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  • 1.
    Borglund, Dan
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical Engineering.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical Engineering.
    Active wing flutter suppression using a trailing edge flap2002In: Journal of Fluids and Structures, ISSN 0889-9746, E-ISSN 1095-8622, Vol. 16, no 3, 271-294 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aeroservoelastic behaviour of a thin rectangular wing with a controllable trailing edge flap is investigated. A rather high aspect ratio motivates a numerical model based on linear beam theory for the structural dynamics and strip theory for the unsteady aerodynamic loads. Experimental flutter testing shows good agreement with the numerical stability analysis, and the impact of the trailing edge flap on the dynamics is verified by open-loop testing. The problem of stabilizing the wing utilizing the trailing edge flap is posed, and the design of a fixed-structure feedback controller is performed using numerical optimization. The problem of maximizing closed-loop modal damping with constraints on actuator performance is solved for a sequence of flow speeds and the obtained controller is synthesized using gain scheduling. The fairly large predicted increase in critical speed is experimentally verified with satisfactory accuracy.

  • 2.
    Burman, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of the Hull of a High Speed Craft2011In: 16th International Conference on Composite Structures / [ed] Prof Antonio Ferreria, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Burman, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of theHull of a High Speed CraftIn: Composite structures, ISSN 0263-8223, E-ISSN 1879-1085Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) has been performed on the hull of a 24 meter long high speed patrol craft. The aim of the study is to compare different structural materials concepts to determine differences and sensitivities in environmental impact, especially in relation to the total impact including fuel burn. The material concepts studied are aluminium and various composite combinations consisting of glass fibre and carbon fibre with vinyl ester resin both as single skins and as sandwich with a Divinycell foam core. For each material concept a unique and weight optimized structural design was employed fulfilling the DNV high speed craft design code [1]. All identical systems and components for the five hull concepts are omitted in the LCA and hence a comparative study is performed focused on the hull structure. The commercial software SimaPro have been utilized for the LCA calculations and the impact assessment method chosen is the CML Baseline 2000.

    The structural optimization carried out in [1] show that a weight reduction by to up to 50% (on the hull) could be achieved by switching from aluminium to a carbon fibre sandwich concept. The weight reduction switching from glass fibre single skin to a carbon fibre sandwich concept is roughly 20%.

     

    The LCA study performed herein shows that, regardless of hull material concept, the environmental impact is by large dominated by the usage phase due to relatively large fuel consumption. A lower structural weight will reduce the fuel consumption and hence the environmental impact. This is illustrated in fig. 1 for the aluminum hull. All different phases of the life cycle are plotted for all environmental impact categories assessed herein. The green color is related to the operation phase and the red is the manufacturing phase. As observed the operation phase is dominating.

     

    In fig. 2 are the results from the LCA presented for all hull concepts and for all environmental impact factors. The Al-hull is the concept with highest structural weight (red bars) and hence was found to have the highest environmental impact. The carbon fibre sandwich hull (green bars) had the lowest weight of the five and consequently the lowest environmental impact.

    In the normalization analysis performed, in which different impact factors are assessed using a common impact unit, three impact factors stand out as dominating, independent of hull concept; Abiotic depletion, Global warming and Acidification. All these impact factors are herein associated with the usage phase and diesel consumption. If the operation phase is omitted and only the manufacturing phase (including the material extraction/manufacturing) is studied the observation is that the aluminium concept still will have the largest environmental impact for all categories. The most significant environmental impact is now on the marine and the fresh water aquatic ecotoxicity which is associated with the aluminium raw material excavation and manufacturing processes.

