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  • 1. Bertels, K.
    et al.
    Jacques, J. -M
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Swedish Institute of Computer Science, Sweden.
    Risk and crises management in complex systems2005In: Micro Meso Macro: Addressing Complex Systems Couplings, World Scientific Publishing , 2005, p. 305-316Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture (Closed 20120101), Software and Computer Systems, SCS (Closed 20120101). Swedish Institute of Computer Science, Sweden.
    Commentary: The joy of mesh2009In: BMJ. British Medical Journal (International Ed.), ISSN 0959-8146, E-ISSN 0959-535X, Vol. 337, p. a2500-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Digital Cities: Strategic White Paper2013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Speedwriting in Networked Foresight2014In: Innovation for Sustainable Economy & Society: The Proceedings of The XXV ISPIM Conference 2014 / [ed] Huizingh, K.R.E., Conn, S., Torkkeli, M. and Bitran, I., ISPIM Society , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Networked foresight is an established means to achieve an understanding of trends, changes, disruptives, and ideas with high innovation potential. When managed successfully, it allows for the elicitation of knowledge from competent professionals, with complementary resources, assets, and capabilities, providing benefit both to partners and to the network as a whole. The Innovation Radar business catalyst of EIT ICT Labs (a virtual organisation of multi-nationals, research institutes, and academic institutions) has used speedwriting as an integral part of its structured brainstorming, with the aim of efficiently producing networked foresight with adequate depth and width. Speedwriting aids width in particular, as it prompts the inclusion of disruptives and speculative developments. Eight Innovation Radar workshops involving more than 100 experts in total have employed the speedwriting element to maximise value for the organisation. Since speedwriting is a largely undocumented method, its merits to strategic and corporate foresight are here scrutinised in detail.

  • 5.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Technical Foresight Report: Future Media Distribution2013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Who Were Where When?: On the Use of Social Collective Intelligence in Computational Epidemiology2014In: Social Collective Intelligence / [ed] Daniele Miorandi, Vincenzo Maltese, Michael Rovatsos, Anton Nijholt and James Stewart, Switzerland: Springer , 2014, p. 203-225Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A triangular (case, theoretical, and literature) study approach is used to investigate if and how social collective intelligence is useful to computational epidemiology. The hypothesis is that the former can be employed for assisting in converting data into useful information through intelligent analyses by deploying new methods from data analytics that render previously unintelligible data intelligible. A conceptual bridge is built between the two concepts of crowd signals and syndromic surveillance. A concise list of empirical observations supporting the hypothesis is presented. The key observation is that new social collective intelligence methods and algorithms allow for massive data analytics to stay with the individual, in micro. It is thus possible to provide the analyst with advice tailored to the individual and with relevant policies, without resorting to macro (statistical) analyses of homogeneous populations.

  • 7.
    Boman, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Cakici, Baki
    Stockholm University.
    Guttmann, Christian
    EBTIC.
    Al Hosani, Farida
    HAAD.
    Al Mannaei, Asma
    HAAD.
    Syndromic Surveillance in the United Arab Emirates2012In: International Conference on Innovations in Information Technology (IIT), 2012, IEEE conference proceedings, 2012, p. 31-35Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opportunities for innovation in view of three complex problems faced by the UAE health care providers are described. The information dissemination problem faced could be approached by creating new channels for providing the population with public health information. These channels are precisely the ones typically used in so-called syndromic surveillance, including care-related data from communicable disease spread indicators, but also tweets and blog posts, for example. Syndromic surveillance could likewise assist the health authorities in addressing the knowledge elicitation problem: how to get more information on the life style, self care, and prevention among individual citizens. To some extent the prediction problem—how to predict the spread of infectious disease in the future and how to mathematically model social behaviour in the case of various health-threatening scenarios—would also be addressed by syndromic surveillance. Fully employed, the solutions proposed would provide new ICT services enabling preparedness for many forms of communicable disease outbreaks, as well as for natural disasters.

  • 8.
    Boman, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS. SICS.
    Gillblad, Daniel
    SICS.
    Learning Machines for Computational Epidemiology2014In: Proceedings - 2014 IEEE International Conference on Big Data, Washington DC: IEEE conference proceedings, 2014, p. 1-5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resting on our experience of computational epidemiologyin practice and of industrial projects on analytics ofcomplex networks, we point to an innovation opportunity forimproving the digital services to epidemiologists for monitoring,modeling, and mitigating the effects of communicable disease.Artificial intelligence and intelligent analytics of syndromicsurveillance data promise new insights to epidemiologists, butthe real value can only be realized if human assessments arepaired with assessments made by machines. Neither massivedata itself, nor careful analytics will necessarily lead to betterinformed decisions. The process producing feedback to humanson decision making informed by machines can be reversed toconsider feedback to machines on decision making informed byhumans, enabling learning machines. We predict and argue forthe fact that the sensemaking that such machines can perform intandem with humans can be of immense value to epidemiologistsin the future.

