusses the role of travel information services and ICT in the work of achieving more sustainable mobility.

  • 32.
    Palm, Jenny
    et al.
    Lund Univ, IIIEE, Box 196, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Residential solar electricity adoption: how households in Sweden search for and use information2018In: Energy, Sustainability and Society, ISSN 2192-0567, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As a renewable energy solution, photovoltaics (PVs) are crucial in the transition to a more sustainable energy system. Besides large PV installations, household adoption of PVs will be an important contribution to this transition. However, the adoption of PVs on a household level faces many barriers, with gathering and understanding information being one of the major barriers. The aim of this article is to do an in-depth analysis of how households search for and interpret information about PVs and to discuss how to reach different groups with information. Methods: The results in this paper are based on three interview studies made between autumn 2013 and autumn 2016. In the first interview study, seven non-adopters of photovoltaics were interviewed. In the second study, seven adopters of photovoltaics were addressed. In the third study, a total of 44 households were interviewed, with a mix of non-adopters and adopters. In total, 58 households were interviewed. Results: From the interviews, we developed four ideal types for PV adoption. The non-adopters use few sources of information, find the information complicated, and have a tendency to emphasize barriers rather than enablers for PV adoptions. The environmentally engaged adopters search a lot of information but find it difficult to know when they have enough or the right information. They also find information too technical and complicated and find it hard to compare quotes. The professionally skilled group easily accesses information but also experienced problems in comparing quotes and are critical to that many problems occur during the installation process. The accidental adopters more or less happen to get a PV system and needed little information. They usually took the offer from the provider first met. Conclusions: We can conclude that when dividing the households into different ideal types, it is possible to detect what kind of information measures different groups need. To get a future increase of the number of installed PVs, it is important to develop different measures in parallel, to meet the needs from the different groups.

  • 33.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    At odds with a worldview: teaching limits at a technical university2016In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 36-39Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    “It’s not fair!”: making students engage in sustainability2013In: Proceedings of the EESD13 Conference, Cambridge, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we address the issue of teaching a subject, sustainability, that ideally should permeate the whole engineering education, but at the moment often plays a minor role in the curriculum. Here we discuss the tactics of planning and conducting a sustainability course with the explicit goal of truly engaging the students and making an impact on their thinking. Furthermore, we here present a framework that can be used in course planning and analysis. Finally, we discuss how this framework was used in our sustainability course for Media Technology engineering students at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, and the engagement and resulting change in students perception of sustainability. Moreover, we argue that beyond rethinking the engineer and the engineering education, we also need to rethink our roles as university teachers.

  • 35.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kirman, Ben
    Bates, Oliver
    The futures of computing and wisdom2018In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - NordiCHI ’18, ACM Press, 2018, p. 960-963Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increasing interest in discussing the consequences of the technologies we invent and study in HCI. Whether it is climate change, ethical computing, capitalist and neo-liberal models of commerce and society, grassroots movements, big data or alternative paradigms in distributed systems, this workshop will invite participants to explore these consequences and ask how we move forward with responsibility and new forms of knowing and knowledge. We invite participants to join us, as we cast forward fifty years to 2068 to imagine the future of wisdom, and to reflect on how we got there. By writing Fictional Abstracts, an abstract from a research paper yet to be written, we will unpick critical tensions in the advancement of computing over the next decades. The workshop will develop perspectives on the futures of computing and critically reflect on the assumptions, methods, and tools for enabling (and disabling) such futures.

  • 36.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Friday, Adrian
    University of Lancaster.
    Limits to the Sharing Economy2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been much interest in the Sharing Economy in recent years, accompanied with the hope that it will change and specifically make better use of existing resources. It in- tuitively makes sense, from a sustainability point of view, that the sharing of resources is good. It could even be said that the Sharing Economy ought to align well with Comput- ing within Limits and its underlying premises. In this paper however, we take a critical stance and will elaborate on the intersection between the Sharing Economy and Limits (in- cluding pinpointing potential conflicts) so as to identify and discuss a ‘Limits-compliant Sharing Economy’. We argue that even though there are limits to the Sharing Economy today, it still has potential benefits for a future of scarcity— but only if the practice of sharing is approached with a dual focus on sharing and on limits at the same time. Finally we conclude that even though we have begun to explore the fu- ture of sharing, there is still a need to further develop ideas of how the underlying infrastructure for this movement will look. 

