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  • 1.
    Abshirini, Ehsan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Architectural Design.
    Resilience, space syntax and spatialinterfaces: The case of river cities2017In: A|Z ITU Journal of the Faculty of Architecture, ISSN 1303-7005, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 25-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resilience defined as the capacity of a system to manage impacts, keep its efficiency and continue its development has been scrutinized by researchers from different points of view over the past decades. Due to the prominence of resilience in urban planning, this paper intends to find out how the spatial structure of cities deals with disturbances, and if geographical phenomena such as rivers affect the resilience in cities. Using the space syntax methods syntactically analyze the resilience in cities, we innovatively introduce two measures; similarity and sameness. These measures are in relation with the syntactical properties of cities and compare the degree of resilience between different groups. Similarity measures the degree to which each city retains the relative magnitude of its foreground network after a disturbance and sameness is the degree to which each city retains the same segments as its foreground network after a disturbance. Likewise to network resilience studies, we apply different disturbances on cities and explore the reaction of cities to disturbances in terms of size of the foreground network and which segments are parts thereof. We then compare different groups based on these measurements as a method to analyze sameness and similarity. The results show that the resilience, in the way we define it, is different in different cities depending on in which view and based on which parameters we are discussing the resilience. Additionally morphological phenomena such as rivers have a great impact on the structure of cities and in turn on their resilience.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Resilience
  • 2.
    Abshirini, Ehsan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Rivers as integration devices in cities2016In: City, Territory and Architecture, E-ISSN 2195-2701, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As dynamic systems rivers and cities have been in interaction under changing relations over time, and the morphology of many cities has risen through a long and steady struggle between the city functions and the river system flowing inside. This makes river cities an interesting case to study how the presence of geographical features interacts with spatial morphology in the formation of cities.

    Methods: The basis of this research is enabled by utilizing a novel model for cross-city comparison presented by Hillier in his Santiago keynote in 2012 called a “star model”. This is done on large samples of cities investigating concurrent configurations, as well as how the properties in this star model react to specific forms of disturbance.

    Results: Results illustrate that the foreground network as identified through maximum choice values in cities are more vital to the structure of cities than the bridges. The overall syntactic structure tends to retain its character (degree of distributedness) and the location of its foreground network (which street segments constitute the foreground network) even when bridges are targeted. Furthermore, counter to the initial hypothesis, river cities tend to change less than non-river cities after targeted disturbance of the systems. Finally, the results show that while there is a statistical morphological difference between river cities and non-river cities, this difference is not directly explained through the bridges.

    Conclusion: Integrating space syntax with statistical and geospatial analysis can throw light on the way in which the properties of city networks and urban structure reflect the relative effect of rivers on the morphology of river cities. The paper, finally, contributes through offering one piece of a better perception of the structure of river-cities that can support strategies of river-cities interaction as well as enhance our knowledge on the constraints and limits to that interaction.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Abshirini & Koch - Rivers as integration devices in cities
  • 3.
    Abshirini, Ehsan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geodesy and Geoinformatics.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Visibility Analysis, Similarity and Dissimilarity in General Trends of Building Layouts and their Functions2013In: Proceedings of Ninth International Space Syntax Symposium / [ed] Young Ook Kim, Hoon Tae Park, Kyung Wook Seo, Seoul: Sejong University Press , 2013, p. 11:1-11:15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visibility analysis is one of the key methods in space syntax theory that discusses visual information conveyed to observers from any location in space that is potentially directly visible for the observer without any obstruction. Visibility – simply defined as what we can see – not only affects the spatial function of buildings, but also has visual relation to the perception of buildings by inhabitants and visitors. In this paper we intend to present the result of visibility analysis applied on a sample of building layouts of different sizes and functions from a variety of places of periods. The main aim of this paper is to statistically explore the general trends of building layouts and show if and how visibility properties such as connectivity, clustering coefficient, mean depth, entropy, and integration values can make distinctions among different functions of buildings. Our findings reveal that there are significant correlation coefficients among global properties of visibility in which we consider the mean value of properties, a similarity suggesting that they are not intensively manipulated by architecture. On the other hand, there are correlations although less so than the previous, still significant among local properties of visibility in which we consider the (max-min) value of properties, suggesting that social, cultural or other physical parameters distinguish buildings individually. We also show that functions such as ‘museum’ and ‘veterinary’ are relatively well-clustered, while functions such as ‘ancient’ and ‘shopping’ show high diversity. In addition, using a decision tree model we show that, in our sample, functions such as ‘museum’ and ‘library’ are more predictable rather than functions such as ‘hospital’ and ‘shopping.’ All of these mean that – at least in our sample – the usability and applicability of well-clustered and well-predicted functions have been predominant in shaping their interior spaces; vice versa, in well-diverse and unpredicted functions, the pragmatic solutions of people’s daily life developed in material culture affect the visual properties of their interior spaces.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Abshirini & Koch -- Visibility Analysis, Similarity, and Dissimilarity in General Trends of Building Layouts and their Functions (SSS9 2013)
  • 4.
    Abshirini, Ehsan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Legeby, Ann
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Flood hazard and its impact on the resilience of cities: An accessibility-based approach to amenities in the city of Gothenburg, Sweden2017In: Proceedings - 11th International Space Syntax Symposium, SSS 2017, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Departamento de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Georrecursos , 2017, p. 36.1-36.15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the wake of climate change and its impact on increasing the number and intensity of floods, adaptability of cities to and resistance against the flood hazard is critical to retain functionality of the cities. Vulnerability of urban infrastructure and its resilience to flooding from different points of view have been important and worth investigating for experts in different fields of science. Flood hazards as physical phenomena are influenced by form of the cities and thus the magnitude of their impacts can be intensified by urban infrastructures such as street networks and buildings (Bacchin et. al, 2011). In this paper, we aim to develop a method to assess the resilience of a river city (the city of Gothenburg in Sweden), which is prone to flood events, against such disturbances and find out how the city reacts to river floods and to what extent the city retains its accessibility to essential amenities after a flood occurs. To do so, collecting required data; we, firstly, simulate flood inundation with two different return periods (50 and 1000 years) and then the impact areas overlay on the street networks. Evaluating the resilience of the city, syntactic properties of the street networks before and after flooding are measured at different scales. Additionally, accessibility and the minimum distance of the street networks to essential amenities such as healthcare centers, schools and commercial centers, at a medium distance (3 Km) is examined. The results show that flooding influences the city configuration at global scale more than the local scale based on comparison of syntactic properties before and after flooding. However, the results of accessibility and the minimum distance show that the impact of flooding on the functionality of the city is more limited to the riparian areas and the city is not affected globally.

  • 5.
    Abshirini, Ehsan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geoinformatics.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Legeby, Ann
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Flood Resilient Cities: A Syntactic and Metric Novel on Measuring the Resilience of Cities against Flooding, Gothenburg, Sweden2017In: Journal of Geographic Information System, ISSN 2151-1950, E-ISSN 2151-1969, Vol. 9, p. 505-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flooding is one of the most destructive natural disasters which have rapidly been growing in frequency and intensity all over the world. In this view, assessment of the resilience of the city against such disturbances is of high necessity in order to significantly mitigate the disaster effects of flooding on the city structures and the human lives. The aim of this paper is to develop a method to assess the resilience of a river city (the city of Gothenburg in Sweden), which is prone to flood Hazard, against such disturbances. By simulating flood inundation with different return periods, in the first step, the areas of impact are determined. To assess the resilience, two different methods are followed. One is a syntactic method grounded in the foreground network in space syntax theory and the other is based on measuring accessibility to the essential amenities in the city. In the first method, similarity and sameness parameters are defined to quantitatively measure the syntactic resilience in the city. In the next step, accessibility to amenities and the minimum distance to amenities before and after each disturbance is measured. The results, in general, show that such disturbances affect the city structure and the resilience of the city differently. For instance, the city is more resilient after flooding ac- cording to accessibility measures. This clearly means that the answer to the question of resilience is mainly dependent on “resilience of what and for what.”

    Download full text (pdf)
    Abshirini et al - Flood Resilient Cities
  • 6.
    Berghauser Pont, Meta
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Ståhle, Alexander
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Marcus, Lars
    Chalmers.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Fitger, Martin
    XMN Software AB.
    Legeby, Ann
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Stavroulaki, Ioanna
    Chalmers.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Miranda Carranza, Pablo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Architectural Technologies.
    Nordström, Tobias
    Spacescape AB.
    PST2019Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    PST is a tool for performing space syntax and regular accessibility analyses. It currently consists of two main parts - a C++ and Python library called Pstalgo and a plugin for the desktop application QGIS.

