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  • 1. Annosi, M. C.
    et al.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Brunetta, F.
    Investigating the impact of agile methods on learning and innovation2017In: Learning and Innovation in Hybrid Organizations: Strategic and Organizational Insights, Springer International Publishing , 2017, p. 73-97Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a turbulent environment, increased flexibility and efficiency are essential for most firms to survive. Many organizations have responded to the need for greater efficiency and productivity by building more Agile structures and shifting to the implementation of Agile software (SW) methodologies. Although the adoption of Agile methodologies is becoming widespread, robust empirical evidence on their effectiveness is lacking as is evidence of the improvements brought by Agile compared to other methods. This chapter provides empirical evidence on the impact of Agile on organizational product and process innovation and learning. Authors investigate the following research question: How does use of Agile methods impact on product and process related innovation and learning in teams? While the relationship between the investment in knowledge and innovation output has been studied extensively, little work focuses on the role of Agile in growing the organization’s knowledge base through team learning. The data collected include traditional R&D innovation indicators and also in-depth measures of organizational performance and overall team outcomes, which allow us to study not only the extent to which Agile impacts on the firm’s innovation and learning performance but also the dynamic team learning process.

  • 2.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Investigating the impact of agile methods on learning and innovation2013Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Martini, Antonella
    Peonia, Laura
    The dual control systems of agile teams: exploring knowledge management issues2014In: IFKAD 2014: 9th International Forum on Knowledge Asset Dynamics, 2014, p. 1907-1931Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper aims to contribute to the exploration of micro-foundations for innovation in autonomous team-based firms. It describes how different types of management control systems influence the innovation performance of teams through an extensive field study of a large scale agile implementation. It reveals the moderating role played by different kinds of managerial control systems and by perceived time pressure on teams in the relationship between a team's absorptive capacity and its innovation performance. Design/methodology/approach - A total of 44 individual semi-structured interviews were used to collect data over three separate data collection stages conducted from August to November 2013. All data were triangulated with the qualitative content analysis results of free comments from 121 people, covering different agile roles in the same organizations as above, and embedded in a survey performed in August 2013. Due to the complexity of the topic and the lack of prior studies investigating the effect of agile implementation on team learning and innovation capabilities, an abductive research approach (Peirce, 1931) was selected as a suitable method. Originality/value - The empirical results indicate that a team's beliefs on the importance of learning strongly influence its self-regulated learning behaviours. They represent the configuration of AC meta-routines underlying the concept of absorptive capacity (Lewin et al., 2011) at the team-level, conducive to teams' exploration activities. Moreover, the antecedents for a team's exploitative and exploratory innovation activities are presented and two types of managerial controls for driving exploitative innovation activities are identified. Additionally, team-level absorptive capacity was analysed, since it is a less explored, but important construct, leading to a team's exploitative product innovation. Practical implications - This study's findings have a number of implications for practice. The results imply that autonomous team-based organizations may be better off not using one single standard control system to manage all their teams. In fact, beyond securing a team's access to knowledge, management needs to provide teams with differentiated means to develop necessary competencies and capacities for understanding, assimilating and using the knowledge they retrieve. In addition, management should influence a team's beliefs by valuing the tasks requiring innovation and transmitting sustainable values to teams through their mission and vision statements.

  • 4.
    Backström, Tomas
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Environmental Technology and Work Science.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Industrial Economics and Management.
    EFFECTS OF FOUR DIFFERENT TYPES OF LEARNING ORGANISATIONS2004In: International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management, ISSN 1465-6612, E-ISSN 1741-5160Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Di Vincenzo, F.
    et al.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Mascia, D.
    Exploring the role of structural holes in learning: an empirical study of Swedish pharmacies2012In: Journal of Knowledge Management, ISSN 1367-3270, E-ISSN 1758-7484, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 576-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: There is a lack of studies investigating the role of the structural configuration of social capital - more specifically, structural holes - for employees' individual learning. The objective of this paper is to address this gap in the literature, ultimately enhancing understanding of the link between the structural configuration of social capital and individual learning. Design/methodology/approach: An online questionnaire survey was administered to employees affiliated to 22 pharmacies in Sweden to gather attributional and relational data on the individual level. Social network analysis techniques were used to describe salient structural characteristics of individuals' social capital. The impact of social capital on individual learning was explored through ordinal logistic regression models based on maximum likelihood estimations. Findings: The presence of structural holes initially increases the degree of individual learning, then reaches a maximum and begins to gradually decrease. Practical implications: The results of the study provide valuable input for the development and management of networks within firms, in order to improve learning and innovation. In addition, given the close proximity between learning, as conceptualized in this study, and other job attitudes, human resource management practices in general could benefit greatly from the results. Originality/value: In this paper, the authors focus on the structural configuration of social capital, more specifically structural holes, and its inter-relationship with learning. Although prior literature has analyzed various beneficial effects of social capital, this study is the first of its kind to investigate the role of the structural configuration of the social capital for employees' individual learning.

