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  • 1.
    Ansari, Farhan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Salajkova, Michaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lars, Berglund
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Strong surface treatment effects on reinforcement efficiency in biocomposites based on cellulose nanocrystals in poly(vinyl acetate) matrix2015In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 3916-3924Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, the problem to disperse cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) in hydrophobic polymer matrices has been addressed through application of an environmentally friendly chemical modification approach inspired by clay chemistry. The objective is to compare the effects of unmodified CNC and modified CNC (modCNC) reinforcement, where degree of CNC dispersion is of interest. Hydrophobic functionalization made it possible to disperse wood-based modCNC in organic solvent and cast well-dispersed nanocomposite films of poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) with 1-20 wt % CNC. Composite films were studied by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), tensile testing, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Strongly increased mechanical properties were observed for modCNC nanocomposites. The reinforcement efficiency was much lower in unmodified CNC composites, and specific mechanisms causing the differences are discussed.

  • 2.
    Berglund, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Sehaqui, Houssine
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Cellulose-based materials comprising nanofibrillated cellulose from native cellulose2011Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The present invention relates to cellulose-based materials comprising nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) from native cellulose. exhibiting highly superior properties as compared to other cellulose-based materials, a method for preparing such cellulose-based material, and uses thereof are also disclosed.

  • 3.
    Berglund, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Kochumalayil, Joby Jose
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Oxygen barrier for packaging applications2011Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The present invention relates to composite material of xyloglucan and clay for use as a coating material. The invention also relates to a method of producing the coating.

  • 4.
    Brumer, Harry
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Rutland, Mark
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Sinnott, M. L.
    Teeri, Tuula T.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Cross-Linking Involving a Polymeric Carbohydrate Material2005Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The present invention relates to a method of cross-linking a polymeric carbohydrate material with a second material by means of a soluble carbohydrate polymer and a crosslinking agent. The present invention furthermore relates to the resulting cross-linked material, to uses of the cross-linked material, as well as to a kit comprising the soluble carbohydrate polymer and the cross-linking agent.

  • 5.
    Brumer, Harry
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Baumann, Martin J.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Carlsson, Kjell
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Teeri, Tuula
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Activation of crystalline cellulose surfaces though the chemoenzymatic modification of xyloglucan2004In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 126, no 18, p. 5715-1721Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose constitutes an important raw material for many industries. However, the superb load-bearing properties of cellulose are accompanied by poor chemical reactivity. The hydroxyl groups on cellulose surfaces can be reacted but usually not without loss of fiber integrity and strength. Here, we describe a novel chemoenzymatic approach for the efficient incorporation of chemical functionality onto cellulose surfaces. The modification is brought about by using a transglycosylating enzyme, xyloglucan endotranglycosylase, to join chemically modified xyloglucan oligosaccharides to xyloglucan, which has a naturally high affinity to cellulose. Binding of the chemically modified hemicellulose molecules can thus be used to attach a wide variety of chemical moieties without disruption of the individual fiber or fiber matrix.

  • 6. Butchosa, Nria
    et al.
    Brown, Christian
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Antimicrobial activity of biocomposites based on bacterial cellulose and chitin nanoparticles2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Butchosa, Nuria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Brown, Christian
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanocomposites of bacterial cellulose nanofibers and chitin nanocrystals: fabrication, characterization and bactericidal activity2013In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 15, no 12, p. 3404-3413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An environmentally friendly approach was implemented for the production of nanocomposites with bactericidal activity, using bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers and chitin nanocrystals (ChNCs). The antibacterial activity of ChNCs prepared by acid hydrolysis, TEMPO-mediated oxidation or partial deacetylation of a-chitin powder was assessed and the structure of the ChNC nanoparticles was characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and solid-state C-13-NMR. The partially deacetylated ChNCs (D-ChNC) showed the strongest antibacterial activity, with 99 +/- 1% inhibition of bacterial growth compared to control samples. Nanocomposites were prepared from BC nanofibers and D-ChNC by (i) in situ biosynthesis with the addition of D-ChNC nanoparticles in the culture medium of Acetobacter aceti, and (ii) post-modification by mixing D-ChNC with disintegrated BC in an aqueous suspension. The structure and mechanical properties of the BC/D-ChNC nanocomposites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and an Instron universal testing machine. The bactericidal activity of the nanocomposites increased with the D-ChNC content, with a reduction in bacterial growth by 3.0 log units when the D-ChNC content was 50%. D-ChNC nanoparticles have great potential as substitutes for unfriendly antimicrobial compounds such as heavy metal nanoparticles and synthetic polymers to introduce antibacterial properties to cellulosic materials.

  • 8.
    Butchosa, Nuria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Leijon, Felicia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Enhancing toughness of cellulose nanofibrils through the expression of cellulose-binding modules in plantManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Butchosa, Nuria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Water redispersible nanofibrillated cellulose adsorbed with carboxymethyl cellulose2014In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 247, p. 130-CELL-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Butchosa, Núria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Water redispersible cellulose nanofibrils adsorbed with carboxymethyl cellulose2014In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 4349-4358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) are difficult to redisperse in water after they have been completely dried due to the irreversible agglomeration of cellulose during drying. Here, we have developed a simple process to prepare water-redispersible dried CNFs by the adsorption of small amounts of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and oven drying. The adsorption of CMC onto CNFs in water suspensions at 22 and 121 °C was studied, and the adsorbed amount of CMC was measured via conductimetric titration. The water-redispersibility of dried CNFs adsorbed with different amounts of CMC was characterized by sedimentation test. Above a critical threshold of CMC adsorption, i.e. 2.3 wt%, the oven dried CNF–CMC sample was fully redispersible in water. The morphology, rheological, and mechanical properties of water-redispersed CNF–CMC samples were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy, viscosity measurement, and tensile test, respectively. The water-redispersed CNFs preserved the original properties of never dried CNFs. This new method will facilitate the production, transportation and storage, and large-scale industrial applications of CNFs.

