Change search
Refine search result
1 - 36 of 36
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Ahlin, G.
    et al.
    Hilgendorf, C.
    Karlsson, J.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Artursson, P.
    Endogenous Gene and Protein Expression of Drug-Transporting Proteins in Cell Lines Routinely Used in Drug Discovery Programs2009In: Drug Metabolism And Disposition, ISSN 0090-9556, E-ISSN 1521-009X, Vol. 37, no 12, p. 2275-2283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the gene and protein expression profiles of important drug-transporting proteins in human cell lines commonly used for studies of drug transport mechanisms. Human cell lines used to transiently or stably express single transporters [HeLa, human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293] and leukemia cell lines used to study drug resistance by ATP-binding cassette transporters (HL-60, K562) were investigated and compared with organotypic cell lines (HepG2, Saos-2, Caco-2, and Caco-2 TC7). For gene expression studies, real-time polymerase chain reaction was used, whereas monospecific polyclonal antibodies were generated and used to investigate protein expression by immunohistochemistry. Thirty-six transporters were studied for gene expression, and nine were studied for protein expression. The antibodies were validated using expression patterns in human tissues. Finally, the function of one ubiquitously expressed transporter, MCT1/SLC16A1, was investigated using [C-14]lactic acid as a substrate. In general, the adherent cell lines (HeLa, HEK293) displayed low transporter expression, and the expression patterns were barely affected by transfection. The leukemia cell lines (K562, HL-60) and Saos-2 also had low endogenous transporter expression, whereas the organotypic cell lines (HepG2 and Caco-2) showed higher expression of some transporters. Comparison of gene and protein expression profiles gave poor correlations, but better agreement was obtained for antibodies with a good validation score, indicating that antibody quality was a significant variable. It is noteworthy that the monocarboxylic acid-transporting protein MCT1 was significantly expressed in all and was functional in most of the cell lines, indicating that MCT1 may be a confounding factor when the transport of small anionic drugs is investigated.

  • 2.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Garme, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    Högfeldt, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Magnell, Marie
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Vägen från student till ingenjör: exempel från två kandidatexamenskurser och ett förslag om en programsammanhållande byggnadsställning2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3. Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    et al.
    Sibbons, P.
    Williams, G.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Metcalfe, S. M.
    The E3 Ligase Axotrophin/MARCH-7: Protein Expression Profiling of Human Tissues Reveals Links to Adult Stem Cells2010In: Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, ISSN 0022-1554, E-ISSN 1551-5044, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 301-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Axotrophin/MARCH-7 was first identified in mouse embryonic stem cells as a neural stem cell gene. Using the axotrophin/MARCH-7 null mouse, we discovered profound effects on T lymphocyte responses, including 8-fold hyperproliferation and 5-fold excess release of the stem cell cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Our further discovery that axotrophin/MARCH-7 is required for targeted degradation of the LIF receptor subunit gp190 implies a direct role in the regulation of LIF signaling. Bioinformatics studies revealed a highly conserved RING-CH domain in common with the MARCH family of E3-ubiquitin ligases, and accordingly, axotrophin was renamed "MARCH-7." To probe protein expression of human axotrophin/MARCH-7, we prepared antibodies against different domains of the protein. Each antibody bound its specific target epitope with high affinity, and immunohistochemistry cross-validated target specificity. Forty-eight human tissue types were screened. Epithelial cells stained strongly, with trophoblasts having the greatest staining. In certain tissues, specific cell types were selectively positive, including neurons and neuronal progenitor cells in the hippocampus and cerebellum, endothelial sinusoids of the spleen, megakaryocytes in the bone marrow, crypt stem cells of the small intestine, and alveolar macrophages in the 7 lung. Approximately 20% of central nervous system neuropils were positive. Notably, axotrophin/MARCH-7 has an expression profile that is distinct from that of other MARCH family members. This manuscript contains online supplemental material at http://www.jhc. org. Please visit this article online to view these materials. (J Histochem Cytochem 58:301-308, 2010)

  • 4. Bengtsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Krogh, Morten
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Schedvins, Kjell
    Silfversward, Claes
    Linder, Stig
    Auer, Gert
    Alaiya, Ayodele
    James, Peter
    Large-scale proteomics analysis of human ovarian cancer for biomarkers2007In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 1440-1450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ovarian cancer is usually found at a late stage when the prognosis is often bad. Relative survival rates decrease with tumor stage or grade, and the 5-year survival rate for women with carcinoma is only 38%. Thus, there is a great need to find biomarkers that can be used to carry out routine screening, especially in high-risk patient groups. Here, we present a large-scale study of 64 tissue samples taken from patients at all stages and show that we can identify statistically valid markers using nonsupervised methods that distinguish between normal, benign, borderline, and malignant tissue. We have identified 217 of the significantly changing protein spots. We are expressing and raising antibodies to 35 of these. Currently, we have validated 5 of these antibodies for use in immunohistochemical analysis using tissue microarrays of healthy and diseased ovarian, as well as other, human tissues.

  • 5.
    Berglund, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gry, Marcus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck laboratory.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Ottoson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wernérus, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wester, Kenneth
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck laboratory.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck laboratory.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck laboratory.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Generation of validated antibodies towards the human proteomeArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we show the results from a large effort to generate antibodies towards the human proteome. A high-throughput strategy was developed based on cloning and expression of antigens as recombitant protein epitope signature tags (PrESTs) Affinity purified polyclonal antibodies were generated, followed by validation by protein microarrays, Western blotting and microarray-based immunohistochemistry. PrESTs were selected based on sequence uniqueness relative the proteome and a bioinformatics analysis showed that unique antigens can be found for at least 85% of the proteome using this general strategy. The success rate from antigen selection to validated antibodies was 31%, and from protein to antibody 55%. Interestingly, membrane-bound and soluble proteins performed equally and PrEST lengths between 75 and 125 amino acids were found to give the highest yield of validated antibodies. Multiple antigens were selected for many genes and the results suggest that specific antibodies can be systematically generated to most human proteibs.