  • 6. Di Vincenzo, Fausto
    et al.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    Mascia, Daniele
    Exploring the Role of Structural Holes in Learning: an Empirical Study of Swedish Pharmacies2011In: 2011 6th International Forum on Knowledge Asset Dynamics (IFKAD 2011): Knowledge-Based Foundations of the Service Economy, 2011, p. 185-204Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we focus on the structural configuration of social capital, more specifically structural holes, and its inter-relationship with learning. A wide range of literature has analysed social capital and its beneficial effects, however, despite the extensive investigations of social capital, there is surprisingly enough still a lack of studies investigating the role of the structural configuration of the social capital for employees' individual learning. The objective of this paper is to address this gap in the literature, enhancing our understanding of the links between social capital and individual learning. An online questionnaire survey was administered to 252 employees affiliated with the 22 pharmacies. The analysis was made through ordinal logistic regression models based on maximum likelihood estimations. The results suggest that the presence of structural holes first increases the degree of individual learning, then reaches a maximum and begins to decrease gradually. The mechanism at work in the relationship between structural holes and individual learning is an interesting area for further research. Tentative explanations to this cognitive psychological effect are discussed in terms of cognitive distance as well as information overload.

  • 7.
    Gutierrez, Ernesto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Abedi, Aref
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Wallsten, Jakob
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    A method for designing processes for Project Portfolio Management2010In: Proceedings of the 8th International NordDesign Conference 2010 / [ed] Andreas Dagman, Rikard Söderberg, 2010, p. 55-64Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Project Portfolio Management (PPM) is the process that aims to the evaluation, selection and prioritization of ideas and projects for developing new products. PPM is considered a key managerial task and a core competence influencing companies.

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  • 8.
    Gutiérres, Ernesto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Project Portfolio Management: research for improving practice2009Report (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    An Empirical Test of the Importance of Knowledge Exchange for new Service Development in Swedish Pharmacies.2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Exploring Sustainable Work Systems: An Interactional Perspective on Learning and Organizing2005Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Working conditions are increasingly unpredictable, complex, and ungovernable creating severe health risks for employees and negative economic consequences for both corporations and society. Considering the growth in understanding human psychology and sociology, and the progression in measuring working conditions and health, this phenomenon is most perplexing. The enigma has yielded interest in a field known as sustainable work systems, where the challenge is to organize work in a manner that is both beneficial for the business and for its employees.

    In an attempt to shed light on the growing issue, this dissertation outlines the features of a model intended to capture conditions of organization where learning is of paramount importance, and where organization is conceptualised using interaction as the foundation. One central question concerns which forms of interactions and co-operations replace traditional structures in organizations. Another relevant question, linked to the former, concerns the way in which these structures shape conditions of organization, learning, efficiency, and effectiveness.

    A combination of research methods has been employed to provide an enhanced picture of this inquiry. Four corporate sub-units have been subject to a cross-sectional study. These sub-units were chosen by middle managers of a corporation because they excelled in an organizational reform that was initiated two years prior. During 2004, a survey was constructed and distributed to all employees in these four sub-units. Data regarding the sub-units’ efficiency and effectiveness has been collected; and, interviews with managers leading the organizational change have been conducted.

    The two papers included in this thesis disclose four distinctly different approaches to organizational design. All four sub-units have separate conceptions of function and organization, although the guiding principles prescribed by top-management were identical for each of the four first-line managers who were leading the change. Three of the four sub-units have made more pervasive change efforts, and have a higher degree of learning and development, efficiency and effectiveness.

    The results of this thesis suggest that interaction serves as a vehicle for shaping organizational conditions and outcomes. As a consequence of the chosen design, interaction varied between sub-units, thus influencing conditions of organization, learning, efficiency and effectiveness.