  • 11. Carlsson, Daniel O.
    et al.
    Nyström, Gustav
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Strømme, Maria
    Electroactive nanofibrillated cellulose aerogel composites with tunable structural and electrochemical properties2012In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, ISSN 0959-9428, E-ISSN 1364-5501, Vol. 22, no 36, p. 19014-19024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents conductive aerogel composites of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and polypyrrole (PPy) with tunable structural and electrochemical properties. The conductive composites are prepared by chemically polymerizing pyrrole onto TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers dispersed in water and the various nanostructures are obtained employing different drying methods. Supercritical CO2 drying is shown to generate high porosity aerogel composites with the largest surface area (246 m(2) g(-1)) reported so far for a conducting polymer-paper based material, whereas composites produced by ambient drying attain high density structures with mechanical properties significantly surpassing earlier reported values for cellulose-conducting polymer composites when normalized with respect to the content of reinforcing cellulose (Young's modulus = 0.51 GPa, tensile strength = 10.93 MPa and strain to failure = 2.5%). Electrochemical measurements clearly show that differences in the porosity give rise to dramatic changes in the voltammetric and chronoamperometric behavior of the composites. This indicates that mass transport rate limitations also should be considered, in addition to the presence of a distribution of PPy redox potentials, as an explanation for the shapes of the voltammetric peaks. A specific charge capacity of similar to 220 C g(-1) is obtained for all composites in voltammetric experiments performed at a scan rate of 1 mV s(-1) and this capacity is retained also at scan rates up to 50 mV s(-1) for the high porosity composites. The composites should be applicable as electrodes in structural batteries and as membranes in ion exchange applications requiring exchange membranes of high mechanical integrity or high porosity.

  • 12.
    Cunha, Ana Gisela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. INNVENTIA AB, Sweden.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Topochemical acetylation of cellulose nanopaper structures for biocomposites: mechanisms for reduced water vapour sorption2014In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 2773-2787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Moisture sorption decreases dimensional stability and mechanical properties of polymer matrix biocomposites based on plant fibers. Cellulose nanofiber reinforcement may offer advantages in this respect. Here, wood-based nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and bacterial cellulose (BC) nanopaper structures, with different specific surface area (SSA), ranging from 0.03 to 173.3 m(2)/g, were topochemically acetylated and characterized by ATR-FTIR, XRD, solid-state CP/MAS C-13-NMR and moisture sorption studies. Polymer matrix nanocomposites based on NFC were also prepared as demonstrators. The surface degree of substitution (surface-DS) of the acetylated cellulose nanofibers is a key parameter, which increased with increasing SSA. Successful topochemical acetylation was confirmed and significantly reduced the moisture sorption in nanopaper structures, especially at RH = 53 %. BC nanopaper sorbed less moisture than the NFC counterpart, and mechanisms are discussed. Topochemical NFC nanopaper acetylation can be used to prepare moisture-stable nanocellulose biocomposites.

  • 13.
    Ezekiel Mushi, Ngesa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Butchosa, Núria
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanopaper membranes from chitin-protein composite nanofibers: Structure and mechanical properties2014In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 131, no 7, p. 40121-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chitin nanofibers may be of interest as a component for nanocomposites. Composite nanofibers are therefore isolated from crab shells in order to characterize structure and analyze property potential. The mechanical properties of the porous nanopaper structures are much superior to regenerated chitin membranes. The nanofiber filtration-processing route is much more environmentally friendly than for regenerated chitin. Minerals and extractives are removed using HCl and ethanol, respectively, followed by mild NaOH treatment and mechanical homogenization to maintain chitin-protein structure in the nanofibers produced. Atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) reveal the structure of chitin-protein composite nanofibers. The presence of protein is confirmed by colorimetric method. Porous nanopaper membranes are prepared by simple filtration in such a way that different nanofiber volume fractions are obtained: 43%, 52%, 68%, and 78%. Moisture sorption isotherms, structural properties, and mechanical properties of membranes are measured and analyzed. The current material is environmentally friendly, the techniques employed for both individualization and membrane preparation are simple and green, and the results are of interest for development of nanomaterials and biocomposites.