     

  • 4.
    Burman, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Stenius, Ivan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Garme, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Rosen, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of the hull of a high-speed craft2016In: Journal of Engineering for the Maritime Environment (Part M), ISSN 1475-0902, E-ISSN 2041-3084, Vol. 230, no 2, 378-387 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comparative Life Cycle Assessment is performed for different structural material concepts on a 24-m-long high-speed patrol craft. The study is comparative and determines the differences in and sensitivities to environmental impact, especially in relation to the total impact of fuel burn for the different material concepts. The material concepts are aluminium and various composite combinations consisting of glass fibre and carbon fibre with vinyl ester resin both as single skins and as sandwich with a Divinycell foam core. Commercially available standard Life Cycle Assessment software is used for the Life Cycle Assessment calculations. The study shows that regardless of hull material concept, the environmental impact is dominated by the operational phase due to relatively large fuel consumption. In the operational phase, the lightest carbon-fibre concept is shown to have least environmental impact. Considering the manufacturing phase exclusively for the different hull concepts, it is concluded that the manufacturing of the aluminium hull has a somewhat larger environment impact for the majority of Life Cycle Assessment impact categories in comparison to the different composite hulls. The significant impact on the marine and the fresh water aquatic ecotoxicity originates from the aluminium raw material excavation and manufacturing processes. It is shown that the lightest hull, the carbon-fibre sandwich concept, with a 50% structural weight reduction compared to the aluminium design, can be utilized to reduce the fuel consumption by 20% (775 ton of diesel) over the lifetime with significant impact on the dominating environmental aspects considered herein, abiotic depletion, global warming and acidification.

  • 5. Carlsson, M.
    et al.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Design and testing of a blended wing body aeroelastic wind-tunnel model2003In: Journal of Aircraft, ISSN 0021-8669, E-ISSN 1533-3868, Vol. 40, no 1, 211-213 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    El Gaidi, Khalid
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Hallström, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Integrated assessment of diciplinary and interpersonal skills - student perceptions of a novel learning experience2005In: 13th International Symposium at the Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development - Improved Student Learning Through Assessment, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    El Gaidi, Khalid
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Hallström, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Integrated Assessment of Diciplinary, Personal and Interpersonal Skills in a Design-Build Course2005In: 1st CDIO Conference, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Edström, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Hallström, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Mini Workshop - Designing Project-Based Courses for Learning and Cost-Effective Teaching2011In: 2011 Frontiers In Education Conference (FIE), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop draws on experience in the international collaboration for engineering education reform, called the CDIO Initiative, where project-based learning is a key part of the concept. The purpose of project-based courses in engineering education is to provide environments where students can develop a deeper working knowledge of technical fundamentals together with the complex skills necessary for engineering practice, or in short: where students can become engineers. In this workshop, the learning perspective is emphasized, by identifying trade-offs where there are inherent tensions between learning outcomes and other factors in project-based courses (such as project goal, product performance, technical sophistication, teacher popularity, student satisfaction). A set of principles are derived for enhancing learning and teaching in project-based courses, using concrete examples to illustrate thought-provoking implications. Each principle aims to improve both student learning outcomes and cost-effectiveness of teaching. Together the principles constitute a framework for learning-driven course design. The aim is to challenge assumptions and common practices in project-based courses, and provoke fruitful discussion among participants.

  • 9.
    Garme, Karl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Burström, L.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Measures of vibration exposure for a high-speed craft crew2011In: Journal of Engineering for the Maritime Environment (Part M), ISSN 1475-0902, E-ISSN 2041-3084, Vol. 225, no M4, 338-349 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper compares measurement-based measures for human vibration exposure. Data were collected during sea trials on a 10 m, 50 kn coastguard craft equipped with a three-axial accelerometer at the coxswain seat and with vertically mounted gauges measuring the acceleration of the cockpit floor. The ISO 2631-1:1997 measures of vibration (namely the root-mean-square (r.m.s.) value of the whole-body vibration (determined from the frequency-weighted acceleration signal), the maximum transient vibration value (MTVV), and the vibration dose value), the ISO 2631-5:2004 measure (namely the daily equivalent static compression dose Sed), and also statistically based measures to evaluate the acceleration magnitude are compared and discussed with respect to their ability to identify the mitigating effect of the suspension seat and how the different measures rank the severity of the high-speed craft (HSC) ride. The paper concludes that the r.m.s. value and the MTVV are unsuitable for evaluation of the conditions aboard while the other investigated measures show potential in this respect. Further the approach of ISO 2631-5:2004 taking both the short-term and the long-term perspectives on the human exposure to vibration is concluded to be the most mature method well suited to evaluation of HSC conditions.

