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  • 1. Adori, Csaba
    et al.
    Barde, Swapnali
    Bogdanovic, Nenad
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Reinscheid, Rainer R.
    Kovacs, Gabor G.
    Hokfelt, Tomas
    Neuropeptide S- and Neuropeptide S receptor-expressing neuron populations in the human pons2015In: Frontiers in Neuroanatomy, ISSN 1662-5129, E-ISSN 1662-5129, Vol. 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a regulatory peptide with potent pharmacological effects. In rodents, NPS is expressed in a few pontine cell clusters. Its receptor (NPSR1) is, however, widely distributed in the brain. The anxiolytic and arousal promoting effects of NPS make the NPS NPSR1 system an interesting potential drug target in mood-related disorders. However, so far possible disease-related mechanisms involving NPS have only been studied in rodents. To validate the relevance of these animal studies for i.a. drug development, we have explored the distribution of NPS-expressing neurons in the human pons using in situ hybridization and stereological methods and we compared the distribution of NPS mRNA expressing neurons in the human and rat brain. The calculation revealed a total number of 22,317 +/- 2411 NPS mRNA-positive neurons in human, bilaterally. The majority of cells (84%) were located in the parabrachial area in human: in the extension of the medial and lateral parabrachial nuclei, in the Kolliker-Fuse nucleus and around the adjacent lateral lemniscus. In human, in sharp contrast to the rodents, only very few NPS-positive cells (5%) were found close to the locus coeruleus. In addition, we identified a smaller cell cluster (11% of all NPS cells) in the pontine central gray matter both in human and rat, which has not been described previously even in rodents. We also examined the distribution of NPSR1 mRNA-expressing neurons in the human pons. These cells were mainly located in the rostral laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, the cuneiform nucleus, the microcellular tegmental nucleus region and in the periaqueductal gray. Our results show that both NPS and NPSR1 in the human pons are preferentially localized in regions of importance for integration of visceral autonomic information and emotional behavior. The reported interspecies differences must, however, be considered when looking for targets for new pharmacotherapeutical interventions.

  • 2. Adori, Csaba
    et al.
    Barde, Swapnali
    Vas, Szilvia
    Ebner, Karl
    Su, Jie
    Svensson, Camilla
    Mathé, Aleksander A.
    Singewald, Nicolas
    Reinscheid, Rainer R.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kultima, Kim
    Bagdy, Gyorgy
    Hökfelt, Tomas
    Exploring the role of neuropeptide S in the regulation of arousal: a functional anatomical study2016In: Brain Structure and Function, ISSN 1863-2653, E-ISSN 1863-2661, Vol. 221, no 7, p. 3521-3546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a regulatory peptide expressed by limited number of neurons in the brainstem. The simultaneous anxiolytic and arousal-promoting effect of NPS suggests an involvement in mood control and vigilance, making the NPS-NPS receptor system an interesting potential drug target. Here we examined, in detail, the distribution of NPS-immunoreactive (IR) fiber arborizations in brain regions of rat known to be involved in the regulation of sleep and arousal. Such nerve terminals were frequently apposed to GABAergic/galaninergic neurons in the ventro-lateral preoptic area (VLPO) and to tyrosine hydroxylase-IR neurons in all hypothalamic/thalamic dopamine cell groups. Then we applied the single platform-on-water (mainly REM) sleep deprivation method to study the functional role of NPS in the regulation of arousal. Of the three pontine NPS cell clusters, the NPS transcript levels were increased only in the peri-coerulear group in sleep-deprived animals, but not in stress controls. The density of NPS-IR fibers was significantly decreased in the median preoptic nucleus-VLPO region after the sleep deprivation, while radioimmunoassay and mass spectrometry measurements showed a parallel increase of NPS in the anterior hypothalamus. The expression of the NPS receptor was, however, not altered in the VLPO-region. The present results suggest a selective activation of one of the three NPS-expressing neuron clusters as well as release of NPS in distinct forebrain regions after sleep deprivation. Taken together, our results emphasize a role of the peri-coerulear cluster in the modulation of arousal, and the importance of preoptic area for the action of NPS on arousal and sleep.

  • 3. Adori, Csaba
    et al.
    Glueck, Laura
    Barde, Swapnali
    Yoshitake, Takashi
    Kovacs, Gabor G.
    Mulder, Jan
    Magloczky, Zsofia
    Havas, Laszlo
    Boelcskei, Kata
    Mitsios, Nicholas
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Szolcsanyi, Janos
    Kehr, Jan
    Ronnback, Annica
    Schwartz, Thue
    Rehfeld, Jens F.
    Harkany, Tibor
    Palkovits, Miklos
    Schulz, Stefan
    Hokfelt, Tomas
    Critical role of somatostatin receptor 2 in the vulnerability of the central noradrenergic system: new aspects on Alzheimer's disease2015In: Acta Neuropathologica, ISSN 0001-6322, E-ISSN 1432-0533, Vol. 129, no 4, p. 541-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer's disease and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders are associated with deterioration of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), a probable trigger for mood and memory dysfunction. LC noradrenergic neurons exhibit particularly high levels of somatostatin binding sites. This is noteworthy since cortical and hypothalamic somatostatin content is reduced in neurodegenerative pathologies. Yet a possible role of a somatostatin signal deficit in the maintenance of noradrenergic projections remains unknown. Here, we deployed tissue microarrays, immunohistochemistry, quantitative morphometry and mRNA profiling in a cohort of Alzheimer's and age-matched control brains in combination with genetic models of somatostatin receptor deficiency to establish causality between defunct somatostatin signalling and noradrenergic neurodegeneration. In Alzheimer's disease, we found significantly reduced somatostatin protein expression in the temporal cortex, with aberrant clustering and bulging of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive afferents. As such, somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) mRNA was highly expressed in the human LC, with its levels significantly decreasing from Braak stages III/IV and onwards, i.e., a process preceding advanced Alzheimer's pathology. The loss of SSTR2 transcripts in the LC neurons appeared selective, since tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine beta-hydroxylase, galanin or galanin receptor 3 mRNAs remained unchanged. We modeled these pathogenic changes in Sstr2 (-/-) mice and, unlike in Sstr1 (-/-) or Sstr4 (-/-) genotypes, they showed selective, global and progressive degeneration of their central noradrenergic projections. However, neuronal perikarya in the LC were found intact until late adulthood (< 8 months) in Sstr2 (-/-) mice. In contrast, the noradrenergic neurons in the superior cervical ganglion lacked SSTR2 and, as expected, the sympathetic innervation of the head region did not show any signs of degeneration. Our results indicate that SSTR2-mediated signaling is integral to the maintenance of central noradrenergic projections at the system level, and that early loss of somatostatin receptor 2 function may be associated with the selective vulnerability of the noradrenergic system in Alzheimer's disease.

  • 4. Agaton, C.
    et al.
    Galli, J.
    Guthenberg, I. H.
    Janzon, L.
    Hansson, M.
    Asplund, A.
    Brundell, E.
    Lindberg, S.
    Ruthberg, I.
    Wester, K.
    Wurtz, D.
    Hoog, C.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Ståhl, Stefan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Ponten, F.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Affinity proteomics for systematic protein profiling of chromosome 21 gene products in human tissues2003In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 2, no 6, p. 405-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we show that an affinity proteomics strategy using affinity-purified antibodies raised against recombinant human protein fragments can be used for chromosome-wide protein profiling. The approach is based on affinity reagents raised toward bioinformatics-designed protein epitope signature tags corresponding to unique regions of individual gene loci. The genes of human chromosome 21 identified by the genome efforts were investigated, and the success rates for de novo cloning, protein production, and antibody generation were 85, 76, and 56%, respectively. Using human tissue arrays, a systematic profiling of protein expression and subcellular localization was undertaken for the putative gene products. The results suggest that this affinity proteomics strategy can be used to produce a proteome atlas, describing distribution and expression of proteins in normal tissues as well as in common cancers and other forms of diseased tissues.