  • 14.
    Ezekiel Mushi, Ngesa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Joby Kochumalayil, Jose
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Cervin, Nicholas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanostructured hydrogel based on small diameter native chitin nanofibers: Preparation, structure and propertiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Ezekiel Mushi, Ngesa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Nurani, Ghasem
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Soft, bio-inspired chitin/protein nanocomposites: mechanical behavior and interface interactions between recombinant resilin-like proteins and chitin nanofibersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16. Fonteyne, Margot
    et al.
    Correia, Ana
    De Plecker, Sofie
    Vercruysse, Jurgen
    Ilic, Ilija
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Veryaet, Chris
    Remon, Jean Paul
    Onofre, Fernanda
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    De Beer, Thomas
    Impact of microcrystalline cellulose material attributes: A case study on continuous twin screw granulation2015In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, ISSN 0378-5173, E-ISSN 1873-3476, Vol. 478, no 2, p. 705-717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) states in its Q8 'Pharmaceutical Development' guideline that the manufacturer of pharmaceuticals should have an enhanced knowledge of the product performance over a range of material attributes, manufacturing process options and process parameters. The present case study evaluates the effect of unspecified variability of raw material properties upon the quality attributes of granules; produced using a continuous from-powder-to-tablet wet granulation line (ConsiGma (TM) 25). The impact of different material attributes of six samples of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was investigated. During a blind study the different samples of MCC were used separately and the resulting granules were evaluated in order to identify the differences between the six samples. Variation in size distribution due to varying water binding capacity of the MCC samples was observed. The cause of this different water binding capacity was investigated and was caused by a different degree of crystallinity. Afterwards, an experimental design was conducted in order to evaluate the effect of both product and process variability upon the granule size distribution. This model was used in order to calculate the required process parameters to obtain a preset granule size distribution regardless of the type of MCC used. The difference in water binding capacity and its effect on granular properties was still present when combining the MCC grades with different binders.

  • 17. Fortunati, E.
    et al.
    Armentano, I.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Iannoni, A.
    Saino, E.
    Visai, L.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Kenny, J. M.
    Multifunctional bionanocomposite films of poly(lactic acid), cellulose nanocrystals and silver nanoparticles2012In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 87, no 2, p. 1596-1605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocomposite films were prepared by the addition of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) eventually surfactant modified (s-CNC) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles in the polylactic acid (PLA) matrix using melt extrusion followed by a film formation process. Multifunctional composite materials were investigated in terms of morphological, mechanical, thermal and antibacterial response. The nanocomposite films maintained the transparency properties of the PLA matrix. Thermal analysis showed increased values of crystallinity in the nanocomposites, more evident in the s-CNC based formulations that had the highest tensile Young modulus. The presence of surfactant favoured the dispersion of cellulose nanocrystals in the polymer matrix and the nucleation effect was remarkably enhanced. Moreover, an antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coil cells was detected for ternary systems, suggesting that these novel nanocomposites may offer good perspectives for food packaging applications which require an antibacterial effect constant over time. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 18. Fortunati, E.
    et al.
    Armentano, I.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Puglia, D.
    Terenzi, A.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Kenny, J. M.
    Microstructure and nonisothermal cold crystallization of PLA composites based on silver nanoparticles and nanocrystalline cellulose2012In: Polymer degradation and stability, ISSN 0141-3910, E-ISSN 1873-2321, Vol. 97, no 10, p. 2027-2036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly(lactic acid) (PIA) based high performance nanocomposites, were prepared using an innovative combination of nanocrystalline cellulose and silver nanoparticles. Binary and ternary systems were prepared by solvent casting process and their morphological, mechanical and thermal responses were investigated. Pristine (CNC) and surfactant modified cellulose nanocrystals (s-CNC) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles were used, and the effect of cellulose crystal nano-dimension, cellulose modification, and the combination of cellulose nanostructures with silver nanoparticles, was investigated. The important industrial problem of slow crystallization of PIA was addressed by the use of cellulose nanocrystals as biobased nucleating agents and the nonisothermal cold crystallization behaviour of reinforced binary and ternary systems was studied. The presence of surfactant on the nanocrystal surface favoured the dispersion of CNC in the PLA matrix while the thermal investigations and the nonisothermal crystallization studies underlined the ability of s-CNC to act as nucleation agent in both binary and ternary nanocomposites.

  • 19. Gebauer, Denis
    et al.
    Oliynyk, Vitaliy
    Salajkova, Michaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Sort, Jordi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bergstrom, Lennart
    Salazar-Alvarez, German
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    A transparent hybrid of nanocrystalline cellulose and amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles2011In: NANOSCALE, ISSN 2040-3364, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 3563-3566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose hybrids are promising candidates for biodegradable multifunctional materials. Hybrids of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles were obtained through a facile chemical approach over a wide range of compositions. Controlling the interactions between NCC and ACC results in hard, transparent structures with tunable composition, homogeneity and anisotropy.

  • 20.
    Geng, Shiyu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. Luleå Univ Technol, Div Mat Sci, Dept Engn Sci & Math, SE-97187 Luleå, Sweden.
    Yao, Kun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Luleå Univ Technol, Div Mat Sci, Dept Engn Sci & Math, SE-97187 Luleå, Sweden.;Univ Oulu, Fibre & Particle Engn, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland..
    High-Strength, High-Toughness Aligned Polymer-Based Nanocomposite Reinforced with Ultralow Weight Fraction of Functionalized Nanocellulose2018In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 4075-4083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multifunctional lightweight, flexible, yet strong polymer-based nanocomposites are highly desired for specific applications. However, the control of orientation and dispersion of reinforcing nanoparticles and the optimization of the interfacial interaction still pose substantial challenges in nanocellulose-reinforced polymer composites. In this study, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-grafted cellulose nanofibers have demonstrated much better dispersion in a poly(lactic acid) (PLA) matrix as compared to unmodified nanocellulose. Through a uniaxial drawing method, aligned PLA/nanocellulose nanocomposites with high strength, high toughness, and unique optical behavior can be obtained. With the incorporation of 0.1 wt % of the PEG-grafted cellulose nanofibers in PLA, the ultimate strength of the aligned nanocomposite reaches 343 MPa, which is significantly higher than that of other aligned PLA-based nanocomposites reported previously. Moreover, its ultimate strength and toughness are enhanced by 39% and 70%, respectively, as compared to the aligned nanocomposite reinforced with unmodified cellulose nanofibers. In addition, the aligned nanocomposite film is highly transparent and possesses an anisotropic light scattering effect, revealing its significant potential for optical applications.