  • 6.
    Berglund, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Jonasson, Kalle
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    A whole-genome bioinformatics approach to selection of antigens for systematic antibody generation2008In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 8, no 14, p. 2832-2839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we present an antigen selection strategy based on a whole-genome bioinformatics approach, which is facilitated by an interactive visualization tool displaying protein features from both public resources and in-house generated data. The web-based bioinformatics platform has been designed for selection of multiple, non-overlapping recombinant protein epitope signature tags by display of predicted information relevant for antigens, including domain- and epitope sized sequence similarities to other proteins, transmembrane regions and signal peptides. The visualization tool also displays shared and exclusive protein regions for genes with multiple splice variants. A genome-wide analysis demonstrates that antigens for approximately 80% of the human protein-coding genes can be selected with this strategy.

  • 7.
    Berglund, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ottosson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Wernérus, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    et al.,
    A genecentric human protein atlas for expression profiles based on antibodies2008In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, Vol. 7, no 10, p. 2019-2027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An attractive path forward in proteomics is to experimentally annotate the human protein complement of the genome in a genecentric manner. Using antibodies, it might be possible to design protein-specific probes for a representative protein from every protein-coding gene and to subsequently use the antibodies for systematical analysis of cellular distribution and subcellular localization of proteins in normal and disease tissues. A new version (4.0) of the Human Protein Atlas has been developed in a genecentric manner with the inclusion of all human genes and splice variants predicted from genome efforts together with a visualization of each protein with characteristics such as predicted membrane regions, signal peptide, and protein domains and new plots showing the uniqueness (sequence similarity) of every fraction of each protein toward all other human proteins. The new version is based on tissue profiles generated from 6120 antibodies with more than five million immunohistochemistry-based images covering 5067 human genes, corresponding to similar to 25% of the human genome. Version 4.0 includes a putative list of members in various protein classes, both functional classes, such as kinases, transcription factors, G-protein-coupled receptors, etc., and project-related classes, such as candidate genes for cancer or cardiovascular diseases. The exact antigen sequence for the internally generated antibodies has also been released together with a visualization of the application-specific validation performed for each antibody, including a protein array assay, Western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and, for a large fraction, immunofluorescence-based confocal microscopy. New search functionalities have been added to allow complex queries regarding protein expression profiles, protein classes, and chromosome location. The new version of the protein atlas thus is a resource for many areas of biomedical research, including protein science and biomarker discovery.

  • 8. Cepeda, D.
    et al.
    Ng, H. -F
    Sharifi, H. R.
    Mahmoudi, S.
    Cerrato, V. S.
    Fredlund, E.
    Magnusson, K.
    Nilsson, H.
    Malyukova, A.
    Rantala, J.
    Klevebring, D.
    Viñals, F.
    Bhaskaran, N.
    Zakaria, S. M.
    Rahmanto, A. S.
    Grotegut, S.
    Nielsen, M. L.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Sun, D.
    Lerner, M.
    Navani, S.
    Widschwendter, M.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Jirström, K.
    Pontén, F.
    Wohlschlegel, J.
    Grandér, D.
    Spruck, C.
    Larsson, L. -G
    Sangfelt, O.
    CDK-mediated activation of the SCFFBXO28 ubiquitin ligase promotes MYC-driven transcription and tumourigenesis and predicts poor survival in breast cancer2013In: EMBO Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1757-4676, E-ISSN 1757-4684, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 999-1018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SCF (Skp1/Cul1/F-box) ubiquitin ligases act as master regulators of cellular homeostasis by targeting key proteins for ubiquitylation. Here, we identified a hitherto uncharacterized F-box protein, FBXO28 that controls MYC-dependent transcription by non-proteolytic ubiquitylation. SCFFBXO28 activity and stability are regulated during the cell cycle by CDK1/2-mediated phosphorylation of FBXO28, which is required for its efficient ubiquitylation of MYC and downsteam enhancement of the MYC pathway. Depletion of FBXO28 or overexpression of an F-box mutant unable to support MYC ubiquitylation results in an impairment of MYC-driven transcription, transformation and tumourigenesis. Finally, in human breast cancer, high FBXO28 expression and phosphorylation are strong and independent predictors of poor outcome. In conclusion, our data suggest that SCFFBXO28 plays an important role in transmitting CDK activity to MYC function during the cell cycle, emphasizing the CDK-FBXO28-MYC axis as a potential molecular drug target in MYC-driven cancers, including breast cancer. FBXO28 is identified as part of a SCF complex acting as a regulator of tumor cell proliferation and an important modifier of MYC function. FBXO28 may be a new prognostic factor in breast cancer and a new potential drug target in MYC- driven tumors.

  • 9.
    Danielsson, Frida
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fasterius, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Sullivan, Devin
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hases, Linnea
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sanli, Kemal
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhang, Cheng
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Huss, M.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Technical University of Denmark, Hørsholm, Denmark.
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Transcriptome profiling of the interconnection of pathways involved in malignant transformation and response to hypoxia2018In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 9, no 28, p. 19730-19744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In tumor tissues, hypoxia is a commonly observed feature resulting from rapidly proliferating cancer cells outgrowing their surrounding vasculature network. Transformed cancer cells are known to exhibit phenotypic alterations, enabling continuous proliferation despite a limited oxygen supply. The four-step isogenic BJ cell model enables studies of defined steps of tumorigenesis: the normal, immortalized, transformed, and metastasizing stages. By transcriptome profiling under atmospheric and moderate hypoxic (3% O2) conditions, we observed that despite being highly similar, the four cell lines of the BJ model responded strikingly different to hypoxia. Besides corroborating many of the known responses to hypoxia, we demonstrate that the transcriptome adaptation to moderate hypoxia resembles the process of malignant transformation. The transformed cells displayed a distinct capability of metabolic switching, reflected in reversed gene expression patterns for several genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation and glycolytic pathways. By profiling the stage-specific responses to hypoxia, we identified ASS1 as a potential prognostic marker in hypoxic tumors. This study demonstrates the usefulness of the BJ cell model for highlighting the interconnection of pathways involved in malignant transformation and hypoxic response.