  • 37.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hook, Mikael
    Tanenbaum, Joshua
    Pufal, Marcel
    Wangel, Josefin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    What if there had only been half the oil?: Rewriting history to envision the consequences of peak oil2017In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 31, p. 170-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is unequivocal evidence that we are facing the greatest energy transition since the dawn of the industrial age. We need to urgently shift from a global fossil fuel and CO2-emitting energy system to 1) decrease our CO2 emissions and combat the effects of climate change and 2) face a future of depleting fossil fuel resources. Yet there is still a lack of collective action to start taking effective measures to meet these challenges. We argue that there is a need for narratives in general and for a special type of narrative in particular, allohistorical scenarios, that act as thought experiments whose main function is to defamiliarize us with what is taken for granted. Such scenarios invite us to explore plausible parallel paths, thereby making it possible to imagine futures that are essentially different from the path-dependence of an unyielding historical past. Such futures enable us to grapple with a present that is saturated by the inertia of past decisions and the sunken costs of existing infrastructure. We here present the design rationale for the Coalworld scenario: an alternative world where only half the oil ever existed. We also describe the methodology and the assumptions that underlie the Coalworld scenario.

  • 38.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Aguiar Borges, Luciane
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE). KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Architecture & Built Environm, Stockholm, Sweden..
    The (Un)sustainability of Imagined Future Information Societies2017In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2017 ACM SIGCHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS (CHI'17), ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2017, p. 773-785Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pathway to a sustainable society is not clear, and we need to consider different developmental possibilities. This paper describes the results of a research project in the intersection of HCI and Futures Studies as well as in the intersection between "the future information society" and sustainability. We here present parts of the body of materials that were developed in a multi-year research project with the aim of describing and evaluating the sustainability impact of possible future information societies. We also discuss some of the lessons learned and what HCI and design fiction can learn from Futures Studies in general and from this project in particular. The main stakeholders in this project have been city administrators and corporate partners, and the overarching goal has primarily been to influence planning processes at the regional (Stockholm, Sweden) level.

  • 39.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    Preist, C.
    Håkansson, M.
    Knowles, B.
    Is there a European strand of sustainable HCI?2014In: Proceedings of the NordiCHI 2014: The 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Fun, Fast, Foundational, 2014, p. 809-812Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability has been an established topic at the main CHI conference since 2007. It has, however, not been an equally prominent theme at the NordiCHI conference. It is now time to establish Sustainable HCI as an important and prominent topic also at NordiCHI.

  • 40.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Patterns of Engagement: Using a board game as a tool to address sustainability in engineering educations2016In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Engineering Education for Sustainable Development / [ed] Mazijn, Bernard, Brugge, Belgium: Instituut vóór Duurzame Ontwikkeling vzw , 2016, p. 302-310Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Global Dimension in Engineering Education (GDEE) refers to all non-technical topics that will impact the engineering profession at a global level over the next couple of decades. As teachers at a Media Technology engineering programme at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Computer Science and Communication, we have definitely felt that substantial amounts of ingenuity is required to make students interested in such topics, since many of the students regard them as non- central or of little interest when compared to their (non-GDEE) “core” interests, skills and aspirations.

    We here describe how we have worked to overcome students’ (potential) aversion to one particular GDEE topic, sustainability, by incorporating a board game, Gasuco, into the introductory module of a course about “Media Technology and Sustainability”. We describe and analyse our use of the game in terms of “pedagogical patterns for learning” (Laudrillard, 2012). 

  • 41.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Walldius, Åke
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    HCI in a World of Limitations: Addressing the Social Resilience of Computing2013In: Post-Sustainability - A CHI 2013 Sustainability Community Workshop, 2013, Vol. 27Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Most computer scientistsand practitioners assume that we live in a world of possibilities and that inexorable forces of technological development will help bring us a future of increased wellbeing and of growing economic prosperity. An increasing number of scientists however point at the triple crisis(ecology, economy, energy) and imagine radically different futures based not on expansion and possibilities, but on limitations and/or decline. We propose that a broad program should be formulated that takes biophysical and economic limitations as its starting point and outline some areas that are paramount for HCI to come to grips with.

  • 42.
    Penzenstadler, Birgit
    et al.
    University of California-Irvine, USA.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Picha Edwardsson, Malin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    ICT4S 2029: What will be the Systems Supporting Sustainability in 15 Years?2014In: Proceedings of the 2014 conference ICT for Sustainability, Atlantis Press , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research is often inspired by visions of the future. These visions can take on various narrative forms, and can fall anywhere along the spectrum from utopian to dystopian. Even though we recognize the importance of such visions to help us shape research questions and inspire rich design spaces to be explored, the opportunity to discuss them is rarely given in a research context. Imagine how civilization will have changed in 15 years. What is your vision for systems that will be supporting sustainability in that time Which transformational changes will have occurred in the mean time that allow for these systems Is ICT even the right tool or does it contradict sustainability by making our world ever more complex How can we make systems and our societies more sustainable and resilient by ICT4S This paper presents a compilation of fictional abstracts for inspiration and discussion, and provides means to stimulate discussion on future research and contributes to ICT4S community building.

  • 43.
    Wangel, Josefin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Broms, Loove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Kanulf, Gabriel
    Freelance graphic designer.
    Ljunggren, Andrejs
    Freelance graphic designer.
    Vitiden: en energifiktion2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We must accept the present reality – only thereby do we have the possibility to understand it, relate to it to influence it and create culture that is a flexible tool for the transition.

    This is the opening paragraph of "Vitiden - an energy fiction"1 where the transition to a more sustainable society is explored through interacting text and image. In the forward-looking and text-based manifesto, Vitiden is outlined as an answer to today's ecological and social challenges. The high pitch and ambitions of the manifesto are commented on by an image-based future archaeology, constructed by fictional fragments of the future. Inset images from the acceptera manifesto2, which is also paraphrased in the introductory paragraph of Vitiden, relates the energy fiction to the modernist societal development and the critique thereof. A generous body of annotations contributes with further perspectives.

    1) The term Vitiden is Swedish and can be translated to the 'we-age'. In contrast to other 'ages' such as the bronze age or the atom age, Vitiden is not a description of a historical era, but a suggested future, an age yet to come, distinguished by its emphasis on togetherness.

    1An energy fiction is a design fiction or essentially any image of the future dealing primarily with questions related to energy, in this case as an enabling and constraining factor for sociomaterial entanglements and practices to emerge and endure.

    2Asplund, G., Gahn, W., Markelius, S., Paulsson, G., Sundahl, E., Åhrén, U. 1980[1931] acceptera. Tiden förlag. Faksimil.

  • 44.
    Zapico Lamela, Jorge Luis
    et al.
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ebner, Hannes
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hacking sustainability: Broadening participation through Green Hackathons2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Green Hackathon is an international series of coding events withsustainability purpose. Developers, researchers, environmental practitioners,and anyone else who is interested, work for a limited amount of time to createinnovative software solutions for sustainability. These events have explicitlyaimed to invite a broad spectrum of expertise besides technical expertise. Thisarticle presents the experiences and tensions of including these end users at amostly technically oriented event, and discusses how end-user developmentcould be used to encourage more reflective practices and as well as broadeningthe participation and the interdisciplinary collaboration in these events – withhigher-quality as a prospective outcome.

1 - 44 of 44
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