  • 5.
    Agaton, Charlotta
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Falk, Ronny
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Selective enrichment of monospecific polyclonal antibodies for antibody-based proteomics efforts2004In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 1043, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A high stringency protocol, suitable for systematic purification of polyclonal antibodies, is described. The procedure is designed to allow the generation of target protein-specific antibodies suitable for functional annotation of proteins. Antibodies were generated by immunization with recombinantly produced affinity-tagged target proteins. To obtain stringent recovery of the antibodies, a two-step affinity chromatography principle was devised to first deplete the affinity tag-specific antibodies followed by a second step for affinity capture of the target protein-specific antibodies. An analytical dot-blot array system was developed to analyze the cross-reactivity of the affinity-purified antibodies. The results suggest that the protocol can be used in a highly parallel and automated manner to generate mono-specific polyclonal antibodies for large-scale, antibody-based proteomics efforts, i.e. affinity proteomics.

  • 6.
    Agaton, Charlotta
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Genome-based proteomics2004In: Electrophoresis, ISSN 0173-0835, E-ISSN 1522-2683, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 1280-1288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein-protein interactions play crucial roles in various biological pathways and functions. Therefore, the characterization of protein levels and also the network of interactions within an organism would contribute considerably to the understanding of life. The availability of the human genome sequence has created a range of new possibilities for biomedical research. A crucial challenge is to utilize the genetic information for better understanding of protein distribution and function in normal as well as in pathological biological processes. In this review, we have focused on different platforms used for systematic genome-based proteome analyses. These technologies are in many ways complementary and should be seen as various ways to elucidate different functions of the proteome.

  • 7.
    Agaton, Charlotta
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Unneberg, Per
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Sievertzon, Maria
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Holmberg, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Ehn, Maria
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Larsson, Magnus
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Gene expression analysis by signature pyrosequencing2002In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 289, no 1-2, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     We describe a novel method for transcript profiling based on high-throughput parallel sequencing of signature tags using a non-gel-based microtiter plate format. The method relies on the identification of cDNA clones by pyrosequencing of the region corresponding to the 3'-end of the mRNA preceding the poly(A) tail. Simultaneously, the method can be used for gene discovery, since tags corresponding to unknown genes can be further characterized by extended sequencing. The protocol was validated using a model system for human atherosclerosis. Two 3'-tagged cDNA libraries, representing macrophages and foam cells, which are key components in the development of atherosclerotic plaques, were constructed using a solid phase approach. The libraries were analyzed by pyrosequencing, giving on average 25 bases. As a control, conventional expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing using slab gel electrophoresis was performed. Homology searches were used to identify the genes corresponding to each tag. Comparisons with EST sequencing showed identical, unique matches in the majority of cases when the pyrosignature was at least 18 bases. A visualization tool was developed to facilitate differential analysis using a virtual chip format. The analysis resulted in identification of genes with possible relevance for development of atherosclerosis. The use of the method for automated massive parallel signature sequencing is discussed.

  • 8. Agnarsdottir, Margret
    et al.
    Sooman, Linda
    Bolander, Asa
    Stromberg, Sara
    Rexhepaj, Elton
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Gallagher, William
    Lennartsson, Johan
    Ekman, Simon
    Uhlen, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Hedstrand, Hakan
    SOX10 expression in superficial spreading and nodular malignant melanomas2010In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 468-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SOX10 is a transcription factor expressed in nerve cells and melanocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the protein expression pattern of SOX10 in malignant melanoma tumors and to analyze whether the results correlated with clinical parameters and the proliferation marker Ki-67. Furthermore, proliferation and migration were analyzed in three different cell lines employing SOX10 small interfering RNA-mediated silencing. Expression patterns were determined in 106 primary tumors and 39 metastases in addition to 16 normal skin samples and six benign nevi employing immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays. The immunohistochemical staining was evaluated manually and with an automated algorithm. SOX10 was strongly expressed in the benign tissues, but for the malignant tumors superficial spreading melanomas stained stronger than nodular malignant melanomas (P = 0.008). The staining intensity was also inversely correlated with T-stage (Spearman's rho = -0.261, P = 0.008). Overall survival and time to recurrence were significantly correlated with SOX10 intensity, but not in multivariate analysis including T-stage. With the automated algorithm there was an inverse correlation between the SOX10 staining intensity and the proliferation marker, Ki-67 (rho = -0.173, P = 0.02) and a significant difference in the intensity signal between the benign tissues, the primary tumors and the metastases where the metastases stained the weakest (P <= 0.001). SOX10 downregulation resulted in variable effects on proliferation and migration rates in the melanoma cell lines. In conclusion, the SOX10 intensity level differed depending on the tissue studied and SOX10 might have a role in survival. No conclusion regarding the role of SOX10 for in-vitro proliferation and migration could be drawn. Melanoma Res 20:468-478

  • 9. Ahlin, G.
    et al.
    Hilgendorf, C.
    Karlsson, J.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Artursson, P.
    Endogenous Gene and Protein Expression of Drug-Transporting Proteins in Cell Lines Routinely Used in Drug Discovery Programs2009In: Drug Metabolism And Disposition, ISSN 0090-9556, E-ISSN 1521-009X, Vol. 37, no 12, p. 2275-2283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the gene and protein expression profiles of important drug-transporting proteins in human cell lines commonly used for studies of drug transport mechanisms. Human cell lines used to transiently or stably express single transporters [HeLa, human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293] and leukemia cell lines used to study drug resistance by ATP-binding cassette transporters (HL-60, K562) were investigated and compared with organotypic cell lines (HepG2, Saos-2, Caco-2, and Caco-2 TC7). For gene expression studies, real-time polymerase chain reaction was used, whereas monospecific polyclonal antibodies were generated and used to investigate protein expression by immunohistochemistry. Thirty-six transporters were studied for gene expression, and nine were studied for protein expression. The antibodies were validated using expression patterns in human tissues. Finally, the function of one ubiquitously expressed transporter, MCT1/SLC16A1, was investigated using [C-14]lactic acid as a substrate. In general, the adherent cell lines (HeLa, HEK293) displayed low transporter expression, and the expression patterns were barely affected by transfection. The leukemia cell lines (K562, HL-60) and Saos-2 also had low endogenous transporter expression, whereas the organotypic cell lines (HepG2 and Caco-2) showed higher expression of some transporters. Comparison of gene and protein expression profiles gave poor correlations, but better agreement was obtained for antibodies with a good validation score, indicating that antibody quality was a significant variable. It is noteworthy that the monocarboxylic acid-transporting protein MCT1 was significantly expressed in all and was functional in most of the cell lines, indicating that MCT1 may be a confounding factor when the transport of small anionic drugs is investigated.

  • 10. Ahmad, Yasmeen
    et al.
    Boisvert, Francois-Michel
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lamond, Angus I.
    Systematic Analysis of Protein Pools, Isoforms, and Modifications Affecting Turnover and Subcellular Localization2012In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 11, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In higher eukaryotes many genes encode protein isoforms whose properties and biological roles are often poorly characterized. Here we describe systematic approaches for detection of either distinct isoforms, or separate pools of the same isoform, with differential biological properties. Using information from ion intensities we have estimated protein abundance levels and using rates of change in stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture isotope ratios we measured turnover rates and subcellular distribution for the HeLa cell proteome. Protein isoforms were detected using three data analysis strategies that evaluate differences between stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture isotope ratios for specific groups of peptides within the total set of peptides assigned to a protein. The candidate approach compares stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture isotope ratios for predicted isoform- specific peptides, with ratio values for peptides shared by all the isoforms. The rule of thirds approach compares the mean isotope ratio values for all peptides in each of three equal segments along the linear length of the protein, assessing differences between segment values. The three in a row approach compares mean isotope ratio values for each sequential group of three adjacent peptides, assessing differences with the mean value for all peptides assigned to the protein. Protein isoforms were also detected and their properties evaluated by fractionating cell extracts on one- dimensional SDS- PAGE prior to trypsin digestion and MS analysis and independently evaluating isotope ratio values for the same peptides isolated from different gel slices. The effect of protein phosphorylation on turnover rates was analyzed by comparing mean turnover values calculated for all peptides assigned to a protein, either including, or excluding, values for cognate phosphopeptides. Collectively, these experimental and analytical approaches provide a framework for expanding the func- tional annotation of the genome.