  • 9.
    Boman, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Gullström, Charlie
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Mediated Futures: Technical Foresight report. European Institute of Innovation and Technology, EIT ICT Labs2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report outlines trends, challenges, and opportunities relating to the future of

    Smart Spaces and ICT-mediated human communication, as observed from within

    one of the EIT ICT Labs focus areas: Mediating Presence, during 2012-2013. The

    study should be seen as an initial and open-ended exploration that seeks to

    contribute a productive point of departure for more ambitious work, which will be

    undertaken across the Smart Spaces Action Line and using the Innovation Radar

    platform in future years. In particular, the business potential of mediating presence is

    the focus of a forthcoming 2014 Foresight Technical Report.

    As a foresight, Mediated Futures identifies and exposes future themes with high

    innovation potential relating to presence technologies, using a time frame roughly six

    months to five years ahead. Its purpose is to create a common outlook on the future

    of ICT and to establish a shared vocabulary and fruitful methodologies for future

    strategy thinking across the EIT ICT Labs nodes and partner organisations.

    A series of workshops and other collaborative activities have been organised within

    the Mediating Presence activity over the last 15 months. The pivotal output is a

    series of one-pagers, short fictional texts, three of which can be encountered on the

    following pages. Tentative and possibly provocative, these are slogan-based

    descriptions of future scenarios that serve to trigger new perspectives. A total of six

    clusters of topics were covered by one-pagers:

     Data doubles

     New magic

     Luddites

     Socialites

     Future of WorkA working future

     Spaces and things

  • 10.
    Boman, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish Institute of Computer Science (SICS).
    Johansson, S. J.
    Modeling epidemic spread in synthetic populations - Virtual plagues in Massively Multiplayer Online Games2007In: 3rd Digital Games Research Association International Conference: "Situated Play", DiGRA 2007, 2007, p. 357-361Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A virtual plague is a process in which a behavior-affecting property spreads among characters in a Massively Multiplayer Online Game (MMOG). The MMOG individuals constitute a synthetic population, and the game can be seen as a form of interactive executable model for studying disease spread, albeit of a very special kind. To a game developer maintaining an MMOG, recognizing, monitoring, and ultimately controlling a virtual plague is important, regardless of how it was initiated. The prospect of using tools, methods and theory from the field of epidemiology to do this seems natural and appealing. We will address the feasibility of such a prospect, first by considering some basic measures used in epidemiology, then by pointing out the differences between real world epidemics and virtual plagues. We also suggest directions for MMOG developer control through epidemiological modeling. Our aim is understanding the properties of virtual plagues, rather than trying to eliminate them or mitigate their effects, as would be in the case of real infectious disease.

  • 11.
    Boman, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Sensemaking in Intelligent Data Analytics2015In: Künstliche Intelligenz, ISSN 0933-1875, E-ISSN 1610-1987Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A systemic model for making sense of health data is presented, in which networked foresight complements intelligent data analytics. Data here serves the goal of a future systems medicine approach by explaining the past and the current, while foresight can serve by explaining the future. Anecdotal evidence from a case study is presented, in which the complex decisions faced by the traditional stakeholder of results—the policymaker—are replaced by the often mundane problems faced by an individual trying to make sense of sensor input and output when self-tracking wellness. The conclusion is that the employment of our systemic model for successful sensemaking integrates not only data with networked foresight, but also unpacks such problems and the user practices associated with their solutions.

  • 12.
    Boman, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Sandin, Anna
    Implementing an agent trade server2006In: Decision Support Systems, ISSN 0167-9236, E-ISSN 1873-5797, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 318-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An experimental server for stock trading autonomous agents is presented and made available, together with an agent shell for swift development. The server, written in Java, was implemented as proof-of-concept for an agent trade server for a real financial exchange.