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  • 11.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Feedback and Sustainable Competitive Advantage2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Feedback for Innovation: Exploring Multiple Modalities2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Learning when Organizing: The Influence of Interactions on Learning at WorkManuscript (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Influence of Internal Channels of Communication on Incremental and Radical Innovation in Swedish PharmaciesIn: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    The Instrumentality of Talk: On the Creation of Sustainable Organizations Through Social Interactions2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Working conditions are increasingly unpredictable, complex, and ungovernable creating severe health risks for employees and potential negative economic consequences for both corporations and society. Considering the growth in understanding human psychology and sociology, and the progression in measuring working conditions and health, this phenomenon is most perplexing. The enigma has yielded a returned interest in firms’ sustainable competitive advantage, where the challenge is to gain insights into work conditions that are beneficial both for the business and for its employees.

    In an attempt to shed light on the growing issue, this thesis outlines the features of a structural equation model intended to test organizational and individual adaptability, where learning and interaction are of paramount importance. The central issue concerns the forms of interactions and learning that contribute to consequences of organizational outcomes (i.e. efficiency, effectiveness, and innovation) and to simultaneously assess the influence of these processes on employees’ outcomes (i.e. individual learning, goal commitment, and regeneration).

    To provide an enhanced picture of this inquiry, 22 pharmacies encompassing 252 employees have been subject to a cross-sectional study. The role of three interactional perspectives has been tested to ascertain their potential to be enablers of sustainable competitive advantage. These three perspectives are: feedback, knowledge exchange, and social network.

    The results of this thesis suggest that these three forms of interaction serve as a vehicle for shaping organizational and individual outcomes. Main findings presented in this thesis are that interactions facilitate organizational outcomes and individual outcomes. However, just as interaction facilitates favourable outcomes, it also has effects that can be constrictive. Generally, it is possible to enhance, decrease, or vary these interactions in order to improve the organizations’ sustainable competitive advantage, to the benefit of employees, stockholders, and customers. This undertaking, however, is not a simple one as certain interactions produce trade-off effects in the attainment of sustainable competitive advantage.

  • 16.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Engineering Design, Integrated Product Development and Design.
    Eneberg, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Engineering Design, Integrated Product Development and Design.
    Uncovering misalignments in the health- and elderly care system2023In: Journal of Integrated Care, ISSN 1476-9018, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 117-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The increasing size of the elderly population is emerging as a primary catalyst for the escalation of healthcare expenditure, and a sense of urgency is manifest. However, the complexity of the health- and elderly care systems provides challenges in improving system efficiency. Hence, the system-level understanding of the main obstacles to integration care needs further exploration. In order to better integrate health- and elderly care, the study needs to identify the actual misalignments underpinning the issue. This study provides the theoretical foundations for resource misalignments and provides empirical examples of these. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews with multiple stakeholders on various hierarchical levels were carried out to create a more complete view of the system and resources deployed in health- and elderly care. The application of user-centered design methods and co-creation with employees have also been crucial to the outcomes of the study. Findings: Results show that health- and elderly care is a large-scale complex system. The overlapping and mutually reinforcing misalignments are: (1) regulation and policy differences, (2) stakeholder quantity and variation, (3) external control of health- and elderly care, (3) decreasing collaboration and (4) communication channels and IT development. Originality/value: This qualitative study builds on institutional theory and resource integration theory and contributes with empirical descriptions of misalignments in the health- and elderly care system. These descriptions will serve as points of departure for systems design to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of health- and elderly care.

  • 17.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lund, Katarina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Creative climate and continuous improvement: An empirical test of the dimensions in the CCQ2012In: Proceedings of the 13th International CINet conference, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Networks for Innovation - But What Networks and What Innovation?2012In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is a social and interactive process in which collaboration and exchange of knowledge and information play crucial roles. Two conflicting hypotheses have been raised in previous research: Burt's structural hole hypothesis and the density hypothesis. In brief, the former of these hypotheses builds upon arguments for open network structures in the acquisition of innovation; the latter one builds upon arguments for closed network structures for innovation. To shed some light on this state of confusion, this paper tests these two conflicting hypotheses on two separate measures of innovation in a service industry setting. One innovation measure is more incremental in nature and regards the implementation of employees' ideas. The other innovation measure is more radical in nature and regards new services. Findings suggest that social network measures are, indeed, powerful predictors of innovation and, further, that the impact of these are likely to be radically different depending upon the type and measure of innovation. Consequently, this paper recommends caution when studying the impact of social network measures upon innovation, and that more fine-grained measurements in particular are needed rather than focusing upon inter-relationships of an overly general and superficial nature.