    PST is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or (at your option) any later version. The GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to share and change all versions of a program--to make sure it remains free software for all its users.

    For latest download visit either the Chalmers publication page, or find "Releases" on the Github page.

  • 7.
    Bergström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, History and Theory of Architecture.
    Marcus, Lars
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    KI Arkitektur och kunskapsmiljö: Tävlingen/Etableringen/Förnyelsen2010 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities, like many other institutions in today’s society, are to such an extent connected to their buildings that activity and built structures can be difficult to separate from each other. What we can begin to see is how people have always used building to establish and maintain both societal functions and more everyday customs and practices. Activities that manage to establish themselves in built form become a natural and supportive part of our material reality, whereas activities that do not may have problems surviving. In our times, characterized by continuous change, established solutions can also be in the way of new development and hinder us from seeing how the built environment could be designed in a different way.

    Seen from this perspective, KI – Karolinska Institutet – constitutes an interesting example between consciously shaped environment and highly qualified academic activity. Karolinska Institutet is since long one of Swedens most creative knowledge environments. The institute’s buildings have come to over a long period of time and is characterized by high ambitions, where different ideas of the conditions of knowledge production have governed both the overall plan and the design of individual buildings. By clarifying these ideas, and simultaneously investigating how the built result works, we hope to contribute not only to the understanding of the development of Karolinska Institutet, but to e more general knowledge of the relation between architecture and knowledge environment as well.

     

  • 8.
    Borrion, Herve
    et al.
    UCL.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Integrating Architecture and Crime Science: A Transdisciplinary Challenge2017In: Transdisciplinary Higher Education: A Theoretical Basis Revealed in Practice / [ed] Gibbs, Paul, Berlin: Springer, 2017, p. 91-107Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of products and urban structures on citizens’ security has been explored and exploited across civilisations. Rarely, though, has the research in this field been as vibrant as now. Examples of research and development work can be found in many disciplines and on various scales. They concern the design of street furniture to prevent bicycle theft, identification of urban topological structures that can reduce drug dealing, development of structures that can resist pressure waves from explosive devices, and improvement of buildings’ resilience to toxic agents. In spite of this breadth of knowledge, there is still a significant gap between architecture, design and crime science. To shed a light on the underexploited connections between these disciplines, we examine the cultural and methodological differences that characterise them. Using the problem-solving approach promoted by crime scientists as support for cross-disciplinary analysis, we then discuss its compatibility with architecture and design practices. Finally, we summarise our analysis with a list of recommendations for the development of postgraduate course curricula that support collaborative work in security and crime science.

  • 9. Borrion, Hervé
    et al.
    Ekblom, Paul
    Alrajeh, Dalal
    Borrion, Aiduan Li
    Keane, Aidan
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design. Chalmers Institute of Technology.
    Mitchener-Nissen, Timothy
    Toubaline, Sonia
    The Problem with Crime Problem-Solving: Towards a Second Generation Pop?2020In: British Journal of Criminology, ISSN 0007-0955, E-ISSN 1464-3529, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 219-240, article id azz029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his 2018 Stockholm prize winner lecture, Goldstein highlighted the need for problem-oriented policing (POP) to be not only effective but also fair. Contributing to the development of POP, this study examines how a wider perspective on problem-solving generally, and scoping in particular, can be adopted to address some of the growing challenges in 21st century policing. We demonstrate that the concept of ‘problem’ was too narrowly defined and that, as a result, many problem-solving models found in criminology are ill-structured to minimize the negative side-effects of interventions and deliver broader benefits. Problem-solving concepts and models are compared across disciplines and recommendations are made to improve POP, drawing on examples in architecture, conservation science, industrial ecology and ethics.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Borrion et al - The Problem with Crime Problem-Solving (BJC 2020)
  • 10.
    Borrion, Hervé
    et al.
    UCL University College London.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Architecture2018In: Routledge Handbook of Crime Science / [ed] Richard Wortley, Aiden Sidebottom, Nick Tilley, Gloria Laycock, New York: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 145-166Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on crime prevention in relation to architecture as a discipline and as built material environment. It discusses earlier research and presents developments from the EU project ‘Resilient Infrastructure and Building Security’ (RIBS). In the chapter, we insist on the term ‘architecture’ (instead of the ostensibly more neutral term ‘built environment’) as historical, social, aesthetical and cultural values ought to be considered in crime prevention discussions. The chapter begins with an overview of the main principles and theoretical developments in the field of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED). This is followed by a section illustrating important contributions that architects have made to the instantiation of criminological principles. The last section of the chapter presents computational tools that have been developed to support architects in designing more secure and more resilient buildings. We conclude with critically examining and discussing what contribution these elements have made to enhance and nuance CPTED concepts, methods and practices.

  • 11.
    Borén, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Platser i Praktiken och Social Hållbarhet: Hökarängen och andra små centrumbildningar i fokus2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Stadsbyggnad och samhällsplanering är som framgår av förordet inget neutralt område utan en praktik och ett kunskapsområde med stora implikationer för människors vardagsliv liksom för samhället i stort. Det handlar om att få platser att fungera bra för dem som bor, arbetar eller på annat sätt är involverade i platsen, och där i samman­hanget ’fungera’ avser hela skalan från individens möjligheter till självförverkligande, till det för staden och samhället gemensamma bästa.

    Över tid förändrar sig förutsättningarna och platser som en gång formgivits i samklang med sin tid behöver i stadsbyggnadens och samhällsplaneringens praktik omtolkas och ges nya innebörder för att kunna leva upp till den nya tidens krav, utan att för den skull ge avkall på grundläggande överenskommelser i samhällskontraktet. Platser i praktiken kommer då att handla om social hållbarhet och om vilken typ av stad vi vill ha i vilken typ av samhälle. En komponent i detta handlar om livskraften i det lokala offentliga rummet och de villkor som gäller där oavsett om detta är beläget i stadens centrum eller i något av stadens ytterområden, där mycket av stadens liv levs. Det är detta lokala offentliga rum som den här rapporten ämnar bidra till att belysa.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 12.
    Choi, Eunyoung
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Movement and the connectivity of streets: A closer look at route distribution and pedestrian density2015In: SSS 2015 - 10th International Space Syntax Symposium, The Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Correlations between pedestrian movement and connectivity of streets have been frequently found in numerous studies. The configuration of the street network and its relation to observed movement patterns found in space syntax research is, of course, a significant part from them. With an attempt to further investigate the relation between urban form and movement behaviour, this study tests the correlation between configurational measures and a more detailed data on pedestrian movement. Observed in three residential neighbourhoods from Stockholm, the first part of data collected is the number of pedestrian per street segment (on a given moment). This so-called ’snapshot’ data of the pedestrian density is tested with the configurational measures of the street network. The preliminary result shows a significant degree of correlation between pedestrian density and configuration. More importantly, another set of data on pedestrian movement is the data of 200 individual trips made in one of the three study areas (with highest average movement density). The detailed data on individual walking trips is obtained through random on-site tracking of pedestrians, and includes the route and the details of the trip character. This data is also tested in its correlation to configuration measures. An interesting result from this is the large difference in the degrees of correlation found for origin/destination segments and route-in-between segments. The result also shows that the degree of correlation also differs according to the character of the walking activity e.g. utilitarian, recreational, etc. Testing with data on movement containing more details of pedestrian behaviour, this study tries to investigate how urban form interacts with pedestrian movement in the aspect of street connectivity.

  • 13.
    Dincel, Seren
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lighting Design.
    Besenecker, Ute
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lighting Design.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Zielinska-Dabkowska, Karolina M.
    Gdańsk University of Technology, Faculty of Architecture (GUT).
    Light formed through urban morphology and different organism groups: First findings from a systematic review.2024In: IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environment, ISSN 1755-1307, E-ISSN 1755-1315, Vol. 1320, p. 1-12, article id 012002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevailing implementation and usage of contemporary lighting technologies and design practices in cities have created over-illuminated built environments. Recent studies indicate that exposure to electric lighting effects formed through spatial characteristics has visual, physiological, and behavioural effects on both humans and non-humans, such as wildlife. In order to gain a better understanding of the impact that electric lighting has on space and different organism groups, a comprehensive literature review was conducted applying PRISMA 2020 systematic review guidelines. Results of the searches from various databases, such as Web of Science, PubMed and Scopus, identified 5260 related studies. A total of 55 papers connected to four themes: (1) urban morphology; (2) human visual impressions; (3) ecological impacts; and (4) design approaches and methods were analysed with a focus on urban morphology. The review provided the following general findings: lighting properties alone are inadequate to depict visual impressions of pedestrians, patterns formed through light interacting with spatial characteristics can contribute to understanding how spaces are visually perceived and help characterising the exposure of wildlife organisms to potential disturbances.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Dincel_2024_IOP_Conf._Ser.__Earth_Environ._Sci._1320_012002
  • 14.
    Ekelund, Björn
    et al.
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Space Syntax: Ett analysverktyg för planering och utvärdering av arkitektur i byggd miljö2012Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Förord [av Lisa Daram]

    Planering, projektering och utvärdering av arkitektur och byggd miljö innehåller ett centralt tema som, hur märkligt det än låter, kan vara lätt att tappa bort. Nämligen det faktum att det som sker eller kommer att ske i den byggda miljön inte syns i ritningar och modeller.