  • 21.
    Guerriero, Gea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Avino, Mariano
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Fugelstad, Johanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Clergeot, Pierre-Henri
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Chitin Synthases from Saprolegnia Are Involved in Tip Growth and Represent a Potential Target for Anti-Oomycete Drugs2010In: PLOS PATHOG, ISSN 1553-7366, Vol. 6, no 8, p. e1001070-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oomycetes represent some of the most devastating plant and animal pathogens. Typical examples are Phytophthora infestans, which causes potato and tomato late blight, and Saprolegnia parasitica, responsible for fish diseases. Despite the economical and environmental importance of oomycete diseases, their control is difficult, particularly in the aquaculture industry. Carbohydrate synthases are vital for hyphal growth and represent interesting targets for tackling the pathogens. The existence of 2 different chitin synthase genes (SmChs1 and SmChs2) in Saprolegnia monoica was demonstrated using bioinformatics and molecular biology approaches. The function of SmCHS2 was unequivocally demonstrated by showing its catalytic activity in vitro after expression in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant SmCHS1 protein did not exhibit any activity in vitro, suggesting that it requires other partners or effectors to be active, or that it is involved in a different process than chitin biosynthesis. Both proteins contained N-terminal Microtubule Interacting and Trafficking domains, which have never been reported in any other known carbohydrate synthases. These domains are involved in protein recycling by endocytosis. Enzyme kinetics revealed that Saprolegnia chitin synthases are competitively inhibited by nikkomycin Z and quantitative PCR showed that their expression is higher in presence of the inhibitor. The use of nikkomycin Z combined with microscopy showed that chitin synthases are active essentially at the hyphal tips, which burst in the presence of the inhibitor, leading to cell death. S. parasitica was more sensitive to nikkomycin Z than S. monoica. In conclusion, chitin synthases with species-specific characteristics are involved in tip growth in Saprolegnia species and chitin is vital for the micro-organisms despite its very low abundance in the cell walls. Chitin is most likely synthesized transiently at the apex of the cells before cellulose, the major cell wall component in oomycetes. Our results provide important fundamental information on cell wall biogenesis in economically important species, and demonstrate the potential of targeting oomycete chitin synthases for disease control.

  • 22. Gunnarsson, Lavinia Cicortas
    et al.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Montanier, Cedric
    Karlsson, Eva Nordberg
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Ohlin, Mats
    Engineered xyloglucan specificity in a carbohydrate-binding module2006In: Glycobiology, ISSN 0959-6658, E-ISSN 1460-2423, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 1171-1180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of plant cell wall biology is constantly growing and consequently so is the need for more sensitive and specific probes for individual wall components. Xyloglucan is a key polysaccharide widely distributed in the plant kingdom in both structural and storage tissues that exist in both fucosylated and non-fucosylated variants. Presently, the only xyloglucan marker available is the monoclonal antibody CCRC-M1 that is specific to terminal alpha-1,2-linked fucosyl residues on xyloglucan oligo- and polysaccharides. As a viable alternative to searches for natural binding proteins or creation of new monoclonal antibodies, an approach to select xyloglucan-specific binding proteins from a combinatorial library of the carbohydrate-binding module, CBM4-2, from xylanase Xyn10A of Rhodothermus marinus is described. Using phage display technology in combination with a chemoenzymatic method to anchor xyloglucan to solid supports, the selection of xyloglucan-binding modules with no detectable residual wild-type xylan and beta-glucan-binding ability was achieved.

  • 23. Henriksson, Marielle
    et al.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Method of producing and the use of microfibrillated paper2009Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The present invention relates to a method of producing a cellulose based paper, the paper itself and the use thereof where the paper exhibits enhanced mechanical properties. The method involves providing a suspension of well dispersed modified cellulose at a low concentration. The properties and the chemical structure of the paper make it suitable for in vivo applications such as implant material.

  • 24.
    Henriksson, Marielle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Producing paper, useful as e.g. filter paper, speaker membrane and suture, comprises providing modified nanofibrils of cellulose, providing suspension of modified nanofibrils, and filtering, dewatering and drying the nanofibrils2009Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The present invention relates to a method of producing a cellulose based paper, the paper itself and the use thereof where the paper exhibits enhanced mechanical properties. The method involves providing a suspension of well dispersed modified cellulose at a low concentration. The properties and the chemical structure of the paper make it suitable for in vivo applications such as implant material.

  • 25.
    Joby Kochumalayil, Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Bergenstråhle-Wohlert, Malin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Utsel, Simon
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bioinspired and highly oriented clay nanocomposites with a xyloglucan biopolymer matrix: Extending the range of mechanical and barrier properties2013In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 84-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of clay bionanocomposites requires processing routes with nanostructural control. Moreover, moisture durability is a concern with water-soluble biopolymers. Here, oriented bionanocomposite coatings with strong in-plane orientation of clay platelets are for the first time prepared by continuous water-based processing. Montmorillonite (MTM) and a "new" unmodified biological polymer (xyloglucan (XG)) are combined. The resulting nanocomposites are characterized by FE-SEM, TEM, and XRD. XG adsorption on MTM is measured by quartz crystal microbalance analysis. Mechanical and gas barrier properties are measured, also at high relative humidity. The reinforcement effects are modeled. XG dimensions in composites are estimated using atomistic simulations. The nanostructure shows highly oriented and intercalated clay platelets. The reinforcement efficiency and effects on barrier properties are remarkable and are likely to be due to highly oriented and well-dispersed MTM and strong XG-MTM interactions. Properties are well preserved in humid conditions and the reasons for this are discussed.