  • 13.
    Brouwers, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Software and Computer Systems, SCS.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Software and Computer Systems, SCS.
    Camitz, M.
    Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Department of Epidemiology.
    Mäkilä, K.
    Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Department of Epidemiology.
    Tegnell, A.
    National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Micro-simulation of a smallpox outbreak using official register data2010In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 15, no 35, p. 17-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To explore the efficacy of four vaccine-based policy strategies (ring vaccination, targeted vaccination, mass vaccination, and pre-vaccination of healthcare personnel combined with ring vaccination) for controlling smallpox outbreaks in Sweden, disease transmission on a spatially explicit social network was simulated. The mixing network was formed from high-coverage official register data of the entire Swedish population, building on the Swedish Total Population Register, the Swedish Employment Register, and the Geographic Database of Sweden. The largest reduction measured in the number of infections was achieved when combining ring vaccination with a pre-vaccination of healthcare personnel. In terms of per dose effectiveness, ring vaccination was by far the most effective strategy. The results can to some extent be adapted to other diseases and environments, including other countries, and the methods used can be analysed in their own right.

  • 14.
    Brouwers, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Software and Computer Systems, SCS.
    Cakici, Baki
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Software and Computer Systems, SCS.
    Camitz, Martin
    Karolinska Institutet, MEB.
    Tegnell, Anders
    Socialstyrelsen.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Software and Computer Systems, SCS.
    Economic consequences to society of pandemic H1N1 influenza 2009: preliminary results for Sweden2009In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 14, no 37, p. 19333-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiments using a microsimulation platform show that vaccination against pandemic H1N1 influenza is highly cost-effective. Swedish society may reduce the costs of pandemic by about SEK 2.5 billion (approximately EUR 250 million) if at least 60 per cent of the population is vaccinated, even if costs related to death cases are excluded. The cost reduction primarily results from reduced absenteeism. These results are preliminary and based on comprehensive assumptions about the infectiousness and morbidity of the pandemic, which are uncertain in the current situation.

  • 15.
    Cakici, Baki
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture (Closed 20120101), Software and Computer Systems, SCS (Closed 20120101).
    Boman, Magnus
    A workflow for software development within computational epidemiology2011In: Journal of Computational Science, ISSN 1877-7503, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 216-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A critical investigation into computational models developed for studying the spread of communicable disease is presented. The case in point is a spatially explicit micro-meso-macro model for the entire Swedish population built on registry data, thus far used for smallpox and for influenza-like illnesses. The lessons learned from a software development project of more than 100 person months are collected into a check list. The list is intended for use by computational epidemiologists and policy makers, and the workflow incorporating these two roles is described in detail.

  • 16. Davidsson, P.
    et al.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Distributed monitoring and control of office buildings by embedded agents2005In: Information Sciences, ISSN 0020-0255, E-ISSN 1872-6291, Vol. 171, no 4, p. 293-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe a decentralized system consisting of a collection of software agents that monitor and control an office building. It uses the existing power lines for communication between the agents and the electrical devices of the building, such as sensors and actuators for lights and heating. The objectives are both energy saving and increasing customer satisfaction through value added services. Results of qualitative simulations and quantitative analysis based on thermodynamical modeling of an office building and its staff using four different approaches for controlling the building indicate that significant energy savings can result from using the agent-based approach. The evaluation also shows that customer satisfaction can be increased in most situations. The approach here presented makes it possible to control the trade-off between energy saving and customer satisfaction (and actually increase both, in comparison with current approaches).

  • 17.
    Gullström, Charlie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Analogue Friday 1: Thumbs Up! and Analogue Friday 2: InstaYum!: Impact event and film production2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    As part of a public dissemination impact activity within the Mediating Presence project of EIT ICT Labs in 2013, partners were invited to a series of Mediated Seminars, seeking to identify valuable trends relating to the future of the media industry in general, and to smart spaces in a particular. The participants reviewed and discussed all the recent publications available via the EIT ICT Labs Web site (www.eitictlabs.eu/publications), as well as a wide range of publicly available reports and white papers. As a result of this process, the idea was put forward to produce four films that would trigger reflection within the research community about the technical development relating to "smart spaces". This represents a new and experimental form of outreach and dissemination for the activity.

    The workshop was successfully concluded, with preliminary drafts for scripts, intended for the creation of four short films, handed over to four different film producers by responsible activity researchers in four different cities (Delft, Helsinki, Luleå, and Stockholm). Tentative versions of three films were screened according to plan at the Espoo SSP Results Day event in December, from which valuable feedback was received, allowing for the first three films to be slightly revised and completed at the end of December. In parallel, the fourth film was realised in two parts and completed at the end of December: Analogue Friday 1 and 2.

  • 18.
    Gullström, Charlie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Smart Collaboration Spaces: Technical Foresight report. European Institute of Innovation and Technology, EIT ICT Labs2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report outlines trends, challenges, and opportunities relating to the future of Smart Spaces and ICT-mediated human communication, as observed from within one of the EIT ICT Labs focus areas: Mediating Presence, during 2012-2013. The study should be seen as an initial and open-ended exploration that seeks to contribute a productive point of departure for more ambitious work, which will be undertaken across the Smart Spaces Action Line and using the Innovation Radar platform in future years. In particular, the business potential of mediating presence is the focus of a forthcoming 2014 Foresight Technical Report.