  • 10.
    Garme, Karl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Simulations and Full-Scale Trials for a HSC Linked by Wave-Height Measurements2005In: 8th International Conference on Fast Sea Transportation, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Garme, Karl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    In Detail Investigation of Planing Pressure2010In: Proceedings of the HYDRALAB III Joint User Meeting, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper describes an experimental study with the major aim to get a detailed picture of thepressure distribution carrying a planning craft at high speed through calm water and waves.The instrumentation, load cases and performed runs are discussed as well as the steps to usethe measurement data for evaluation of numerical models for planing craft in waves.

  • 12.
    Garme, Karl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Stenius, Ivan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    In Detail Investigation of Planing Pressure2011Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Garme, Karl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Stenius, Ivan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Rough water performance of lightweight high-speed craft2014In: Journal of Engineering for the Maritime Environment (Part M), ISSN 1475-0902, E-ISSN 2041-3084, Vol. 228, no 3, 293-301 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown how the use of composite materials and application of sophisticated design methods can give significantly lighter high-speed craft structures than what is normally achieved for traditional aluminium designs. A reduction in structural mass and a corresponding reduction in displacement improve the craft calm water performance but can be unfavourable regarding the rough water performance. Here, the rough water performance of two versions of a fast patrol vessel, one in aluminium and the other in carbon fibre sandwich, is studied with simplified semi-empirical methods and more advanced non-linear time domain simulations. In speeds up to 30 knots, the rough water performance of the two craft versions is found to be practically equal. At higher speeds, the lighter composite craft experiences higher vertical accelerations than the heavier aluminium craft, which implies less operational availability. Using trim ballast tanks, the rough water performance of the lighter craft is improved, and it is shown that the acceleration levels can be reduced and even lowered relative to the heavier aluminium craft. This means that the calm water advantages of a lighter composite vessel can be utilized with the same ride comfort and operational availability as for a heavier aluminium vessel.

  • 14.
    Grenestedt, Joakim L
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Hallström, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    On cracks emanating from wedges in expanded PVC foam1996In: Engineering Fracture Mechanics, ISSN 0013-7944, E-ISSN 1873-7315, Vol. 54, no 4, 445-456 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An experimental and analytical study was made on the effect of stress singularities on the strength of expanded PVC foam materials of different densities. Experiments were performed on specimens with different wedge geometries ranging from sharp cracks, with the ordinary inverted square root stress singularity, to shallow re-entrant corners with weak singularities. A brittle fracture criterion based on a generalised stress intensity factor, called Q, at the wedge tip was fit to experimental data. The critical stress intensity factor, Qcr, for crack initiation depends on the wedge geometry. This dependence was estimated from simple point-stress criteria and a criterion due to Seweryn [Brittle fracture criterion for structures with sharp notches. Engng Fracture Mech. 47, 673-681 (1994)], and good agreement with experimental data was obtained. When the point-stress criterion was applied to Mode II sharp cracks, poor agreement with published data was found. A critical study of the Mode II crack specimen was therefore initiated, leading to the conclusion that the commonly used specimen gives erroneous values of KIIc and the reason seems to be due to crack surface friction. A new Mode II crack specimen which eliminates crack surface friction was proposed and tested, and good agreement with the point-stress criterion was obtained. A criterion for homogeneous materials proved to be adequate also for the porous PVC foams.

  • 15.
    Hallström, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    The Route Towards a Sustainable Design-Implement Course2007In: 3rd CDIO Conference, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical Engineering.
    Aircraft composites and aeroelastic tailoring1998Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis treats various aspects of structural polymercomposites in aircraft applications. The mechanical performanceand quality of resin transfer molded (RTM) carbon fiberreinforced epoxy composites is studied. In a first part, the influence of manufacturing process parameters on the mechanicalbehavior of laminates is experimentally investigated. A number of process parameters are used as variables and performance ismeasured in terms of tensile and compressive strength as wellas interlaminar fracture toughness. The process parameters are concluded to have little affect on the measured properties. In a second part, the quality and structural performance of an entirely co-cured RTM manufactured aircraft control surfacedemonstrator is investigated. A series of quasi staticstructural tests using distributed loading is performed. Experimental results are compared with finite element analysis. Effects of impact damage on the performance are also studied.Good agreement is obtained between the predictions and the experiments.

