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  • 1.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Blackne, Johannes
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Jansson, Niklas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Tracking productivity patterns in an engineering design project2013In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED: Volume 8, 2013, Vol. 8 DS75-08, p. 125-134Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to analyze if self-evaluation of perceived productivity could help detect alarming patterns in time and stop projects from failing. The study is based on descriptive quantitative data that has been gathered continuously throughout a student engineering design project, highlighting three factors of influence; perceived productivity, perception of stage completion and work activity distribution. The productivity data was analyzed by detecting patterns in form of peaks or lows and combining the patterns with qualitative data from observations and documented work activities. Measurements were done on 33 occasions during the project where 280 individual answers for productivity (P) and completion (C) and 115 individual answers for work activity distribution were collected. The findings provide extraction of peak values and low values that enable tracking of critical incidents. Through an in-depth activity back-log each value was enriched with an understanding of what took place and its project consequences. Over time the recognized pattern helped the design team to become more proactive in activity precision and execution, resource allocation and process reflections.

  • 2.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lindh Karlsson, M.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Allowing Playfulness: Examining Innovativeness2010In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education EPDE10 / [ed] Boks W; Ion, W; McMahon, C and Parkinson B, 2010, p. 114-119Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A child’s playfulness and ability to fantasize are also key creative mechanisms in adulthood. Allowing low formal control functions and high self determination is valuable for intrinsic motivation, triggering new ideas, curiosity, experimentation and the desire to impact and change traditional practices – creating innovativeness. This paper sets out to do three things: provide a literature review of the different aspects and angles of knowledge- and competence learning, and the area of creative techniques and an innovative team process; offer experiences and learning from the unique case studies used; and thirdly, to present the concept of Innovopoly - a new tool to better achieve creative learning and examination in higher education through both the innovative working process and the creative process. These elements together give us the ability to discuss how higher education could best implement courses and methods in order to prepare our students for the future.

  • 3.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lindh Karlsson, M.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innopoly: Design Steps Towards Proficiency in Innovative Practices2011In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education E&PDE11 / [ed] Kovacevic, Ahmed, Ion, William, McMahon, Chris, Buck, Lyndon and Hogarth, Pete, 2011, p. 281-286Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a follow-up on last year’s design steps and case studies analysis to bundle innovation skills in an educational model. In our previous research we presented the ideas and construct foundations to a game plan ideology to build up common knowledge and examine innovativeness. In this, the next phase paper, our ambitions is to deepen students’ abilities for self-governed innovative practices within a team. We have used a series of workshops with engineering design students and design students to frame and concretize the ‘Innovopoly’ educational platform. But also to find a way of communicate a coveted and sustainable knowledge and to motivate the learning since it will affect the momentum of a self-driven learning process. The implementation efforts of specific interdisciplinary design elements aim to strengthen the acknowledgement of how to perform a common and open innovative process and a holistic perspective. In order to do that, Innopoly has a three-dimensional concept based on four process phases and four different layers that can be varied according to level, how the team solves the defined task but also from the effect of an unknown factor in the game. Firstly, Innopoly put emphasis on the team process and team requirements as individual and mutual accountability, commitment to a common purpose, shared leadership and autonomy. Secondly, the game integrates the divergence of the team with a creative process where different knowledge backgrounds and experiences can open up a broader set of perspectives and refinements of ideas for each individual. Thirdly, Innopoly put the focus on external factors like working environment and visual and concrete working techniques and methods that can affect teams' work process. Fourthly, the involvement with organisations and industry in the task definition and also the idea that industry people can work together with the students when they perform the game give a realistic and up to date knowledge to the students in the learning context. The iterative process provides a greater understanding and anchoring knowledge through reflection and students' common discussion. The education model, ‘Innopoly’, builds on student-oriented learning, derived in design situations and situated practices. The ambitions to examine innovative practices are redeemed in incorporation of skills applied to manifest an autonomy level of performance and integrity. ‘Innopoly’ carries the outline logics from the innovation process – identification, research, ideation, concept, prototyping, testing and commercialization similar to the value increase as can be back traced to the original game form. The knowledge construction is supported in their performance, behaviour, thinking and reflections during all four phases. The educational prototype ‘Innopoly’ comprises of an inclination model inspired from Bloom’s taxonomy where ambitions is to prepare our students for future challenges.