  • 11.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Gharizadeh, B.
    Gustafsson, A. C.
    Sterky, Fredrik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Nyrén, Pål
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biochemistry and Biotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis by pyrosequencing2000In: Analytical Biochemistry, ISSN 0003-2697, E-ISSN 1096-0309, Vol. 280, no 1, p. 103-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing demand for high-throughput methods for analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) positions. Here, we have evaluated a novel sequencing approach, pyrosequencing, for such purposes. Pyrosequencing is a sequencing-by-synthesis method in which a cascade of enzymatic reactions yields detectable light, which is proportional to incorporated nucleotides. One feature of typing SNPs with pyrosequencing is that each allelic variant will give a unique sequence compared to the two other variants. These variants can easily be distinguished by a pattern recognition software. The software displays the allelic: alternatives and allows for direct comparison with the pyrosequencing raw data. For optimal determination of SNPs, various protocols of nucleotide dispensing order were investigated. Here, we demonstrate that typing of SNPs can efficiently be performed by pyrosequencing using an automated system for parallel analysis of 96 samples in approximately 5 min, suitable for large-scale screening and typing of SNPs.

  • 12.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Nyrén, Pål
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biochemistry and Biotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Ronaghi, M.
    Analysis of the p53 tumor suppressor gene by pyrosequencing2000In: BioTechniques, ISSN 0736-6205, E-ISSN 1940-9818, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 140-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tumor suppressor genes are implicated in cell cycle progression. Inactivation of these genes predominantly occurs through mutations and/or allelic loss that involves both alleles. With inactivation by multiple mutations in a single gene, cloning of the amplified gene is necessary to determine whether the mutations reside on one ol both alleles. Using pyrosequencing, a recently developed approach based on sequencing-by-synthesis, we studied genetic variability in the p53 tumor suppressor gene and could quantify the ratio between the mutated and wild-type amplified fragments. Further-more, this sequencing technique also allows allelic determination of adjacent mutations with no cloning of amplified fragments.

  • 13.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Ren, Z P
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Pontén, F
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Pontén, J
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Genetic instability in the 9q22.3 region is a late event in the development of squamous cell carcinoma.1998In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 17, no 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin represents a group of neoplasms which is associated with exposure to UV light. Recently, we obtained data suggesting that invasive skin cancer and its precursors derive from one original neoplastic clone. Here, the analysis were extended by loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis in the chromosome 9q22.3 region. A total of 85 samples, taken from twenty-two sections of sun-exposed sites, corresponding to normal epidermis, morphological normal cells with positive immuno-staining for the p53 protein (p53 patches), dysplasias, cancer in situ (CIS) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the skin were analysed. Overall, about 70% of p53 patches had mutations in the p53 gene but not LOH in the p53 gene or 9q22.3 region. Approximately 70% of the dysplasias showed p53 mutations of which about 40% had LOH in the p53 region but not in the 9q22.3 region. In contrast, about 65% of SCC and CIS displayed LOH in the 9q22.3 region, as well as frequent (80%) mutations and/or LOH in the p53 gene. These findings strongly suggest that alterations in the p53 gene is an early event in the progression towards SCC, whereas malignant development involves LOH and alterations in at least one (or several) tumor suppressor genes located in chromosome 9q22.3.

  • 14.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Andersson, Helene
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    SNP analysis by allele-specific extension in a micromachined filter chamber2002In: BioTechniques, ISSN 0736-6205, E-ISSN 1940-9818, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 748-754Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Akan, Pelin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Alexeyenko, Andrey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Costea, Paul Igor
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hedberg, Lilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Werne Solnestam, Beata
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hallman, Jimmie
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Comprehensive analysis of the genome transcriptome and proteome landscapes of three tumor cell lines2012In: Genome Medicine, ISSN 1756-994X, E-ISSN 1756-994X, Vol. 4, p. 86-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We here present a comparative genome, transcriptome and functional network analysis of three human cancer cell lines (A431, U251MG and U2OS), and investigate their relation to protein expression. Gene copy numbers significantly influenced corresponding transcript levels; their effect on protein levels was less pronounced. We focused on genes with altered mRNA and/or protein levels to identify those active in tumor maintenance. We provide comprehensive information for the three genomes and demonstrate the advantage of integrative analysis for identifying tumor-related genes amidst numerous background mutations by relating genomic variation to expression/protein abundance data and use gene networks to reveal implicated pathways.

  • 16. Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    et al.
    Sibbons, P.
    Williams, G.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Metcalfe, S. M.
    The E3 Ligase Axotrophin/MARCH-7: Protein Expression Profiling of Human Tissues Reveals Links to Adult Stem Cells2010In: Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, ISSN 0022-1554, E-ISSN 1551-5044, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 301-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Axotrophin/MARCH-7 was first identified in mouse embryonic stem cells as a neural stem cell gene. Using the axotrophin/MARCH-7 null mouse, we discovered profound effects on T lymphocyte responses, including 8-fold hyperproliferation and 5-fold excess release of the stem cell cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Our further discovery that axotrophin/MARCH-7 is required for targeted degradation of the LIF receptor subunit gp190 implies a direct role in the regulation of LIF signaling. Bioinformatics studies revealed a highly conserved RING-CH domain in common with the MARCH family of E3-ubiquitin ligases, and accordingly, axotrophin was renamed "MARCH-7." To probe protein expression of human axotrophin/MARCH-7, we prepared antibodies against different domains of the protein. Each antibody bound its specific target epitope with high affinity, and immunohistochemistry cross-validated target specificity. Forty-eight human tissue types were screened. Epithelial cells stained strongly, with trophoblasts having the greatest staining. In certain tissues, specific cell types were selectively positive, including neurons and neuronal progenitor cells in the hippocampus and cerebellum, endothelial sinusoids of the spleen, megakaryocytes in the bone marrow, crypt stem cells of the small intestine, and alveolar macrophages in the 7 lung. Approximately 20% of central nervous system neuropils were positive. Notably, axotrophin/MARCH-7 has an expression profile that is distinct from that of other MARCH family members. This manuscript contains online supplemental material at http://www.jhc. org. Please visit this article online to view these materials. (J Histochem Cytochem 58:301-308, 2010)

  • 17.
    Alm, Tove L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    The Affinity Binder Knockdown Initiative.2016In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, ISSN 1059-1524, E-ISSN 1939-4586, Vol. 27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Alm, Tove L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    von Feilitzen, Kalle
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    ANTIBODYPEDIA: THE WIKI OF ANTIBODIES2016In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, ISSN 1059-1524, E-ISSN 1939-4586, Vol. 27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Alm, Tove
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Introducing the Affinity Binder Knockdown Initiative-A public-private partnership for validation of affinity reagents2016In: EuPA Open Proteomics, ISSN 0014-2328, E-ISSN 2212-9685, Vol. 10, p. 56-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The newly launched Affinity Binder Knockdown Initiative encourages antibody suppliers and users to join this public-private partnership, which uses crowdsourcing to collect characterization data on antibodies. Researchers are asked to share validation data from experiments where gene-editing techniques (such as siRNA or CRISPR) have been used to verify antibody binding. The initiative is launched under the aegis of Antibodypedia, a database designed to allow comparisons and scoring of publicly available antibodies towards human protein targets. What is known about an antibody is the foundation of the scoring and ranking system in Antibodypedia.

