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  • 1. Abu-Khader, M. M.
    et al.
    Shawaqfeh, A. T.
    Naddaf, Z.
    Maity, J. P.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Radon in the groundwater in the Amman-Zarqa Basin and related environments in Jordan2018In: Groundwater for Sustainable Development, ISSN 2352-801X, Vol. 7, p. 73-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The occurrence of radon (222Rn) in environment (groundwater and indoor air) from geogenic sources is receiving an growing attention due to its adverse impact on human health worldwide including Jordan. Highlighting the current status of radon in Jordan, the present study of radon concentrations in ground waters in the Amman-Zarqa basin (AZB) was investigated. Groundwater samples were collected from fifteen wells located in three main areas of Ras Al-Ain, Al-Rsaifeh and Al-Hashemite. Radon concentration was measure using Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) Tri- Carb 3110 with discriminator and the highest values for radon concentration in water were observed in Al-Rsaifeh area and ranged from 4.52 up to 30.70 Bq/l with an average of 11.22 Bq/l, which were attributed to the decay of naturally distributed uranium in phosphate rock from Al-Rsaifeh mines. In Ras Al-Ain area, the radon concentration were noted ranged from 0.6 to 5.55 Bq/l with an average of 2.82 Bq/l, and also in Al-Hashemite area were ranged from 0.77 to 5.37 Bq/l with an average of 4.04 Bq/l. The overall average concentration of tested samples was 5.77 Bq/l and found within the acceptable international levels. Ground water samples of Ras Al-Ain area showed good quality as was tested of low salinity. It recorded the lowest average radon concentration of 2.82 Bq/l. Also, Radon indoor and building materials was reviewed. In conclusion, this study presented an urged need for developing national regulations and standards as well as awareness program concerning the radon status in Jordan.Elsevier B.V.

  • 2.
    Ahmad, Arslan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Hoofd Ingenieursbureau, Brabant Water N.V., 's-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands .
    Van De Wetering, S.
    Groenendijk, M.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Advanced Oxidation-Coagulation-Filtration (AOCF) - An innovative treatment technology for targeting drinking water with <1 μg/L of arsenic2014In: One Century of the Discovery of Arsenicosis in Latin America (1914-2014): As 2014 - Proceedings of the 5th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, CRC Press, 2014, p. 817-819Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advanced Oxidation-Coagulation-Filtration (AOCF) has been investigated for producing drinking water with less than 1 μg L-1 of As through a series of bench scale and pilot scale experiments. At bench scale, the suitable coagulant, its combination dose with KMnO4 oxidant, the optimum process pH and kinetics of As removal were determined. The optimized AOCF technique was capable of consistently reducing the As concentration to below 1 μg L-1 when implemented at pilot scale and did not adversely affect the already existing removal processes of Fe, Mn and NH4 +. Dual media filter solved the filter run time reduction issue.

  • 3. Ahmed, K. M.
    et al.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Groundwater arsenic mitigation in Bangladesh: Two decades of advancements in scientific research and policy instruments2014In: One Century of the Discovery of Arsenicosis in Latin America (1914-2014): As 2014 - Proceedings of the 5th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, 2014, p. 886-888Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two decades have passed since the first detection of arsenic above allowable limits in groundwater of Bangladesh. A good number of scientific research and mitigation projects have so far been completed but still today more than 22 million people are exposed to arsenic leaves of 50 μg L-1 or more. As there are many untested new wells, it is not precisely known how many people are exposed to what level. Scientific knowledge about occurrences, distribution and release mechanisms have enhanced significantly. Although deep tube wells have emerged as the most effective mitigation measure over most of the country, still there are areas where this does not work. Recent studies reported effectiveness of alternative options like intermediate deep wells and subsurface arsenic removal. There has been a major paradigm shift in the policy arena regarding arsenic mitigation.

  • 4. Ahmed, K. M.
    et al.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Hasan, M. A.
    Rahman, M
    von Brömssen, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Hossain, Mohammed
    Islam, M. Mainul
    Rahman, Marina
    Rashid, S.M.A.
    Sustainable Arsenic Mitigation (SASMIT) in Bangladesh: The Matlab strategy2010In: Abstracts with programs (Geological Society of America), ISSN 0016-7592, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 652-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5. Ahmed, K. M.
    et al.
    Sultana, S.
    Hasan, M. A.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Hasan, M. K.
    Burgess, W. K.
    Hoque, M. A.
    Groundwater quality contrasts between Upper and Lower Dupi Tila Aquifers in Megacity Dhaka, Bangladesh2011In: Groundwater quality contrasts between Upper and Lower Dupi Tila Aquifers in Megacity Dhaka, Bangladesh: Proc. 7th International Groundwater Quality Conference, 2011, p. 71-74Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dhaka is one of the fastest growing megacities of the world and is set to become the third largest by 2025. Currently about 86% of the municipal water supply comes from over 500 wells drilled in the Dupi Tila aquifers underlying the city. The Upper Dupi Tila aquifer (UDTA) is overexploited and a large part has been dewatered; abstractions from the lower Dupi Tila started only recently. Results of water analysis and EC surveys have been used to decipher the variations in groundwater quality in the UDTA and LDTA. EC surveys reveal a systematic deterioration of water quality in the vicinity of the Buriganga River in southeast Dhaka. The UDTA is more widely affected by anthropogenic processes than the LDTA, which still largely exhibits its intrinsic water quality characteristics. Regular monitoring and proper management practices are essential to protect the quality of this precarious resource.

  • 6.
    Ahmed, K. Matin
    et al.
    Univ Dhaka, Dept Geol.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Hasan, Md. Aziz
    Univ Dhaka, Dept Geol.
    Akhter, S. Humayun
    Univ Dhaka, Dept Geol.
    Alam, S. M. Mahbub
    Univ Dhaka, Dept Geol.
    Bhuyian, M. A. Hossain
    Univ Dhaka, Dept Geol.
    Imam, M. Badrul
    Univ Dhaka, Dept Geol.
    Khan, Aftab A.
    Univ Dhaka, Dept Geol.
    Sracek, Ondra
    Masaryk Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Mineral Petrol & Geochem.
    Arsenic enrichment in groundwater of the alluvial aquifers in Bangladesh: an overview2004In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 181-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic in the groundwater of Bangladesh is a serious natural calamity and a public health hazard. Most groundwater from the shallow alluvial aquifers (<150 m), particularly in the Holocene plain lands, are vulnerable to As-enrichment. Delta plains and flood plains of the Ganges-Brahmaputra river system are moderately to severely enriched and more than 60% of the tube wells are affected. Shallow aquifers in the Meghna river basin and coastal plains are extremely enriched with more than 80% of the tube wells affected. Aquifers in the Pleistocene uplands and Tertiary hills are low in As. The vertical lithofacies sequence of the sediments from highly enriched areas of the country show two distinct lithofacies associations-a dominantly sandy channel-fill association and a fine-grained over bank association. The sediments can be grouped into 4 distinct lithofacies, viz. clay, silty clay, silty sand and sand. Thin section petrography of the As-enriched aquifer sands shows that the sands are of quartzolithic type and derived from the collision suture and fold thrust belt of the recycled orogen provenance. Groundwater is characterized by circum-neutral pH with a moderate to strong reducing nature. The waters are generally of Ca-Mg-HCO3 or Ca-Na-HCO3 type, with HCO3- as the principal anion. Low SO42- and NO3-, and high dissolved organic C (DOC) and NH4+ concentrations are typical chemical characteristics of groundwater. The presence of dissolved sulfides in these groundwaters indicates reduction Of SO4. Total As concentration in the analyzed wells vary between 2.5 and 846 mug l(-1) with a dominance of As(III) species (67-99%). Arsenic(III) concentrations were fairly consistent with the DOC and NH4+ contents. The HNO3 extractable concentrations of As (As-NO3) in the sediments (0.5-17.7 mg kg(-1)), indicate a significant positive correlation with Fe-NO3, Mn-NO3, Al-NO3 and P-NO3. The concentrations Of S-NO3 (816-1306 mg kg(-1)) peaked in the clay sediments with high organic matter (up to 4.5 wt.%). Amounts of oxalate extractable As (As..) and Fe (Fe x) ranged between 0.1-8.6 mg kg(-1) and 0.4-5.9 g kg(-1), respectively. Arsenic(ox) was positively correlated with Fe-ox, Mn-ox, and Al-ox in these sediments. Insignificant amounts of opaque minerals (including pyrite/arsenopyrite) and the presence of high As contents in finer sediments suggests that some As is incorporated in the authigenically precipitated sulfides in the reducing sediments. Moreover, the chemical extractions suggest the presence of siderite and vivianite as solid phases, which may control the aqueous chemistry of Fe and PO43-. Reductive dissolution of Fe oxyhydroxide present as coatings on sand grains as well as altered mica (biotite) is envisaged as the main mechanism for the release of As into groundwater in the sandy aquifer sediments.