  • 19.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Networks for innovation – but what networks and what innovation?2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Lindskog, Pernilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lean in healthcare: Engagement in development, job satisfaction or exhaustion?2016In: Journal of Hospital Administration, ISSN 1927-6990, E-ISSN 1927-7008, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 91-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conclusions about implementing the management concept lean in healthcare are contradictory and longitudinal studies are scarce. In particular, little is known of how working conditions contribute to the sustainability of lean in healthcare. The aim of this article is to identify to what extent lean tools (visual follow-up boards, standardised work, 5S [housekeeping], and value stream mapping [VSM]) promote working conditions for employees and managers in healthcare organisations (outcomes: engagement in development, job satisfaction and exhaustion), while considering the context (i.e., job resources and job demands) and aspects of the implementation process. A longitudinal quantitative study was conducted that involved employees and managers in two hospitals and one municipality (n = 448). Applying the job demands-resources model, multiple linear regression models were used. VSM, standardised work and 5S promoted employees and managers’ working conditions when supported by job resources. When no support was provided, visual follow-up boards were inhibiting employees and managers’ job satisfaction. VSM and standardised work were seen as central lean tools. In this sample, the application of lean cannot be considered sustainable as employees and managers’ working conditions deteriorated under the implementation of lean.

  • 21.
    Lindskog, Pernilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Lean Tools Promoting Individual Innovation in Healthcare2016In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean is a management concept that has been implemented in different sectors, including healthcare. In lean, employees continuously improve the work processes, which is closely associated with small step innovation. In moving away from the ambiguity surrounding lean in healthcare, this empirical study expands upon lean tools and innovation enabling job resources, as a contextual prerequisite, promoting healthcare employees’ individual innovation at work. Three public sector entities in Sweden participated in a longitudinal quantitative study (n=281). Idea generation and idea implementation, as individual innovation, were analysed using four-level multiple linear regression models. 5S and value stream mapping facilitated employee individual innovation. Hence, these lean tools are considered job resources for such innovation in the initial phase of implementing lean. After controlling for the lean context, job resources and job demands, visual follow-up boards and standardised work had no significant influence upon individual innovation, while development resources and information as participation promoted individual innovation. This study contributes to the understanding of how individual innovation is associated with lean tools and other innovation-related resources in healthcare. These results add to the knowledge of methods and resources promoting individual innovation when initiating a lean implementation.

  • 22.
    Magnusson, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Prioritisation of innovation project ideas - Differences between individual and group processes2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Management controls and ambidexterity2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Rosén, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Peters, Anne-Kathrin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Daniels, Mats
    Uppsala university.
    Danielson, Mats
    Stockholm university.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Håkansson, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Transformation-Driving Education: Perspectives Emerging in a Dialogue between Teachers with Experiences from Challenge-Driven Education2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Research Full Paper explores different implementations of and teachers’ experiences from challenge-driven education and similar learning approaches in engineering education and other higher education contexts. Through an action research approach key concerns among the teachers and similarities and differences between the studied courses can be identified. The study highlights the potential in these learning approaches, as means for breaking and going beyond the traditional boundaries of higher education, enhancing and cross-fertilizing engineering education with other disciplines, and empowering students both as professionals and humans. It also indicates potential barriers and in-built tensions that are crucial to handle for successful implementation. The study further shows on great opportunities for mutual learning and collaboration between teachers from diverse contexts and backgrounds. The findings are discussed in relation to research within domains such as sustainability education, transformative learning, and futures studies, and opportunities for further research and development are outlined.

  • 25.
    Rosén, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Peters, Anne-Kathrin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Daniels, Mats
    Uppsala university.
    Danielson, Mats
    Stockholm university.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Håkansson, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Transformation-Driving Education: Perspectives Emerging in a Dialogue between Teachers with Experiences from Challenge-Driven Education2022In: Proceedings: Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Research Full Paper explores different implementations of and teachers’ experiences from challenge-driven education and similar learning approaches in engineering education and other higher education contexts. Through an action research approach key concerns among the teachers and similarities and differences between the studied courses can be identified. The study highlights the potential in these learning approaches, as means for breaking and going beyond the traditional boundaries of higher education, enhancing and cross-fertilizing engineering education with other disciplines, and empowering students both as professionals and humans. It also indicates potential barriers and in-built tensions that are crucial to handle for successful implementation. The study further shows on great opportunities for mutual learning and collaboration between teachers from diverse contexts and backgrounds. The findings are discussed in relation to research within domains such as sustainability education, transformative learning, and futures studies, and opportunities for further research and development are outlined.

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