    A nondestructive method for determination of elasticmaterial properties of orthotropic plates using naturalfrequencies is developed and verified. Finite elementcalculations of the natural frequencies of the plate are matched to experimentally determined frequencies using theelastic constants as variables. The method is successfully verified even for nontrivial specimen geometries with cornersingularities. Emphasis is on practical utilization ofknowledge about numerical and modeling errors as well asexperimental uncertainties.

    The optimal design of a thin orthotropic wing subject toaeroelastic constraints is studied using numerical methods andverified in low speed wind tunnel testing. The flutter speed ofthe wing is maximized using the laminate orientation asvariable. Further, the problem of increasing the flutter speed to a prescribed value using minimal amount of additional concentrated masses on a  fixed wing design is investigated. The main objective of the study is to verify that the performance of the optimized design can be achieved also in experiments. It is found that the optimal design is very sensitive to uncertainties in material and structural properties.Consequently, this has to be accounted for in the problemformulation. It is shown, and experimentally verified, that the robustness requirements on the optimal design can be met byreformulating the optimization problem.

  • 17.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Optical measurements of flutter mode shapes2000In: Journal of Aircraft, ISSN 0021-8669, E-ISSN 1533-3868, Vol. 37, no 5, 846-849 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The usefulness of an optical motion capture system in aeroelastic wind-tunnel testing is investigated. A system consisting of four infrared charge-coupled device cameras, observing flat passive reflecting markers, is installed in a low-speed tunnel to measure Butter mode shapes. Free vibration and aeroelastic measurements are performed on four wing configurations consisting of thin flat orthotropic composite laminates with varying laminate orientation. The laminate orientations are chosen to result in dissimilar flutter mode shapes. The wings are equipped with up to 20 markers, and the motion is sampled at 240 Wt. Quantitative scalar comparisons between analysis and experiments, with respect to both amplitude and phase are done using the modal assurance criterion (MAC). Measurements of mode shapes on free vibrating wings (ground vibration tests), as well as limit-cycle Butter oscillations, show good agreement with numerical results. MAC ratings consistently exceeding 0.96 are achieved, However, it is clearly seen that the agreement is better for free vibration comparisons than for Butter This is expected considering the higher complexity of the Butter problem. Thus, the cause cannot be attributed exclusively to insufficiencies in the optical system but also to inaccuracies in the modeling. The good quality of the measurements proves the usefulness of such a noncontact positioning system in experimental wind-tunnel testing, not only in the present flutter context, but in a variety of experimental work affected by aeroelastic deformation.

  • 18.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical Engineering.
    Grenestedt, Joachim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical Engineering.
    Influence of process parameters on mechanical behavior of RTM moldings1995In: Tenth International Conference on Composite Materials: III. Processing and Manufacturing; Whistler, British Columbia; Canada; 14-18 Aug. 1995., 1995, 261-268 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical Engineering.
    Grenestedt, Joachim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical Engineering.
    Performance and quality of a resin transfer molded aircraft control surface1995Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical Engineering.
    Ringertz, Ulf
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical Engineering.
    Aeroelastic design optimization with experimental verification1998In: Journal of Aircraft, ISSN 0021-8669, E-ISSN 1533-3868, Vol. 35, no 3, 505-507 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical Engineering.
    Ringertz, Ulf
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical Engineering.
    Aeroelastic tailoring considering uncertainties in material properties1998In: Structural optimization (Print), ISSN 0934-4373, E-ISSN 1436-2503, Vol. 15, no 3-4, 157-162 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Young, Pete Y.
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Hallström, Stefan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical Engineering.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Aeronautical Engineering.
    Svensson, Thomas
    Linköping University.
    Lessons learned from design-build-test-based project courses2004In: Design 2004: Proceedings of the 8th International Design Conference, Vols 1-3 / [ed] Marjanovic, D, 2004, 665-672 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Razola, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Adressing localized assault loads in composite craft design2013In: Transactions of the Royal Institution of Naval Architects Part B: International Journal of Small Craft Technology, ISSN 1740-0694, Vol. 154, no Part B2, B87-B93 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the design of composite craft with respect to non-hydromechanic, local loads not explicitly covered in the basic design standards. The primary aim of this paper is to prompt a discussion on these localized assault loads and the associated robustness issue for composite craft. A background and review of craft robustness and resistance to these types of loads is presented to provide a basis for a more nuanced discussion on inherent differences between different material concepts. Through a literature review and interviews with designers and operators different opinions on what is regarded as robust craft and why are identified. Further, a discussion on how progress can be made with respect to designing more efficient craft out of composites, based on the outlining of a possible design approach, is presented.