  • 7. Ahmed, K.M
    et al.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Civil and Environmental Engineering.
    Hasan, M.A
    Akhter, S.H
    Alam, S.M.M
    Bhuyian, M.A.H
    Imam, M.B
    Khan, A.A
    Sracek, O
    Arsenic contamination in grounwater of alluvial aquifers in Bangladesh: An overview2004In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 181-200Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Alam, M.S.
    et al.
    Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada.
    Ahmed, Kazi Matin
    University of Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Hasan, M.A.
    University of Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Muhammed
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Controls of sedimentary facies on arsenic mobilization in shallow aquifers of the Matlab North Upazila, southeastern Bangladesh2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Groundwater extracted from shallow (<100 m bgl) Holocene alluvial aquifers, is the primary source of drinking water in Matlab North Upazila, Southeast Bangladesh. The distribution of lithofacies and its relation to hydrochemistry in such heterogeneous deposits are of fundamental importance for the analysis of groundwater quality. Aquifer sediment samples were collected from 48 locations throughout the study area. Lithofacies distribution was characterized using grain size and sediment colors. Channel fills (sandy) and over bank (silt-clay) deposits the two main lithofacies groups, were identified. These sandy deposits represent an active meandering river or channel fills sediment sequence, which are usually capped by silts and clays of an over bank sediment sequence. All the collected sediments samples were generalized and subdivided based on four distinct color variations, such as Black, White, Off-white, and Red according to Munsell color chart and water-well drillers’ perception.

    Mineral compositions showed variability with the sediment color and grain size. Red and off-white sediments contain fewer amounts of metastable minerals (hornblende, actinolite, kyanite and pyroxenes etc.) than that of black sediments, whereas black sediments contain higher amount of biotite. The relatively high content of biotite and other dark colored ferromagnesian minerals are responsible for the black and grayish color of these sediments. Ferruginous coating on silicates, particularly on quartz grains, gives the red and off-white coloration. Based on the available information regarding sediment colors of aquifers in which tubewell screens were placed, 44 domestic hand pumped tubewells (HTWs) were selected for water sampling. The groundwater abstracted from black sediments of shallow aquifer showed higher concentrations in DOC (median: 5.81 mg/L), dissolved NH

    4+ (median: 3.47 mg/L), PO43- (median: 1.36 mg/L), Fe (median: 4.87 mg/L), As (median: 252.53 μg/L) and relatively low Mn (median: 0.54 mg/L) and SO42-(median: 0.59 mg/L) concentrations, whereas groundwater abstracted from off-white and red sediments of shallow aquifer showed lower concentrations in DOC (median: 1.95 and 1.71 mg/L, respectively), dissolved NH4+ (median: 0), PO43- (median: 0.14 and 0.04 mg/L, respectively), Fe (median: 2.25 and 0.63 mg/L, respectively), As (median: 17.36 and 15.05 μg/L, respectively) and relatively high Mn+2 (median: 1.12 and 1.15 mg/L, respectively) and SO42- (median: 0.79 and 0.78 mg/L, respectively) concentrations. The water samples collected from black sediments (median Eh: 211 mV) indicated most reducing environment, followed by white (median Eh: 227 mV), whereas off-white and red sediments (median Eh: 268 and 274 mV) signified less reducing environment. The study supports that the sediment colors in shallow aquifer can be a reliable indicator of high and low-As concentrations and can be a useful tool for local drillers to target arsenic safe aquifers.

  • 9. Amofah, Lea Rastas
    et al.
    Maurice, Christian
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Extraction of Arsenic from Soils Contaminated with Wood Preservation Chemicals2010In: Soil & sediment contamination, ISSN 1532-0383, E-ISSN 1549-7887, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 142-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three soil samples contaminated by chromated zinc arsenate (CZA) or chromated copper arsenate (CCA) were investigated in a laboratory scale to study As mobilization and to identify a chemical agent that could be used in soil washing to extract arsenic. Besides high As extraction, the cost, occupational health issues and technical aspects were considered when selecting the chemical. Arsenic is strongly bound to CZA/CCA soils; only similar to 50% of the tot-As was removed from water-washed soils. High Fe or Al mobilization is not necessarily indicative of high As removal from CZA/CCA soils. A high Cu/As-ratio and a large amount of soluble Ca in the soil hampered As extraction. The high ratio can be an indication of stable Cu-arsenates in soil. Calcium can react with the extraction agent or with As during extraction. Sodium hydroxide, dithionite with citrate (and oxalate) (dithionite solutions), and oxalate with citrate were the most efficient chemicals for removing As from the soils. The disadvantages of using these strong chemicals are: a high cost (oxalate with citrate); damage to equipment (dithionite solutions); an adverse impact on occupational health (dithionite solutions); or a deterioration in soil quality after extraction (NaOH and dithionite solutons). Phosphate, solutions based on NH2OH center dot HCl, or citrate were not efficient in mobilizing As from the soils.

  • 10. Amofah, Lea Rastas
    et al.
    Maurice, Christian
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    The influence of temperature, pH/molarity and extractant on the removal of arsenic, chromium and zinc from contaminated soil2011In: Journal of Soils and Sediments, ISSN 1439-0108, E-ISSN 1614-7480, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 1334-1344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Normal soil washing leave high residual pollutant content in soil. The remediation could be improved by targeting the extraction to coarser fractions. Further, a low/high extraction pH and higher temperature enhance the pollutant removal, but these measures are costly. In this study, the utility of NaOH, oxalate-citrate (OC) and dithionite-citrate-oxalate (DCO) solutions for extracting of arsenic, chromium and zinc from contaminated soil were assessed and compared. In addition the effects of NaOH concentration and temperature on NaOH extractions, and those of temperature and pH on OC and DCO extractions, were evaluated. Materials and methods A two-level, full-factorial design with a centre point was implemented. Two factors, concentration and temperature,were evaluated in NaOH extractions, and pH and temperature for OC and DCO solutions. In all cases, the extraction temperature was 20A degrees C, 30A degrees C and 40A degrees C. The studied NaOH concentrations were 0.05, 0.075 and 0.1 M. The pH in OC solutions was 3, 5 and 7, and in DCO solutions, 4.7, 6.3 and 6.7. Water-washed and medium coarse soil fraction of arsenic, chromium and zinc contaminated soil was agitated for 15 min with the extraction solution. Results and discussion In NaOH extractions, the temperature and (less strongly) NaOH concentration significantly affected As and Cr mobilisation, but only the latter affected Zn mobilisation. Both pH and temperature significantly (and similarly) influenced As and Cr mobilisation in OC extractions, while only the pH influenced Zn mobilisation. In contrast, the extraction temperature (but not pH) influenced As, Cr and Zn mobilisation in DCO extractions. Conclusions For all extractants, mobilisation was most efficient at elevated temperature (40A degrees C). None of the extractants reduced the soil's As content to below the Swedish EPA's guideline value. Use of DCO is not recommended because dithionite has a short lifetime and residual arsenic contents in DCO-extracted soil are relatively high. Instead, sequential extraction with NaOH followed by OC solutions (affording significant reductions in As, Cr and Zn levels in the soil with short extraction times) at 40A degrees C is recommended.

  • 11.
    Annaduzzaman, Md
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Sanitary Engineering Section, Department of Water Management, Delft University of Technology, Stevinweg 1, 2628 CN, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Biswas, Ashis
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Bhopal, Bhopal Bypass Road, Bhauri, Bhopal 462 066, Madhya Pradesh, India.
    Hossain, M.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. NGO Forum for Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation, Block-E, Lalmatia, Dhaka 1207, Bangladesh.
    Ahmed, K. M.
    van Halem, D.
    Arsenic and manganese in shallow tubewells: validation of platform color as a screening tool in Bangladesh2018In: Groundwater for Sustainable Development, ISSN 2352-801X, Vol. 6, p. 181-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to evaluate the potential of handpump tubewell platform color as a low-cost, quick and convenient screening tool for As and Mn in drinking water tubewells. For this study, groundwater samples and corresponding tubewell platform pictures were collected from 272 shallow tubewells in Matlab Upazila of South-Eastern Bangladesh. The result shows that arsenic concentration within the surveyed (n = 272) tubewells, 99% (n = 269) exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline value of 10 µg/L, and 98% (n = 267) exceeded the Bangladesh drinking water standards (BDWS) of 50 µg/L. In relation to the platform color concept, within 233 (total 272) red colored platform tubewells, 230 (99%) exceeded the WHO guideline value of 10 µg/L, and 229 (98%) tubewells exceeded BDWS of 50 µg/L. This result shows a strong correlation between the development of red color stain on tubewell platform and As concentrations in the corresponding tubewell water. This study suggests that red-colored platform can be used for primary identification of tubewells with an elevated level of As and thus could prioritize sustainable As mitigation management in developing countries where water comes from reductive shallow aquifers. This study did not confirm the potential for Mn screening, as red discoloration by Fe oxides was found to mask the black discoloration of Mn oxides. It is recommended to further investigate this screening tool in regions with a higher well-to-well variability of As contaminations, as in the presented study As was found >10ug/L in 99% of the tubewells.