    Hur den byggda miljön påverkar människors beteenden är inget som framträder av sig självt - grunden för beslut måste byggas i hypotetisk form och medvetet tillföras diskussioner mellan entreprenörer, beställare, planerare och arkitekter. Tyvärr saknas alltför ofta resonemang om människors behov och beteenden i det byggda, och ännu oftare saknas uttalad metodik.

    Den här skriften handlar om space syntax - en analysmetod som i naturvetenskaplig mening ger sig i kast med att hitta mätbara förhållanden i det byggda som man menar har påverkan på människors beteenden. Därtill kommer den verkligt svåra uppgiften att tolka analysresultaten. Precis som vid användning av andra metoder inom området arkitektur och byggd miljö krävs ett levande tolkningsarbete som omfattar ifrågasättanden, prövanden och diskussioner kring analysresultaten.

    Skriften riktar sig till dig som använder eller vill använda space syntax i ditt arbete. Och till dig som är allmänt intresserad av kunskap om samband mellan människor och byggd miljö.

    Tack till Björn och Daniel för att ni med ett öppet förhållningssätt delat med er av ert kunnande om en metod som ni regelbundet använder. Tack till Formas som bidragit till skriften och sist men verkligen inte minst: Tack till Arkus medlemsföretag som gör studier som denna möjliga.

    Lisa Daram Arkus kansli, oktober 2012

  • 15. Fagerholm, Nora
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Karl
    Eilola, Salla
    Giusti, Matteo
    Hasanzadeh, Kamyar
    Kajosaari, Anna
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Korpilo, Silviya
    Kyttä, Marketta
    Legeby, Ann
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Liu, Yu
    Præstholm, Søren
    Raymond, Christopher
    Rinne, Tiina
    Stahl Olafsson, Anton
    Barthel, Stephan
    Analysis of pandemic outdoor recreation and green infrastructure in Nordic cities to enhance urban resilience2022In: npj Urban Sustainability, E-ISSN 2661-8001, Vol. 2, no 1, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent empirical research has confirmed the importance of green infrastructure and outdoor recreation to urban people’s well- being during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, only a few studies provide cross-city analyses. We analyse outdoor recreation behaviour across four Nordic cities ranging from metropolitan areas to a middle-sized city. We collected map based survey data from residents (n = 469–4992) in spring 2020 and spatially analyse green infrastructure near mapped outdoor recreation sites and respondents’ places of residence. Our statistical examination reveals how the interplay among access to green infrastructure across cities and at respondents’ residential location, together with respondents’ socio-demographic profiles and lockdown policies or pandemic restrictions, affects outdoor recreation behaviour. The results highlight that for pandemic resilience, the history of Nordic spatial planning is important. To support well-being in exceptional situations as well as in the long term, green infrastructure planning should prioritise nature wedges in and close to cities and support small-scale green infrastructure

    Download full text (pdf)
    Fagerholm et al - Analysis of pandemic outdoor recreation (NPJUS, 2022)
  • 16.
    Feng, Chen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Legeby, Ann
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Accessibility patterns based on steps, direction changes, and angular deviation: Are they consistent?2022In: Proceedings: 13th International Space Syntax Symposium / [ed] Akkelies van Nes, Remco E. de Koning, Western Norway University of Applied sciences , 2022, p. 534:1-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modeling spaces and their relationships is at the core of syntactic analysis, including reach analysis. In a syntactic model, two spaces can be described as close together or far apart based on the directional distance between them. In this study, we compare three different ways of measuring directional distance—namely, by number of steps, by number of direction changes, and by angular deviation—in the context of accessibility and reach analysis. By graphically showing how choosing a different way of measuring directional distance can result in a different reach or accessibility pattern, we provide an intuitive understanding of the different natures of the syntactic measures. By demonstrating how the modeling conventions and the geometric composition of lines at a local scale can have a huge impact on the results of syntactic analysis at a larger scale, we call for more attention to the conventions and principles used for modeling street networks.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Feng C, D Koch & A Legeby -- Accessibility patterns based on steps, direction changes, and angular deviation (SSS13, 2022)
  • 17. Jesper, Steen
    et al.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Samspelet på vårdavdelningen: Om att vara tillgänglig för varandra i det rumsliga sammanhanget2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report is oriented towards those who work with healthcare and those who work with the design of healthcare environments. The purpose is to work as support in situations when change of or production of new healthcare units are discussed. The intention is to support internal discussions around what are wished for conditions – what should be emphasized in the commission of what is to be built – as well as to contribute to the communication between healthcare personnel on the one hand and architect and facilities owner on the other.

    Our aim is to arrive at questions at the level of principles that we experience as generally valid – and that depending on context require different solutions in different cases. It is this kind of questions, with their inherent contradictions, we propose need to be discussed in connection with changes of a healthcare unit. In this way, the work with designing new environments can be based on an increased insight in what choices the work encompasses and the consequences these choices have.

    The report is a result of a research project named “To see and be seen in healthcare; User-oriented design for visibility and cooperation in spatial systems for healthcare”. In the project, four different healthcare units in the Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge have been studied, two chosen because they have been recently rebuilt and two because they had a traditional design and were about to be rebuilt. The project has been conducted by researchers in architecture at KTH in close cooperation with people from the hospital and from within healthcare and healthcare facilities production.

    Even if this report is a result of a research project it does not intend to put forward true pictures of how things work. This is true for all research that tries to capture human behaviour. The questions we aim to handle are large and it could be considered questionable that we with our limited experience of healthcare should conduct this kind of discussion. We believe, however, that there is a point in looking at healthcare with the eyes of someone from the outside. Of course the content of this report needs to be critically reviewed; it is the reader’s judgment that decides what are the valid questions in her or his own situation.

    (The report contains a 5-page summary in English)

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    The prototype software SPOT with Paths
  • 18.
    Karlström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Ståhle, Alexander
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Marcus, Lars
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Mattsson, Lars-Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Place, space syntax and attraction-accessibility2009In: Proceedings of the Seventh International Space Syntax Symposium, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    A cortege of ghostly bodies: Abstraction, prothesis, and the logic of the mannequin2018In: Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies / [ed] Hélène Frichot, Catharina Gabrielsson, Helen Runting, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 99-105Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bodies are both present and thoroughly gendered in commercial environments – and, by extension, in public space. Such gendered presence is addressed in studies of both the historical evolution and current conditions of consumption and public space alike, which show that it takes many, varied forms.[1] Where much discourse on bodies in such spaces tends to focus on photographic and video material – in magazines, on billboards, and on shopfronts – somewhat less attention has been given to the role of mannequins (here, specifically wax and plastic mannequin ‘dolls’ used to display fashion in shopfronts and inside stores). Mannequins clearly perform something other than the photographic material used to display fashion: they are less detailed, less formulated, and less expressive.[2] This is not due to an inability to make mannequins more ‘real’. Considering their prevalence and gendered presence and distribution, it is worth considering how they specifically contribute to processes of subjectification, embodiment, identity, and fashion negotiation.[3] This project builds on four primary sources: empirical research into commercial space, specifically two department stores;[4] Vanessa Osborne’s ‘The Logic of the Mannequin’;[5] Gilles Châtelet’s discussions on diagrams, space, and abstraction-prothesis processes;[6] and an experimental, explorative study undertaken at Dansmuseet (the Museum of Dance and Movement) in Stockholm in 2012.[7] The project aims to develop our understanding of how mannequins operate in commercial space and society – specifically, how in their abstraction these inanimate objects not only allow for but in fact demand completion from observers. 