  • 20.
    Alm, Tove
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    von Feilitzen, Kalle
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    A Chromosome-Centric Analysis of Antibodies Directed toward the Human Proteome Using Antibodypedia2014In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 1669-1676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibodies are crucial for the study of human proteins and have been defined as one of the three pillars in the human chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (CHPP). In this article the chromosome-centric structure has been used to analyze the availability of antibodies as judged by the presence within the portal Antibodypedia, a database designed to allow comparisons and scoring of publicly available antibodies toward human protein targets. This public database displays antibody data from more than one million antibodies toward human protein targets. A summary of the content in this knowledge resource reveals that there exist more than 10 antibodies to over 70% of all the putative human genes, evenly distributed over the 24 human chromosomes. The analysis also shows that at present, less than 10% of the putative human protein-coding genes (n = 1882) predicted from the genome sequence lack antibodies, suggesting that focused efforts from the antibody-based and mass spectrometry-based proteomic communities should be encouraged to pursue the analysis of these missing proteins. We show that Antibodypedia may be used to track the development of available and validated antibodies to the individual chromosomes, and thus the database is an attractive tool to identify proteins with no or few antibodies yet generated.

  • 21.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Keskitalo, J.
    Sjödin, A.
    Bhalerao, Rupali
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Sterky, Fredrik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Wissel, K.
    Tandre, K.
    Aspeborg, Henrik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Moyle, R.
    Ohmiya, Y.
    Brunner, A.
    Gustafsson, P.
    Karlsson, J.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Nilsson, O.
    Sandberg, G.
    Strauss, S.
    Sundberg, B.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Jansson, S.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    A transcriptional timetable of autumn senescence2004In: Genome Biology, ISSN 1465-6906, E-ISSN 1474-760X, Vol. 5, no 4, p. R24-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We have developed genomic tools to allow the genus Populus ( aspens and cottonwoods) to be exploited as a full-featured model for investigating fundamental aspects of tree biology. We have undertaken large-scale expressed sequence tag ( EST) sequencing programs and created Populus microarrays with significant gene coverage. One of the important aspects of plant biology that cannot be studied in annual plants is the gene activity involved in the induction of autumn leaf senescence. Results: On the basis of 36,354 Populus ESTs, obtained from seven cDNA libraries, we have created a DNA microarray consisting of 13,490 clones, spotted in duplicate. Of these clones, 12,376 (92%) were confirmed by resequencing and all sequences were annotated and functionally classified. Here we have used the microarray to study transcript abundance in leaves of a free-growing aspen tree ( Populus tremula) in northern Sweden during natural autumn senescence. Of the 13,490 spotted clones, 3,792 represented genes with significant expression in all leaf samples from the seven studied dates. Conclusions: We observed a major shift in gene expression, coinciding with massive chlorophyll degradation, that reflected a shift from photosynthetic competence to energy generation by mitochondrial respiration, oxidation of fatty acids and nutrient mobilization. Autumn senescence had much in common with senescence in annual plants; for example many proteases were induced. We also found evidence for increased transcriptional activity before the appearance of visible signs of senescence, presumably preparing the leaf for degradation of its components.

  • 22. Andersson, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Stromberg, Sara
    Backvall, Helena
    Kampf, Caroline
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Wester, Kenneth
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Analysis of protein expression in cell microarrays: A tool for antibody-based proteomics2006In: Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, ISSN 0022-1554, E-ISSN 1551-5044, Vol. 54, no 12, p. 1413-1423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tissue microarray (TMA) technology provides a possibility to explore protein expression patterns in a multitude of normal and disease tissues in a high-throughput setting. Although TMAs have been used for analysis of tissue samples, robust methods for studying in vitro cultured cell lines and cell aspirates in a TMA format have been lacking. We have adopted a technique to homogeneously distribute cells in an agarose gel matrix, creating an artificial tissue. This enables simultaneous profiling of protein expression in suspension- and adherent-grown cell samples assembled in a microarray. In addition, the present study provides an optimized strategy for the basic laboratory steps to efficiently produce TMAs. Presented modifications resulted in an improved quality of specimens and a higher section yield compared with standard TMA production protocols. Sections from the generated cell TMAs were tested for immunohistochemical staining properties using 20 well-characterized antibodies. Comparison of immunoreactivity in cultured dispersed cells and corresponding cells in tissue samples showed congruent results for all tested antibodies. We conclude that a modified TIVIA technique, including cell samples, provides a valuable tool for high-throughput analysis of protein expression, and that this technique can be used for global approaches to explore the human proteome.

  • 23. Andersson, Gustav
    et al.
    Wennersten, Christoffer
    Gaber, Alexander
    Boman, Karolina
    Nodin, Björn
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Segersten, Ulrika
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Jirström, Karin
    Reduced expression of ezrin in urothelial bladder cancer signifies more advanced tumours and an impaired survival: validatory study of two independent patient cohorts2014In: BMC Urology, ISSN 1471-2490, E-ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 36-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reduced membranous expression of the cytoskeleton-associated protein ezrin has previously been demonstrated to correlate with tumour progression and poor prognosis in patients with T1G3 urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder treated with non-maintenance Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (n = 92), and the associations with adverse clinicopathological factors have been validated in another, unselected, cohort (n = 104). In the present study, we examined the prognostic significance of ezrin expression in urothelial bladder cancer in a total number of 442 tumours from two independent patient cohorts. Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of ezrin was evaluated in tissue microarrays with tumours from one retrospective cohort of bladder cancer (n = 110; cohort I) and one population-based cohort (n = 342; cohort II). Classification regression tree analysis was applied for selection of prognostic cutoff. Kaplan-Meier analysis, log rank test and Cox regression proportional hazards' modeling were used to evaluate the impact of ezrin on 5-year overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Ezrin expression could be evaluated in tumours from 100 and 342 cases, respectively. In both cohorts, reduced membranous ezrin expression was significantly associated with more advanced T-stage (p < 0.001), high grade tumours (p < 0.001), female sex (p = 0.040 and p = 0.013), and membranous expression of podocalyxin-like protein (p < 0.001 and p = 0.009). Moreover, reduced ezrin expression was associated with a significantly reduced 5-year OS in both cohorts (HR = 3.09 95% CI 1.71-5.58 and HR = 2.15(1.51-3.06), and with DSS in cohort II (HR = 2.77, 95% CI 1.78-4.31). This association also remained significant in adjusted analysis in Cohort I (HR1.99, 95% CI 1.05-3.77) but not in Cohort II. In pTa and pT1 tumours in cohort II, there was no significant association between ezrin expression and time to progression. Conclusions: The results from this study validate previous findings of reduced membranous ezrin expression in urothelial bladder cancer being associated with unfavourable clinicopathological characteristics and an impaired survival. The utility of ezrin as a prognostic biomarker in transurethral resection specimens merits further investigation.

  • 24. Andersson, Sandra
    et al.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hallström, Björn M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sundström, Christer
    Danielsson, Angelika
    Edlund, Karolina
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Asplund, Anna
    The Transcriptomic and Proteomic Landscapes of Bone Marrow and Secondary Lymphoid Tissues2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 12, p. e115911-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The sequencing of the human genome has opened doors for global gene expression profiling, and the immense amount of data will lay an important ground for future studies of normal and diseased tissues. The Human Protein Atlas project aims to systematically map the human gene and protein expression landscape in a multitude of normal healthy tissues as well as cancers, enabling the characterization of both housekeeping genes and genes that display a tissue-specific expression pattern. This article focuses on identifying and describing genes with an elevated expression in four lymphohematopoietic tissue types (bone marrow, lymph node, spleen and appendix), based on the Human Protein Atlas-strategy that combines high throughput transcriptomics with affinity-based proteomics. Results: An enriched or enhanced expression in one or more of the lymphohematopoietic tissues, compared to other tissue-types, was seen for 693 out of 20,050 genes, and the highest levels of expression were found in bone marrow for neutrophilic and erythrocytic genes. A majority of these genes were found to constitute well-characterized genes with known functions in lymphatic or hematopoietic cells, while others are not previously studied, as exemplified by C19ORF59. Conclusions: In this paper we present a strategy of combining next generation RNA-sequencing with in situ affinity-based proteomics in order to identify and describe new gene targets for further research on lymphatic or hematopoietic cells and tissues. The results constitute lists of genes with enriched or enhanced expression in the four lymphohematopoietic tissues, exemplified also on protein level with immunohistochemical images.