  • 12.
    Annaduzzaman, Md.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Deshpande, Paritosh Chakor
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Ersoz, M.
    Lazarova, Z.
    Chitosan biopolymer: a treatment option for uranium(VI) removal from drinking waterManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Annaduzzaman, Md.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Ersoz, M.
    Lazarova, Z.
    Characterization of a chitosan biopolymer and arsenate removal for drinking water treatment2014In: One Century of the Discovery of Arsenicosis in Latin America (1914-2014): As 2014 - Proceedings of the 5th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, CRC Press, 2014, p. 745-747Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chitosan biopolymer with a deacetylation degree of 85%, was assessed for its capability to adsorb As(V) from drinking water by batch experiments. To characterize the chitosan biopolymer, chitosan was analyzed by FTIR and SEM. The results showed that chitosan is an effective and promising sorbent for As(V) from drinking water. From the batch tests, results showed a maximum adsorption of 355 μg/L of As(V) with 1.18 μg g-1 adsorption capacity at pH 6. The kinetic data, obtained at pH 6 could be fitted with pseudo-second order equation (adsorption capacity: 0.923 μg g-1) and the process was suitably described by a Freundlich (R2 = 0.9933) model than by a Langmuir model (R2 = 0.9741). The results above indicated that chitosan is a very favorable sorbent for As(V) removal from aqueous solution.

  • 14.
    Annaduzzaman, Md.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Ersoz, M.
    Lazarova, Z.
    Evaluation and optimization of chitosan biopolymer as an adsorbent for arsenic(V) in drinking watert treatmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Annaduzzaman, Md.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Biswas, Ashis
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Hossain, Md
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. International Center for Applied Climate Science, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, QLD, Australia .
    Alauddin, M.
    Cekovic, R.
    Alauddin, S.
    Shaha, S.
    Tubewell platform color as a screening tool for arsenic in shallow drinking water wells in Bangladesh2016In: Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability - Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016, CRC Press/Balkema , 2016, p. 632-633Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of a simple and low cost technique for determination of arsenic (As) in drinking water wells is an urgent need to accelerate As mitigation policy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potentiality of tubewell platform color as low-cost, quick and convenient screening tool for As. The result shows strong correlation between the development of red color stain on tubewells platform and As enrichment in the corresponding tubewells water compared to WHO (10 μg/L) and BDWS (50 μg/L), with 99% certainty. The red color stain in the platform indicates 98% sensitivity with WHO (10 μg/L) and BDWS (50 μg/L). With regard to WHO and BDWS, the corresponding efficiency of the platform color as screening tool for As are 97.3% and 97%. This study suggests that platform color can be potentially used for screening tubewells, help users switch to tube wells with low As and facilitate sustainable As mitigation efforts in developing countries. 

  • 16.
    Annaduzzaman, Md.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Biswas, Ashis
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Hossain, Mohammad
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Ahmed, Kazi Matin
    University of Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Tubewell platform color: A low-cost and rapid screening tool for arsenic and manganese in drinking water2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Presence of high level of geogenic arsenic (As) in groundwater is one of the major and adverse drinking water quality problem all over the world, especially in Southeast Asia, where groundwater is the prominent drinking water source. Bangladesh is already considered as one of the most As affected territories, where As contamination in the groundwater is key environmental disasters. Recently besides As, presence of high level of manganese (Mn) in drinking water has also got attention due to its neurological effect on children. It becomes very essential to formulate a reliable safe drinking water management policy to reduce the health threat caused by drinking As and Mn contained groundwater. The development of a simple low cost technique for the determination of As and Mn in drinking water wells is an important step to formulate this policy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potentiality of tubewell platform color as low-cost, quick and convenient screening tool for As and Mn in drinking water wells (n=272) in a highly arsenic affected area on Matlab, Southeastern Bangladesh.

    The result shows strong correlation between the development of red color stain on tubewell platform and As enrichment in the corresponding tubewell water compared to WHO drinking water guideline (10 μg/L) as well as Bangladesh drinking water standard (BDWS) (50 μg/L), with certainty values of 98.7% and 98.3% respectively. The sensitivity and efficiency of red colored platforms to screen high As water in tubewells are 98% and 97% respectively at 10 μg/L, whereas at cut-off level of 50μg/L both sensitivity and efficiency values are 98%. This study suggests that red colored platform could be potentially used for primary identification of tubewells with elevated level of As and thus could prioritise sustainable As mitigation management in developing countries. Due to lack of tubewells with black colored platform in the study area, the use of platform color concept for screening of Mn enriched water in the wells have not been tested significantly, which requires further study.

    Acknowledgements: This study was carried out with support from the Liuuaeus-Palme Academic Exchange Programme supported by International Programs Office (IPK) and the KTH led joint collaborative action research project on Sustainable Arsenic Mitigation- SASMIT (Sid Contribution 750000854).

  • 17.
    Aullón Alcaine, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Schulz, C.
    Universidad Nacional de la Pampa, Argentina.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    University of Southern Queensland, Australia.
    Thunvik, Roger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Physics.
    Mörth, Carl-Magnus
    Stockholms Universitet, Institutionen för geologiska vetenskaper.
    Geogenic arsenic and fluoride in shallow aquifers of northeastern La Pampa, Argentina: mobility constraints2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    High concentrations of geogenic arsenic (As) and fluoride (F-) in groundwater have been reported at elevated concentrations in different parts of the Chaco-Pampean Plain, in Argentina, where more than 2 million people may be exposed to high levels of these toxic elements through drinking water. Groundwater from the shallow aquifer is far exceeding the permissible WHO Standard limits of 10 μg/L for As and 1.5 mg/L for fluoride, as well as the Argentinean Standard limit of 50 μg/L for As. Geogenic As results due to the weathering of ash originated by volcanic eruptions from the Andean Cordillera and transported by wind and deposited along with the sediments and also as discrete layers and lenses over large geographical area containing around 90% of rhyolitic glass. Groundwater is hosted in a sandy silty interconnected system of aquifers and aquitards within the The Pampean aquifer. A total of 44 groundwater samples were collected from the shallow aquifers in NE of La Pampa province. Two rural areas covering an area of 600km2 in Quemú Quemú (QQ) and 300km2 in Intendente Alvear (IA) were investigated in the present study. Groundwater was circum-neutral to alkaline (pH 7.43-9.18), predominantly oxidizing (Eh ~0.24 V) with widely variable EC range (456-11,400 μS/cm). The major cation dissolved in groundwater was Na+, while the predominant anions were HCO3-, Cl- and SO42-, respectively. Water type in QQ was mostly Na-HCO3- while in IA, the composition differed between Na-HCO3- and Na-Cl-SO42- water types. Groundwater composition showed high degree of mineralization and high salinity evidenced by high EC. In discharge areas, high evaporation rates result in high salinity of shallow groundwater and visible salts incrustations on the surface of the lakes. Elevated concentrations of NO3- and PO43- observed in some wells indicated possible anthropogenic contamination. Total As concentration in groundwater from QQ ranged from 5.58 to 535 μg/L, where 94% of the wells exceeded the WHO standard limit for safe drinking water of 10 μg/L, and 56% of the wells exceeded the old Argentine standard limit of 50 μg/L. F- concentrations revealed heterogeneity and high concentrations in some wells (0.5-14.2 mg/L), 78% of samples in QQ study area exceeded the WHO standard limit of 1.5 mg/L. Under oxidizing conditions and neutral to alkaline pH, arsenate (AsV) species predominated, mainly in HAsO42- forms. As "hotspots" indicated locally contamination and correlated positively with F-, HCO3-, B and V and showed negative correlation with salinity, dissolved Fe, Al and Mn. The mechanisms involved in the mobilization of As in the shallow aquifers are controlled by the rise of pH, variations in Eh conditions and the presence of competitor ions (HCO3-, PO43-, Si, V oxyanions). Geochemical processes like adsorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution and redox reactions may trigger to As mobilization in the shallow aquifers of La Pampa region.