  • 20.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Analysing Architectural Configuration: Spatial heterogeneity as form, function, and communication2009In: urbanism & urban qualities: New Data & Methodologies / [ed] Jonna Majgaard Krarup, Thomas Sick Nielsen, Henrik Harder, Ålborg: Ålborg Universitet , 2009, p. 25-30Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatial and material form, the tools and modes of architects, participate in shaping our lives in many ways which are not detirminate but strongly influential. One of the ways in which it does this is by spatial configuration - that is, the setup of relations between spaces - which responds to and describes social relations as well as potentials, possibilities, restrictions, and suggestions. This both through practical and communicative means, and in a great many ways. Research at sad tries to focus more specifically at these components of the physical environment, and some intriguing results have been produced both when it comes to buildings and urban environments. Critical for these findingshave been the involvement of different theories and methods that complement one another, and the development of new models of analysis. This presentation aims to briefly present some of these models and results.

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  • 21.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    ...and avoidance2015In: Proceedings of the 10th International Space Syntax Symposium / [ed] Kayvan Karimi, Laura Vaughan, Kerstin Sailer, Garyfalia Palaiologou, Tom Bolton, London: Space Syntax Laboratory, The Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London , 2015, p. 22:1-22:12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Social Logic of Space it is stated that spatial configuration affects social relations in how it structures patterns of movement, encounter and avoidance. Since then, a lot of space syntax research has investigated these phenomena to provide empirical support and to refine the understanding of mechanisms and relations. However, most of this research focuses on the first half of these patterns - that of how space structures and generates encounters, whereas studies of how space generates patterns of avoidance is less often studied. The outset of this paper is that in order to understand a 'social logic of space', the study of how space generates, allows, or prevents patterns of avoidance is a missing key question that may also further develop discourses of patterns of encounter. Avoidance, as a social action, simply requires a series of socio-spatial, interactive, and shared relations to and through space that necessitates assumptions, presumptions, and speculations of the behaviours of specific or generic others that studies of encounters at times can avoid. In extension, while a development rather than a challenge to studies of encounters, this informs knowledge on the relations between society, activity, and space in general, and on the socio-cultural structuring taking place in everyday spatial performativity.

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    Koch, Daniel - And Avoidance (SSS10)
  • 22.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design. Chalmers Civil Engineering and Architecture.
    Architectural Articulation and Configurations of Space: Advancing theory, principles and bases for spatial modelling2019In: Proceedings of the 12th Space Syntax Symposium, Beijing: Beijing Jiaotong University , 2019, p. 264-1:1-264-1:17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Space syntax has established itself as a significant field of research into architectural and urban phenomena through the analysis of spatial configuration. Analyses that predominantly consist of variations on modelling spatial configurations as systems of axial lines, segments, convex spaces or isovists with further refinements. This analysis builds on the process of, as stated in the Social Logic of Space, first making discrete units out of continuous space, so as to create a system that can be analyzed, and then subjecting this system to analysis. The procedures of creating these discrete systems have seen many iterations, lately often employing a range of processes to road center line maps or similar existing geographical information or, increasingly dominantly for buildings, VGA analysis where isovists are distributed evenly in a grid in the space subject to analysis. This has allowed for more rapid analysis of larger sets of data and ostensibly less impact of human decisions in constructing the analytic models. At the same time, theoretical developments have increasingly looked to cognition to explain statistical results and to theorize the spatial units employed in syntactical analysis. This work has been important for the field. However, some important questions still await robust theoretical reconciliation. For instance, isovists, argued for as representation of vision, are employed both to analyze visibility and accessibility while the scale and type of object or material boundary that is considered a boundary in an axial line or convex space map varies. This article does not strive to provide a final resolution to these challenges, but discusses and refines the theoretical basis to provide potential paths forward. In this discussion, the article compares spatial configuration as the understanding of the combination of construction of pre-defined entities to spatial configuration as the result of subdivision and articulation of spatial differentiation in several ways, which incorporates cognition as an active faculty that operates in relation to intent and background of whomever is concerned, but also allows to consider the potential of different cultures embedded in cognition through notions of salience and articulation. It suggests that some of the difficulties in finding a clear-cut definition of e.g. ‘convex space’ lies in that rather than a geometric property of ‘space’, one might look to their formation and articulation by material boundaries as culturally and situationally conditioned. This allows for a more dynamic yet not completely relativistic theoretical ground for developing analytic modelling further and meeting challenges that are yet theoretically unresolved.

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    Koch, 2019 - Architecture Articulation Configuration
  • 23.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Architectural Disjunctions: Morphological identity andsyntactic contrasts of visibility and permeability2012In: Proceedings: Eighth International Space Syntax Symposium / [ed] Margareta Greene, José Reyes & Andrea Castro, 2012, p. 8143:1-8143:18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Architecture can be understood as deliberate elaborations of physical forms and configurations into socially and culturally meaningful objects, enabling activities and programmes as well as communicating ideas andvalues. It can be argued that part of this elaboration is that of staging, and that of the treatment of differences of visibility and permeability, which carries strong cultural and social connotations. However, this is often discussed either as singular situations of exposure or accessibility, or as compensatory use of one over the other, where visibility serves to compensate for accessibility, or provide a certain form of transpatiality. Studying structures of relations between visibility and permeability, however, leading to an understanding of emergent degrees of exposure and availability, seems to say a lot about architectural character and identity. This paper argues that a more thorough study of this relation is central to developing architectural morphology, and proposes a model for ‘building profiling’ that sets up an analysis of how the interrelation between visibility and accessibility can be used to inform architectural analysis of the identity of architectural structures as well as the way that identity of the content is described. This is done on the onehand elaborating on basic architectural morphologies commonly used within space syntax, but also compares to experimental works such as Autant’s Théâtre de l’espace from 1937 and everyday urban and architectural situations. The main line of argument is the change from individual situations to a system of syntactic, configurative relations which, it is argued, requires a degree of secondary abstraction – an abstraction that provides thorough understanding of certain architectural effects of configuration that contributes to the character and identity of buildings or urban spaces.

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    Full paper
  • 24.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Architectural Fashion Magazines2009In: Proceedings of the 7th International Space Syntax Symposium / [ed] Daniel Koch, Lars Marcus, Jesper Steen, Stockholm: KTH , 2009, p. 057:1-057:14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent research project regarding the layout, commodity distribution and performativity of department stores, one of the most important findings was the way in which commodity distribution did not follow the layman's retail theories of attractor goods and impulse buys, but rather quite directly resembled something else: namely a nuanced but clear description by staging of the social roles the commodities for sale have in society. Closest resemblance to the spatial configurative description of difference and belonging could be found in fashion- and lifestyle magazines, and closest resemblance to the arrangement of home goods could be found in likening the entire home floors to apartments. In both cases not as direct copies but by contextual reference via the social situations, roles, and descriptions performed in and by space. This was remarkably much done through comfigurative positioning in space, in relation to some of the performative effects we have come to know are in part dependent on spatial configuration. This has later been expanded, if in rudimentary research, to examining retailer positioning in the urban fabric. Some of these patterns are very similar, suggesting there to be social logics of retail and consumption that respond to spatial situations in a more intricate way than simply providing more customers by more passers-by. Many of these responses or strategies are configurative in their nature both spatially and socially, and linked to the effects of spatial configuration on presence, movement, and being. This paper present some of these results in the light of recent findings in marketing theory, and suggests that this has implications for how complex buildings of the kinds of museums, department stores and libraries should be studied.

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  • 25.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Architectural Interfaces and Resilience: modeling, diagramming, measuring2013In: Architectural Morphology: Investigative modelling and spatial analysis / [ed] Daniel Koch & Pablo Miranda Carranza, Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2013, p. 1-6Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Writing an abstract or summary for my presentation to this event proves more difficult than expected – which lies in part at the heart of the event itself: it serves a dual purpose, at least. On the one hand the intention is to present, quite pragmatically, some results from the research project funding it. On the other hand, the inten-tion is to raise questions on a higher level regarding architecture, modelling and spatial analysis. These are not contradictory, as the latter in part comes from the former, but it raises some issues as to whether to focus a summary on the results concretely, or the implications that were part of spawning the theme of the workshop. This ‘summary’, therefore, will have to wander somewhere in-between while aiming to definitively provide the former. I intend to get to this stage later on.