  • 10.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hallström, Björn M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kampf, C.
    Djureinovic, D.
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Habuka, Masato
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tahmasebpoor, S.
    Danielsson, A.
    Edlund, K.
    Asplund, A.
    Sjöstedt, E.
    Lundberg, E.
    Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Skogs, Marie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ottosson Takanen, J.
    Berling, H.
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Mulder, J.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lindskog, C.
    Danielsson, Frida
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mardinoglu, A.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Von Feilitzen, Kalle
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Forsberg, Mattias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zwahlen, Martin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olsson, I.
    Navani, S.
    Huss, Mikael
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pontén, F.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Analysis of the human tissue-specific expression by genome-wide integration of transcriptomics and antibody-based proteomics2014In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 397-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global classification of the human proteins with regards to spatial expression patterns across organs and tissues is important for studies of human biology and disease. Here, we used a quantitative transcriptomics analysis (RNA-Seq) to classify the tissue-specific expression of genes across a representative set of all major human organs and tissues and combined this analysis with antibody- based profiling of the same tissues. To present the data, we launch a new version of the Human Protein Atlas that integrates RNA and protein expression data corresponding to 80% of the human protein-coding genes with access to the primary data for both the RNA and the protein analysis on an individual gene level. We present a classification of all human protein-coding genes with regards to tissue-specificity and spatial expression pattern. The integrative human expression map can be used as a starting point to explore the molecular constituents of the human body.

  • 11.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Skogs, Marie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Älgenäs, C.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pontén, F.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Klevebring, Daniel
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kampf, C.
    Asplund, A.
    Sjöstedt, E.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, C.
    Edqvist, P. -H
    Olsson, I.
    Rydberg, U.
    Hudson, P.
    Ottosson Takanen, J.
    Berling, H.
    Björling, Lisa
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Rockberg, J.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Navani, S.
    Jirström, K.
    Mulder, J.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zwahlen, Martin
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsberg, Mattias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Von Feilitzen, Kalle
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Contribution of antibody-based protein profiling to the human chromosome-centric proteome project (C-HPP)2013In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 2439-2448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A gene-centric Human Proteome Project has been proposed to characterize the human protein-coding genes in a chromosome-centered manner to understand human biology and disease. Here, we report on the protein evidence for all genes predicted from the genome sequence based on manual annotation from literature (UniProt), antibody-based profiling in cells, tissues and organs and analysis of the transcript profiles using next generation sequencing in human cell lines of different origins. We estimate that there is good evidence for protein existence for 69% (n = 13985) of the human protein-coding genes, while 23% have only evidence on the RNA level and 7% still lack experimental evidence. Analysis of the expression patterns shows few tissue-specific proteins and approximately half of the genes expressed in all the analyzed cells. The status for each gene with regards to protein evidence is visualized in a chromosome-centric manner as part of a new version of the Human Protein Atlas (www.proteinatlas.org).

  • 12.
    Fasterius, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Raso, Cinzia
    Kennedy, Susan
    Rauch, Nora
    Lundin, Par
    Kolch, Walter
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    A novel RNA sequencing data analysis method for cell line authentication2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 2, article id e0171435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have developed a novel analysis method that can interrogate the authenticity of biological samples used for generation of transcriptome profiles in public data repositories. The method uses RNA sequencing information to reveal mutations in expressed transcripts and subsequently confirms the identity of analysed cells by comparison with publicly available cell-specific mutational profiles. Cell lines constitute key model systems widely used within cancer research, but their identity needs to be confirmed in order to minimise the influence of cell contaminations and genetic drift on the analysis. Using both public and novel data, we demonstrate the use of RNA-sequencing data analysis for cell line authentication by examining the validity of COLO205, DLD1, HCT15, HCT116, HKE3, HT29 and RKO colorectal cancer cell lines. We successfully authenticate the studied cell lines and validate previous reports indicating that DLD1 and HCT15 are synonymous. We also show that the analysed HKE3 cells harbour an unexpected KRAS-G13D mutation and confirm that this cell line is a genuine KRAS dosage mutant, rather than a true isogenic derivative of HCT116 expressing only the wild type KRAS. This authentication method could be used to revisit the numerous cell line based RNA sequencing experiments available in public data repositories, analyse new experiments where whole genome sequencing is not available, as well as facilitate comparisons of data from different experiments, platforms and laboratories.