  • 25.
    Andrade, Jorge
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Berglund, Lisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Using Grid Technology for Computationally Intensive Applied Bioinformatics Analyses2006In: In Silico Biology, ISSN 1386-6338, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 495-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For several applications and algorithms used in applied bioinformatics, a bottle neck in terms of computational time may arise when scaled up to facilitate analyses of large datasets and databases. Re-codification, algorithm modification or sacrifices in sensitivity and accuracy may be necessary to accommodate for limited computational capacity of single work stations. Grid computing offers an alternative model for solving massive computational problems by parallel execution of existing algorithms and software implementations. We present the implementation of a Grid-aware model for solving computationally intensive bioinformatic analyses exemplified by a blastp sliding window algorithm for whole proteome sequence similarity analysis, and evaluate the performance in comparison with a local cluster and a single workstation. Our strategy involves temporary installations of the BLAST executable and databases on remote nodes at submission, accommodating for dynamic Grid environments as it avoids the need of predefined runtime environments (preinstalled software and databases at specific Grid-nodes). Importantly, the implementation is generic where the BLAST executable can be replaced by other software tools to facilitate analyses suitable for parallelisation. This model should be of general interest in applied bioinformatics. Scripts and procedures are freely available from the authors.

  • 26. Andrews, B. J.
    et al.
    Marian Walhout, A. J.
    Iyengar, R.
    Apweiler, R.
    Ardlie, K.
    Azeloglu, E. U.
    Birtwistle, M. R.
    Coon, J. J.
    Dolinski, K.
    Fan, T.
    FitzGerald, G. A.
    Gavin, A. -C
    Gingras, A. -C
    Gough, N. R.
    Hoffmann, A.
    Lee, M. J.
    Loew, L. M.
    CraigMak, H.
    Murphy, R. C.
    Myers, C.
    Snyder, M. P.
    Sorger, P. K.
    Stolovitzky, G.
    Subramaniam, S.
    Taipale, M.
    Travé, G.
    Troyanskaya, O. G.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Vidal, M.
    Quantitative human cell encyclopedia2016In: Science Signaling, ISSN 1945-0877, E-ISSN 1937-9145, Vol. 9, no 443, article id mr1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientists gathered to discuss the necessity, feasibility, and challenges of generating a quantitative catalog of the components in human cells that is essential for our understanding of human physiology in health and disease and to support future breakthroughs in treating diseases. This report summarizes the discussion that emerged at the Human Quantitative Dynamics Workshop held in Bethesda, MD, USA, in December 2015.

  • 27.
    Anfelt, Josefine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Hallström, Björn
    Nielsen, Jens
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Hudson, Elton Paul
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Using Transcriptomics To Improve Butanol Tolerance of Synechocystis sp Strain PCC 68032013In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 79, no 23, p. 7419-7427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyanobacteria are emerging as promising hosts for production of advanced biofuels such as n-butanol and alkanes. However, cyanobacteria suffer from the same product inhibition problems as those that plague other microbial biofuel hosts. High concentrations of butanol severely reduce growth, and even small amounts can negatively affect metabolic processes. An understanding of how cyanobacteria are affected by their biofuel product can enable identification of engineering strategies for improving their tolerance. Here we used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to assess the transcriptome response of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 to two concentrations of exogenous n-butanol. Approximately 80 transcripts were differentially expressed at 40 mg/liter butanol, and 280 transcripts were different at 1 g/liter butanol. Our results suggest a compromised cell membrane, impaired photosynthetic electron transport, and reduced biosynthesis. Accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scaled with butanol concentration. Using the physiology and transcriptomics data, we selected several genes for overexpression in an attempt to improve butanol tolerance. We found that overexpression of several proteins, notably, the small heat shock protein HspA, improved tolerance to butanol. Transcriptomics-guided engineering created more solvent-tolerant cyanobacteria strains that could be the foundation for a more productive biofuel host.

  • 28.
    Anfelt, Josefine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Kaczmarzyk, Danuta
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Shabestary, Kiyan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Renberg, Björn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Nielsen, Jens
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. Tech Univ Denmark.
    Hudson, Elton P.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Genetic and nutrient modulation of acetyl-CoA levels in Synechocystis for n-butanol production2015In: Microbial Cell Factories, ISSN 1475-2859, E-ISSN 1475-2859, Vol. 14, article id 167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a strong interest in using photosynthetic cyanobacteria as production hosts for biofuels and chemicals. Recent work has shown the benefit of pathway engineering, enzyme tolerance, and co-factor usage for improving yields of fermentation products. Results: An n-butanol pathway was inserted into a Synechocystis mutant deficient in polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis. We found that nitrogen starvation increased specific butanol productivity up to threefold, but cessation of cell growth limited total n-butanol titers. Metabolite profiling showed that acetyl-CoA increased twofold during nitrogen starvation. Introduction of a phosphoketolase increased acetyl-CoA levels sixfold at nitrogen replete conditions and increased butanol titers from 22 to 37 mg/L at day 8. Flux balance analysis of photoautotrophic metabolism showed that a Calvin-Benson-Bassham-Phosphoketolase pathway had higher theoretical butanol productivity than CBB-Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas and a reduced butanol ATP demand. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that phosphoketolase overexpression and modulation of nitrogen levels are two attractive routes toward increased production of acetyl-CoA derived products in cyanobacteria and could be implemented with complementary metabolic engineering strategies.

  • 29.
    Ardalan, Arman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kluetsch, Cornelya F. C.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Zhang, Ai-bing
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Erdogan, Metin
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Houshmand, Massoud
    Tepeli, Cafer
    Ashtiani, Seyed Reza Miraei
    Savolainen, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Comprehensive study of mtDNA among Southwest Asian dogs contradicts independent domestication of wolf, but implies dog–wolf hybridization2011In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 373-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity indicate explicitly that dogs were domesticated, probably exclusively, in southern East Asia. However, Southwest Asia (SwAsia) has had poor representation and geographical coverage in these studies. Other studies based on archaeological and genome-wide SNP data have suggested an origin of dogs in SwAsia. Hence, it has been suspected that mtDNA evidence for this scenario may have remained undetected. In the first comprehensive investigation of genetic diversity among SwAsian dogs, we analyzed 582 bp of mtDNA for 345 indigenous dogs from across SwAsia, and compared with 1556 dogs across the Old World. We show that 97.4% of SwAsian dogs carry haplotypes belonging to a universal mtDNA gene pool, but that only a subset of this pool, five of the 10 principal haplogroups, is represented in SwAsia. A high frequency of haplogroup B, potentially signifying a local origin, was not paralleled with the high genetic diversity expected for a center of origin. Meanwhile, 2.6% of the SwAsian dogs carried the rare non-universal haplogroup d2. Thus, mtDNA data give no indication that dogs originated in SwAsia through independent domestication of wolf, but dog–wolf hybridization may have formed the local haplogroup d2 within this region. Southern East Asia remains the only region with virtually full extent of genetic variation, strongly indicating it to be the primary and probably sole center of wolf domestication. An origin of dogs in southern East Asia may have been overlooked by other studies due to a substantial lack of samples from this region.

  • 30. Attems, Johannes
    et al.
    Alpar, Alan
    Spence, Lauren
    McParland, Shane
    Heikenwalder, Mathias
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tanila, Heikki
    Hökfelt, Tomas G. M.
    Harkany, Tibor
    Clusters of secretagogin-expressing neurons in the aged human olfactory tract lack terminal differentiation2012In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 109, no 16, p. 6259-6264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expanding the repertoire of molecularly diverse neurons in the human nervous system is paramount to characterizing the neuronal networks that underpin sensory processing. Defining neuronal identities is particularly timely in the human olfactory system, whose structural differences from nonprimate macrosmatic species have recently gained momentum. Here, we identify clusters of bipolar neurons in a previously unknown outer "shell" domain of the human olfactory tract, which express secretagogin, a cytosolic Ca2+ binding protein. These "shell" neurons are wired into the olfactory circuitry because they can receive mixed synaptic inputs. Unexpectedly, secretagogin is often coexpressed with polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule, beta-III-tubulin, and calretinin, suggesting that these neurons represent a cell pool that might have escaped terminal differentiation into the olfactory circuitry. We hypothesized that secretagogin-containing "shell" cells may be eliminated from the olfactory axis under neurodegenerative conditions. Indeed, the density, but not the morphological or neurochemical integrity, of secretagogin-positive neurons selectively decreases in the olfactory tract in Alzheimer's disease. In conclusion, secretagogin identifies a previously undescribed cell pool whose cytoarchitectonic arrangements and synaptic connectivity are poised to modulate olfactory processing in humans.