  • 26.
    Joby Kochumalayil, Jose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Kasai, Wakako
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Regioselective modification of a xyloglucan hemicellulose for high-performance biopolymer barrier films2013In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 93, no 2, p. 466-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biobased polymers such as starch and hemicelluloses from wood are of interest for packaging applications, but suffer from limitations in performance under moist conditions. Xyloglucan from industrial tamarind seed waste offers potential, but its Tg is too high for thermal processing applications. Regioselective modification is therefore performed using an approach involving periodate oxidation followed by reduction. The resulting polymer structures are characterized using MALDI-TOF-MS, size-exclusion chromatography, FTIR and carbohydrate analysis. Films are cast from water and characterized by thermo-gravimetry, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, dynamic water vapor sorption, oxygen transmission and tensile tests. Property changes are interpreted from structural changes. These new polymers show much superior performance to current petroleum-based polymers in industrial use. Furthermore, this regioselective modification can be carefully controlled, and results in a new type of cellulose derivatives with preserved cellulose backbone without the need for harmful solvents.

  • 27.
    Kanoth, Bipinbal Parambath
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Claudino, Mauro
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Biocomposites from Natural Rubber: Synergistic Effects of Functionalized Cellulose Nanocrystals as Both Reinforcing and Cross-Linking Agents via Free-Radical Thiol-ene Chemistry2015In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 7, no 30, p. 16303-16310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural rubber/cellulose nanocrystals (NR/CNCs) form true biocomposites from renewable resources and are demonstrated to show significantly improved thermo-mechanical properties and reduced stress-softening. The nanocomposites were prepared from chemically functionalized CNCs bearing thiols. CNCs served as both reinforcing and cross-linking agents in the NR matrix, and the study was designed to prove the cross-linking function of modified CNCs. CNCs were prepared from cotton, and the cross-linkable mercapto-groups were introduced onto the surface of CNCs by esterification. Nanocomposite films were prepared by dispersing the modified CNCs (m-CNCs) in NR matrix by solution casting. The cross-links at the filler matrix (m-CNCs NR) interface were generated by photochemically initiated thiol-ene reactions as monitored by real-time FTIR analysis. The synergistic effects of reinforcement and chemical cross-linking at the m-CNCs NR interface on structure, thermo-mechanical, and stress-softening behavior were investigated. Methods included field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), swelling tests, dynamic mechanical analysis, and tensile tests. Compared to biocomposites from NR with unmodified CNCs, the NR/m-CNCs nanocomposites showed 2.4-fold increase in tensile strength, 1.6-fold increase in strain-to-failure, and 2.9-fold increase in work-of-fracture at 10 wt % of m-CNCs in NR.

  • 28.
    Kochumalayil, Joby
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Sehaqui, Houssine
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Tamarind seed xyloglucan: a promising biopolymer matrix for bioinspired nanocomposite materials2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Kochumalayil, Joby
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Sehaqui, Houssine
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Xyloglucan films2009Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The present invention pertains to films comprising xyloglucan, processes for preparing films comprising xyloglucan, as well as various uses of said films as for instance packaging material. Specifically, the present invention relates to xyloglucan films having advantageous properties relating to inter alia tensile strength, elastic modulus, and strain-to-failure.

  • 30.
    Kochumalayil, Joby
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Sehaqui, Houssine
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Tamarind seed xyloglucan: a thermostable high-performance biopolymer from non-food feedstock2010In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, ISSN 0959-9428, E-ISSN 1364-5501, Vol. 20, no 21, p. 4321-4327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polysaccharide biopolymers from renewable resources are of great interest as replacements for petroleum-based polymers since they have lower cradle-to-grave non-renewable energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Starch is widely used as a packaging material but is based on food resources such as potato or corn, and suffers from high sensitivity to water vapor even under ambient conditions. For the first time, xyloglucan (XG) from tamarind seed waste is explored as an alternative high-performance biopolymer from non-food feedstock. XG is purified, and dissolved in water to cast films. Moisture sorption isotherms, tensile tests and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis are performed. Glycerol plasticization toughening and enzymatic modification (partial removal of galactose in side chains of XG) are attempted as means of modification. XG films show much lower moisture sorption than the amylose component in starches. Stiffness and strength are very high, with considerable ductility and toughness. The thermal stability is exceptionally high and is approaching 250 degrees C. Glycerol plasticization is effective already at 10% glycerol. These observations point towards the potential of XG as a "new'' biopolymer from renewable non-food plant resources for replacement of petroleum-based polymers.