    As a foresight, Mediated Futures identifies and exposes future themes with high innovation potential relating to presence technologies, using a time frame roughly six months to five years ahead. Its purpose is to create a common outlook on the future of ICT and to establish a shared vocabulary and fruitful methodologies for future strategy thinking across the EIT ICT Labs nodes and partner organisations.

    A series of workshops and other collaborative activities have been organised within the Mediating Presence activity over the last 15 months. The pivotal output is a series of one-pagers, short fictional texts, three of which can be encountered on the following pages. Tentative and possibly provocative, these are slogan-based descriptions of future scenarios that serve to trigger new perspectives. A total of six clusters of topics were covered by one-pagers:

    Data doubles

     New magic

     Luddites

     Socialites

     Future of WorkA working future

     Spaces and things

  • 19. Gyllenbäck, K. B.
    et al.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Narrative bridging2011In: Des. Comput. Cogn., 2011, p. 525-544Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the design of interactive media, various forms of intuitive practice come into play. It might prove tempting to use templates and strong narrative structures instead of developing the narrative directly for interactive media. This leads towards computer implementation too swiftly. The narrative bridging method focuses on the initial design phase, in which the conceptual modeling takes place. The purpose is to provide designers with a non-intrusive method that supports the design process without interfering with its creative elements. The method supports the sentient construction of digital games with a narrative, with the ultimate goal of enhancing the player's experience. A prototype test served as a first evaluation, and two games from that test are showcased here for the purpose of illustrating the hands-on use of narrative bridging. The test demonstrated that the method could aid time-constrained design, and in the process detect inconsistencies that could prevent the design team from making improvements. The method also provided teams with a shared vocabulary and outlook.

  • 20. Heger, Tobias
    et al.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS. SICS, Sweden.
    Networked foresight: The case of EIT ICT Labs2015In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 101, p. 147-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to explore the value of networked foresight: foresight conducted in innovation networks for the benefit of the network and its partners with active contributions from the partners. Strategic management, specifically the dynamic capabilities approach and vast literature on corporate and strategic foresight argue that deficiencies like one-dimensionality, narrow-sightedness and myopia of closed corporate processes are remedied by incorporating external sources. A broad knowledge base promises to especially benefit foresight in multiple ways. Thus, created an analytical framework that integrates the dynamic capabilities approach with existing results on potential value contributions of foresight, enriched with existing findings in networked foresight and organizational design in the light increasing importance of inter-organizational networks. We conducted a series of interviews and a survey among foresight practitioners in a network to explore the perceived value proposition of networked foresight for the network partners and the network itself. The analysis is based on data drawn from the EIT ICT Labs network of large industry corporations, small-and-medium sized companies, and academic and research institutes. Our study shows that network partners use the results primarily for sensing activities, i.e. data collection and to a lesser extend activity initiation. More sensitive and fundamental organizational aspects such as strategy and decision-making or path-dependency are less affected. Especially SMEs may benefit substantially from network approaches to foresight whereas MNEs are more confident in their existing corporate foresight processes and results. The value for the network itself is substantial and goes beyond value creation potential for companies as discussed in literature. The development of a shared vision—relatable to organizational learning and reconfiguration capabilities—was identified as particularly valuable for the network.

  • 21. Heger, Tobias
    et al.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Value Creation from Networked Foresighting in the EIT ICT Labs2013In: Innovating in Global Markets: Challenges for Sustainable Growth, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Results from an in-depth study of networked foresighting are presented, and the added value for the nodes in the network forming the organization under study analyzed.The network’s nodes use the results to a very high degree for data collection and activity initiation. Benefits include new insights and outside opinions from a trusted network. Foresighting results are used less for sensitive aspects such as guidance for strategy, decision-making and fundamental organizational issues such as path-dependency. Here, the results were found to be too general and not applicable to needs. The network itself benefits from foresight in most known ways, i.e. for triggering responses, starting and facilitating strategic discussions and change, identifying needed resources, and several secondary uses. Newaspects valid for the network itself but less for its nodes were identified.

  • 22. Lybäck, D.
    et al.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV. Swed. Institute of Computer Science, Sweden.
    Agent trade servers in financial exchange systems2004In: ACM Transactions on Internet Technology, ISSN 1533-5399, E-ISSN 1557-6051, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 329-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New services based on the best-effort paradigm could complement the current deterministic services of an electronic financial exchange. Four crucial aspects of such systems would benefit from a hybrid stance: proper use of processing resources, bandwidth management, fault tolerance, and exception handling. We argue that a more refined view on Quality-of-Service control for exchange systems, in which the principal ambition of upholding a fair and orderly marketplace is left uncompromised, would benefit all interested parties.