  • 24.
    Rosén, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Delin, Petter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Garme, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Palmquist, Mikael
    Seaware AB.
    Sample Calculations on the Level 2 Vulnerability Criteria for Parametric Roll2010Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Rosén, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Borglund, Dan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Flight Dynamics.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Hallström, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Garme, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    3+2≠5 eller Programmål för ingenjörsutbildningar i ljuset av Bolognareformen2011In: 3:e Utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Rosén, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Edström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Borglund, Dan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Organisation and leadership.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Hallström, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Garme, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Programmål inom den nya utbildningsstrukturen på KTH2010Report (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Rosén, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Garme, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Full-Scale Design Evaluation of the Visby Class Corvette2007In: 9th International Conference on Fast Sea Transportation, FAST'07, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Skoglund, Lukas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Evaluating Weather Routing Decisions Using Ensemble Weather Forecasts2014In: International Conference on Design & Operation of Container Ships, The Royal Institution of Naval Architects , 2014, 61-66 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Weather routing decisions are typically based on performance predictions, in terms of estimated time of arrival, ETA, fuel consumption, and consideration of various constraints on the vessel operation such as limitations on allowable acceleration levels or slamming frequencies.

  • 29.
    Skoglund, Lukas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    On the use of ensemble weather forecasts to improve the robustness of numerical weather routing for ocean going vesselsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Skoglund, Lukas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems. Seaware AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Ovegard, Erik
    Seaware AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    A comparative study of deterministic and ensemble weather forecasts for weather routing2015In: Journal of Marine Science and Technology, ISSN 0948-4280, E-ISSN 1437-8213, Vol. 20, no 3, 429-441 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents and discusses the results of a comparison between using deterministic and ensemble weather forecasts for weather routing. The study is based on comparisons between predicted and realised performance of routes suggested by a route optimization method and focuses on two important performance factors, namely, fuel consumption and late arrival. The study is purely qualitative since the simulations do not include re-routing of the vessel as new forecasts become available. To perform the study a multi-objective dynamic programming method is tailored to the problem and implemented to perform the route optimization and a ship performance model is used to calculate the additional fuel consumption due to wind and waves acting on the ship. The results show that route optimization using ensemble weather forecasts has the potential to reduce the risk of late arrival for voyages during periods of harsh weather.