  • 31.
    Kochumalayil, Joby
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Nanostructured high-performance biocomposites based on Tamarind seed polysaccharide2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Kochumalayil, Joby
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Swedish Center for Biomimetic Fiber Engineering, BioMime. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Nanostructured high-performance biocomposites based on Tamarind seed xyloglucan2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33. Larsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Larsson, Anette
    Different types of microfibrillated cellulose as filler materials in polysodium acrylate superabsorbents2011In: Chinese Journal of Polymer Science, ISSN 0256-7679, E-ISSN 1439-6203, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 407-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three types of microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) with differences in structure and surface charge were used at low concentration as filler materials in polysodium acrylate superabsorbents (SAPs). The swelling of the composite hydrogels was determined in 0.9% NaCl solution as well as in deionized water. The shear modulus of the samples was determined through uniaxial compression analysis after synthesis and after swelling in 0.9% NaCl solution. Furthermore, the ability to retain filler effects after washing was investigated. The results showed that all of the investigated MFCs had a strong reinforcing effect on the shear modulus after synthesis. The filler effect on swelling and on the associated shear modulus of swollen samples showed a more complicated dependence on structure and surface charge. Finally, it was found that the filler effects were reasonably retained after washing and subsequent drying. The results confirm that MFC holds great potential as a filler material in superabsorbent applications. Furthermore, the results provide some insight on how the structural properties and surface charge of MFC will affect gel properties depending on swelling conditions. This information should be useful in evaluating the use of different types of MFC in future applications.

  • 34.
    Lönnberg, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Teeri, Tuula T.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Samir, Said
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    POLY 661-Grafting of poly(e-caprolactone) from microfibrillated cellulose films: for biocomposite applications2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Lönnberg, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Investigation of the graft length impact on the interfacial toughness in a cellulose/poly(ε-caprolactone) bilayer laminate2011In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 9-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interfacial adhesion between immiscible cellulose–polymer interfaces is a crucial property for fibrous biocomposites. To tailor the interfacial adhesion, the grafting of polymers from cellulose films was studied using ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone. The poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) grafted cellulose was analyzed with FTIR, AFM and via water CA measurements. The graft length was varied by the addition of a free initiator, enabling tailoring of the interfacial toughness. Films of microfibrillated cellulose were grafted with PCL and hot-pressed together with a PCL-film to form a bilayer laminate. Interfacial peeling toughness correlates very strongly with PCL degree of polymerization (DP). PCL grafts form physical entanglements in the PCL matrix and promote significant plastic deformation in the PCL bulk, thus increasing interfacial peeling energy.

  • 36.
    Lönnberg, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Fogelström, Linda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Towards molecular design of the cellulose/polycaprolactoneinterphase: engineering of debonding toughnessIn: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Lönnberg, Hanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Teeri, Tuula T.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Brumer, Harry III
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Grafting of cellulose fibers with polycaprolactone and poly(lactide) via ring-opening polymerization2006In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, no 7, p. 2178-2185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of epsilon-caprolactone (epsilon-CL) and L-lactide (L-LA) has been performed from cellulose fibers. The hydroxyl groups on cellulose act as initiators in the polymerization, and the polymers are covalently bonded to the cellulose fiber. As an attempt to introduce more available hydroxyl groups on the surface, and thereby obtain higher grafting efficiency in the ROP of epsilon-CL and L-LA, unmodified paper was modified with xyloglucan-bis(methylol)-2-methylpropanamide (XG-bis-MPA) and 2,2-bis(methylol)propionic acid (bis-MPA), respectively. The grafted substrates were characterized via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), contact angle measurement, atomic force microscopy, and enzymatic degradation. The results showed a successful grafting of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) from the cellulose fiber surfaces. Furthermore, the results showed an improved grafting efficiency after activation of the cellulose surface with bis-MPA, and showed that the amount of grafted polymer could be controlled by the ratio of added free initiator to monomer.

  • 38.
    Moberg, Tobias
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Tang, Hu
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Rigdahl, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Preparation and Viscoelastic Properties of Composite Fibres Containing Cellulose Nanofibrils: Formation of a Coherent Fibrillar Network2016In: Journal of Nanomaterials, ISSN 1687-4110, E-ISSN 1687-4129, Vol. 2016, article id 9569236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composite fibres with a matrix of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) as reinforcing elements were produced using a capillary viscometer. Two types of CNF were employed: one based on carboxymethylated pulp fibres and the other on TEMPO-oxidized pulp. Part of the latter nanofibrils was also grafted with PEG in order to improve the compatibility between the CNF and the PEG matrix. The nominal CNF-content was kept at 10 or 30 weight-%. The composite fibres were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy in addition to dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). Evaluation of the storage modulus indicated a clear reinforcing effect of the CNF, more pronounced in the case of the grafted CNF and depending on the amount of CNF. An interesting feature observed during the DMTA-measurements was that the fibrils within the composite fibres appeared to forma rather coherent and load-bearing network which was evident even after removing of the PEG-phase (by melting). An analysis of the modulus of the composite fibres using a rather simple model indicated that the CNF were more efficient as reinforcing elements at lower concentrations which may be associated with a more pronounced aggregation as the volume fraction of CNF increased.

  • 39.
    Morimune-Moriya, Seira
    et al.
    Chubu Univ, Coll Engn, Dept Appl Chem, Matsumoto, Nagano 4878501, Japan..
    Salajkova, Michaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nishino, Takashi
    Kobe Univ, Grad Sch Engn, Dept Chem Sci & Engn, Kobe, Hyogo 6578501, Japan..
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Reinforcement Effects from Nanodiamond in Cellulose Nanofibril Films2018In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 2423-2431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although research on nanopaper structures from cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) is well established, the mechanical behavior is not well understood, especially not when CNF is combined with hard nanoparticles. Cationic CNF (Q-CNF) was prepared and successfully decorated by anionic nanodiamond (ND) nanoparticles in hydrocolloidal form. The Q-CNF/ND nanocomposites were filtered from a hydrocolloid and dried. Unlike many other carbon nano composites, the QCNF/ND nanocomposites were optically transparent. Reinforcement effects from the nanodiamond were remarkable, such as Young's modulus (9.8 -> 16.6 GPa) and tensile strength (209.5 -> 277.5 MPa) at a content of only 1.9% v/v of ND, and the reinforcement mechanisms are discussed. Strong effects on CNF network deformation mechanisms were revealed by loading unloading experiments. Scratch hardness also increased strongly with increased addition of ND.