  • 13.
    Fasterius, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Biotechnology.
    Single cell RNA-seq variant analysis for exploration of inter- and intra-tumour genetic heterogeneityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14. Huang, Fang
    et al.
    Zhang, XP
    Szigyarto, Cristina
    Glaser, Elzbieta
    Import and processing of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins during development of pea plants: Plant Mitochondria from Gene to Function1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15. Kennedy, S
    et al.
    Fasterius, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Biotechnology.
    Kolch, W
    et al.,
    Adaptive rewiring of protein-protein interactions and signal flow in the EGFR signaling network by mutant RASManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16. Knorpp, Carina
    et al.
    Szigyarto, Cristina
    Glaser, Elzbieta
    Evidence for a novel ATP-dependent membrane-associated protease in spinach leaf mitochondria.1995In: Biochemical Journal, ISSN 0264-6021, E-ISSN 1470-8728, Vol. 310 ( Pt 2)Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the presence of an ATP-dependent proteolytic activity in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf mitochondria. The proteolysis was observed as degradation of newly imported precursor protein. The precursor studied was that of the ATP synthase F1 beta subunit of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia, transcribed and translated in vitro. Degradation of pre-F1 beta was observed during kinetic studies of import in vitro. The degradation was characterized in chase experiments in which the precursor was imported into mitochondria. The import reaction was subsequently stopped by the addition of valinomycin and oligomycin. The fate of the imported precursor inside the mitochondria was monitored under different experimental conditions. There was no proteolytic degradation of the newly imported precursor at 15 degrees C, whereas 50% of the precursor was degraded after a 45 min incubation at 25 degrees C. The proteolytic activity was found to be ATP-dependent and was partially inhibited by a metal chelator, o-phenanthroline. Fractionation of mitochondria prior to degradation showed that all the ATP-dependent degradative activity was associated with the mitochondrial membrane fraction. The membrane-bound protease was inhibited by Pefabloc [4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulphonyl fluoride hypochloride], an inhibitor of serine-type proteases and by N-ethylmaleimide, a thiol group reagent. Our studies thus describe a novel ATP-dependent membrane-associated serine-type protease in plant mitochondria that is capable of degrading newly imported non-assembled proteins.

  • 17.
    Knorpp, Carina
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Szigyarto, Cristina
    Stockholm University.
    Glaser, Elzbieta
    Stockholm University.
    Evidence for a novel ATP-dependent membrane-associated protease in spinach leaf mitochondria1995In: Biochemical Journal, ISSN 0264-6021, E-ISSN 1470-8728, Vol. 310, p. 527-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the presence of an ATP-dependent proteolytic activity in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf mitochondria. The proteolysis was observed as degradation of newly imported precursor protein. The precursor studied was that of the ATP synthase F1 beta subunit of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia, transcribed and translated in vitro. Degradation of pre-F1 beta was observed during kinetic studies of import in vitro. The degradation was characterized in chase experiments in which the precursor was imported into mitochondria. The import reaction was subsequently stopped by the addition of valinomycin and oligomycin. The fate of the imported precursor inside the mitochondria was monitored under different experimental conditions. There was no proteolytic degradation of the newly imported precursor at 15 degrees C, whereas 50% of the precursor was degraded after a 45 min incubation at 25 degrees C. The proteolytic activity was found to be ATP-dependent and was partially inhibited by a metal chelator, o-phenanthroline. Fractionation of mitochondria prior to degradation showed that all the ATP-dependent degradative activity was associated with the mitochondrial membrane fraction. The membrane-bound protease was inhibited by Pefabloc [4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulphonyl fluoride hypochloride], an inhibitor of serine-type proteases and by N-ethylmaleimide, a thiol group reagent. Our studies thus describe a novel ATP-dependent membrane-associated serine-type protease in plant mitochondria that is capable of degrading newly imported non-assembled proteins.

  • 18. Koerkamp, M. G.
    et al.
    Rep, M.
    Bussemaker, H. J.
    Hardy, Gpma
    Mul, A.
    Piekarska, K.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    de Mattos, J. M. T.
    Tabak, H. F.
    Dissection of transient oxidative stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using DNA microarrays2002In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, ISSN 1059-1524, E-ISSN 1939-4586, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 2783-2794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Yeast cells were grown in glucose-limited chemostat cultures and forced to switch to a new carbon source, the fatty acid oleate. Alterations in gene expression were monitored using DNA microarrays combined with bioinformatics tools, among which was included the recently developed algorithm REDUCE. Immediately after the switch to oleate, a transient and very specific stress response was observed, followed by the up-regulation of genes encoding peroxisomal enzymes required for fatty acid metabolism. The stress response included up-regulation of genes coding for enzymes to keep thioredoxin and glutathione reduced, as well as enzymes required for the detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Among the genes coding for various isoenzymes involved in these processes, only a specific subset was expressed. Not the general stress transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4, but rather the specific factor Yap1p seemed to be the main regulator of the stress response. We ascribe the initiation of the oxidative stress response to a combination of poor redox flux and fatty acid-induced uncoupling of the respiratory chain during the metabolic reprogramming phase.

  • 19.
    Lindskog, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Berglund, L.
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Design of protein epitope signature tags for antibody-based proteomicsManuscript (Other academic)
  • 20. Lourbakos, A.
    et al.
    Hiller, M.
    Kozaczynska, K.
    Baptiste, R. Jean
    Reza, M.
    Niks, E.
    Koeks, Z.
    de Klerk, D.
    Wolterbeek, R.
    Campion, G.
    Nadarajah, V. D.
    Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Calissano, M.
    Muntoni, F.
    Lochmueller, H.
    Verschuuren, J. J. G. M.
    Goemans, N.
    Tulinius, M.
    de Kimpe, S.
    Aartsma-Rus, A.
    't Hoen, P. A. C.
    Spitali, P.
    MMP-9 serum levels increase over time in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and decrease upon treatment with drisapersen2014In: Human Gene Therapy, ISSN 1043-0342, E-ISSN 1557-7422, Vol. 25, no 11, p. A27-A28Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21. Lourbakos, A.
    et al.
    Yau, N.
    de Bruijn, P.
    Hiller, M.
    Kozaczynska, K.
    Jean-Baptiste, R.
    Reza, M.
    Wolterbeek, R.
    Koeks, Z.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    de Klerk, D.
    Campion, G.
    Zaharieva, I.
    Nadarajah, V. D.
    Nilsson, P.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Muntoni, F.
    Lochmuller, H.
    Verschuuren, J. J.
    Goemans, N.
    Tulinius, M.
    Niks, E. H.
    de Kimpe, S.
    Aartsma-Rus, A.
    't Hoen, Peter A. C.
    Spitali, P.
    Evaluation of serum MMP-9 as predictive biomarker for antisense therapy in Duchenne2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 17888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle disorder caused by lack of dystrophin. Predictive biomarkers able to anticipate response to the therapeutic treatments aiming at dystrophin re-expression are lacking. The objective of this study is to investigate Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) as predictive biomarker for Duchenne. Two natural history cohorts were studied including 168 longitudinal samples belonging to 66 patients. We further studied 1536 samples obtained from 3 independent clinical trials with drisapersen, an antisense oligonucleotide targeting exon 51: an open label study including 12 patients; a phase 3 randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study involving 186 patients; an open label extension study performed after the phase 3. Analysis of natural history cohorts showed elevated MMP-9 levels in patients and a significant increase over time in longitudinal samples. MMP-9 decreased in parallel to clinical stabilization in the 12 patients involved in the open label study. The phase 3 study and subsequent extension study clarified that the decrease in MMP-9 levels was not predictive of treatment response. These data do not support the inclusion of serum MMP-9 as predictive biomarker for DMD patients.