  • 18.
    Aullón Alcaine, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Sandhi, Arifin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Thunvik, Roger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Schulz, C.
    Mörth, C. M.
    Distribution and mobility of geogenic arsenic in the shallow aquifers of the northeast of La Pampa, Argentina2012In: Understanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment, 2012, p. 132-134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Groundwater contamination with elevated Arsenic (As) and other toxic trace elements has been studied in the central part of the vast Chaco-Pampean Plain, in the city of Quemú Quemú, northeastern La Pampa, Argentina. The groundwater samples were mostly alkaline with pH ranging up to 9.18, oxidizing and characterized by high EC. The concentration of total As (5.58-535 μg/L) and fluoride (0.5-14.2 mg/L) in some samples exceeded the recommended WHO drinking water guideline and the Argentine national drinking water standard. Arsenic was positively correlated with bicarbonate (HCO 3 -), Boron (B), Fluoride (F) and Vanadium (V). Long-term consumption of the groundwater could pose a severe health threat for the local community.

  • 19.
    Balfors, Berit
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    SINGH, NANDITA
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Koku, John
    Dept. of Geography & Environment, University of Ghana.
    Contamination of water resources in Takwa mining area of Ghana: Linking technical, social-economic and gender dimensions2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ghana is Africa’s second largest producer of gold with gold deposits in western part of the country. There are seven large-scale mines and 168 small-scale mining concessions valid in the region. Wassa West District is an important mining area, with Tarkwa as administrative capital. In recent years, the area has been exposed to lead, cadmium, arsenic, mercury and cyanide. Both small and large-scale mining industries have reportedly contaminated rivers, streams, dug wells and boreholes with heavy metals such as lead, cadmium, arsenic, mercury and cyanide. There has been significant adverse impact upon health, economy, and social life that may be felt differently by women and men, raising the question of sustainable access to safe water as a millennium development goal (MDG) in the area.

    A multi-disciplinary approach was adopted in the project with distinct work components on the technical as well as on social, gender and policy aspects. It also aimed to suggest integrated strategies to address the problem so as to ensure achievement of the MDGs. Based upon a field study in 37 local communities coupled with water and sediment analysis from the area, the research indicated the existence of not only higher levels of metal contaminants in local water resources in Tarkwa area, particularlymanganese and iron, but also arsenic and aluminium in some wells. However, water resources, particularly groundwater is currently safe for human consumption but the spillages of cyanide and other effluents into surface streams have health and ecological implications. Levels of mercury in stream sediments are high with a clear risk of methylation of the mercury and transfer in the food chain via fish to humans.

    Regarding the impact of mining, it was found that for women who are the primary domestic water managers, contamination of local water sources has forced them to fetch water from greater distances, and livelihoods are hampered due to the fish loss through cyanide spillages in streams. Another finding was the lack of trust and rising water conflicts between mining authorities and the local communities. Regarding the policy aspects underlying the problem, it was found that there is a lack of coordination between the 3 policy areas, namely, rural water supply, mining, and environmental impact assessment (EIA) and environmental protection to the detriment of women as water users and domestic water managers. While impact of mining is increasingly seen as an issue of human rights violation, little is being done to strengthen participatory approaches especially involving women in rural water supply programs. The detailed analysis of the EIA regulations reveals that most mining have not undertaken any comprehensive EIA guiding their operations.

    A number of recommendations have emerged from the integrated perspective attempted to be developed through this research. These include a need for further in-depth explorations on the situation of contamination in groundwater and surface waters as well as stream sediments in the area; the need to resolve the situations of water conflicts between the local communities and the mining authorities by promoting greater public participation; and the need to minimize the gaps between the three related policy frameworks. Also, there is a necessity to strengthen environmental compliance on part of the mining companies so as to uphold the quality of water resources in the area.

  • 20. Bhattacharya, Aparajita
    et al.
    Routh, Joyanto
    Jacks, Gunnar
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Morth, Magnus
    Environmental assessment of abandoned mine tailings in Adak, Vasterbotten district (northern Sweden)2006In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 1760-1780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sulfide-rich mine tailings in Adak that are exposed to weathering cause acid mine drainage characterized by low PH (2-4) and high SO4 (UP to 800 mg L-1). Surface water, sediment and soil samples collected in this study contain higher concentrations of As, Cu, Fe and Zn, compared to the target and/or intervention limits set by international regulatory agencies. In particular, high As concentrations in water (up to 2900 mu g L- 1) and sediment (up to 900 mg kg(-1)) are of concern. There is large variability in trace element concentrations, implying that both physical (grain size) and chemical factors (pH, secondary phases as sulfides, Al-oxides or clay minerals) play an important role in their distribution. The low PH keeps the trace elements dissolved, and they are transported farther downstream. Trace element partition coefficients are low (log K-d = 0.3-4.3), and saturation indices calculated with PHREEQC are < 0 for common oxide and sulfidic minerals. The sediment and soil samples indicate an enhanced pollution index (up to 17), and high enrichment factors for trace elements (As up to 38,300; Zn up to 800). Finally, leaves collected from different plant types indicate bioaccumulation of several elements (As, Al, Cu, Fe and Zn). However, some of the plants growing in this area (e.g., Salix, Equisetum) are generally resistant to metal toxicity, and hence, liming and phytoremediation could be considered as potential on-site remediation methods.

  • 21.
    Bhattacharya, P.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Hossain, M.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Jacks, G.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Matin Ahmed, K.
    Hasan, M. A.
    Von Brömssen, M.
    Frape, S. K.
    Hydrogeochemical contrasts across the multi-level aquifers of Bengal basin in Matlab, Bangladesh: Implications for arsenic free and low-manganese drinking water sources2016In: Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability - Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016, CRC Press/Balkema , 2016, p. 45-46Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Targeting shallow, intermediate-deep and deep aquifers, piezometers nests were installed at 15 locations in the Matlab region, an As hotspot in southeastern Bangladesh. Groundwater levels and water quality were monitored for over a three years period. Stable isotopic composition was used to identify the hydrogeological characteristics of different aquifers, hydraulic connectivity between the contaminated and safe aquifers. Within the shallow depth (up to 100m), two aquifers (Aquifer-1 and Aquifer-2) were identified, and groundwater from Aquifer-1 indicated consistently high As concentration was found to be As-enriched (median As levels upto 714 μg/L). Considerable variability in As concentrations were observed in Aquifer-2 wells (6–30 μg/L) comprising relatively oxidized or less reduced red and off-white sands. The intermediate-deep and deep aquifers were found to contain very low As concentration and these aquifers are hydraulically separated from the shallow aquifers. Groundwater depth and elevation and stable isotope signatures also reflect that intermediate-deep and deep aquifers, in most places belong to the same hydrostratigraphic unit (Aquifer-3). © 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, London.

  • 22.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Ahmed, K.M.
    Hasan, M.A.
    Broms, S.
    Fogelström, J.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Sracek, O.
    von Brömssen, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Routh, J.
    Mobility of arsenic in groundwater in a part of Brahmanbaria district, NE Bangladesh2006In: Managing Arsenic in the Environment: From soil to human health / [ed] Naidu, R., Smith, E., Owens, G., Bhattacharya, P. Nadebaum. P., Melbourne, Australia: CSIRO Publishing , 2006, p. 95-115Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Biswas, Ashis
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Halder, Dipti
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Nath, B.
    Chatterjee, D.
    Mukherjee, A.
    Tubewell platform color: Assessment of a tool for rapid screening of arsenic and manganese in well water2012In: Understanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment, Taylor & Francis Group, 2012, p. 515-518Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study attempts to make a statistical comparison between Tubewell (TW) platform color and the level of Arsenic (As) and Manganese (Mn) concentration in groundwater abstracted from a set of 423 Tubewells (TWs) in Chakdaha Block of Nadia District, West Bengal, India to validate platform color as a screening tool for both As and Mn in groundwater. The results indicate that water extracted from TWs with black colored platform in 93% cases was safe for As while water extracted from TWs with red colored platform is contaminated with As with 38% certainty, compared to drinking water standard of India (50 ÎŒg/L). At this standard the respective efficiency, sensitivity and specificity of the tool are 65, 85 and 59%. If WHO drinking water guideline (10 ÎŒg/L) is considered, the certainty increases to 73% and 84% respectively for black and red colored platform with respective efficiency, sensitivity and specificity values of 79, 77 and 81%. Furthermore, the black colored platform with 78% certainty indicates well water is enriched with Manganese (Mn), while red colored platform indicates water is low in Mn with 64% certainty evaluated against Indian national standard of 300 ÎŒg/L. This study demonstrates that platform color can be potentially used as an initial screening tool for As and Mn, to assess the safe water acess for drinking purposes.