  • 40.
    Mushi, Ngesa Ezekiel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Butchosa, Nuria
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Salajkova, Michaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanostructured membranes based on native chitin nanofibers prepared by mild process2014In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 112, p. 255-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Procedures for chitin nanofiber or nanocrystal extraction from Crustaceans modify the chitin structure significantly, through surface deacetylation, surface oxidation and/or molar mass degradation. Here, very mild conditions were used to disintegrate chitin fibril bundles and isolate low protein content individualized chitin nanofibers, and prepare nanostructured high-strength chitin membranes. Most of the strongly 'bound' protein was removed. The degree of acetylation, crystal structure as well as length and width of the native chitin microfibrils in the organism were successfully preserved. Atomic force microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy, showed chitin nanofibers with width between 3 and 4 nm. Chitin membranes were prepared by filtration of hydrocolloidal nanofiber suspensions. Mechanical and optical properties were measured. The highest data so far reported for nanostructured chitin membranes was obtained for ultimate tensile strength, strain to failure and work to fracture. Strong correlation was observed between low residual protein content and high tensile properties and the reasons for this are discussed.

  • 41.
    Mushi, Ngesa Ezekiel Zekiel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Kochumalayil, Joby J.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Cervin, Nicholas Tchang Chang
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nanostructurally Controlled Hydrogel Based on Small-Diameter Native Chitin Nanofibers: Preparation, Structure, and Properties2016In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chitin nanofibers of unique structure and properties can be obtained from crustacean and fishery waste. These chitin nanofibers have roughly 4nm diameters, aspect ratios between 25-250, a high degree of acetylation and preserved crystallinity, and can be potentially applied in hydrogels. Hydrogels with a chitin nanofiber content of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0wt% were successfully prepared. The methodology for preparation is new, environmentally friendly, and simple as gelation is induced by neutralization of the charged colloidal mixture, inducing precipitation and secondary bond interaction between nanofibers. Pore structure and pore size distributions of corresponding aerogels are characterized using auto-porosimetry, revealing a substantial fraction of nanoscale pores. To the best of our knowledge, the values for storage (13kPa at 3wt%) and compression modulus (309kPa at 2wt%) are the highest reported for chitin nanofibers hydrogels.

  • 42.
    Mushi, Ngesa Ezekiel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Membrane and hydrogel properties from chitin fibril structures: Structure and properties at neutral pH2014In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 247, p. 21-CELL-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Nordgren, Niklas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Eklöf, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Rutland, Mark W.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    CELL 260-Top-down grafting of xyloglucan to gold monitored by QCM-D and AFM: Enzymatic activity and interactions with cellulose2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the manufacture and characterisation of model surfaces consisting of end grafted xyloglucan (XG), a naturally occurring polysaccharide, onto a gold substrate. The now well-established XET-technology was utilised for enzymatic incorporation of a thiol moiety at one end of the xyloglucan backbone. This functionalised macromolecule was subsequently top-down grafted to gold, forming a thiol-bonded xyloglucan brush-like layer. The grafting was monitored in-situ with QCM-D and a significant difference in the adsorbed/grafted amount between unmodified xyloglucan and the thiol-functionalised polymer was observed. The grafted surface was demonstrated to be accessible to enzyme digestion using the plant endo-xyloglucanase TmNXG1. The nanotribological properties towards cellulose of the untreated crystal, brush modified surface and enzyme exposed surfaces were compared with a view to understanding the role of xyloglucan in friction reduction. Friction coefficients obtained by the AFM colloidal probe technique using a cellulose functionalised probe on the xyloglucan brush showed an increase of a factor of two after the enzyme digestion and this result is interpreted in terms of surface roughness. Finally, the brush is shown to exhibit binding to cellulose despite its highly oriented nature.

  • 44.
    Nordgren, Niklas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Eklöf, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Brumer III, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Rutland, Mark
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Top-Down Grafting of Xyloglucan to Gold Monitored by QCM-D and AFM: Enzymatic Activity and Interactions with Cellulose2008In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 942-948Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the manufacture and characterisation of model surfaces consisting of end grafted xyloglucan (XG), a naturally occurring polysaccharide, onto a gold substrate.  The now well-established XET-technology was utilised for enzymatic incorporation of a thiol moiety at one end of the xyloglucan backbone.  This functionalised macromolecule was subsequently top-down grafted to gold, forming a thiol-bonded xyloglucan brush-like layer. The grafting was monitored in-situ with QCM-D and a significant difference in the adsorbed/grafted amount between unmodified xyloglucan and the thiol-functionalised polymer was observed.  The grafted surface was demonstrated to be accessible to enzyme digestion using the plant endo-xyloglucanase TmNXG1.  The nanotribological properties towards cellulose of the untreated crystal, brush modified surface and enzyme exposed surfaces were compared with a view to understanding the role of xyloglucan in friction reduction.  Friction coefficients obtained by the AFM colloidal probe technique using a cellulose functionalised probe on the xyloglucan brush showed an increase of a factor of two after the enzyme digestion and this result is interpreted in terms of surface roughness.  Finally, the brush is shown to exhibit binding to cellulose despite its highly oriented nature.