  • 22. Lu, Wenshu
    et al.
    Gotzmann, Josef
    Sironi, Lucia
    Jaeger, Verena-Maren
    Schneider, Maria
    Lueke, Yvonne
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Brachner, Andreas
    Ellenberg, Jan
    Foisner, Roland
    Noegel, Angelika A.
    Karakesisoglou, Iakowos
    Sun1 forms immobile macromolecular assemblies at the nuclear envelope2008In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta. Molecular Cell Research, ISSN 0167-4889, E-ISSN 1879-2596, Vol. 1783, no 12, p. 2415-2426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SUN-domain proteins form a novel and conserved family of inner nuclear membrane (INM) proteins, which establish physical connections between the nucleoplasm and the cytoskeleton. In the current study, we provide evidence that within the nuclear envelope (NE) Stint proteins form highly immobile oligomeric complexes in interphase cells. By performing inverse fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis, we demonstrate in vivo that both perinuclear and nucleoplasmic Sun I segments are essential for maintenance of Sun I immobility at the NE. Our data in Particular underline the self-association properties of the C-terminal coiled-coil Sun I segment, the ability of which to form dimers and tetramers is demonstrated. Furthermore, the Sun1 tertiary Structure involves interchain disulfide bonds that might contribute to higher homo-oligomer formation, although the overall dynamics of the Sun1 C-terminus remains unaffected when the cysteins involved are mutated. While a major Sun1 pool colocalizes with nuclear pore complex proteins, a large fraction of the Sun1 protein assemblies colocalize with immunoreactive foci of Sun2, another SUN-domain paralogue at the NE. We demonstrate that the Sun1 coiled-coil domain permits these heterophilic associations with Sun2. Sun1 therefore provides a non-dynamic platform for the formation of different macromolecular assemblies at the INM Our data support a model in which SUN-protein-containing multivariate complexes may provide versatile outer nuclear membrane attachment sites for cytoskeletal filaments. Crown

  • 23.
    Nilsson, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Larsson, Karin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Wernérus, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Ottoson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ödling, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Paavilainen, Linda
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Ann-Catrin
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wester, Kenneth
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Towards a human proteome atlas: High-throughput generation of mono-specific antibodies for tissue profiling2005In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 5, p. 4327-4337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A great need exists for the systematic generation of specific antibodies to explore the human proteome. Here, we show that antibodies specific to human proteins can be generated in a high-throughput manner involving stringent affinity purification using recombinant protein epitope signature tags (PrESTs) as immunogens and affinity-ligands. The specificity of the generated affinity reagents, here called mono-specific antibodies (msAb), were validated with a novel protein microarray assay. The success rate for 464 antibodies generated towards human proteins was more than 90% as judged by the protein array assay. The antibodies were used for parallel profiling of patient biopsies using tissue microarrays generated from 48 human tissues. Comparative analysis with well-characterized monoclonal antibodies showed identical or similar specificity and expression patterns. The results suggest that a comprehensive atlas containing extensive protein expression and subcellular localization data of the human proteome can be generated in an efficient manner with mono-specific antibodies.

  • 24. Patrakka, Jaakko
    et al.
    Xiao, Zhijie
    Nukui, Masatoshi
    Takemoto, Minoru
    He, Liqun
    Oddsson, Asmundur
    Perisic, Ljubica
    Kaukinen, Anne
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Jalanko, Hannu
    Betsholtz, Christer
    Tryggvason, Karl
    Expression and subcellular distribution of novel glomerulus-associated proteins dendrin, ehd3, sh2d4a, plekhh2, and 2310066E14Rik2007In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, ISSN 1046-6673, E-ISSN 1533-3450, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 689-697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The glomerular capillary tuft is a highly specialized microcapillary that is dedicated to function as a sophisticated molecular sieve. The glomerulus filter has a unique molecular composition, and several essential glomerular proteins are expressed in the kidney exclusively by glomerular podocytes. A catalog of > 300 glomerulus-upregulated transcripts that were identified using expressed sequence tag profiling and microarray analysis was published recently. This study characterized the expression profile of five glomerulus-upregulated transcripts/proteins (ehd3, dendrin, sh2d4a, plekhh2, and 2310066E14Rik) in detail. The expression pattern of these novel glomerular transcripts in various mouse tissues was studied using reverse transcriptase-PCR, Northern blotting, and in situ hybridization. For studying the distribution of corresponding proteins, polyclonal antibodies were raised against the gene products, and Western blotting, immunofluorescence, and immunoelectron microscopic analyses were performed. Remarkably, it was discovered that all five transcripts/proteins were expressed in the kidney exclusively by glomerular cells. Ehd3 was expressed only by glomerular endothelial cells. Importantly, ehd3 is the first gene ever shown to be expressed exclusively by glomerular endothelial cells and not by other endothelial cells in the kidney. Dendrin, sh2d4a, plekhh2, and 2310066E14Rik, however, were transcribed solely by podocytes. With the use of polyclonal antibodies, dendrin, sh2d4a, and plekhh2 proteins were localized to the slit diaphragm and the foot process, whereas 2310066E14Rik protein was localized to the podocyte major processes and cell body. This study provides fresh insights into glomerular biology and uncovers new possibilities to explore the role of these novel proteins in the glomerular physiology and pathology.