  • 31.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Birgersson, Elin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mezger, Anja
    Nilsson, Mats
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture2016In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 1251-1256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off-target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi-automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead-based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read-out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof-of-concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off-target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA-based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead-based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond.

  • 32.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Chaouch, Amina
    Lochmüller, Hanns
    Politano, Luisa
    Bertini, Enrico
    Spitali, Pietro
    Hiller, Monika
    Niks, Eric H.
    Gualandi, Francesca
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Bushby, Kate
    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke
    Schwartz, Elena
    Le Priol, Yannick
    Straub, Volker
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cirak, Sebahattin
    't Hoen, Peter A. C.
    Muntoni, Francesco
    Ferlini, Alessandra
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili
    Affinity proteomics within rare diseases: a BIO-NMD study for blood biomarkers of muscular dystrophies2014In: EMBO Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1757-4676, E-ISSN 1757-4684, Vol. 6, no 7, p. 918-936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the recent progress in the broad-scaled analysis of proteins in body fluids, there is still a lack in protein profiling approaches for biomarkers of rare diseases. Scarcity of samples is the main obstacle hindering attempts to apply discovery driven protein profiling in rare diseases. We addressed this challenge by combining samples collected within the BIO-NMD consortium from four geographically dispersed clinical sites to identify protein markers associated with muscular dystrophy using an antibody bead array platform with 384 antibodies. Based on concordance in statistical significance and confirmatory results obtained from analysis of both serum and plasma, we identified eleven proteins associated with muscular dystrophy, among which four proteins were elevated in blood from muscular dystrophy patients: carbonic anhydrase III (CA3) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), both specifically expressed in slow-twitch muscle fibers and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2) and electron transfer flavo-protein A (ETFA). Using age-matched sub-cohorts, 9 protein profiles correlating with disease progression and severity were identified, which hold promise for the development of new clinical tools for management of dystrophinopathies.

  • 33.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Häggmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Khademi, M.
    Olsson, T.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Autoantibody profiling in multiple sclerosis using arrays of human protein fragments2013In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 12, no 9, p. 2657-2672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Profiling the autoantibody repertoire with large antigen collections is emerging as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers for autoimmune diseases. Here, a systematic and undirected approach was taken to screen for profiles of IgG in human plasma from 90 individuals with multiple sclerosis related diagnoses. Reactivity pattern of 11,520 protein fragments (representing ̃38% of all human protein encoding genes) were generated on planar protein microarrays built within the Human Protein Atlas. For more than 2,000 antigens IgG reactivity was observed, among which 64% were found only in single individuals. We used reactivity distributions among multiple sclerosis subgroups to select 384 antigens, which were then reevaluated on planar microarrays, corroborated with suspension bead arrays in a larger cohort (n = 376) and confirmed for specificity in inhibition assays. Among the heterogeneous pattern within and across multiple sclerosis subtypes, differences in recognition frequencies were found for 51 antigens, which were enriched for proteins of transcriptional regulation. In conclusion, using protein fragments and complementary high-throughput protein array platforms facilitated an alternative route to discovery and verification of potentially disease-associated autoimmunity signatures, that are now proposed as additional antigens for large-scale validation studies across multiple sclerosis biobanks.

  • 34.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Häggmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Neiman, Maja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Igel, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Schwenk, Jochen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Systematic antibody and antigen-based proteomic profiling with microarrays2011In: EXPERT REVIEW OF MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS, ISSN 1473-7159, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 219-234Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current approaches within affinity-based proteomics are driven both by the accessibility and availability of antigens and capture reagents, and by suitable multiplexed technologies onto which these are implemented. By combining planar microarrays and other multiparallel systems with sets of reagents, possibilities to discover new and unpredicted protein disease associations, either via directed hypothesis-driven or via undirected hypothesis-generating target selection, can be created. In the following stages, the discoveries made during these screening phases have to be verified for potential clinical relevance based on both technical and biological aspects. The use of affinity tools throughout discovery and verification has the potential to streamline the introduction of new markers, as transition into clinically required assay formats appears straightforward. In this article, we summarize some of the current building blocks within array-and affinity-based proteomic profiling with a focus on body fluids, by giving a perspective on how current and upcoming developments in this bioscience could enable a path of pursuit for biomarker discovery.

  • 35.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mitsios, N.
    Khademi, M.
    Alfredsson, L.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mulder, J.
    Olsson, T.
    Schwenk, Jochen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Anoctamin 2, a novel autoimmune target candidate in multiple sclerosis2014In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 20, p. 49-50Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Mitsios, Nicholas
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Khademi, Mohsen
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sjoberg, Ronald
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Forsstrom, Bjorn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bredenberg, Johan
    Bomfim, Izaura Lima
    Holmgren, Erik
    Gronlund, Hans
    Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb
    Abdelmagid, Nada
    Uhlen, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Waterboer, Tim
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Mulder, Jan
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Nilsson, Peter
    Anoctamin 2 identified as an autoimmune target in multiple sclerosis2016In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 113, no 8, p. 2188-2193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system and also is regarded as an autoimmune condition. However, the antigenic targets of the autoimmune response in MS have not yet been deciphered. In an effort to mine the autoantibody repertoire within MS, we profiled 2,169 plasma samples from MS cases and population-based controls using bead arrays built with 384 human protein fragments selected from an initial screening with 11,520 antigens. Our data revealed prominently increased autoantibody reactivity against the chloride-channel protein anoctamin 2 (ANO2) in MS cases compared with controls. This finding was corroborated in independent assays with alternative protein constructs and by epitope mapping with peptides covering the identified region of ANO2. Additionally, we found a strong interaction between the presence of ANO2 autoantibodies and the HLA complex MS-associated DRB1*15 allele, reinforcing a potential role for ANO2 autoreactivity in MS etiopathogenesis. Furthermore, immunofluorescence analysis in human MS brain tissue showed ANO2 expression as small cellular aggregates near and inside MS lesions. Thus this study represents one of the largest efforts to characterize the autoantibody repertoire within MS. The findings presented here demonstrate that an ANO2 autoimmune subphenotype may exist in MS and lay the groundwork for further studies focusing on the pathogenic role of ANO2 autoantibodies in MS.

  • 37.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    et al.,
    The calcium-activated chloride channel anoctamine 2 as an autoimmune component of multiple sclerosisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 38. Azimi, A.
    et al.
    Caramuta, S.
    Seashore-Ludlow, B.
    Boström, J.
    Robinson, J. L.
    Edfors, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tuominen, R.
    Kemper, K.
    Krijgsman, O.
    Peeper, D. S.
    Nielsen, J.
    Hansson, J.
    Egyhazi Brage, S.
    Altun, M.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Maddalo, G.
    Targeting CDK2 overcomes melanoma resistance against BRAF and Hsp90 inhibitors2018In: Molecular Systems Biology, ISSN 1744-4292, E-ISSN 1744-4292, Vol. 14, no 3, article id e7858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel therapies are undergoing clinical trials, for example, the Hsp90 inhibitor, XL888, in combination with BRAF inhibitors for the treatment of therapy-resistant melanomas. Unfortunately, our data show that this combination elicits a heterogeneous response in a panel of melanoma cell lines including PDX-derived models. We sought to understand the mechanisms underlying the differential responses and suggest a patient stratification strategy. Thermal proteome profiling (TPP) identified the protein targets of XL888 in a pair of sensitive and unresponsive cell lines. Unbiased proteomics and phosphoproteomics analyses identified CDK2 as a driver of resistance to both BRAF and Hsp90 inhibitors and its expression is regulated by the transcription factor MITF upon XL888 treatment. The CDK2 inhibitor, dinaciclib, attenuated resistance to both classes of inhibitors and combinations thereof. Notably, we found that MITF expression correlates with CDK2 upregulation in patients; thus, dinaciclib would warrant consideration for treatment of patients unresponsive to BRAF-MEK and/or Hsp90 inhibitors and/or harboring MITF amplification/overexpression. 