  • 45.
    Pei, Aihua
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Surface-modification of nanocelluloses and their applications in poly(lactic acid)/nanocellulose biocomposites2014In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 247, p. 163-CELL-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Pei, Aihua
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Butchosa, Nuria
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Surface quaternized cellulose nanofibrils for high-performance anionic dyes removal in water2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Pei, Aihua
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Butchosa, Nuria
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Surface quaternized cellulose nanofibrils with high water absorbency and adsorption capacity for anionic dyes2013In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 2047-2055Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface quaternized cellulose nanofibrils were mechanically disintegrated from wood pulp that was pretreated through a reaction with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride. The resulting quaternized cellulose nanofibrils (Q-NFC) with trimethylammonium chloride contents of 0.59-2.31 mmol g(-1) were characterized by conductometric titration, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). When the trimethylammonium chloride content on cellulose reached approximately 0.79 mmol g(-1) corresponding to a degree of substitution of 0.13 per bulk anhydroglucose unit, highly viscous and transparent aqueous dispersions of cellulose nanofibrils were obtained by mechanical homogenization of the chemically pretreated cellulose/water slurries. AFM observation showed that the dispersions consisted of individualized cellulose I nanofibrils 1.6-2.1 nm in width and 1.3-2.0 mu m in length. Cellulose nanopapers prepared from the Q-NFC aqueous dispersions exhibited high tensile strength (ca. 200 MPa) and Young's modulus (ca. 10 GPa) despite high porosity (37-48%). The nanopapers also demonstrated ultrahigh water absorbency (750 g g(-1)) with high surface cationic charge density. Stable hydrogels were obtained after swelling the nanopaper in water. The Q-NFC nanofibrils also possessed high anionic dye adsorption capability. The adsorption capacity increased with increasing trimethylammonium chloride content on cellulose.

  • 48.
    Pei, Aihua
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Malho, Jani-Markus
    Ruokolainen, Janne
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Strong Nanocomposite Reinforcement Effects in Polyurethane Elastomer with Low Volume Fraction of Cellulose Nanocrystals2011In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 44, no 11, p. 4422-4427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyurethane/cellulose nanocrystal nanocomposites with ultrahigh tensile strength and stain-to-failure with strongly improved modulus were prepared by adding cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) during the preparation of prepolymer. The nanostructure of this polyurethane consisted of individualized nanocellulose crystals covalently bonded and specifically associated with the hard polyurethane (PU) microdomains as characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The storage modulus and thermal stability of the nanocomposites were significantly improved as measured by dynamic mechanical analysis. This was due to a combination of CNCs reinforcement in the soft matrix and increased effective cross-link density of the elastomer network due to CNC-PU molecular interaction. Tensile test revealed that the nanocomposites have both higher tensile strength and strain-to-failure. In particular, with only 1 wt % of cellulose nanocrystals incorporated, an 8-fold increase in tensile strength and 1.3-fold increase in strain-to-failure were achieved, respectively. Such high strength indicates that CNCs orient strongly at high strains and may also induce synergistic PU orientation effects contributing to the dramatic strength enhancement. The present elastomer nanocomposite outperforms conventional rubbery materials and polyurethane nanocomposites reinforced with microcrystalline cellulose, carbon nanotubes, or nanoclays.

  • 49.
    Pei, Aihua
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Functionalized cellulose nanocrystals as biobased nucleation agents in poly(L-lactide) (PLLA): Crystallization and mechanical property effects2010In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 70, no 5, p. 815-821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The important industrial problem of slow crystallization of poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) is addressed by the use of cellulose nanocrystals as biobased nucleation reagents. Cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) were prepared by acid hydrolysis of cotton and additionally functionalized by partial silylation through reactions with n-dodecyldimethylchlorosilane in toluene. Such silylated cellulose nanocrystals (SCNC) were dispersible in tetrahydrofuran and chloroform, and formed stable suspensions. Nanocomposite films of PLLA and CNC or SCNC were prepared by solution casting. The effects of surface silylation of cellulose nanocrystals on morphology, non-isothermal and isothermal crystallization behavior, and mechanical properties of these truly nanostructured composites were investigated. The unmodified CNC formed aggregates in the composites, whereas the SCNC were well-dispersed and individualized in PLLA. As a result, the tensile modulus and tensile strength of the PLLA/SCNC nanocomposite films were more than 20% higher than for pure PLLA with only 1. wt.% SCNC, due to crystallinity effects and fine dispersion.

  • 50. Peltzer, Mercedes
    et al.
    Pei, Aihua
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Jiménez, Alfonso
    Surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals by grafting with poly(lactic acid)2014In: Polymer international, ISSN 0959-8103, E-ISSN 1097-0126, Vol. 63, no 6, p. 1056-1062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of biopolymers obtained from renewable resources is currently growing and they have found unique applications as matrices and/or nanofillers in 'green' nanocomposites. Grafting of polymer chains to the surface of cellulose nanofillers was also studied to promote the dispersion of cellulose nanocrystals in hydrophobic polymer matrices. The aim of this study was to modify the surface of cellulose nanocrystals by grafting from L-lactide by ring-opening polymerization in order to improve the compatibility of nanocrystals and hydrophobic polymer matrices. The effectiveness of the grafting was evidenced by the long-term stability of a suspension of poly(lactic acid)-grafted cellulose nanocrystals in chloroform, by the presence of the carbonyl peak in modified samples determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and by the modification in C1s contributions observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. No modification in nanocrystal shape was observed in birefringence studies and transmission electron microscopy.

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