  • 25.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    et al.
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Gry, Marcus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Berglund, Lisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Andersson-Svahn, Helene
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Asplund, Anna
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ottosson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Wernérus, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Wester, Kenneth
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ubiquitous protein expression in human cells, tissues and organsManuscript (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Spitali, Pietro
    et al.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands..
    Hettne, Kristina
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands..
    Tsonaka, Roula
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Med Stat & Bioinformat, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Charrout, Mohammed
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands..
    van den Bergen, Janneke
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Koeks, Zaida
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Kan, Hermien E.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Radiol, CJ Gorter Ctr High Field MRI, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Hooijmans, Melissa T.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Radiol, CJ Gorter Ctr High Field MRI, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Roos, Andreas
    Univ Newcastle, Inst Med Genet, MRC Ctr Neuromuscular Dis, John Walton Muscular Dystrophy Res Ctr, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Straub, Volker
    Univ Newcastle, Inst Med Genet, MRC Ctr Neuromuscular Dis, John Walton Muscular Dystrophy Res Ctr, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Muntoni, Francesco
    UCL, Great Ormond St Inst Child Hlth, Dubowitz Neuromuscular Ctr, London, England..
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Biotechnology.
    Koel-Simmelink, Marleen J. A.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Amsterdam Neurosci, Dept Clin Chem, Neurochem Lab & Biobank, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Teunissen, Charlotte E.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Amsterdam Neurosci, Dept Clin Chem, Neurochem Lab & Biobank, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Lochmueller, Hanns
    Univ Newcastle, Inst Med Genet, MRC Ctr Neuromuscular Dis, John Walton Muscular Dystrophy Res Ctr, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Niks, Erik H.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Neurol, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands.;Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Radiol, CJ Gorter Ctr High Field MRI, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Tracking disease progression non-invasively in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies2018In: Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle, ISSN 2190-5991, E-ISSN 2190-6009, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 715-726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Analysis of muscle biopsies allowed to characterize the pathophysiological changes of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (D/BMD) leading to the clinical phenotype. Muscle tissue is often investigated during interventional dose finding studies to show in situ proof of concept and pharmacodynamics effect of the tested drug. Less invasive readouts are needed to objectively monitor patients' health status, muscle quality, and response to treatment. The identification of serum biomarkers correlating with clinical function and able to anticipate functional scales is particularly needed for personalized patient management and to support drug development programs. Methods A large-scale proteomic approach was used to identify serum biomarkers describing pathophysiological changes (e.g. loss of muscle mass), association with clinical function, prediction of disease milestones, association with in vivo(31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy data and dystrophin levels in muscles. Cross-sectional comparisons were performed to compare DMD patients, BMD patients, and healthy controls. A group of DMD patients was followed up for a median of 4.4years to allow monitoring of individual disease trajectories based on yearly visits. Results Cross-sectional comparison enabled to identify 10 proteins discriminating between healthy controls, DMD and BMD patients. Several proteins (285) were able to separate DMD from healthy, while 121 proteins differentiated between BMD and DMD; only 13 proteins separated BMD and healthy individuals. The concentration of specific proteins in serum was significantly associated with patients' performance (e.g. BMP6 serum levels and elbow flexion) or dystrophin levels (e.g. TIMP2) in BMD patients. Analysis of longitudinal trajectories allowed to identify 427 proteins affected over time indicating loss of muscle mass, replacement of muscle by adipose tissue, and cardiac involvement. Over-representation analysis of longitudinal data allowed to highlight proteins that could be used as pharmacodynamic biomarkers for drugs currently in clinical development. Conclusions Serum proteomic analysis allowed to not only discriminate among DMD, BMD, and healthy subjects, but it enabled to detect significant associations with clinical function, dystrophin levels, and disease progression.

  • 27. Stahl, A.
    et al.
    Pavlov, P. F.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    Glaser, E.
    Rapid degradation of the presequence of the F-1 beta precursor of the ATP synthase inside mitochondria2000In: Biochemical Journal, ISSN 0264-6021, E-ISSN 1470-8728, Vol. 349, p. 703-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated the fate of the presequence of an overexpressed protein derived from the precursor of the F(1)beta subunit of ATP synthase after import and processing in mitochondria. Our studies revealed a rapid degradation of the presequence inside mitochondria catalysed by matrix-located protease(s). In contrast, the mature portion of the precursor was not degraded. This is the first experimental evidence of the rapid degradation of the F(1)beta a mitochondrial presequence in organello after in vitro import and processing.