  • 39.
    Bachmann, Julie
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Burte, Florence
    Pramana, Setia
    Conte, Ianina
    Brown, Biobele J.
    Orimadegun, Adebola E.
    Ajetunmobi, Wasiu A.
    Afolabi, Nathaniel K.
    Akinkunmi, Francis
    Omokhodion, Samuel
    Akinbami, Felix O.
    Shokunbi, Wuraola A.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Pawitan, Yudi
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sodeinde, Olugbemiro
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wahlgren, Mats
    Fernandez-Reyes, Delmiro
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Affinity Proteomics Reveals Elevated Muscle Proteins in Plasma of Children with Cerebral Malaria2014In: PLoS Pathogens, ISSN 1553-7366, E-ISSN 1553-7374, Vol. 10, no 4, p. e1004038-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic inflammation and sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes are central processes in the pathophysiology of severe Plasmodium falciparum childhood malaria. However, it is still not understood why some children are more at risks to develop malaria complications than others. To identify human proteins in plasma related to childhood malaria syndromes, multiplex antibody suspension bead arrays were employed. Out of the 1,015 proteins analyzed in plasma from more than 700 children, 41 differed between malaria infected children and community controls, whereas 13 discriminated uncomplicated malaria from severe malaria syndromes. Markers of oxidative stress were found related to severe malaria anemia while markers of endothelial activation, platelet adhesion and muscular damage were identified in relation to children with cerebral malaria. These findings suggest the presence of generalized vascular inflammation, vascular wall modulations, activation of endothelium and unbalanced glucose metabolism in severe malaria. The increased levels of specific muscle proteins in plasma implicate potential muscle damage and microvasculature lesions during the course of cerebral malaria.

  • 40.
    Barbe, Laurent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Stenius, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lewin, Erland
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Asplund, Anna
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Andersson-Svahn, Helene
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Toward a confocal subcellular atlas of the human proteome2008In: Molecular and cellular proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 499-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information on protein localization on the subcellular level is important to map and characterize the proteome and to better understand cellular functions of proteins. Here we report on a pilot study of 466 proteins in three human cell lines aimed to allow large scale confocal microscopy analysis using protein-specific antibodies. Approximately 3000 high resolution images were generated, and more than 80% of the analyzed proteins could be classified in one or multiple subcellular compartment(s). The localizations of the proteins showed, in many cases, good agreement with the Gene Ontology localization prediction model. This is the first large scale antibody-based study to localize proteins into subcellular compartments using antibodies and confocal microscopy. The results suggest that this approach might be a valuable tool in conjunction with predictive models for protein localization.

  • 41.
    Benfeitas, Rui
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mardinoglu, A.
    New challenges to study heterogeneity in cancer redox metabolism2017In: Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, ISSN 2296-634X, Vol. 5, no JUL, article id 65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important pathophysiological molecules involved in vital cellular processes. They are extremely harmful at high concentrations because they promote the generation of radicals and the oxidation of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, which can result in apoptosis. An imbalance of ROS and a disturbance of redox homeostasis are now recognized as a hallmark of complex diseases. Considering that ROS levels are significantly increased in cancer cells due to mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS metabolism has been targeted for the development of efficient treatment strategies, and antioxidants are used as potential chemotherapeutic drugs. However, initial ROS-focused clinical trials in which antioxidants were supplemented to patients provided inconsistent results, i.e., improved treatment or increased malignancy. These different outcomes may result from the highly heterogeneous redox responses of tumors in different patients. Hence, population-based treatment strategies are unsuitable and patient-tailored therapeutic approaches are required for the effective treatment of patients. Moreover, due to the crosstalk between ROS, reducing equivalents [e.g., NAD(P)H] and central metabolism, which is heterogeneous in cancer, finding the best therapeutic target requires the consideration of system-wide approaches that are capable of capturing the complex alterations observed in all of the associated pathways. Systems biology and engineering approaches may be employed to overcome these challenges, together with tools developed in personalized medicine. However, ROS- and redox-based therapies have yet to be addressed by these methodologies in the context of disease treatment. Here, we review the role of ROS and their coupled redox partners in tumorigenesis. Specifically, we highlight some of the challenges in understanding the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), one of the most important ROS in pathophysiology in the progression of cancer. We also discuss its interplay with antioxidant defenses, such as the coupled peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin and glutathione/glutathione peroxidase systems, and its reducing equivalent metabolism. Finally, we highlight the need for system-level and patient-tailored approaches to clarify the roles of these systems and identify therapeutic targets through the use of the tools developed in personalized medicine. © 2017 Benfeitas, Uhlen, Nielsen and Mardinoglu.

  • 42. Bengtsson, Erik
    et al.
    Nerjovaj, Pashtrik
    Wangefjord, Sakarias
    Nodin, Björn
    Eberhard, Jakob
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Borgquist, Signe
    Jirström, Karin
    HMG-CoA reductase expression in primary colorectal cancer correlates with favourable clinicopathological characteristics and an improved clinical outcome2014In: Diagnostic Pathology, ISSN 1746-1596, E-ISSN 1746-1596, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 78-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An association between tumor-specific HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) expression and good prognosis has previously been demonstrated in breast and ovarian cancer. In this study, the expression, clinicopathological correlates and prognostic value of HMGCR expression in colorectal cancer was examined. Findings: Immunohistochemical expression of HMGCR was assessed in tissue microarrays with primary tumours from 557 incident cases of colorectal cancer in the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study. Pearson's Chi Square test was applied to explore the associations between HMGCR expression and clinicopathological factors and other investigative biomarkers. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to assess the relationship between HMGCR expression and cancer-specific survival (CSS) according to negative vs positive HMGCR expression. A total number of 535 (96.0%) tumours were suitable for analysis, of which 61 (11.4%) were HMGCR negative. Positive cytoplasmic HMGCR expression was associated with distant metastasis-free disease at diagnosis (p = 0.002), lack of vascular invasion (p = 0.043), microsatellite-instability (p = 0.033), expression of cyclin D1 (p = <0.001) and p21 (p = <0.001). Positive HMGCR expression was significantly associated with a prolonged CSS in unadjusted Cox regression analysis in the entire cohort (HR = 1.79; 95% CI 1.20-2.66) and in Stage III-IV disease (HR = 1.71; 95% CI 1.09-2.68), but not after adjustment for established clinicopathological parameters. Conclusions: Findings from this prospective cohort study demonstrate that HMGCR is differentially expressed in colorectal cancer and that positive expression is associated with favourable tumour characteristics and a prolonged survival in unadjusted analysis. The utility of HMGCR as a predictor of response to neoadjuvant or adjuvant statin treatment in colorectal cancer merits further study. Virtual slides: The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2115647072103464.

  • 43. Bengtsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Krogh, Morten
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Schedvins, Kjell
    Silfversward, Claes
    Linder, Stig
    Auer, Gert
    Alaiya, Ayodele
    James, Peter
    Large-scale proteomics analysis of human ovarian cancer for biomarkers2007In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 1440-1450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ovarian cancer is usually found at a late stage when the prognosis is often bad. Relative survival rates decrease with tumor stage or grade, and the 5-year survival rate for women with carcinoma is only 38%. Thus, there is a great need to find biomarkers that can be used to carry out routine screening, especially in high-risk patient groups. Here, we present a large-scale study of 64 tissue samples taken from patients at all stages and show that we can identify statistically valid markers using nonsupervised methods that distinguish between normal, benign, borderline, and malignant tissue. We have identified 217 of the significantly changing protein spots. We are expressing and raising antibodies to 35 of these. Currently, we have validated 5 of these antibodies for use in immunohistochemical analysis using tissue microarrays of healthy and diseased ovarian, as well as other, human tissues.