  • 23. Moore, Heather
    et al.
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Ethnographies of Practice, Visioning, and Foresight2014In: Innovation for Sustainable Economy & Society / [ed] Huizingh, K.R.E., Conn, S., Torkkeli, M. and Bitran, I., 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comparative study of three concluded projects is presented, to be used as a backdrop for a newly proposed project on critical adoption of 5G network infrastructure, middleware and service proposed solutions. Since the implementation of those proposed solutions lie 5-8 years into the future, forecasting is necessary and the three concluded projects act as a complementary backcasting exercise in this context. All three concluded projects focused on the development and envisioning of infrastructures for future digital services, all with the proviso that involvement of a wide range of stakeholders could be secured. They were all subject to a rapidly changing development, both on the side of engineering advances and on the side of societal views on such advances. Hence, the new project will have an emphasis on transparency of protocol design and participatory engagement of a greater range of perspectives.

  • 24. Moore, Heather
    et al.
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Ethnographies of Practice, Visioning and Foresight in Future-Oriented Technology Analysis2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25. Nylander, Stina
    et al.
    Bylund, Markus
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Mobile access to real-time information-the case of autonomous stock brokering2004In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 42-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When services providing real-time information are accessible from mobile devices, functionality is often restricted and no adaptation of the user interface to the mobile device is attempted. Mobile access to real-time information requires designs for multi-device access and automated facilities for the adaptation of user interfaces. We present TapBroker, a push update service that provides mobile and stationary access to information on autonomous agents trading stocks. TapBroker is developed for the Ubiquitous Interactor system and is accessible from Java Swing user interfaces and Web user interfaces on desktop computers, and from a Java Awt user interface on mobile phones. New user interfaces can easily be added without changes in the service logic.

  • 26. Odelstad, Jan
    et al.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Algebras for Agent Norm-Regulation2004In: Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence, ISSN 1012-2443, E-ISSN 1573-7470, Vol. 42, no 1-3, p. 141-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An abstract architecture for idealized multi-agent systems whose behaviour is regulated by normative systems is developed and discussed. Agent choices are determined partially by the preference ordering of possible states and partially by normative considerations: The agent chooses that act which leads to the best outcome of all permissible actions. If an action is non-permissible depends on if the result of performing that action leads to a state satisfying a condition which is forbidden, according to the norms regulating the multi-agent system. This idea is formalized by defining set-theoretic predicates characterizing multi-agent systems. The definition of the predicate uses decision theory, the Kanger–Lindahl theory of normative positions, and an algebraic representation of normative systems.

  • 27. Rasmusson, L.
    et al.
    Boman, Magnus
    Analytical expressions for Parrondo games2002In: Fluctuation and Noise Letters, ISSN 0219-4775, E-ISSN 1793-6780, Vol. 2, no 4, p. L343-L348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present some new analytical expressions for the so-called Parrondo effect, where simple coin-flipping games with negative expected value are combined into a winning game. Parrondo games are state-dependent. By identifying the game state variable, we can compute the stationary game state probabilities. Mixing losing games increases the probability of entering into a game state with positive value, as can be seen clearly from our analytical expressions for the Parrondo game value.

  • 28.
    Sanches, Pedro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Svee, Eric Oluf
    Bylund, Markus
    Hirsch, Benjamin
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Knowing Your Population: Privacy-Sensitive Mining of Massive Data2013In: Network and Communication Technologies, ISSN 1927-064X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 34-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Location and mobility patterns of individuals are important to environmental planning, societal resilience, public health, and a host of commercial applications. Mining telecommunication traffic and transactions data for such purposes is controversial, in particular raising issues of privacy. However, our hypothesis is that privacy-sensitive uses are possible and often beneficial enough to warrant considerable research and development efforts. Our work contends that peoples’ behavior can yield patterns of both significant commercial, and research, value. For such purposes, methods and algorithms for mining telecommunication data to extract commonly used routes and locations, articulated through time-geographical constructs, are described in a case study within the area of transportation planning and analysis. From the outset, these were designed to balance the privacy of subscribers and the added value of mobility patterns derived from their mobile communication traffic and transactions data. Our work directly contrasts the current, commonly held notion that value can only be added to services by directly monitoring the behavior of individuals, such as in current attempts at location-based services. We position our work within relevant legal frameworks for privacy and data protection, and show that our methods comply with such requirements and also follow best-practices.

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