  • 28. Ström, Cecilia E.
    et al.
    Johansson, Fredrik
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Erixon, Klaus
    Helleday, Thomas
    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is not involved in base excision repair but PARP inhibition traps a single-strand intermediate2011In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 3166-3175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Base excision repair (BER) represents the most important repair pathway of endogenous DNA lesions. Initially, a base damage is recognized, excised and a DNA single-strand break (SSB) intermediate forms. The SSB is then ligated, a process that employs proteins also involved in SSB repair, e.g. XRCC1, Ligase III and possibly PARP1. Here, we confirm the role of XRCC1 and PARP in direct SSB repair. Interestingly, we uncover a synthetic lethality between XRCC1 deficiency and PARP inhibition. We also treated cells with alkylating agent dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and monitored the SSB intermediates formed during BER. DMS-induced SSBs were quickly repaired in wild-type cells; while a rapid accumulation of SSBs was observed in cells where post-incision repair was blocked by a PARP inhibitor or by XRCC1 deficiency (EM9 cells). Interestingly, DMS-induced SSBs did not accumulate in PARP1 siRNA depleted cells, demonstrating that PARP1 is not required for efficient completion of BER. Based on these results we suggest no immediate role for PARP1 in BER, but that PARP inhibitors trap PARP on the SSB intermediate formed during BER. Unexpectedly, addition of PARP inhibitor 2 h after DMS treatment still increased SSB levels indicating ongoing repair even at this late time point.

  • 29. Szigyarto, Cristina
    et al.
    Dessi, Patrik
    Smith, M K
    Knorpp, Carina
    Harmey, M A
    Day, david A
    Glaser, Elzbieta
    Whelan, James
    A matrix-located processing peptidase of plant mitochondria.1998In: Plant Molecular Biology, ISSN 0167-4412, E-ISSN 1573-5028, Vol. 36, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nuclear-encoded mitochondrial precursor proteins are proteolytically processed inside the mitochondrion after import. The general mitochondrial processing activity in plant mitochondria has been shown to be integrated into the cytochrome bc1 complex of the respiratory chain. Here we investigate the occurrence of an additional, matrix-located processing activity by incubation of the precursors of the soybean mitochondrial proteins, alternative oxidase, the FAd subunit of the ATP synthetase and the tobacco F1 beta subunit of the ATP synthase, with the membrane and soluble components of mitochondria isolated from soybean cotyledons and spinach leaves. A matrix-located peptidase specifically processed the precursors to the predicted mature form in a reaction which was sensitive to orthophenanthroline, a characteristic inhibitor of mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP). The specificity of the matrix peptidase was illustrated by the inhibition of processing of the alternative oxidase precursor in both soybean and spinach matrix extracts upon altering a single amino acid residue in the targeting presequence (-2 Arg to Gly). Additionally, there was no evidence for general proteolysis of precursor proteins incubated with the matrix. The purity of the matrix fractions was ascertained by spectrophotometric and immunological analyses. The results demonstrate that there is a specific processing activity in the matrix of soybean and spinach in addition to the previously well characterized membrane-bound MPP integrated into the cytochrome bcl complex of the respiratory chain.

  • 30. Szigyarto, Cristina
    et al.
    Glaser, Elzbieta
    Membrane-associated ATP-dependent degradation of mitochondrial precursor proteins: Proteolysis in Cell Functions. V K Hopsu-Havu, M Jarvinen, Heidrun Kirschke1997In: / [ed] Hopsu-Havu V K, Järvinen M, Kirschke H, Amsterdam, Netherlands: IOS Press, 1997, p. 298-306Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31. Szigyarto, Cristina
    et al.
    Hugosson, Marie
    Moberg, Per
    Andreu, David
    Glaser, Elzbieta
    L and D presequence peptides derived from the precursor of F1beta subunit of the ATP synthase inhibit mitochondrial protein import by interaction with import machinery.2001In: Plant Molecular Biology, ISSN 0167-4412, E-ISSN 1573-5028, Vol. 47, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the effect of L and D enantiomers of a 25-residue peptide derived from the N-terminal region of the presequence of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia F1beta subunit of the ATP synthase, pF1beta(1, 25), on import into spinach leaf mitochondria. Three in vitro synthesized precursor proteins using different import pathways were used. Import of the precursor proteins of F1beta subunit of the ATP synthase, pre-F1beta, and the alternative oxidase, pre-AOX, required addition of external ATP. whereas the chimeric precursor containing the N-terminal 84 amino acids of the cytochrome b2 precursor protein linked to dihydrofolate reductase, pre-b2(1, 84)-DHFR was not dependent on ATP. Import of pre-F1beta, and pre-AOX was inhibited already at 1 microM and 3 microM concentration of the L and D enantiomers, whereas inhibition of import of pre-b2(1, 84)-DHFR, occurred at concentrations >10 microM of both enantiomers. Binding efficiency of the precursor proteins was not affected by addition of the L and D enantiomers. There was no correlation between inhibition of import of pre-F1beta and pre-AOX and dissipation of membrane potential measured as a decrease of Rhodamine 123 fluorescence quenching. The inhibitory effect of the L and D presequence enantiomers on import of pre-F1beta and pre-AOX was concluded to occur within the outer membrane translocase machinery beyond the initial precursor receptor interaction. Furthermore, the fact that the D enantiomer had the same effect as the natural peptide showed that interaction of the presequence with the import machinery was not dependent on chiral properties of the presequence.