  • 24.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Bundschuh, J
    Groundwater for sustainable development - cross cutting the UN sustainable development goals2015In: Groundwater for Sustainable Development, ISSN 2352-801X, Vol. 1, no 1-2, p. 155-157Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Chatterjee, Debashis
    Department of Chemistry, University of Kalyani, Kalyani-741 235, India.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Occurrence of arsenic-contaminated groundwater in alluvial aquifers from delta plains, eastern India: Options for safe drinking water supply1997In: International Journal of Water Resources Development, ISSN 0790-0627, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 79-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic contamination in groundwater used for drinking purposes has been envisaged as a problem of global concern. Exploitation of groundwater contaminated with arsenic within the delta plains in West Bengal has caused adverse health effects among the population within a span of 8-10 years. The sources of arsenic in natural water are a function of the local geology, hydrology and geochemical characteristics of the aquifers. The retention and mobility of different arsenic species are sensitive to varying redox conditions. The delta plains in West Bengal are characterized by a series of meander belts formed by the fluvial processes comprising different cycles of complete or truncated fining upward sequences (sand-silt-clay). The arseniferous groundwater belts are mainly located in the upper delta plain and in abandoned meander channels. Mineralogical investigations have established that arsenic in the silty day as well as in the sandy layers occurs as coatings on mineral grains. Clayey sediments intercalated with sandy aquifers at depths between 20 and 80 m are reported as a major source of arsenic in groundwater. Integrated knowledge on geological, hydrological and geochemical characteristics of the multi-level aquifer system of the upper delta plain is therefore necessary in predicting the origin, occurrence and mobility of arsenic in groundwater in West Bengal. This would also provide a basis for developing suitable low-cost techniques for safe drinking water supply in the region.

  • 26.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Claesson, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bundschuh, J.
    Sracek, O.
    Fagerberg, Jens
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Martin, R. A.
    Storniolo, A. D.
    Thir, J. M.
    Distribution and mobility of arsenic in the Rio Dulce alluvial aquifers in Santiago del Estero Province, Argentina2006In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 358, no 1-3, p. 97-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Factors controlling arsenic (As) mobilization in the aquifers of the Rio Dulce alluvial cone were investigated. Groundwater analyses show severe As contamination (average concentration of 743 mu g/L) from geogenic sources, but spatial variability of As concentration is considerable. Sequential leaching of sediment samples from unsaturated zone using de-ionised water, bicarbonate, acetate, and oxalate extracted As to different extents. Sediment oxalate extraction showed that Al and Mn oxide and hydroxides are more abundant than Fe oxides and hydroxides, in spite of similar total Fe, Mn, and Al concentrations in the sediment. Speciation calculations performed for saturated zone samples indicated that Fe and Al oxides and hydroxides are stable in groundwater, suggesting that As adsorption processes may be to some extent controlled by the presence of Fe and Al mineral phases. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that As is related to F, V, Mo, B, Si, most likely due to their common origin in volcanic ash. This suggests the volcanic ash as the probable source of groundwater As. Locally, elevated pH values linked to carbonate dissolution, cation exchange, and dissolution of silicates promote release of adsorbed As. Another factor contributing to the release of As locally may be the input of organic matter from excessive irrigation. The conceptual model of As release includes: i) As influx from dissolution of volcanic glass in volcanic ash, ii) adsorption of As on the surface of Fe and Al mineral phases in relatively low pH zones, and iii) high mobility of As in high pH zones. Future work should be focused on the determination of mineralogical forms of As in volcanic ash and on detailed investigation on factors controlling As mobility.

  • 27.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Claesson, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Fagerberg, Jens
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    Storniolo, Angel del R.
    Martin, Raul A.
    Thir, Juan Martin
    Sracek, Ondra
    Natural arsenic in the groundwater of the alluvial aquifers of Santiago del Estero Province, Argentina2005In: Natural Arsenic in Groundwater: Occurrence, Remediation and Management / [ed] Bundschuh, J; Bhattacharya, P; Chandrasekharam, D, London: Balkema, 2005, p. 57-65Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural occurrences of arsenic has been documented in groundwater of the shallow aquifers of the Chaco-Pampean Plain, Argentina. The distribution of arsenic and mechanisms of its mobilization in the shallow alluvial aquifers was investigated around the city of Santiago del Estero in Northwestern Argentina in order to provide an insight into the complex hydrological and geochemical conditions that yields high As concentrations in groundwater. Significant spatial variations of total arsenic (As-tot) concentrations were observed with an average value of 743 mu g/L. Arsenate was a dominant species in most samples. Average concentrations of Al, Mn, and Fe were 360 mu g/L, 574 mu g/L, and 459 mu g/L, respectively. The 7M HNO3 extraction of sediments and volcanic ash-layer indicated AS(N03) concentrations ranging between 2.5-7.1 mg/kg. AS(N03) indicated a significant positive correlation with Mn-N03, Al-N03, and Fe-N03. Oxalate extractions revealed significant fractions of As (Aso(ox)) in the sediments (0.4-1.4mg/kg) and a dominance of oxalate extractable Al- and Mn. Speciation calculations indicate that Al oxide and hydroxides have the potential to precipitate in the groundwater, suggesting that As adsorption processes may be to some extent controlled by Al oxides and hydroxides. Mobility of As at local scale seems to depend on high pH values, related to the dissolution of carbonates driven by cation exchange, and dissolution of silicates. There is a clear relationship of As with F, V, B and Si, suggesting their common origin in volcanic ash layer. Preliminary conceptual model of arsenic input includes release of As and Al from dissolution of volcanic ash layer, precipitation of Al oxides and hydroxides followed by adsorption of As on Al and Fe phases in sediments, and release of As under high pH conditions.

  • 28.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Hasan, Md Aziz
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Sracek, Ondra
    Smith, Euan
    Ahmed, K. Matin
    von Brömssen, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Huq, S. M. Imamul
    Naidu, Ravi
    Groundwater chemistry and arsenic mobilization in the Holocene flood plains in south-central Bangladesh2009In: Environmental Geochemistry and Health, ISSN 0269-4042, E-ISSN 1573-2983, Vol. 31, p. 23-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comparative study of arsenic enrichment in the Bengal Delta (BD) was carried Out in three alluvial aquifers in south-central Bangladesh. Investigated sites included Sonargaon in Narayanganj, Chandina in Comilla and Sirajdikhan in Munshiganj districts. At all sites samples from different depths were collected, and water chemistry and redox status vs. depth trends were determined. The concentrations of DOC and HCO3- were highest at Sirajdikhan site, while at the Sonargaon and Chandina sites the concentrations were lower. On the contrary, the NH4+ concentration was high at the Chandina site as compared to the other sites. There was a good match between dissolved As and Fe at the Sirajdikhan and Sonargaon sites, but not at the Chandina site. The dissolved aqueous concentration of Mn was low at the Chandina site, which suggested that the Mn(IV) redox buffering step was missing. Speciation modeling indicated a possibility of siderite precipitation at all sites, but precipitation of rhodochrosite only at the Sonargaon and Sirajdikhan sites. At the Sirajdikhan site, the log P-CO2 values were very high (-1.37), which revealed the production Of CO2 in redox processes. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicated an impact of sea water and redox status of different samples. These results suggest that the dissolved As is de-coupled from dissolved Mn because when released, As is re-adsorbed onto the Fe(Ill) minerals in solid phase, as well as from dissolved Fe when precipitation of Fe(II) minerals controls the aqueous concentrations of Fe. In addition, several other concurrent redox processes may exert kinetic constraints depending on refractory characteristics of Fe(II) minerals.

  • 29.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Hossain, Mohammed
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Ahmed, K. M.
    Hasan, M. A.
    Von Brömssen, M.
    Groundwater arsenic pollution: A conceptual framework for sustainable mitigation strategy2014In: One Century of the Discovery of Arsenicosis in Latin America (1914-2014): As 2014 - Proceedings of the 5th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, CRC Press, 2014, p. 881-885Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tubewells installed by local drillers, provide access of drinking water in rural Bangladesh. Significant proportion of these wells contains arsenic (As) above the WHO guideline and the Bangladesh Drinking Water Standard. Various attempts for mitigation at household and community scale have resulted in limited success, but through the local driller's initiatives, the tubewells are the source of priority drinking water supply. We have developed a concept of Sustainable Arsenic Mitigation (SASMIT) to identify and target the safe aquifers through detailed hydrogeological studies for scientific validation of the water quality with respect to the color of the shallow sediments as perceived by local drillers. Together with water quality monitoring, we have also targeted the Intermediate Depth Aquifers (IDA) for providing As-safe and low manganese (Mn) water. SASMIT intervention logic also considered the relevant socio-economic scenario, such as household distribution, poverty issues and available safe water access for prioritizing safe well installation.

  • 30.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Hossain, Mohammed
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Rahman, Shamsun Naima
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Robinson, Clare
    Nath, Bibhash
    Rahman, Marina
    Islam, M. Mainul
    Von Brömssen, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Ahmed, Kazi Matin
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Chowdhury, Dulaly
    Rahman, Mahfuzar
    Jakariya, Mohammed
    Persson, Lars Ake
    Vahter, Marie
    Temporal and seasonal variability of arsenic in drinking water wells in Matlab, southeastern Bangladesh: A preliminary evaluation on the basis of a 4 year study2011In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 1177-1184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporal and seasonal variability of As concentrations in groundwater were evaluated in As-affected areas of Matlab, southeastern Bangladesh. Groundwater samples from 61 randomly selected tubewells were analyzed for As concentrations over a period of three years and four months (from July 2002 to November 2005) and monitored seasonally (three times a year). The mean As concentrations in the sampled tubewells decreased from 153 to 123 mu g/L during July 2002 to November 2005. Such changes were pronounced in tubewells with As concentration >50 mu g/L than those with As concentrations <50 mu g/L. Similarly, individual wells revealed temporal variability, for example some wells indicated a decreasing trend, while some other wells indicated stable As concentration during the monitoring period. The mean As concentrations were significantly higher in Matlab North compared with Matlab South. The spatial variations in the mean As concentrations may be due to the differences in local geological conditions and groundwater flow patterns. The variations in mean As concentrations were also observed in shallow (<40 m) and deep (>40 m) wells. However, to adequately evaluate temporal and seasonal variability of As concentration, it is imperative to monitor As concentrations in tubewells over a longer period of time. Such long-term monitoring will provide important information for the assessment of human health risk and the sustainability of safe drinking water supplies.

  • 31.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jacks, G.
    Ahmed, K. M.
    Routh, J.
    Khan, A. A.
    Arsenic in groundwater of the Bengal Delta Plain aquifers in Bangladesh2002In: Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, ISSN 0007-4861, E-ISSN 1432-0800, Vol. 69, no 4, p. 538-545Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Brömssen, Mattias von
    Ramböll AB, 10462 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Arsenic in Swedish groundwater Mobility and risk for naturally elevated concentrations: Final Report2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic (As) in groundwater has become a serious global problem during the last few decades forseveral reasons. The chronic toxicity from drinking water has motivated the lowering of thehealth limit from 50 μg/L to 10 μg/L. Due to the rather complicated analytical chemistry of As ithas seldom been analysed in groundwater. Once the common occurrence of excess As ingroundwater has been discovered like in Bangladesh it has become evident that As in concentrationswell above the health limit can be easily mobilized from very moderate amounts in the aquifermaterial under specific conditions. There are essentially three mechanisms of mobilization: 1)oxidation of sulphides containing As; 2) reduction of ferric compounds releasing adsorbed Asand 3) high pH conditions leading to lowered adsorption capacity of ferric and aluminium compounds.

    This study has aimed at investigating the mobilization of As under the conditions existing in Precambrianrocks and the overlying tills in Sweden. As study area the north-eastern part of theVästerbotten county was chosen. The occurrence of sulphides both in mineralisations and insome of the country rocks may infer that the risk of elevated As concentrations in groundwatermay be a bit higher there than elsewhere in Sweden. The hypothesis was that the two firstmechanisms mentioned above would be responsible for any elevated groundwater As in groundwater,thus either oxidation of sulphides or reducing conditions leading the reduction of ferrichydroxides.

    Samples were collected from drilled wells, dug wells and springs. pH, Eh and temperature weremeasured in the field and the samples were filtered through 0.20 m filters in the field. As(II) wasseparated from As(V) in the field by ion-exchangers. As redox conditions are the determinantsfor the mobilization of As the groundwaters have been classified into five redox classes followinga classification developed by the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. Dug wells with elevatedAs turned out to be in the oxidizing part of the classification while drilled wells were foundin all classes. This is reasonable as drilled wells often collect water from different environmentsthrough the different fracture systems the drilled wells contact. Wetland springs are found tohave moderately reducing water high in iron. While drilled wells and dug wells show a wide spectrumof As(III)/As(tot) ratios the As(III) is clearly dominant in wetland springs. Drilled wellsshowed the highest concentrations of As up to 300 μg/L and wells drilled in alkaline volcanicrocks had the highest median concentrations of As. Arsenic in wetland springs were strongly correlatedto iron. Another clear relationship was that groundwater with even low concentrations ofnitrate was low in As. Obviously the presence of nitrate indicates an oxidizing environmentwhere As is firmly adsorbed onto ferric hydroxides. There was no clear relationship with sulphateindicating that the drilled wells which made up the majority of the groundwaters often had waterof a mixed origin coming to the well via different fracture systems.

    The results indicate that As should in general be analysed in household wells as it is difficult topredict the presence of elevated concentrations from the major ion chemistry. High iron concentrationis a factor that indicates an elevated risk of As above the health limit. Nitrate on the otherhand indicates a low risk for elevated As concentration.

  • 33.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Nath, Bibhas
    Chatterjee, Debashis
    Department of Chemistry, University of Kalyani, Kalyani-741 235, India.
    Biswas, Ashis
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Halder, Dipti
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Majumder, Santanu A.
    Bhowmick, Subhamoy K.
    Ramanathan, AL L.
    Natural Arsenic in Coastal Groundwaters in the Bengal Delta Region in West Bengal, India2010In: Management and Sustainable Development of Coastal Zone Environments / [ed] Ramanathan, A.; Bhattacharya, P.; Dittmar, T.; Prasad, B.; Neupane, B., Springer Netherlands, 2010, p. 146-160Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bengal Delta region is currently confronted with largest groundwater arsenic calamity in history of human kind (BGS-DPHE, 2001; Mukherjee and Bhattacharya, 2001; Bhattacharya et al., 2002a; McArthur et al., 2001; Smedley and Kinniburgh, 2002; Mukherjee et al., 2006; Nath et al., 2005, 2007, 2008). Concentrations of arsenic in drinking water wells in the region often exceed the WHO drinking water guideline value (10 μg L-1) and the national safe limit of both India and Bangladesh for arsenic in drinking water (Smedley and Kinniburgh, 2002; RGNDWM, 2002; CGWB, 1999; Bhattacharya et al., 2002a). About one third (35 million) population inhabiting in this region (West Bengal and Bangladesh), currently at risk of long-term arsenic exposure (Bhattacharya et al., 2001; RGNDWM, 2002; Chakraborti et al., 2004; Kapaj et al., 2006), are being diagnosed with a wide spectrum of adverse health impacts including skin disorders such as hyper/hypo-pigmentation, keratosis and melanosis and are also in hot-spot areas of BDP which is reflected in a rise in the number of cancer cases (Guha Mazumdar et al., 1988). The distribution pattern of arsenic occurrence in BDP is patchy and there are numerous hotspots of arsenic contamination in the semi-confined shallow Holocene aquifer (Bhattacharya et al., 1997; Smedley and Kinniburgh, 2002). The scale of the problem is serious both in terms of hotspots and geographic area coverage (173 × 10 3 km2, eastern part of Hoogly-Bhagirathi/Western part of Ganga-Padma-lower Meghna flood plains).

  • 34.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Svensson, M.
    von Bromssen, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Genesis of arsenic enriched groundwater and relationship with bedrock geology in northern Sweden2012In: Metals and related substances in drinking water: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference, METEAU, LONDON: IWA PUBLISHING , 2012, p. 242-246Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing concern over incidents of widespread human exposure to arsenic (As) from groundwater sources has been noticed during the past three decades. Vaasterbotten county in northern Sweden hosts a large number of sulphide ore deposits and a number of gold deposits are recently discovered. Both are accompanied by elevated arsenic contents. Proterozoic metasediments sandwiched in the bedrock and mixed into the till contains elevated amounts of arsenic as well. During the present study about 80 groundwater samples were collected from dug wells, bore-wells and springs in the Skellefte field in Vasterbotten County in northern Sweden. Data from community environmental offices were also collected and included in the study. Arsenic concentrations were elevated in borewells and wetland springs while none of the dug wells had arsenic contents above 10 mg/l. The highest content seen in borewells was 300 mg/l and in wetland springs 100 mg/l. The As(III)/As(tot) varied largely in borewells while it was mostly above 0.8 in wetland springs indicating more reducing contents in the latter. The use of a redox classification indicated that two nechanisms were involved in the mobilisation of he arsenic, oxidation of sulphides and reduction of ferric oxyhydroxides. In some cases the borewells showed a mixed pattern, indicating inflow from different environments.

  • 35.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    von Brömssen, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Ahmed, Kazi Matin
    DEpartment of Geology, UNiversity of Dhaka, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh.
    Arsenic in Groundwater of Bangladesh: Options for Safe Drinking Water2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study was undertaken in order to find and scientifically validate the options for arsenic safewater in Bangladesh. The study has been carried out in a geological province where most of theshallow wells have arsenic above the allowable limit for drinking water according to Bangladeshstandard. The original study plan has been modified as newer information on arsenic mobilisationand mitigation was available. Accordingly the emphasis on dug well and arsenic removal filter hadbeen shifted to other options such as geologically targeted aquifers. Also at the same time therehas been collaboration with number of other projects been carried out in and around the studyarea. Eventually the main focus of the research was shifted to capacity development in order toenhance the local capability for finding safer sources drinking water in the study area and othersimilar environments in the country.

  • 36.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Maity, Jyoti Prakash
    Nath, Bibhash
    Chen, Chien-Yen
    Chatterjee, Debashis
    Mukherjee, Abhijit
    Groundwater arsenic in the Lower Ganges Delta Plain in West Bengal, India and Bangladesh: A hydrogeochemical comparison2010In: Geological Society of America: Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 42, No. 5, 2010, p. 653-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic contaminations in groundwater have been widely reported. The serious arsenic contamination of groundwater of Lower Ganga delta Plain (LGDP) in West Bengal, India and Bangladesh has emerged as a global natural environmental health disaster. The Bengal Delta Plain (BDP) is one of the largest deltas in the world, drained by the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna river (GBM) systems. Groundwater samples were collected from 67 different sites located in the districts of 24-Parganas (S), 24-Parganas (N) and Nadia in West Bengal, India along the western margin (Bhagirathi sub-basin), and 40 different sites located in the districts of Comilla, Laxmipur, Munshiganj, Faridpur and Jhenaida districts of Bangladesh along the eastern part of the Bengal Basin (Padma-Meghna sub-basin).

    Groundwater in the Nadia, West Bengal is mostly of Ca–HCO3 type while in the lower part of the delta, the groundwater is of Ca-Mg-SO4 type. The concentrations of major solutes (Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+, K+, HCO3-, SO42-, NO3- and PO43- in groundwater of Meghna sub-basin is more variable than Bhagirathi sub-basin that indicating different hydrological setting in the parts of the Bengal basin. The trace element concentrations such as As, Fe and Mn also show considerable variability in the two distinct parts of the Bengal basin. Most groundwaters of the LGDP contain arsenic above the WHO and the BIS standard of 0.01 mg/L as well as in many case above the Bangladesh drinking water standard (0.05 mg/L). Both sites have moderately reducing environment, with high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, indicating dominantly metal-reducing processes and nearly similar mechanism in As mobilization. The occurrence of elevated arsenic in groundwater is generally associated with natural biogeochemical reactions (such as reductive dissolution of iron oxides/hydroxides) by altering groundwater redox state and releasing arsenic from sediment to aqueous phase. The various redox-sensitive solutes indicate overlapping redox zones, leading to partial redox equilibrium conditions where As, once liberated from minerals of sediments, would tend to remain in groundwater because of the complex interplay among the electron acceptors. Also, microbes in organic matter environment are acting as the major electron acceptor, in the Lower Ganges Delta Plain.

  • 37.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Mukherjee, A. B.
    Jacks, G.
    Nordqvist, S.
    Metal contamination at a wood preservation site: characterisation and experimental studies on remediation2002In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 290, no 03-jan, p. 165-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the occurrence of As, Cu, Cr and Zn in the soil at an abandoned wood preservation unit and to examine some possible extractants for the contaminants in the soil. The mean As content of the contaminated surface soils (0-10 cm) was 186 mg kg(-1), where as the mean concentrations of Cu, Cr and Zn in soils from the contaminated area were 26, 29 and 91 mg kg(-1), respectively. The elevated As content in the mineral soils is related to adsorption of inorganic As phases in the fine grained fractions, which are characterised by large surface area and high positive surface charge under the current acidic conditions. Cu and Cr were found to be rather mobile, which is reflected in their lower abundance in soils and significant accumulation in sediments in the drainage leaving the area. The fine fraction of the soil (<0.125 mm) has an average metal content increased by nearly 34% as compared to the <2-mm fraction conventionally used for the analysis and assessment of soil contamination. The <2-mm fraction constitutes approximately 65% of the total weight while the fine fraction (< 0.125 mm) constitutes approximately 10%. These facts, taken together, are essential for the choice of remediation measures. Oxalate solutions have been tested as extractants for soil remediation. Dark acid oxalate extraction dissolves the amorphous Al- and Fe-oxides and hydroxides and mobilises the adsorbed inorganic As species. Oxalate also acts as a ligand for the cationic heavy metals, releasing them from exchangeable sites. With a three-step sequential leaching, up to 98-99% of the metals could be removed. At lower concentrations and higher pH, the leaching decreased to approximately 70%.

  • 38.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Mukherjee, A.
    Mukherjee, A. B.
    Groundwater Arsenic in India: Source, Distribution, Effects and Alternate Safe Drinking Water Sources2013In: Reference Module in Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences, Elsevier, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Elevated natural groundwater arsenic, a carcinogen, has created a severe environmental health crisis in several parts of India. Since the discovery of groundwater arsenic and arsenicosis in West Bengal, in 1984, a huge wealth of information has been generated by groundwater arsenic research during the last three decades. The principal mechanism of arsenic mobilization in groundwater is believed to be reductive dissolution of Fe-oxyhydroxides in aquifer sediments. Arsenic enriched groundwater used for irrigation also leads to long-term risks for arsenic enrichment in the soils and bioaccumulation in crops. Various studies are ongoing to develop a holistic approach for arsenic mitigation.

  • 39.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Mukherjee, Arun B.
    Helsinki University Environmental Research Centre, Finland.
    Zeevenhoven, Ron
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo, Finland .
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Loeppert, Richard H.
    Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX, USA.
    Arsenic in Soil and Groundwater Environment: Biogeochemical Interactions, Health Effects and Remediation2007Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume presents the recent developments in the field of arsenic in soil and groundwater. Arranged into nine sections, the text emphasizes the global occurrences of arsenic in the environment, particularly on its source, pathways, behavior, and effects it has on soils, plants, water, animals, and humans. It also covers the diverse issues of arsenic in the mining environment, arsenic emanating from hydrothermal springs, and the geochemical modeling of arsenic adsorption to oxide surfaces. Finally, the text includes different cost effective removal mechanisms of arsenic from drinking water using natural red earth, solar oxidation, and arsenic oxidation by ferrrate.

  • 40.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Naidu, Ravi
    Polya, David A.
    Mukherjee, Abhijit
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    Charlet, Laurent
    Arsenic in hydrological processes-Sources, speciation, bioavailability and management2014In: Journal of Hydrology, ISSN 0022-1694, E-ISSN 1879-2707, Vol. 518, p. 279-283Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Ramanathan, Alagappan
    School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067, India.
    Mukherjee, Arun B.
    Helsinki University Environmental Research Centre, Finland.
    Bundschuh, Jochen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Chandrashekharam, Dornadula
    Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay, Mumbai-400076, India.
    Groundwater and Sustainable Development: Problems, Perspectives and Challenges2008Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Groundwater is the most important source of domestic, industrial, and agricultural water and also a finite resource. Population growth has created an unprecedented demand for water, with the situation most critical in the developing world, where several million people depend on contaminated groundwater for drinking purposes. Geogenic contaminants, such as arsenic and fluoride at toxic levels, pose major environmental risks and endanger public health. This book is a collection of papers providing a multi-disciplinary overview for scientists and professionals involved in the sustainable development of groundwater resources.

  • 42.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Shi, Fei
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Sracek, O
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Bundschuh, J
    Groundwater characteristics in the shallow aquifers of Huhhot region in Inner Mongolia, PR China: Implications on the mobilisation of arsenic2006In: Natural Arsenic in Groundwaters of Latin America: Abstract Volume / [ed] Bundschuh, J., Armienta, M.A., Bhattacharya, P., Matschullat, J., Birkle, P., Rodríguez, R., 2006, p. 11-12Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Elevated arsenic (As) concentration ingroundwater is becoming a worldwide problem. In Huhhot Alluvial Basin (HAB) in 

    Inner Mongolia, People’s Republic ofChina, a population of over a million isexposed to severe health risk due to theconsumption of groundwater with high Asconcentration. In some arsenic seriouslyaffected areas, As concentration reach 1491µg L-1, 149 times over WHO’s drinkingwater guideline value for As and exceed theChinese drinking water standard by a factorof 30 times. Due to the acute shortage ofsafe water supply and inefficient watermanagement system, people are compelledto drink groundwater with high As concentration. Long period ingestion of water withhigh As concentration have lead to chronicarsenic poisoning among the residents ofthe region. This present work deals with thehydrogeochemical characterisation of thegroundwater of the shallow alluvial aquifers and their implications on the chemistryand its relation to the mechanism of Asmobilization in the HAB.Groundwater samples were collected during October 2003, from 29 sites in the village of Tie Men Jing, located about 100 kmfrom Inner Mongolia’s capital Huhhot. ThepH, redox potential (Eh), temperature andelectrical conductivity were measured atsites while major ions, trace elements including As total and As (III) were analyzedin laboratories at the Royal Institute ofTechnology and Stockholm University inSweden. Groundwater is generally neutralto alkaline and the pH varies from 6.67 to8.7. The redox potential (Eh) lies between74 and 669 mV. The electrical conductivity(EC) range varies from 581 to 5200 µS cm-1. Temperature ranges from 9.1 to 13.5 °C.Depths of wells are from 4 m to 75 m.Groundwater is mostly of Na-Mg-HCO3-Cl-type and dominated by HCO3-and Cl-asthe predominant anions. The concentrationsof SO42-range between 0.3 and 172.8 mg L-1and there is a trend of decreasing sulfateconcentrations with increase in well depth.The levels of NO3-were lower than theWHO´s guideline value of 50 mg L-1in 27wells. These high NO3-concentrations 

    could have been caused by anthropogeniccontamination due to the sanitation practices.The PO43-concentration ranges between 0.04to 2.6 mg L-1.Total As concentration ranged from belowdetect limit (5.2 µg L-1) to 141 µg L-1. In 28of the investigated wells, As levels exceededWHO’s guideline value 10 µg L-1and 17wells exceeded Chinese standard 50 µg L-1.Among the 42 groundwater samples of theshallow aquifers only three complied withthe WHO drinking water guideline value forAs. The dominant species in the groundwaterwas As (III). In the 29 wells of Tie MenJing, the concentration of Fe and Mn –exceeded the WHO’s guideline value by afactor of 10.The aquifers are composed of Quaternary(mainly Holocene) fluvial and lacustrinesediments. High As occurring in anaerobicgroundwater in low-lying areas is associatedwith high concenrations of dissolved Fe andMn. Improved water supply system, employment new water and energy resources,poverty fighting and expertise cooperationare recommended to solve Huhhot basinrural area’s drinking water problem.

  • 43.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Sracek, Ondra
    Eldvall, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Asklund, Ragnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Barmen, Gerhard
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Koku, John
    Gustafsson, Jan-Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Singh, Nandita
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Water Management.
    Balfors, Berit Brokking
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Hydrogeochemical study on the contamination of water resources in a part of Tarkwa mining area, Western Ghana2012In: Journal of African Earth Sciences, ISSN 1464-343X, Vol. 66-67, p. 72-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the groundwater chemistry with special concern to metal pollution in selected communities in the Wassa West district, Ghana. In this mining area, 40 ground water samples, mainly from drilled wells, were collected. The groundwaters have generally from neutral to acidic pH values and their Eh values indicate oxidising conditions. The dominating ions are calcium, sodium, and bicarbonate. The metal concentrations in the study area are generally lower than those typically found in mining regions. Only 17 wells show metal concentrations exceeding WHO guidelines for at least one metal. The main contaminants are manganese and iron, but arsenic and aluminium also exceed the guidelines in some wells probably affected by acid mine drainage (AMD). Metal concentrations in the groundwater seem to be controlled by the adsorption processes. Hydrogeochemical modelling indicates supersaturation of groundwater with respect to several mineral phases including iron-hydroxides/oxides, suggesting that adsorption on these minerals may control heavy metal and arsenic concentrations in groundwater. The area is hilly, with many groundwater flow divides that result in several local flow systems. The aquifers therefore are not strongly affected by weathering of minerals due to short groundwater residence times and intense flushing. The local character of groundwater flow systems also prevents a strong impact of acid mine drainage on groundwater systems in a regional scale.

  • 44.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Tandukar, N.
    Neku, A.
    Valero, A. A.
    Mukherjee, A. B.
    Jacks, G.
    Geogenic arsenic in groundwaters from Terai Alluvial Plain of Nepal2003In: Journal de Physique IV: Colloque, ISSN 1155-4339, E-ISSN 1764-7177, Vol. 107, p. 173-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The origin and mobility of arsenic (As) in the groundwater environment has received serious attention in recent years. Recent studies have reported naturally occurring As in groundwaters of the Terai Alluvial Plains (TAP) in southern Nepal, where groundwater exploitation has increased since the 1960s. The source of As in TAP is geogenic and leached primarily due to weathering of As bearing rocks and sediments in the Himalayas. In our present study, we have investigated the groundwater chemistry in the central part of the TAP in Nawalparasi district. TAP groundwaters are near-neutral to alkaline, with predominantly reducing character and high HCO3-, low SO4- and NO3- concentrations. Elevated HCO3 levels possibly result due to the oxidation of organic matter, low SO42- levels reflect sulfate reduction. Elevated NH4+ concentrations in these groundwaters suggest dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the aquifers. Total arsenic (As,.,) levels in groundwater varied from 1.7 mug/L to as high as 404 mug/L with dominance of As(III) species and elevated levels of dissolved Fe and Mn. Arsenic is mobilized in groundwaters as a result of desorption of As-oxyanions adsorbed onto Fe- and Mn-oxides as well as reductive dissolution of these surface reactive phases from the sediments along with release of As in anoxic groundwaters.

  • 45.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Thunvik, Roger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. International Groundwater Arsenic Research Group.
    von Brömssen, Mattias
    Department of Soil and Water Environment Ramböll Sweden AB.
    Targeting Arsenic-Safe Aquifers in Regions with High Arsenic Groundwater and its Worldwide Implications (TASA)2015Report (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Vahter, M.
    Jarsjö, J.
    Kumpiene, J.
    Ahmad, A.
    Sparrenbom, C.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Donselaar, M. E.
    Bundschuh, J.
    Naidu, R.
    Editors’ foreword2016In: 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016, p. xlv-xlviArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    von Brömssen, M.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Hasan, M.A.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Ahmed, K.M.
    Sracek, O.
    Jakariya, M.
    Huq, S.M.I.
    Naidu, R.
    Smith, E.
    Owens, G.
    Arsenic mobilisation in the Holocene flood plains in South-central Bangladesh: Evidences from the hydrogeochemical trends and modeling results2008In: Groundwater for Sustainable Development: Problems, Perspectives and Challenges / [ed] Bhattacharya, P., Ramanathan, AL., Mukherjee A.B., Bundschuh, J., Chandrasekharam, D. Keshari, A.K., The Netherlands: Taylor and Francis/A.A. Balkema , 2008, p. 283-299Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    von Brömssen, M.
    Jakariya, M.
    Hasan, M. A.
    Ahmed, K. M.
    Jonsson, L.
    Lundell, L.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Arsenic-safe aquifer as sustainable source of drinking water supply: A case study from Matlab thana in Southeast Bangladesh2005In: Abstract Volume, The 15th Stockholm Water Symposium: Drainage Basin Management- Hard and Soft Solutions in Regional Development, 2005, p. 143-144Conference paper (Other academic)
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    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
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    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Jakariya, Md
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Hasan, M.
    Ahmed, K. M.
    Ramanathan, A.
    Chandrashekharam, D.
    Mahanta, Chandan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Husain, V.
    Targeting safe aquifers in regions with high arsenic groundwater in South Asia: Options for sustainable drinking water supply2006In: Abstract Volume-International Conference on Arsenic Contamination in Tropics (ICACT-2007) / [ed] Patel K.S., 2006, p. 18-21Conference paper (Other academic)
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    Bhattacharya, Prosun
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    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Welch, A. H.
    Ahmed, K. M.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Naidu, R.
    Arsenic in groundwater of sedimentary aquifers2004In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 163-167Article in journal (Refereed)
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