  • 31.
    Stenius, Ivan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Burman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Norrby, Monica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Razola, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kompositfartyg - en kort introduktion2011Report (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Stenius, Ivan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Fagerberg, Linus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Experimental eigenfrequency study of dry and fully wetted rectangular composite and metallic plates by forced vibrations2016In: Ocean Engineering, ISSN 0029-8018, E-ISSN 1873-5258, Vol. 111, 95-103 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the shortcomings in current design methods for dynamically loaded composite structures in underwater applications. This is done through an experimental study to evaluate the eigenfrequencies of rectangular plates made from metals as well as composites that are tested in air (dry) and completely submerged under water (fully wetted). The eigenfrequencies are studied using forced vibrations. The test series comprises 19 specimens that are made from various materials including aluminium, steel, glass-fibre, and carbon-fibre with aspect ratios varying from 3.7 to 11.2 and breadth to thickness ratios ranging from 2.7 to 20.5. The test method is based on electro-mechanical excitation by random vibrations as well as stepped sine refinements in the vicinity of the identified eigenfrequency. The results clearly show how differently the specimens are affected by the "added mass" from the water when fully wetted compared to the dry condition. Slender and more lightweight configurations are more profoundly affected by water than heavier and more rigid specimens. The results clearly show that for advanced composite materials and more complex geometries the current rule-of-thumb methods used by the industry today are inadequate in predicting the shift in natural frequency due to the effect of the surrounding water.

  • 33.
    Stenius, Ivan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jacob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Explicit FE-modelling of fluid-structure interaction in hull-water impacts2006In: International Shipbuilding Progress, ISSN 0020-868X, E-ISSN 1566-2829, Vol. 53, no 2, 103-121 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper considers explicit FE-modelling of fluid-structure interaction in hull-water impacts. To minimize the variables studied and to enable comparison with analytical methods, the problem is here idealised as a two-dimensional rigid wedge impacting on a calm water surface. A parameter study is performed, where the sensitivity in the mesh resolution and the contact parameter selection is investigated. It is concluded that a numerically stable non-leaking solution to the hull-water impact problem, with good correlation to analytical results, is achievable. It is however also concluded that application of this modelling technique can be costly and far from trivial. The solution is for example highly dependent on the relation between mesh-density and contact-stiffness. Successful modelling hence requires rational approaches for determination of fluid discretization and contact parameters. By making reference to an analytical solution of the hull-water impact problem, the results from the parameter study are generalised, and a rational approach for determination of fluid discretization and contact parameters in the modelling of arbitrary hull-water impact situations is presented. The generality of the approach is favourably demonstrated for different impact angles and velocities.

  • 34.
    Stenius, Ivan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jacob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Explicit FE-modelling of hydroelasticity in panel-water impacts2007In: International Shipbuilding Progress, ISSN 0020-868X, E-ISSN 1566-2829, Vol. 54, no 2-3, 111-127 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers modelling of hydroelasticity in water impacts of ship-hull bottom-panels by use of explicit finite element methods. The finite element analysis is based on a multi-material arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation and a penalty contact algorithm. This modelling technique enables the modelling of the instantaneous fluid-structure interaction. The FE-modelling of elastic panel-water impacts is evaluated by a convergence study and by comparison with experiments. Hydroelastic effects on the panel response are systematically studied for different impact velocities, boundary conditions and structural mass. It is concluded that hydroelastic effects can result in a significant reduction of the structural response for certain combinations of panel deadrise, impact velocity and boundary conditions. Inertia effects are shown to be dominated by added water mass. The present study is compared with other published work concerning hydroelasticity in panel-water impacts.

  • 35.
    Stenius, Ivan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jacob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Hydroelasticity in Marine Hull Bottom Panels2009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper considers the hydroelastic interaction involved in panel- water impacts of high-speed craft. Hydroelastic panel-water impacts are simulated by using the finite element code LS-DYNA and a simplified in- house developed method. The mechanisms involved in the problem are stud- ied by a systematic series of simulations regarding different impact veloc- ities, deadirse angels, boundary conditions, membrane effects, and panel properties. The significance of hydroelasticity on the problem is studied by comparing with methods addressing the problem as completely separable and quasi-static. It is shown that membrane effects can have a large influ- ence on the hydroelastic problem. The results further show that, accounting for hydroelasticity may yield larger maximum deflections and strains com- pared to completely separated and quasi-static solutions. The increase in the structural response when accounting for hydroelasticity can partly be explained by kinematic boundary condition effects, and partly by inertia related added mass effects.