  • 32. Szigyarto, Cristina
    et al.
    Salvagnac, Virginie
    Glaser, Elzbieta
    Proteolysis of Newly imported precursor proteins1998In: / [ed] I.M. Mφller, P. Gardeström, K. Glimelius and E. Glaser, 1998, p. 287-290Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Agaton, Charlotta
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Amini, Bahram
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Andersen, Elisabet
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Andersson, Ann-Catrin
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Angelidou, Pia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Asplund, Caroline
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Berglund, Lisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Bergström, Kristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Cerjan, Dijana
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Ekström, Marica
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Elobeid, Adila
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Eriksson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Falk, Ronny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Fall, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Forsberg, Mattias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gry Björklund, Marcus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gumbel, Kristoffer
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Halimi, Asif
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hallin, Inga
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Hamsten, Carl
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Hansson, Marianne
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hercules, Görel
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Larsson, Karin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lindskog, Mats
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lodewyckx, Wald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lund, Jan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Magnusson, Kristina
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Malm, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Ödling, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Olsson, Ingmarie
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Öster, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Ottosson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Paavilainen, Linda
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Rimini, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Runeson, Marcus
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sköllermo, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Steen, Johanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Stenvall, Maria
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sterky, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Strömberg, Sara
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Tourle, Samuel
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wahlund, Eva
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Waldén, Annelie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wan, Jinghong
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology (closed 20130101).
    Wernérus, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Westberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wester, Kenneth
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    Wrethagen, Ulla
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Xu, Lan Lan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Genet & Pathol.
    A human protein atlas for normal and cancer tissues based on antibody proteomics2005In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 1920-1932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody-based proteomics provides a powerful approach for the functional study of the human proteome involving the systematic generation of protein-specific affinity reagents. We used this strategy to construct a comprehensive, antibody-based protein atlas for expression and localization profiles in 48 normal human tissues and 20 different cancers. Here we report a new publicly available database containing, in the first version, similar to 400,000 high resolution images corresponding to more than 700 antibodies toward human proteins. Each image has been annotated by a certified pathologist to provide a knowledge base for functional studies and to allow queries about protein profiles in normal and disease tissues. Our results suggest it should be possible to extend this analysis to the majority of all human proteins thus providing a valuable tool for medical and biological research.

  • 34.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hallström, Björn M
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Lindskog, Cecilia
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Sjöstedt, Evelina
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Asplund, Anna
    Olsson, IngMarie
    Edlund, Karolina
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Navani, Sanjay
    Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Djureinovic, Dijana
    Takanen, Jenny Ottosson
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Alm, Tove
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik
    Berling, Holger
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Mulder, Jan
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hamsten, Marica
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    von Feilitzen, Kalle
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsberg, Mattias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Persson, Lukas
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Johansson, Fredric
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zwahlen, Martin
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    von Heijne, Gunnar
    Nielsen, Jens
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Tissue-based map of the human proteome2015In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 347, no 6220, p. 1260419-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resolving the molecular details of proteome variation in the different tissues and organs of the human body will greatly increase our knowledge of human biology and disease. Here, we present a map of the human tissue proteome based on an integrated omics approach that involves quantitative transcriptomics at the tissue and organ level, combined with tissue microarray-based immunohistochemistry, to achieve spatial localization of proteins down to the single-cell level. Our tissue-based analysis detected more than 90% of the putative protein-coding genes. We used this approach to explore the human secretome, the membrane proteome, the druggable proteome, the cancer proteome, and the metabolic functions in 32 different tissues and organs. All the data are integrated in an interactive Web-based database that allows exploration of individual proteins, as well as navigation of global expression patterns, in all major tissues and organs in the human body.

  • 35. Wein, Nicolas
    et al.
    Vulin, Adeline
    Falzanaro, Maria S.
    Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Maiti, Baijayanta
    Findlay, Andrew
    Heller, Kristin N.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Bakthavachalu, Baskar
    Messina, Sonia
    Vita, Giuseppe L.
    Gualandi, Francesca
    Wilton, Steve D.
    Yang, Lin
    Dunn, Diane M.
    Schoenberg, Daniel
    Weiss, Robert B.
    Howard, Michael T.
    Ferlini, Alessandra
    Flanigan, Kevin M.
    Successful Use of Out-of-Frame Exon 2 Skipping Induces IRES-Driven Expression of the N-Truncated Dystrophin Isoform: Promising Approach for Treating Other 5 ' Dystrophin Mutations2014In: Molecular Therapy, ISSN 1525-0016, E-ISSN 1525-0024, Vol. 22, p. S294-S295Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36. Wein, Nicolas
    et al.
    Vulin, Adeline
    Falzarano, Maria S.
    Szigyarto, Christina Al-Khalili
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Maiti, Baijayanta
    Findlay, Andrew
    Heller, Kristin N.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Bakthavachalu, Baskar
    Messina, Sonia
    Vita, Giuseppe
    Passarelli, Chiara
    Gualandi, Francesca
    Wilton, Steve D.
    Rodino-Klapac, Louise R.
    Yang, Lin
    Dunn, Diane M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. Ohio State Univ, Ctr Gene Therapy, Nationwide Childrens Hosp, USA.
    Schoenberg, Daniel R.
    Weiss, Robert B.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. Ohio State Univ, Ctr Gene Therapy, Nationwide Childrens Hosp, USA.
    Howard, Michael T.
    Ferlini, Alessandra
    Flanigan, Kevin M.
    Translation from a DMD exon 5 IRES results in a functional dystrophin isoform that attenuates dystrophinopathy in humans and mice2014In: Nature Medicine, ISSN 1078-8956, E-ISSN 1546-170X, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 992-1000Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most mutations that truncate the reading frame of the DMD gene cause loss of dystrophin expression and lead to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, amelioration of disease severity has been shown to result from alternative, translation initiation beginning in DMD exon 6 that leads to expression of a highly functional N-truncated dystrophin. Here we demonstrate that this isoform results from usage of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) within exon 5 that is glucocorticoid inducible. We confirmed IRES activity by both peptide sequencing and ribosome profiling in muscle from individuals with minimal symptoms despite the presence of truncating mutations. We generated a truncated reading frame upstream of the IRES by exon skipping, which led to synthesis of a functional N-truncated isoform in both human subject derived cell lines and in a new DMD mouse model, where expression of the truncated isoform protected muscle from contraction-induced injury and corrected muscle force to the same level as that observed in control mice. These results support a potential therapeutic approach for patients with mutations within the 5' exons of DMD.

1 - 36 of 36
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf