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  • 1.
    Barbagallo, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    A natural variational principle for Biot's equation: Waveguide FE and SEA of multilayered structures comprising porous materials2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Barbagallo, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    A self-adjoint variational principle for anisotropic viscoelastic Biot’s equations2013In: International Journal of Engineering Science, ISSN 0020-7225, E-ISSN 1879-2197, Vol. 63, p. 71-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A variational principle for anisotropic viscoelastic Biot’s equations of motion is presented. It is based upon an extended Hamilton’s principle, also valid for dissipative systems. Using this principle, a functional analogous to the Lagrangian is defined, starting from Biot’s variational formulation based on frame and fluid displacements. Then, a mixed displacement–pressure formulation is presented, which reduces the number of variables of response from six to four. The corresponding functional analogous to the Lagrangian is derived making full use of variational calculus. The derived functionals are self-adjoint and stationary for true motion.

  • 3.
    Barbagallo, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Characterisation of a generic trim-panel: sound reduction index and material parameters2013Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Barbagallo, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Spatial energy decay and indirect couplings in statistical energy analysis2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatial energy decay within elements affects the validity of SEA. This is particularly significant for chains of similar long well-connected structures such as ventilation ducts, fluid-filled pipes and rib-stiffened plates found in ships, aircraft and railway cars. The effects of spatial energy decay on the high frequency response of one-dimensional well-connected elements are herein studied by comparing calculations by an SEA, a spectral finite element method and an SEA-like model. An SEA only includes direct coupling loss factors (CLFs); conversely, an SEA-like model also contains indirect CLFs. At high frequencies, the spatial energy decay increases and SEA overestimates the energies in all elements away from the excitation. Moreover, the indirect CLFs in the SEA-like model have to be considered when evaluating the energy flows, as the accumulated spatial decay from the excitation to the observed point increases. Thus, SEA cannot predict the high frequency response of similar long well-connected elements and alternative formulations are needed.

  • 5.
    Barbagallo, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Liu, Hao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Statistical energy analysis of the sound transmission through layered panels using a variational formulation of the porous materialArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 6. BECKENBAUER, THOMAS
    et al.
    JEAN, PHILIPPE
    KROPP, WOLFGANG
    STEINAUER, BERNHARD
    UECKERMANN, ANDREAS
    SCHULZE, CHRISTIAN
    MEYER, ANDRE
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Fahrbahnbelag und Verfahren zur Herstellung desselben2008Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7. Birgersson, F.
    et al.
    Ferguson, N. S.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Vehicle Engineering.
    Application of the spectral finite element method to turbulent boundary layer induced vibration of plates2003In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 259, no 4, p. 873-891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spectral finite element method and equally the dynamic stiffness method use exponential functions as basis functions. Thus it is possible to find exact solutions to the homogeneous equations of motion for simple rod, beam, plate and shell structures. Normally, this restricts the analysis to elements where the excitation is at the element ends. This study removes the restriction for distributed excitation, that in particular has an exponential spatial dependence, by the inclusion of the particular solution in the set of basis functions. These elementary solutions, in turn, build up the solution for an arbitrary homogeneous random excitation. A numerical implementation for the vibration of a plate, excited by a turbulent boundary layer flow, is presented. The results compare favourably with results from conventional modal analysis.

  • 8. Birgersson, F.
    et al.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    A spectral super element for modelling of plate vibration. Part 2: turbulence excitation2005In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 287, no 02-jan, p. 315-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the accompanying paper, the suitability of a spectral super element to predict the response to point force excitation, was demonstrated. This paper expands the element formulation to also include distributed forces, which is useful when studying distributed excitation. First the sensitivity function, i.e. the structural response to a travelling pressure wave, is found. This sensitivity function and a wavenumber frequency description of the wall pressure are then used to predict the response of a turbulence excited panel in a numerically efficient way. The predictions were validated by a conventional finite element method and also compared to measurements.

  • 9. Birgersson, F.
    et al.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Nilsson, C. M.
    A spectral super element for modelling of plate vibration. Part 1: general theory2005In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 287, no 02-jan, p. 297-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamic response of vibrating structures is studied with a proposed merger of the standard finite element method with the more computationally efficient spectral finite element method. First a plate structure is modelled with a newly developed spectral super element. Then this element is coupled to other parts that can have a more complex geometry and are modelled entirely with conventional finite elements. Some numerical examples are given to illustrate and validate the developed method and studies of numerical stability are also presented. In an accompanying paper the predicted and measured response of a turbulence excited aircraft panel are compared.

  • 10.
    Birgersson, F.
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Vehicle Engineering.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Vehicle Engineering.
    Robert, G.
    Modelling turbulence-induced vibration of pipes with a spectral finite element method2004In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 278, no 05-apr, p. 749-772Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vibration of pipes is studied here using the Arnold-Warburton theory for thin shells and a simplified theory valid in a lower frequency regime. The vibrational response is described numerically with the spectral finite element method (SFEM), which uses the exact solutions of the equations of motion as basis functions. For turbulence excitation, the set of basis functions was extended to include particular solutions, which model a spatially distributed excitation. An efficient numerical solution to homogeneous random excitation is presented and the results compare favourably with wind tunnel measurements.

  • 11.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    A quantitative criterion validating coupling power proportionality in statistical energy analysis2011In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 330, no 1, p. 87-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The response of two general spring-coupled elements is investigated to develop a unifying approach to the weak coupling criterion in Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA). First, the coupled deterministic equations of motion are expressed in the bases given by the Uncoupled elements' eigenmodes. Then, an iterative solution is expressed as a succession of exchanges between elements, where uncoupled motion provides the start approximation, converging lithe 'coupling eigenvalue' is less than unity, in which case coupling is said to be weak. This definition is related to whether response is 'local' or 'global', encompassing a number of previously defined coupling strength definitions, applying for deterministically described structures. A stochastic ensemble is defined by that its members are equal to the investigated structure but the elements have random frequencies. It is required that the coupling eigenvalue be less than unity for all members of the ensemble. This requirement generates the title subject of the article: 'the modal interaction strength'. It is similar to the previously defined coupling strength criterion characterising the ensemble average energy flow in uni-dimensional waveguides. Finally, SEA models are formulated in terms of the uncoupled elements' modal data.

  • 12.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    A symmetric formulation for experimental statistical energy analysis1999In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 223, p. 161-169Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Book Review: David A. Bies and Colin H. Hansen : Engineering Noise Control, Theory and Practice2005In: Journal of Vibration and Acoustics-Transactions of the ASME, ISSN 1048-9002, E-ISSN 1528-8927, Vol. 127, no 1, p. 104-104Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Comments on: “The high-frequency response of a plate carrying a concentrated mass/spring system."1999In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 225, p. 783-800Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Ensemble averaged vibration energy flows in a three-element structure1995In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 187, p. 495-529Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Evaluation of modal density and group velocity by a finite element method2004In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 273, no 02-jan, p. 51-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A finite element method (FEM), the waveguide-FEM, is used to calculate wave propagation characteristics for built-up thin-walled structures. Such characteristics are determined from a dispersion relation in the form of an eigenvalue problem established from the FE formulation. In particular, vital characteristics such as the modal density, the group velocity and the waveform are evaluated. A description of the evaluation of a dispersion relation for a channel beam, from data given by the FE formulation, is presented. Subsequently, the method for determining the modal density and group velocity from FE input data is shown in detail for the beam structure. To show the versatility of the method a second example considers a statistical energy analysis (SEA), made to establish the degree to which vibrations in a wind tunnel are transmitted to a thin-walled plate mounted into its wall. The critical input datum to the SEA model is the wind tunnel's modal density, which is calculated by the method presented.

  • 17.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Exact spectral finite element analysis of stationary vibrations in a rail way car structure1994In: Acta Acustica, Vol. 2, p. 461-482Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Vehicle Engineering.
    Finite element techniques for the evaluation of energy flow parameters: Keynote Lecture2000Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In applications of Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) to complex engineering structures, procedures for the calculation of the SEA parameters are frequently unavailable. This note discusses two Finite Element techniques for identification of energy flow parameters: a waveguide and a modal approach.

  • 19.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Formulas for modal density and for input power from mechanical and fluid point sources in fluid filled pipes1997In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 208, p. 705-728Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Simplified equations of motion for the radial-axial vibrations of fluid filled pipes1997In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 208, p. 685-703Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Spectral finite element analysis of stationary vibrations in a beam – plate structure1996In: Acta Acoustica united with Acustica, ISSN 1610-1928, E-ISSN 1861-9959, Vol. 82, p. 478-497Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Spectral finite element analysis of the vibration of straight fluid-filled pipes with flanges1997In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 199, p. 125-154Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Statistical energy analysis of fluid-filled pipes1999In: IUTAM symposium on Statistical Energy Analysis / [ed] F.J Fahy and W.G. Price, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999, p. 289-300Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    The boundary condition for a free surface with gravity waves formulated as a locally reacting surface impedance1987In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 112, p. 575-576Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Two observations on the wave approach to SEA: Keynote Lecture2007In: 14th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2007, ICSV 2007, 2007, p. 4483-4501Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    First, it is shown that the use of SEA coupling factors derived for the coupling of semi infinite systems is consistent with coupling power proportionality. This demonstration is axiomatic, relying on a set of postulates. It is useful in teaching SEA, as it illustrates concepts and assumptions commonly made. It might be useful for research aiming for a better set of postulates upon which a statistical energy method can be built. Second, the wave motion in double walls is investigated. A new SEA formulation is presented in which each element describe one kind of coupled cavity-wall wave motion. This formulation obsoletes the non-resonant transmission paths and compared to classical formulations, it improves results at frequencies around and a bit above the double wall resonance.

  • 26.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Vibration energy transmission in fluid filled pipes connected with flanges1997In: Structural Dynamics, Recent Advances: Proc of the 6th international conference / [ed] N.S. Fergusson, The Institue of Sound and Vibration , 1997, p. 613-627Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Finnveden, Svante
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Barbagallo, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    A cavity-wall element for the statistical energy analysis of the sound transmission through double wallsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The wave motion within a cavity between two flexible walls is first investigated numerically. The results then form the basis for a new SEA formulation in which each element describe one kind of coupled cavity-wall wave motion. This formulation obsoletes the non-resonant transmission path commonly used in SEA of sound transmission and compared to classical formulations it improves results at frequencies around and a bit above the double wall resonance. The new formulation is compared to three sets of measurements found in the literature showing fair agreements.

  • 28.
    Finnveden, Svante
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Birgersson, F.
    Ross, Urmas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Kremer, Tobias
    A model of wall pressure correlation for prediction of turbulence-induced vibration2005In: Journal of Fluids and Structures, ISSN 0889-9746, E-ISSN 1095-8622, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1127-1143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vibration response of a structure excited by a turbulent boundary layer is investigated experimentally and numerically. First, the wall pressure in a high speed acoustic wind tunnel is characterized and the cross-spectral density is approximated using a Corcos model with frequency dependent correlation lengths and a modified Chase model. Both models agree quite well with the measured cross spectrum. Second, based on these turbulence models, the vibration response is predicted and compared to measurements. At lower frequencies both models perform well. In a higher frequency region, however, the vibration response is greatest for length scales that are much longer than the one given by the convection velocity of the turbulence, and in this frequency region only the modified Chase model works effectively.

  • 29.
    Finnveden, Svante
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Fraggstedt, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Waveguide finite elements for curved structures2008In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 312, no 4-5, p. 644-671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A waveguide finite element formulation for the analysis of curved structures is introduced. The formulation is valid for structures that along one axis have constant properties. It is based on a modified Hamilton's principle valid for general linear viscoelastic motion, which is derived here. Using this principle, material properties such as losses may be distributed in the system and may vary with frequency. Element formulations for isoparametric solid elements and deep shell elements are presented for curved waveguides as well as for straight waveguides. In earlier works, the curved elements have successfully been used to model a passenger car tyre. Here a simple validation example and convergence study is presented, which considers a finite length circular cylinder and all four elements presented are used, in turn, to model this structure. Calculated results compare favourably to those in the literature.

  • 30.
    Finnveden, Svante
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Fraggstedt, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Allmendinger, Felix
    Halkyard, Roger
    PZT actuation of a car tyre: a feasibility study2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Finnveden, Svante
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Fraggstedt, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Nilsson, Carl-Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Waveguide FEA of the vibration of rolling car tyres2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Finnveden, Svante
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Fraggstedt, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Petersson, Björn, A.T
    Experiments on the viscoelastic properties of car tyres2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Finnveden, Svante
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Hao, Liu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Chap 8, Waveguide Finite Element Method2012In: Mid-Frequency, CAE Methodologies for Mid-Frequency Analysis in Vibration and Acoustics / [ed] Wim Desmet, Bert Pluymer, Onur Atak, Leuven: KUL , 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Finnveden, Svante
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Hörlin, Nils-Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Barbagallo, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Characterization of the in vacuo viscoelastic material properties of porous foams used in vehiclesArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Finnveden, Svante
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Hörlin, Nils-Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Barbagallo, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Dynamic characterization of viscoelastic porous foams used in vehicles based on an inverse finite element method2014In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 135, no 4, p. 1834-1843Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Viscoelastic properties of porous materials, typical of those used in vehicles for noise insulation and absorption, are estimated from measurements and inverse finite element procedures. The measurements are taken in a near vacuum and cover a broad frequency range: 20 Hz to 1 kHz. The almost cubic test samples were made of 25mm foam covered by a "heavy layer" of rubber. They were mounted in a vacuum chamber on an aluminum table, which was excited in the vertical and horizontal directions with a shaker. Three kinds of response are measured allowing complete estimates of the viscoelastic moduli for isotropic materials and also providing some information on the degree of material anisotropicity. First, frequency independent properties are estimated, where dissipation is described by constant loss factors. Then, fractional derivative models that capture the variation with frequency of the stiffness and damping are adapted. The measurement setup is essentially two-dimensional and calculations are three-dimensional and for a state of plane strain. The good agreement between measured and calculated response provides some confidence in the presented procedures. If, however, the material model cannot fit the measurements well, the inverse procedure yields a certain degree of arbitrariness to the parameter estimation.

  • 36.
    Finnveden, Svante
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Vehicle Engineering.
    Pinnington, R. J.
    A velocity method for estimating dynamic strain and stress in pipes2000In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 229, no 1, p. 147-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A velocity method for estimating dynamic strain and stress in pipe structures is investigated. With this method, predicted or measured spatial average vibration velocity and theoretically derived strain factors are used to estimate maximum strain at the ends of pipes. Theoretical investigation shows that the strain at a point is limited by an expression proportional to the square root of the strain energy density, which in turn is related to its cross-sectional average. For a reverberant field or for an infinite pipe, the average strain energy density is proportional to the mean square velocity. Upon this basis, the non-dimensional strain factor is defined as the maximum strain times the ratio of the sound velocity to the spatial root mean square vibration velocity. Measurements are made confirming that this is a descriptive non-dimensional number. Using a spectral finite element method, numerical experiments are made varying the pipe parameters and considering all 16 homogeneous boundary conditions. While indicating possible limitations of the method when equipment is mounted on pipes, the experiments verify the theoretical results. The velocity method may become useful in engineering practice for assessments of fatigue life.

  • 37.
    Finnveden, Svante
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Pinnington, Roger
    A velocity method for estimating dynamic strain and stress in pipes.2000In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 229, p. 147-182Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Fraggstedt, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    A Waveguide Finite Element Model Of A Pneumatic Tyre2007In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Fraggstedt, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Estimates of the visco-elastic properties of car tyres2008Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Fraggstedt, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Power dissipation in car tyres2008In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Fraggstedt, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Rolling resistance of car tyres2006In: EURONOISE 2006 - The 6th European Conference on Noise Control: Advanced Solutions for Noise Control, 2006, p. 6P-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a tyre is rolling, a time varying deformation field is created, which is one of the sources of tyre noise. Moreover, a substantial part of the deformation energy is transferred to heat. Thus, given a deformation history and a thermodynamically correct material description, the dissipative losses can be predicted and, for a rolling tyre, these losses determine a significant part of the rolling resistance. In order to see where the losses occur one can also obtain the same result from the power dissipated within each element. In this project an existing tyre model is updated based on estimated visco-elastic properties of the tyre. These properties result from an experimental modal analysis and a measurement of the dynamic shear modulus of the tread. The updated model predicts a vibration response and a rolling resistance in good agreement with measurements.

  • 42.
    Fraggstedt, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    The influence of the road on rolling resistanceArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Kellonemi, Anti
    et al.
    VTT, Finland.
    Mellin, V.
    VTT, Finland.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Gustavini, Remi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Göransson, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Mechanical study of a plane wave transducer for active noise control2007In: Turkish Acoustical Society - 36th International Congress and Exhibition on Noise Control Engineering, INTER-NOISE 2007 ISTANBUL, 2007, p. 1608-1617Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An electrostatic transducer is created by attaching a metallized diaphragm between two porous stator layers. A loudspeaker element constructed this way exhibits a dipole radiation pattern due to its symmetric structure. When the transducer dimensions are large compared to wavelength of the produced sound, the sound field exhibits minimal spatial spreading. When the movement of a radiating surface is in same phase over the whole area, plane waves are produced. The discussed electrostatic transducer exhibits excellent impulse and phase response characteristics, which makes it highly suitable for active noise control. The accuracy of the response is affected by the mechanical behavior of the whole structure. To study the movement of the stators and the diaphragm, laser scanner measurements and simulations were performed. The movement of the stators was noted to play a significant role in the sound creation in addition to the diaphragm movement.

  • 44.
    Liu, Hao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Barbagallo, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Wave motion and sound transmission loss of double walls filled with porous materials2012In: Proceedings Of International Conference On Noise And Vibration Engineering (ISMA2012) / International Conference On Uncertainty In Structural Dynamics (USD2012), 2012, p. 1803-1814Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel semi-analytical approach is presented and employed to calculate the sound transmission loss (STL) of a double wall lined with porous materials. The approach consists of using the waveguide finite element method (WFEM) together with a Rayleigh-Ritz procedure. The former is a convenient semi-analytical approach useful for structures having constant properties along one direction. The Rayleigh-Ritz procedure assumes that the structure satisfies convenient boundary conditions, so that its response can be described by a trigonometric Fourier series. The advantage of the procedure compared to full FE models, and spectral element models, is that it evaluates several orders of magnitude quicker and can describe frequency dependent materials at virtually no cost. In addition, the WFEM readily provides the dispersion curves of the structure, which reveal its physics. Calculations of the STL are favourably compared to measurements.

  • 45.
    Liu, Hao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Barbagallo, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Lopez Arteaga, Ines
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core2014In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 135, no 5, p. 2683-2693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core, which is modeled by Biot's theory, is investigated using the waveguide finite element method. A waveguide poroelastic element is developed based on a displacement-pressure weak form. The dispersion curves of the sandwich panel are first identified as propagating or evanescent waves by varying the damping in the panel, and wave characteristics are analyzed by examining their motions. The energy distributions are calculated to identify the dominant motions. Simplified analytical models are also devised to show the main physics of the corresponding waves. This wave propagation analysis provides insight into the vibro-acoustic behavior of sandwich panels lined with elastic porous materials.

  • 46.
    Liu, Hao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Lopez Arteaga, Ines
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Prediction of sound transmission through elastic porous material lined multilayer panels using a semi-analytical finite element methodManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Liu, Hao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    O'Reilly, Ciarán
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Lopez Arteaga, Ines
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Prediction of sound field in geometrically complex enclosures with the wave expansion methodManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Lundberg, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Björklund, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Pärssinen, M.
    Lopez Arteaga, Ines
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    A nonlinear state-dependent model for vibrations excited by roughness in rolling contacts2015In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, ISSN 0022-460X, E-ISSN 1095-8568, Vol. 345, no 9, p. 197-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A state-dependent method to model contact nonlinearities in rolling contacts is proposed. By pre-calculation of contact stiffness and contact filters as functions of vertical relative displacement, a computationally efficient modelling approach based on a moving point force description is developed. Simulations using the state-dependent model have been analysed by comparison with measurements. Results from the investigated case consisting of a steel ball rolling over a steel beam having two different degrees of roughness - show good agreement between nonlinear simulations and measured beam vibrations. The promising results obtained with the proposed method are potentially applicable to wheel rail interaction and rolling element bearings.

  • 49.
    Lundberg, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Lopez Arteaga, Ines
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Structural and vibroacoustics.
    Björklund, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Non-linear contact forces for beam/ball-interaction and its influence on the dynamic response of the beam2013In: 42nd International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering 2013, INTER-NOISE 2013: Noise Control for Quality of Life, OAL-Osterreichischer Arbeitsring fur Larmbekampfung , 2013, p. 238-247Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A well-defined rolling contact problem is studied with the intention to cover interesting aspects of tyre-road contact modeling and rolling contact in general. More specifically, the dynamic response in a steel beam caused by a steel ball rolling over it is studied by theoretical modeling of the beam- And ball dynamics as well as the contact forces. Validation of the dynamic response simulations is achieved by comparison with measurements. The contact model is shown to be greatly dependent on an accurate estimate of the real contact stiffness. A method to estimate the contact stiffness which leads to good accuracy in dynamic response simulations is presented. Although the contact stiffness is significantly lower for rubber- Asphalt interaction than for steel-steel contact, the results give useful insight for tyre-road contact modeling.

  • 50.
    Lundberg, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Finnveden, Svante
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Marcus Wallenberg Laboratory MWL.
    Lopez Arteaga, Ines
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Björklund, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Non-linear contact stiffness and dynamic contact filter for rolling contacts2014In: FISITA 2014 World Automotive Congress - Proceedings, FISITA , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rolling contacts present in passenger cars such as in bearings and transmission elements are sources of noise and vibration, principally for interior comfort concerns. Moreover, tyre/road noise is the main source of road traffic noise which in turn leads to sleep disturbance and annoyance. In order to simulate friction losses as well as generated noise and vibrations in any rolling contact, it is crucial to have a correct description of the dynamic excitation caused by the roughness of the surfaces in contact. In this paper, a state-dependent modelling approach previously proposed by the authors is applied to a well-defined steel-steel rolling contact. A parametric study investigating the influence of rolling speed on contact conditions is performed, indicating the limits for the use of linear point force expressions for the rolling contact investigated. The state-dependent method is based on pre-calculation of contact stiffness and contact filtering as functions of vertical relative displacement. This leads to a computationally efficient way to include the influence of surface roughness and shape of the contacting bodies in a point force expression. Only vertical contact forces are studied within the scope of this work. Tangential friction forces are likely to affect the resulting vibrations and should therefore be further studied. 

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