  • 36.
    Stenius, Ivan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Hydroelastic interaction in panel-water impacts of high-speed craft2011In: Ocean Engineering, ISSN 0029-8018, E-ISSN 1873-5258, Vol. 38, no 2-3, 371-381 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper considers the hydroelastic interaction involved in panel-water impacts for high-speed craft. Hydroelastic panel-water impacts are simulated by using the finite element code LS-DYNA and a simplified in-house developed method. The mechanisms involved are studied through a systematic series of simulations comprising different impact velocities, deadrise angles, boundary conditions, membrane effects, and panel properties. The terms inertial hydroelastic effects and kinematic hydroelastic effects are introduced to categorize the different mechanisms involved in the hydroelastic problem. It is shown that hydroelastic effects can both increase and reduce the panel responses depending on the impact envelope considered, and it is made clear that the impact envelope has to be carefully considered when establishing the significance of hydroelasticity in a hull-water impact problem. Membrane effects are shown to have large influences on the hydroelastic effects even for moderate panel deflections. The results generated are further used to evaluate and discuss hydroelastic criterion and methods for hydroelastic characterization.

  • 37.
    Stenius, Ivan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    On Structural Design of Energy Efficient Small High-Speed Craft2011In: Marine Structures, ISSN 0951-8339, E-ISSN 1873-4170, Vol. 24, no 1, 43-59 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an integrated design procedure for determination of structural arrangement and scantlings for the complete structure of small high-speed craft. The purpose of the procedure is to serve as a tool in the preliminary design stage where it enables generation of weight minimized designs with very limited effort. The design procedure is applied in a material concept study for a high-speed patrol craft. The various concepts include single skin and sandwich composites, aluminum and steel. It is demonstrated that the mass of the aluminum hull structure can be reduced from the original 11.7 tonnes to 9.6 tonnes through application of the presented design procedure. The most weight efficient material concept is a carbon-fiber foam-cored sandwich with a structural mass of 4.8 tonnes, which is about 50% less than the refined aluminum version. Through simple hydromechanic analysis, potential for fuel and CO2 emission reductions of 8% for the refined aluminum version and 27% for the carbon-fiber sandwich version in relation to the original craft are indicated.

  • 38.
    Söder, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Wallenius Marine AB.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Ovegård, Erik
    Seaware AB.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Huss, Mikael
    Parametric roll mitigation using rudder control2013In: Journal of Marine Science and Technology, ISSN 0948-4280, E-ISSN 1437-8213, Vol. 18, no 3, 395-403 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Severe roll angles can be developed by parametric excitation in relatively moderate weather without any apparent pre-warning for the crew onboard. In this study the prospect of using rudder control to mitigate parametric roll was investigated using multi-degree of freedom simulations. A typical modern Pure Car and Truck Carrier was considered and modelled by coupling a roll model with a planar motion manoeuvring model. The combined model was calibrated using in-service, full-scale trials and model tests. Irregular variations of the metacentric height were applied to simulate recorded, full-scale events of parametric roll that have occurred with the considered design. These simulations with rudder roll control showed promising results and demonstrate that the approach could be very efficient for mitigation of parametric roll.

  • 39.
    Söder, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Rosén, Anders
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Werner, S.
    Huss, Mikael
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Assessment of Ship Roll Damping through Full-Scale and Model-Scale Experiments and Semi-Empirical Methods2012In: 11th International Conference on the Stability of Ships and Ocean Vehicles, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Young, Pete Y
    et al.
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
    Malmqvist, Johan
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Hallström, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Kuttenkeuler, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Svensson, Thomas
    Linköping university.
    Cunningham, Goeffrey
    Queen's University Belfast.
    Design and development of CDIO student workspaces - Lessons learned2005In: 2005 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: The Changing Landscape of Engineering and Technology Education in a Global World, 2005, 2867-2880 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CDIO project, which is an initiative that aims to develop a new model for engineering education, was discussed. A prominent attribute of the CDIO initiative has been the design and implementation of a new class of student workspaces that enable students to design, build and test project-based courses. A large number of factors were considered for the proper set-up of a student workspace that supports design-build-test education experiences. The factors are ownership, functionality, staff competence, costs, safety, security and sustainability.

1 - 40 of 40
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