    The project behind the research workshop Architectural Morphology: Investigative modeling and spatial analysis, Resilient Infrastructure and Building Security, asks several questions to spatial analysis that to certain extents are different than what we usually encounter – and similarly, in our experience, architectural analysis asks questions to the other fields involved in the project that are sometimes given little attention. What I intend to do in this presentation, is to try and extract and describe some implications and questions raised in this work, and set them in relation to a wider architectural and morphological context. Originating in specific questions, what I will try to discuss here is thus some more overarching results that I believe of more general architect-ural interest. These will be formulated through two core concepts that have grown forth as central within the research that seem interdependent: spatial interfaces and spatial resilience

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    Koch - Architectural interfaces and resilience
  • 26.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Architecture as Material Discourse: On the spatial formulation of knowledge and ideals in four library extensions2015In: A|Z ITU Journal of the Faculty of Architecture, ISSN 1303-7005, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 7-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades libraries have been challenged in many ways, perhaps most pointedly by the digital revolution. This is, however, not the first time – a series of booms in library architecture emerging rather when knowledge ideals are chal- lenged than established allows us to discuss library architecture more clearly as investigations into what knowledge, learning and literature could be rather than as expressions of what knowledge, learning and literature is. These questions are complex and multifaceted and require both careful examination of architectural proposals and works and a step back to analyse the propositions they make through their formulations into architectural form. Utilizing four public library extensions in Sweden, of which three have been built and one has been rebooted, and competition and parallel commission proposals for their making, this article discusses how ideas of libraries, knowledge, and literature emerge through the mediation of programme, collections, activity, and visitors in interaction, related to other aspects of architectural form. Building on a series of empirical findings of correspondences between use patterns of libraries and spatial configuration, the article takes this discussion further into what this means for a discussion of architectural principles, ideals, and propositions. 

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    Koch, Daniel -- Architecture as Material Discourse - On the spatial formulation of knowledge and ideals in four library extensions (A|Z ITU, 2015)
  • 27.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Architecture Re-Configured2010In: Journal of Space Syntax, ISSN 2044-7507, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of what differentiates architecture and building has been raised many times in Architecture Theory, with various responses or explanations – usually under the precondition that architecture is something more. It is one of the core questions of architecture theory. Inherent in the discussion seems to be how architecture becomes socially significant and how it conveys meaning. Continuing this line of inquiry, this paper examines how and why spatial configuration lies at the heart of architectural design and explores how and why space syntax research contributes to architecture per se. This is argued using a small set of socio-spatial figures commonly used in architectural design that formulate positions and situations based on discrepancies between configurative relations of visibility and accessibility. It is finally suggested that the conscious manipulation of these discrepancies is a core aspect of architectural design.

  • 28.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Architecture Re-Configured2009In: Proceedings of the 7th International Space Syntax Symosium / [ed] Daniel Koch, Lars Marcus, Jesper Steen, Stockholm: KTH , 2009, p. 058:1-058:11Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of what differentiates architecture and building has been raised many times in Architecture Theory, with various responses or explanations – usually under the precondition that architecture is something more. Space is the Machine makes a contribution to this discussion by elaborating some of the ways in which architecture becomes socially significant and how this differs from the vernacular. This discussion is herein continued, bringing in also a discussion of the formulation of spatial meaning as created through certain strategies of spatial configuration. In relation to the field of research, this paper constitutes a proposal of what this difference between architecture and the vernacular is, and how this is a difference in treatment of spatial configuration, making the findings within space syntax research pivotal for such an understanding. This is argued by use of a few socio-spatial figures commonly used in architectural design, that formulate positions and situations that are based on discrepancies between configurative relations of visibility and accessibility. It is finally suggested that it is the conscious and active use of these discrepancies that lies at the core of architectural design.

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  • 29.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Byggnader till låns: Bygga till, bygga om, bygga nytt bibliotek2008In: Tidskriften RUM, ISSN 1650-1330, Vol. 4, p. 96-107Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att bygga om, bygga till, bygga nytt, eller flytta bibliotek är något som är en aktuell fråga i stora delar av Sverige, och som varit det i några år nu även om det verkar som det hela börjar närma sig en slags kulmen. Malmö började, och i strid ström har efterföljare som Växjö, Halmstad, Haninge, Landskrona, Karlskrona, Vallentuna, Solna, Umeå, Luleå, Ljungby och så vidare följt, liksom Göteborg och Stockholm, även om det varit anmärkningsvärt tyst om Göteborgs ombyggnad jämfört Stockholms. Det är inte heller en process som är unik för Sverige. All denna aktivitet går att studera som en strömning snarare än en uppsättning unika projekt, vilket leder till ett antal frågor: hur behandlar vi det som vi redan har? Vad är det för kunskapssyn som skall rymmas i de nya komplexen? Slutligen motsvarande fråga gällande det gamla byggnadsbeståndet - hur fyller vi ut lokaler ritade i en annan tid och för andra kulturella situationer?

  • 30.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Changing Building Typologies: The typological question and the formal basis of architecture2014In: Journal of Space Syntax, ISSN 2044-7507, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 168-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The call for this themed issue formulates an interesting proposition, one that is a common conception – that people’s behaviour and, accordingly, the use of buildings is changing – and that this leads to the emer- gence of new building typologies. More specifically, it claims that ‘the reality of what is happening inside buildings nowadays is much more complex, diverse and multi-layered than a single word can describe.’ This paper intends to challenge the word ‘nowadays’, which places this situation as something historically unique and special. It will do this in order to conclude with a discussion of theory of analysing architecture.

    The first question to be examined is historical. While it may be true that building use is currently changing rapidly, it is equally true that this has happened before. Some of the most common ‘types’ are in fact under constant change, and this will be illustrated through the ‘shop’ and the ‘home’, concluded by a discussion on the perception of rapid change and historical stability as such. It will be suggested that this is partially embedded in a typological process. The second question is theoretical. It will be argued that the very idea of changing and more flexible use is tied to an idea of architecture with its roots in modernity, where ‘use’ became a central question to plan for, along with the development of a specific notion of function that was intimately connected to the notion of type. Many earlier ‘types’ were not as much use-adapted as ‘appropriate types’ for a range of reasons, sometimes even contrary to ‘use’. This discussion will explore the interdependency between conceptions of type and perceptions of the theoretical, disciplinary, and practical bases of architecture.

    Following this, the paper will conclude by drawing the strands together to discuss architectural analysis and the risks and potentials of typology as an analytical operation.

  • 31.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Choreographing Exposure: Theatrical configurations of architectural disjunction2013In: Proceedings of Ninth International Space Syntax Symposium / [ed] Young Ook Kim, Hoon Tae Park, Kyung Wook Seo, Seoul: Sejong University Press , 2013, p. 70:1-70:18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The way architecture articulates social, cultural, political, and organizational values as well as character and identity through manipulation of visibility, permeability and the relation them in-between has been discussed by many researchers. Consistent methodologies that focus on this specific split are however unusual, and it tends to be handled discursively and on a case-by-case basis. There are also shortcomings in how such disjunctions are considered both in functional and communicatory terms. For development of morphological and configurational analysis, studies of well-known architectural works can be used to investigate geometric and configurative properties and how they relate to analyses and understanding of spatial mediation of societal values. This, however, faces a methodological challenge, as it deals with a multi-variable set of relations – including both amount of and degree of differentiation between visibility and permeability, and potentially questions of directionality that are problematic for syntax analysis to deal with.

    To move forward, one can either build a library of analysed buildings to compare and evaluate different disjunction patterns to, or compare these analyses to a base set of geometries and disjunctions. This paper intends to make generic methodological and theoretical contributions through specific studies of these relations focused on a well-known and analysed building: Adolf Loos' house for Josephine Baker (1928), and introducing comparison to other situations. It also aims to more clearly begin establishing a terminology for such disjunctions that can be used to further refine the understanding.

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    Koch -- Choreographing Exposure (SSS9 2013)
  • 32.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Configuration, geometry and spatial choreography2021In: Architecture, Perception, Curation / [ed] Kristy Cho, Grace Lee, Katie Massa, Elliot Park Jr., John Peponis, Varun Sethi, Hafsa Siap, Alexandra Watson, Atlanta: Georgia Institute of Technology , 2021, p. 64-66Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, I engage with architecture from a perspective related to Judith Butler’s discussion of performativity as structures-in-the making. The relation of local, spatial situatedness to the extended structuring of social relations is of particular interest. This needs to be done with care since, as Nick Kaye notes, architectural space is not a precise enough symbolic system to form statements with distinct meanings, nor abstract and systemic enough to form a structure or lexicon. This leads to an ongoing negotiation of situatedness with space and architecture as active participants. While, for instance, a stage holds a range of possible, probable, and potential meanings and is embedded with sets of (expected and suggested) social relations, the particular meaning of that stage in a particular situation will always-ever be a matter of contextual, situated meaning-making. This does not leave architecture innocent; rather, it is precisely because such situations are dynamic social negotiations that architecture participates in the structural aspects of performativity. I will draw from concrete examples to address the local situatedness of people to one another through architectural configuration and geometry.

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    Koch D - Configuration, Geometry and Spatial Configuration (2021)
  • 33.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Consumption as Spatial Practice2007In: SITE, ISSN 1650-7894, Vol. 18-19, p. 17-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Of the French theorists of his generation Jean Baudrillard was perhaps the one most concerned with consumption and the effects of mass production and advertising on contemporary culture. He was one of the major contributors to the establishment of the term consumer society, a term that has grown increasingly relevant in a society such as our “Western” culture where life to the utmost degree is consumption and shopping—a life lived in commercial spaces or defined largely by artifacts bought in commercial spaces and used primarily by being consumed. Perhaps Baudrillard’s early writings are even more relevant and important today than when they were first published, as consumption has become our main form of active identity building and social positioning, where everyone is expected to be ready to describe themselves, in the middle of the street, in term of their choices of styles, only to see their statements printed in free morning papers the next day. Through consumption and the use of symbols such as clothes, furniture, and other cultural or mundane items, we define ourselves, our identities, and our positions in society. At the same time public spaces, to a high degree, have been closed or transformed into commercial spaces. Even public squares, streets, and city centers have been subject to more or less drastic transformations from open space to indoor malls or shopping centers, and the official rhetoric claims that this will make them more available and comfortable. While this rhetoric may be true in intent, the patterns and possibilities of control are intensified, often outsourced to a private entrepreneur. A phenomenon that has led the cultural geographer Sharon Zukin to coin the expression "Pacification through Cappuccino" (The Cultures of Cities). Through the establishing of such places of consumption in parks and other public spaces, the possibilities of action and agency become more limited without the need for official signs or patrolling personnel. Today life is, so to say, lived both through a logic of consumption and in spaces of consumption.

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    Daniel Koch - Cosumption as spatial practice (SITE 2007)
  • 34.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Den produktiva staden2019In: Arkitekten, ISSN 0347-058X, no 5, p. 52-53Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Framtidens hållbara stad är en minst sagt het potatis. En mängd olika aktörer presenterar förslag, modeller och idéer som rör allt från problembeskrivning till lösningar. Trots alla inlägg och oavsett hur problematiken beskrivs så formuleras lösningen ofta som en relativt tät, kvarterslik stadsstruktur med aktiva bottenvåningar och levande stadsrum.

    Samtidigt blir frågor om lokal produktion och resurshantering allt viktigare, och lyfts som utmaningar för framtida hållbar utveckling av bland annat FN. Men hur väl går lokal produktion och levande stadsmiljö ihop?

    Om vi talar om ”den produktiva staden”, så följer frågan om hur vi föreställer oss staden och hur vi sätter upp ideal och mål för den. I dagsläget är den ideala stadsbilden i princip alltid fri från de komponenter som möjliggör lejonparten av den produktion vi konsumerar.

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    fulltext
  • 35.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Digitalisering och landsbygdsutveckling: Lärdomar från Duvedmodellen för lokalsamhällen 2.02022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Duved Project for Local Communities 2. 0 aims to investigate models for how rural areas can be developed, and to some extent to stand as a model for future societies in broader perspectives. An ambitious, broad, and complex goal, to say the least. In this work, the project's work track digitalization has  been confronted with and processed a wide range of issues, from a number of different perspectives. Central important lessons that have emerged in the work have repeatedly been about the importance of combining the specifics of the local situation with the larger, broader issues and processes that both contribute to, are involved in, and get their unique and specific form in the material reality that constitutes “the local”. But also in that such specificity has consequences: “resource systems” no longer become abstract concepts, or general replicable solutions, but questions about actual materials, people, works, processes, and so on.

    When these become concrete, the “local” also turns out to be of varying size both as a result of prevailing structures and processes, and as a result of which scales are relevant to which issues. This report provides a series of deep-diving arguments for developing the challenges and opportunities of digitalization in a rural context, which consistently puts digitalization in a broader context in order to also have a deeper discussion about how a digitalization process can contribute to increased sustainability.

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    Koch D - Digitalisering och landsbygdsutveckling (KTH, 2022)
  • 36.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    En levande stad2018In: PLAN, ISSN 0032-0560, Vol. 2018, no 6-7, p. 49-67Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I februari i år rapporterade Handelns Utredningsinstitut (HUI) att det i Sverige fanns planer på 2,2 miljoner nya kvadratmeter köpcentrum – något som var en nedgång från tidigare beräknade 2,6 miljoner. Av dessa förväntades i 2017 års rapportering 1,1 miljoner stå klara 2020. Detta i ett land som redan har bland de högsta antalet kvadratmeter köpcentrum per capita i världen. Samtidigt går allt mer stadsplanering ut på att åstadkomma en mer ’levande stad’ genom framförallt ’aktiva bottenvåningar’, där det senare i nio fall av tio, om inte mer, betyder butiker, restauranger och caféer. Argumentation om socialt hållbara städer faller ofta in i samma typ av lösning, där ’stadsliv’ likställs med livliga gator. Livliga gator likställs i sin tur med många människor på gator och torg, som löses med de verktyg som står till hands – handel. Många människor på gatorna framstår allt mer som mål snarare än medel. Det här är en bild som är svår att få ihop med en retorik om minskat resursutnyttjande och omställning av ekonomier inför enklimatsmart framtid. [...]

    I den här artikeln tänker jag mig resonera utifrån detta, och några valda utgångspunkter. För att kunna göra det kommer jag ta mig rätten att göranågot orättvisa beskrivningar, förenklade tolkningar och vara selektiv i mina val av utgångspunkter. På många sätt är det i det närmaste en förhoppning att många läsare tycker att jag överdriver och vinklar snarare äntvärtom – ibland behöver det göras för att kunna förtydliga frågeställningar, utmaningar, och poänger. Det är helt enkelt meningen att utifrån några påtagliga hållbarhetsutmaningar vrida perspektivet på planerings- och stadsbyggnadsutmaningar vi står inför som kan verka övermäktiga mensom jag är övertygad om är både fullt möjliga och nödvändiga att ta oss an, samtidigt som jag kommer röra mig på gränsen till naivitet i vissa delar för att kunna föra huvudargumentet framåt.

    (utdrag ur inledningen)

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    Koch - En Levande Stad (PLAN 2018)
  • 37.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Exponerat, Tillgängligt och iscensatt... och det gömda, det dömda och det glömda2009In: MODE - en introduktion: En tvärvetenskaplig betraktelse / [ed] Louise Wallenberg & Dirk Gindt, Stockholm: Raster Förlag , 2009, p. 175-198Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    [Detta är de inledande styckena i kapitlet och inte ett egentligt abstract]

    Direkt innanför entrén till Åhléns fanns i november 2005 fyrtioåtta(dam)ben klädda i strumpbyxor eller nätstrumpor. FrånKlarabergsleden, innanför glasväggarna, sågs kosmetikmärken som Shiseido, Dior, Givenchy, Roc och Estée Lauder, medan det man möttes av innanför huvudentrén var Biotherm och Lancôme, som övergick i Chanel, Kanebo och Guerlain. Någonstans där bakomfanns, för den som tog sig dit, Max Factor, Revlon, och Decleor, medflera. En trappa upp låg damavdelningen där det fanns tre gånger flerskyltdockor som bar kläderna till försäljning än på herravdelningen,i Debenhams fyra gånger så många. Direkt från entrén till damavdelningarna i varuhusen kunde man se minst ett, helst flera, provrum,gärna också gardinerna som dras för, medan man ofta fick letaför att hitta dem på herravdelningarna. En del påminns man ständigtom medan annat mest flyter förbi, en del måste man aktivt leta efter. Såsom herrstrumpor.

    Det här, som bildar konsekventa mönster i shoppingmiljön, förklaras ofta med tankemodeller som används inom en del retail-litteratur, framförallt i dess populärvetenskapliga version: attraktorvaror och impulsköp.1 Ofta behandlas det vidare som om shoppingmiljönhar ett enda syfte: att exponera så mycket som möjligt, och göra detså enkelt som möjligt att förse sig.2 Det är så det förmedlas i tidskrifteroch bilder, i reklam och inte sällan i andra media som filmer ochteveserier. Ändå kräver det endast lite eftertanke att peka mot varorsom brukar vara undangömda, svårnådda, eller avsides.3 Av den anledningenär det viktigt att diskutera vad valet av grad av exponeringinnebär, och också vad det innebär att något är lätt att nå eller finnsbakom disk, inuti glasboxar, eller längst upp, längst in, längst bak.

    För en sådan diskussion är det av vikt att vi vrider perspektivet och läser behandlingen av mode och kläder i varuhus och butikersom disseminering och förhandling av modesystem snarare än rationelltförsäljningsmaskineri. Detta ger oss en annan bild av vad sompågår, som i viss utsträckning är förklarande.4 Vi bör också släppa enständigt framförd argumentation om målinriktade subjekt och specifika objekt som begärs och söks upp till förmån för en syn där arkitekturenär en aktiv deltagare i ständigt pågående förhandlingar och bestämningar genom hur den ordnar, strukturerar och förmedlar rum. I shoppingmiljön, på plats i den performativa handlingen, sker ett identitetsbildande; en slags träning, utbildning, protest mot och godtagande av modesystemet.5

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 38.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Isovists Revisited: Egocentric space, allocentric space,and the logic of the Mannequin2012In: Proceedings: Eighth International Space Syntax Symposium / [ed] Margareta Greene, José Reyes & Andrea Castro, 2012, p. 8144:1-8144:23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The description of the spatial entities used in space syntax is growingly taking on a direct cognitive character,where for example axial lines are often equated to ‘lines of movement’, convex spaces to ‘spaces of being’,and isovists to ‘visual fields’. While developments of these have served to deepen our understanding of spatial configuration in many ways, it is of importance to revisit the origins of the spatial entities used toinvestigate spatial syntactics and study the implications of alternate definitions. This is a question of whatkind of analysis can be performed and on what sort of objects, but also of positioning of the research field. This paper argues that while the perceiving subject is one valid point of interpretation of the spatial entitiesstudied syntactically, other interpretations enable other questions to be investigated and consequently other results to emerge. In this paper the focus lies on how a de‐centralisation from e.g. subjects’ visual fieldsunearths qualities in the isovist and its consecutive systemization into spatial syntactic relations that risk passby. It furthermore aims to discuss the theory base for analyses of certain phenomena (‘the logic of themannequin’). This discussion revolves around a concept already highlighted in space syntax theory:allocentricy, i.e. the quality of spatial cognition to recognize the situation of ‘elsewhere’, and discusses theimpact of such understanding through systemic operations and through the ‘elsewhere’ of inanimate objects.

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    Full paper
  • 39.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    JASS: Justified Analysis of Spatial Systems2003Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    JASS is a JAVA Application that allows to create and analyse networks as used in space syntax. It is intended for convex space analysis and allows for import of raster image files (jpg, tif) to draw networks and then calculate a set of measures (e.g. Real Relative Assymetry, Connectivity, Mean Depth), and to convert graphs into justified graphs. It also allows exporting graphs to SVG files.

    Download (zip)
    JASS Files
  • 40.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Jämlik livsmiljö: Universell utformning och tillgänglighet som stadsbyggnadsutmaning2022Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research report presents findings froma research project on universal design from a systems perspective. This perspective includes “systems” in several aspects: planning systems, political systems, organizations, social systems, and spatial systems. The focus is on planning systems and spatial systems, addressing chal- lenges and queries in how to understand molar (larger scale, system) perspectives of universal design as interlinked with molecular (local) aspects. It contains a general discussion and conclusion of the project as a whole and three studies, focusing on process and governance, developing models and methods, and investigating universal design challenges in relation to system world, life world, and material world respectively.

    While the report is in Swedish, the appendix contains a brief summary in English.

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    Koch D (red.) Jämlik Livsmiljö (KTH, 2022)
  • 41.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    KTHA #32017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a publication that combines research and teaching in architecture: urban design at KTH Architecture. It is not a complete catalogue but a gathering of contributions that show the breadth of activity but also operates as integrator between different interests and activities at the department. It is one of the outputs of a development project initiated by the head of KTH to develop a research profile towards sustainable urban design in architecture focused around social ecological urban design, which was primarily done by Alexis Pontvik, Ann Legeby, Catharina Gabrielsson, Daniel Koch, Meike Schalk and Erik Wingquist.

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    KTHA3_2017
  • 42.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Memory, Projection, and Imagination: On challenges for observation and statistics based research2016In: Contour, ISSN 2297-6906, Vol. 2, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various forms of material, empirical, or observation-based research has grown in importance over the last decade in both architecture and urban design research, in parallel to an increasingly data-driven research utilising an increasing amount and availability of GIS data, tracking technologies, GPS records, and ICT tools. Assemblage theory and Actor-Network Theory have grown strong in several fields, sometimes linked to ‘flat ontology’, as have empirically based fields such as space syntax and geoinformatics. While it is somewhat dubious to bundle these theories together, they there are tendencies in contemporary research in which they can be linked, with more or less explicit intents to cut past perceptions and conventions to look at the world ‘as it is’ and generate understanding from observed behaviours, actions, and the myriads of interactions going on. This has produced a rich body of research and significant advances in knowledge. However, there is also need for pause and reflection, to avoid risks of repeating the mistakes aimed to oust. This article offers a set of such reflections that will come about through a set of examples, leading onwards into a discussion of the role of memory, projection and imagination, as well as the need to consider how to integrate norms and structures into research that often intentionally leaves such concepts out.

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    Koch, Daniel -- Memory, Projection, and Imagination (Contour, 2016)
  • 43.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Narrative, dramaturgy, and spatial choreography: Movement and subjectivity in museum configurations2024In: Museum Configurations: An Inquiry Into The Design Of Spatial Syntaxes / [ed] John Peponis, New York: Routledge, 2024, p. 120-159Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Museum architecture and curatorial exhibition designs structure the experiences and social relations associated with museum visits. Such experiences and relations are generated and qualified by movement. While patterns of movement and social relations in museums are richly studied in configurational research and museum studies respectively, qualitative aspects of movement remain to be more deeply understood – especially in relation to museum configurations. In this chapter, four museums – the Asakura Museum of Sculpture in Tokyo, Artipelag in Stockholm, Kiasma in Helsinki, and the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum – are put in dialogue to investigate the qualitative aspects of movement. In the investigation, movement is considered individual, collective, communicative, and performative acts, recognising the entanglement of the observer, the observed, and the participant. Working from the point of view of architecture, choreography is used to qualitatively differentiate types of movement and enrich our understanding of the role of bodies and embodiment by discussing path, figure, and gesture. This is further extended into dramaturgy by investigating rhythm, co-presence, and configurational staging. Choreographic and dramaturgical aspects are important parts of the holistic experience of the museum and exhibition narratives. Fundamental to the visitor reconstruction of museum narratives is the retrieval of synchronic configurational meaning from the sequential patterns in which museum space is initially perceived and experienced. This chapter concludes by making the case for the development of a notational language for describing and designing movement both in its local, directly perceived aspects and its emergent configurations.

  • 44.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    On Aesthetics and Spatial Configuration2017In: Proceedings: 11th International Space Syntax Symposium / [ed] Teresa Heitor, Miguel Serra, João Pinelo Silva, Maria Bacharel, Luisa Cannas da Silva, INSTITUTO SUPERIOR TÉCNICO , 2017, p. 162.1-162.14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article takes as its point of departure that any question concerning architecture, in a broad sense, has cultural and aesthetic implications, whether directly concerned with them or focused on social, technical, functional or other concerns. From such an outset, so does spatial configuration. However, while questions of aesthetics have been addressed within syntax research, it has rarely been the central point. This article intends to address more specifically the question of spatial configuration as aesthetics, on the one hand, and the aesthetic implications of configurational analysis on the other. In doing so, it will discuss aesthetic implications of ostensibly non-aesthetic considerations by addressing aesthetics as cultural, social and formal values embedded in and expressed through architectural works, and mediated through engaged and distracted experience. Concretely, the discussion will revolve around a small selection of works to develop a reasoning around aesthetics and con guration. This includes Alexander Klein’s graphic methods to evaluate building plans and its relation to a selection of Mies van der Rohe’s works, to conclude with a discussion relating the ndings to habits and dispositions

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    Koch, Daniel - On Aesthetics and Spatial Configuration
  • 45.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    On Architectural Space and Modes of Subjectivity: Producing the Material Conditions for Creative-Productive Activity2018In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 70-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses extended implications of Lefebvre’s The Production of Space in the context of contemporary global neoliberalism, by focus on its presence in architectural space as lived space and spatial practice. The main discussion concerns Lefebvre’s concepts of abstract space, in relation to Felix Guattari’s three ecologies, and the Aristotelean triad of aisthesis, poiesis and techné. The focus here concerns material architectural space and its relation to modes of subjectivity, especially creative-productive versus consuming subjectivities. The argument begins by elaborating on an understanding of abstract space as present in material architectural space as pervasive processes of disassociation of materiality and labor, and proceeds to through these concepts discuss modes of subjectivity—the dependence of abstract space on subjects as consumers—and the way this relates to challenges of sustainability. It further points to the importance of architectural space considered as built material environment for creative-productive modes of subjectivity which challenge abstract space and in extension consumer society, by offering potential dispositions that set subjects in a different relation to the world.

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    Koch D -- On Architectural Space and Modes of Subjectivity (Urban Planning, 2018)
  • 46.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    On Avoidance2019In: After Effects: Theories and Methodologies in Architectural Research / [ed] Hélène Fright, Gunnar Sandin, Bettina Schwalm, Barcelona: ACTAR, 2019, p. 380-397Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter reflects on how the “social” comes into being and how it relates toquestions of architecture and urban environments. My aim is not to identify what “the social” is but to introduce and discuss a few aspects that seem important for grasping its full complexity. In a sense, the chapter is a response to recent tendencies in practice aswell as theory, where “recent” at times reaches decades back while these tendencies seemto be particularly strong currently. On the practice side, such concerns include the focus onthe creation of “lively” environments as a response to all kinds of perceived or postulatedills or as means to all kinds of positive social outcomes. On the theoretical side, the comingdiscussion reflects on vastly different approaches that focus on questions of architecture, space, identity, and the ever-elusive “social” in a similar way. That is, I address tendenciesto discuss the social as lively, as social interaction, as copresence, as assemblages, as community activity; as negotiation between subjects, objects, bodies, and space; as situated, embodied, or emplaced. These tendencies extend to discussions and theoriesof how “the social,” “urban life,” or social structures come to be produced. I find much ofthis work interesting, as it has demonstrated its fruitfulness on many levels. But I perceive a risk in letting common lines of thought become too dominant; that is, in allowing the fruitful, complex, and rich descriptions of in situ social processes become the description andunderstanding of social processes. What happens to the idea of “social” and “society” if it, in whichever terms we prefer to define it, is somewhat translatable either to Georg Simmel’s sociability, Guy Debord’s spectacle, or strictly and locally situated in its performativity? Ina sense the questions that will be raised reflect Claire Bishop’s critique of relational art as considering “subjectivity as a whole” and “community as immanent togetherness” (Bishop 2004: 67). I find it troubling when the aforementioned terms—lively, social interaction, copresence, etc.—are too readily combined with community, with the assumption that particular forms of enacted (observable) sociality is good specifically because of the implication that other ways of acting are bad.

  • 47.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    On Avoidance: Reflections on Processes of Socio-Spatial Structuring2016In: Civil Engineering and Architecture, ISSN 2332-1121, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 67-78, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay is a reflection on how the ‘social’ comes into being, and how it relates to questions of architecture and urban environments. Taking its departure from a statement in The Social Logic of Space, where it is said spatial configuration affects social relations in how it structures patterns of movement, encounter and avoidance, it develops on the notion of avoidance as a socially and spatially structuring behaviour. One reason for such a focus is a contemporary focus in urban and architectural discourse of encounters and co-presence, whereas patterns and actions of avoidance are less often present. On the one hand, it argues that studying of how space generates, allows, or prevents patterns of avoidance is a missing key question that may also further develop discourses of patterns of encounter. On the other hand, it is suggested that a focus on avoidance demands a series of questions to be answered that is beneficial for understanding socio-spatial behaviour and structures in general. These questions concern the temporal, cultural, personal, and spatial embeddedness of actions that includes memory and myth as well as projection and imagination. Avoidance, furthermore, is argued to be as social an action as encounters, with considerable direct and indirect structuring effects, and thereby to constitute an important piece in socio-spatial structuring processes.

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    Koch, D -- On Avoidance (Civil Engineering and Architecture 2016)
  • 48.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Parallel Spatial Scales: discerning cognitive layers of space2005In: Space Syntax 5th International Symposium: Proceedings Volume II / [ed] Akkelies van Nes, Delft: Techne Press , 2005, p. 373-386Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of working with spatial scales is not new, neither in architecture theory in general nor within space syntax theory - as can be seen in e.g. Hillier (1996) and Read and Budiarto (2003). What this paper attempts, is to make such a discussion and such knowledge more concrete - to begin to find out how, in configurative systems, spatial scales work together, when they appear and if there are regularities in their relationships or uses that can aid our understanding of architecture.

    The research and findings presented are what began as a sidetrack, which proved to be of importance, in a research project on how spatial systems work to produce meaning in society - or, at the recently finished stage of a licentiate thesis, more precisely, how the idea of knowledge is produced through the spatial systems of public libraries.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 49.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    persons, masks, personas: abstraction, projection, and the logic of the mannequin2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fashion and identity are deeply intertwined with one another in situated performativity, entailing not only individuals but atmospheres and relations to others and the Other. Something drawn upon by fashion retail, perhaps most noticeably through mannequins (living or dolls). As a near-constant presence in increasing portions of public space, they become material statements in negotiations of public culture and subjectivity.

    These mannequins depend on a number of factors for their effect, including degrees of interactivity and directionality. The logic of the mannequin, as Louisa Iarocci names it, is dependent on an abstracted or de-personalized character, requiring the viewer to participate through completion. By balancing the concrete and the abstract, they draw upon the viewer’s imagination and projection to become meaningful; they perform diagrammatic operations in the form of being what Gilles Châtelet terms concrete abstractions not only allowing, but requiring the compliance of the viewer for their effects—but situated in space as almost bodies, almost persons.

    The recent exhibition at the dance Museum, Stockholm, Koroly’s Costume drama offered a unique opportunity to investigate this in-betweenness, as well as questions of situatedness,

    abstraction-prothesis, expression, atmosphere, and various forms of interaction hands on—from directly completing or participating in the staged drama to ignoring them altogether, to treating them ‘as is’; that is, as inanimate objects.

    This paper makes use of this exhibition to investigate an increasingly present phenomenon in public space, which clearly participate in (re)production of gender norms and gendered body-subject identities, as well as subject-structures and who is a subject or object for whom. It further builds on the need to closer investigate their modes of operation in order to critically address their role in such processes of subjectification. It further extends this study into their treatment in public and commercial space positioned as a critical architectural question.

  • 50.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Persons, Masks, Personas: Abstraction, Situated Embodiment, and the Logic of the Mannequin2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fashion and identity are deeply intertwined with one another and in situated performativity, entailing not only individuals but atmospheres and relations to others and the Other. Something drawn upon by fashion retail, perhaps most noticeably through mannequins (living or dolls). Comparatively, fashion museums can be argued to have difficulties evoking similar reactions and participation even though often ostensibly operating with the same tools.

    This can be argued to depend on a number of factors, including degrees of interactivity and directionality. While mannequin dolls are seldom directly for interaction, their incarnation in commercial space represent interactivity to commodities in, within, and through spaces around them, and they have a temporal as well as an ownership directionality that proposes identities and identification. The logic of the mannequin, as Vanessa Osborne names it, is dependent on this, as well as an abstracted or de-personalized character of the mannequins, requiring the viewer to participate through completion, often involving placing oneself in the mannequin’s place.

    A situated experience rather than a person-object relation architecture, atmosphere, other mannequins, and other consumers participate. Thus the understanding of the mannequin can be said to be dependent on understanding its situatedness on a stage of multiple actors and actants where consumers complete the composition, much like Giovanna Stavroulaki and John Peponis observes the choreography of statues in Castlevecchio demands the visitor to complete their internal, configuratively staged narrative.

    By balancing the concrete and the abstract, providing enough information to trigger reading but not enough for stable interpretation, these situated presentations draw upon the viewer‟s imagination, allowing and requiring completion. In this sense, the mannequins perform diagrammatic operations, as discussed by Gilles Châtelet, but ones situated in space as almost bodies, almost persons.

    The recent exhibition at the Dance Museum, Stockohlm, Koroly’s Costume Drama, offered a unique opportunity to investigate this in-betweenness, as well as questions of situatedness, abstraction, expression, atmosphere, and various forms of interaction – from directly completing or participating in the staged drama to ignoring them altogether, to treating them „as is‟; that is, as inanimate objects. As few other exhibitions it allowed touch and interaction, and the staging was elaborate, dramatic, and playful. It allowed questions of architectural staging, situation, identity, and the curious operations performed by the mannequin dolls to be investigated in hands on experiments, upon which this presentation elaborates, comparing to material on mannequins in commercial as well as traditional museum environments.

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