  • 44.
    Berglund, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Andrade, Jorge
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    The epitope space of the human proteome2008In: Protein Science, ISSN 0961-8368, E-ISSN 1469-896X, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 606-613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the post-genome era, there is a great need for protein-specific affinity reagents to explore the human proteome. Antibodies are suitable as reagents, but generation of antibodies with low cross-reactivity to other human proteins requires careful selection of antigens. Here we show the results from a proteomewide effort to map linear epitopes based on uniqueness relative to the entire human proteome. The analysis was based on a sliding window sequence similarity search using short windows (8, 10, and 12 amino acid residues). A comparison of exact string matching (Hamming distance) and a heuristic method (BLAST) was performed, showing that the heuristic method combined with a grid strategy allows for whole proteome analysis with high accuracy and feasible run times. The analysis shows that it is possible to find unique antigens for a majority of the human proteins, with relatively strict rules involving low sequence identity of the possible linear epitopes. The implications for human antibody-based proteomics efforts are discussed.

  • 45.
    Berglund, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gry, Marcus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck laboratory.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Ottoson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wernérus, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wester, Kenneth
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck laboratory.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck laboratory.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck laboratory.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Generation of validated antibodies towards the human proteomeArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we show the results from a large effort to generate antibodies towards the human proteome. A high-throughput strategy was developed based on cloning and expression of antigens as recombitant protein epitope signature tags (PrESTs) Affinity purified polyclonal antibodies were generated, followed by validation by protein microarrays, Western blotting and microarray-based immunohistochemistry. PrESTs were selected based on sequence uniqueness relative the proteome and a bioinformatics analysis showed that unique antigens can be found for at least 85% of the proteome using this general strategy. The success rate from antigen selection to validated antibodies was 31%, and from protein to antibody 55%. Interestingly, membrane-bound and soluble proteins performed equally and PrEST lengths between 75 and 125 amino acids were found to give the highest yield of validated antibodies. Multiple antigens were selected for many genes and the results suggest that specific antibodies can be systematically generated to most human proteibs.

  • 46.
    Berglund, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Jonasson, Kalle
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    A whole-genome bioinformatics approach to selection of antigens for systematic antibody generation2008In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 8, no 14, p. 2832-2839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we present an antigen selection strategy based on a whole-genome bioinformatics approach, which is facilitated by an interactive visualization tool displaying protein features from both public resources and in-house generated data. The web-based bioinformatics platform has been designed for selection of multiple, non-overlapping recombinant protein epitope signature tags by display of predicted information relevant for antigens, including domain- and epitope sized sequence similarities to other proteins, transmembrane regions and signal peptides. The visualization tool also displays shared and exclusive protein regions for genes with multiple splice variants. A genome-wide analysis demonstrates that antigens for approximately 80% of the human protein-coding genes can be selected with this strategy.

  • 47.
    Berglund, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ottosson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Wernérus, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    et al.,
    A genecentric human protein atlas for expression profiles based on antibodies2008In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, Vol. 7, no 10, p. 2019-2027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An attractive path forward in proteomics is to experimentally annotate the human protein complement of the genome in a genecentric manner. Using antibodies, it might be possible to design protein-specific probes for a representative protein from every protein-coding gene and to subsequently use the antibodies for systematical analysis of cellular distribution and subcellular localization of proteins in normal and disease tissues. A new version (4.0) of the Human Protein Atlas has been developed in a genecentric manner with the inclusion of all human genes and splice variants predicted from genome efforts together with a visualization of each protein with characteristics such as predicted membrane regions, signal peptide, and protein domains and new plots showing the uniqueness (sequence similarity) of every fraction of each protein toward all other human proteins. The new version is based on tissue profiles generated from 6120 antibodies with more than five million immunohistochemistry-based images covering 5067 human genes, corresponding to similar to 25% of the human genome. Version 4.0 includes a putative list of members in various protein classes, both functional classes, such as kinases, transcription factors, G-protein-coupled receptors, etc., and project-related classes, such as candidate genes for cancer or cardiovascular diseases. The exact antigen sequence for the internally generated antibodies has also been released together with a visualization of the application-specific validation performed for each antibody, including a protein array assay, Western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and, for a large fraction, immunofluorescence-based confocal microscopy. New search functionalities have been added to allow complex queries regarding protein expression profiles, protein classes, and chromosome location. The new version of the protein atlas thus is a resource for many areas of biomedical research, including protein science and biomarker discovery.

  • 48.
    Berglund, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Primer design for high-throughput PCR cloningArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Bergman, Julia
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Botling, Johan
    Uppsala University.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    M Hallström, Björn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Djureinovic, Dijana
    Uppsala University.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University.
    Mathias, Uhlén
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    The human adrenal gland proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.2017In: Endocrinology, ISSN 0013-7227, E-ISSN 1945-7170, Vol. 158, no 2, p. 239-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adrenal gland is a composite endocrine organ with vital functions that include the synthesis and release of glucocorticoids and catecholamines. To define the molecular landscape that underlies the specific functions of the adrenal gland, we combined a genome-wide transcriptomics approach using messenger RNA sequencing of human tissues with immunohistochemistry-based protein profiling on tissue microarrays. Approximately two-thirds of all putative protein coding genes were expressed in the adrenal gland, and the analysis identified 253 genes with an elevated pattern of expression in the adrenal gland, with only 37 genes showing a markedly greater expression level (more than fivefold) in the adrenal gland compared with 31 other normal human tissue types analyzed. The analyses allowed for an assessment of the relative expression levels for well-known proteins involved in adrenal gland function but also identified previously poorly characterized proteins in the adrenal cortex, such as the FERM (4.1 protein, ezrin, radixin, moesin) domain containing 5 and the nephroblastoma overexpressed (NOV) protein homolog. We have provided a global analysis of the adrenal gland transcriptome and proteome, with a comprehensive list of genes with elevated expression in the adrenal gland and spatial information with examples of protein expression patterns for corresponding proteins. These genes and proteins constitute important starting points for an improved understanding of the normal function and pathophysiology of the adrenal glands.

  • 50. Berntsson, Jonna
    et al.
    Lundgren, Sebastian
    Nodin, Björn
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gaber, Alexander
    Jirström, Karin
    Expression and prognostic significance of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor in epithelial ovarian cancer2014In: Journal of Ovarian Research, ISSN 1757-2215, E-ISSN 1757-2215, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 26-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: High expression of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (PIGR) has previously been associated with a favourable prognosis in a few cancer forms, but its expression and relationship with clinical outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has not yet been reported. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the clinicopathological correlates and prognostic significance of PIGR expression in EOC. Methods: After an initial screening in the Human Protein Atlas portal, a validated antibody was selected for extended analysis of immunohistochemical PIGR expression in tissue microarrays with tumours from 154 incident cases of EOC from two pooled prospective population-based cohorts. Subsets of corresponding benign-appearing fallopian tubes (n = 38) and omental metastases (n = 33) were also analysed. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis were applied to examine the impact of PIGR expression on overall survival (OS) and ovarian cancer-specific survival (OCSS). Results: PIGR expression was significantly higher in fallopian tubes compared to primary tumours and metastases (p < 0.001) and lower in carcinoma of the serous subtype compared to other carcinomas (p < 0.001). PIGR expression was significantly associated with lower grade (p = 0.001), mucinous histological subtype (p = 0.002), positive progesterone receptor expression (p = 0.009) and negative or low Ki-67 expression (p = 0.003). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a significantly improved OS (p = 0.013) and OCSS (p = 0.009) for patients with tumours displaying high expression of PIGR. These associations were confirmed in unadjusted Cox regression analysis (HR = 0.48; 95% CI 0.26-0.87; p = 0.015 for OS and HR = 0.43, 95% CI 0.22-0.82; p = 0.011 for OCSS) but did not remain significant after adjustment for age, grade and clinical stage. Conclusions: This study provides a first demonstration of PIGR expression in human fallopian tubes, primary EOC tumours and metastases. High tumour-specific expression of PIGR was found to be associated with a favourable prognosis in unadjusted, but not in adjusted, analysis. These findings are novel and merit further investigation.

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