  • 4.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Prototyping: The collaborative mediator2012In: Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education for Future Wellbeing, EPDE 2012, 2012, p. 648-653Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the potential to deliver 'future wellbeing products', learning mechanisms behind the establishment of such efforts is vital. In this scenario, early efforts are manifested in prototypes that concern ergonomic and innovative product features. Prototypes are made, presented and interpreted differently by people according to their understanding and frame of reference. Newness could interchangeably be used for prototyping as it unlocks cognitive mechanisms where embedded modes, e.g. visualization and communication, enable iterative learning loop in-between peers. The freedom of its use, which depends on contextual relevance and appropriate levels, is therefore important to be aware of. Looking at an ideal, prototypes should be equally strong knowledge disseminators in education as they acted upon in industry, but are they, and how could we expand our perspective on prototyping as a mechanism for creation? This paper investigates how prototyping allows new knowledge to emerge in its implicit role as collaborative mediator. The paper conceptualizes views on prototyping based on student's perceived learning experiences and lecturer experiences from engineering design projects. In contrast to past prototyping research, this paper establishes a link between knowledge embedded perspectives relevant for prototyping and its consequences for learning.

  • 5.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Towards individual innovation capability: The assessment of idea generating methods and creativity in a capstone design course2010In: Proceedings of the ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference 2009, NEW YORK: AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2010, p. 459-466Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation is per se based not only on the individual problem solving, but the process from new ideas to commercialization of new products. However, in a time with rapid technology shifts and frequently altered customer requirements, creativity and more precisely the lack of useful new ideas surfacing is viewed as problematic by companies. Ways of involving creativity has been to apply idea generating (IG) methods for identification of creativity sources. This paper consists of a combined theoretical and empirical approach which aims at studying existing tests and proposing suitable creative methods to be used in higher engineering education. The authors work with an extensive capstone design course in Integrated Product Development that emphasizes systematic and parallel approaches to product development. In contrast to traditional modes and styles of teaching that make few attempts to encourage students to pursue a variety of IG methods the capstone design course in integrated product development puts a large part of the responsibility on the students. In all cases IG and use of creativity methods is a natural ingredient. Thus, students' self-regulation and insights into how to work with methods and exercises is particularly interesting as this may have an affect on managing their creative skill. Overall possible improvements in students' creative potential transcend interesting notions on capability to innovate. Thus, this paper's purpose is to investigate whether creativity as an ingredient of a student's innovation capability is influenced by using IG methods. And whether the selections made by project groups are aligned to best utilize students' creative thinking.

  • 6.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Bernhard, J.
    Reforming engineering education - A feasibility analysis of models for innovation2014In: SEFI Annual Conference 2014, European Society for Engineering Education (SEFI) , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7. Beskow, C.
    et al.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Performing changes in product development: A framework with keys for industrial application2000In: Research in Engineering Design, ISSN 0934-9839, E-ISSN 1435-6066, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 172-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial product development requires continuous improvements in work procedures as a result of constantly changing demands. Support tools have proven to be an oft chosen way to meet new demands; however. few research efforts have been made in how to implement new tools. This article is a contribution to knowledge on carrying out the implementation of support tools. The basis consists of four field studies performed during 1994-1999, containing 78 qualitative research interviews and focusing on the implementation and use of different support tools. A re-analysis has been performed of selected interviews from the field studies. in total 30 interviews. This resulted in recommendations for an implementation framework, consisting of an Implementation Cycle, Organizational Change Field and Managerial Consistence, and five implementation keys: Goal setting, Kowledge Development, Anchoring at All Levels, Suitable Resources and Focus on the Individual.

  • 8.
    Beskow, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Performing Changes in Product Development: an Implementation Framework with Keys2000In: Journal of engineering design (Print), ISSN 0954-4828, E-ISSN 1466-1837, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 172-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial product development requires continuous improvements in work procedures as a result of constantly changing demands. Support tools have proven to be an oft chosen way to meet new demands; however, few research efforts have been made in how to implement new tools. This article is a contribution to knowledge on carrying out the implementation of support tools. The basis consists of four field studies performed during 1994–1999, containing 78 qualitative research interviews and focusing on the implementation and use of different support tools. A re-analysis has been performed of selected interviews from the field studies, in total 30 interviews. This resulted in recommendations for an implementation framework, consisting of an Implementation Cycle, Organizational Change Field and Managerial Consistence, and five implementation keys: Goal setting, Kowledge Development, Anchoring at All Levels, Suitable Resources and Focus on the Individual.

  • 9.
    Buck, L. S.
    et al.
    KTH.
    Nilsson, S.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Improving exploration capability by interacting with start-ups2017In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Design Society , 2017, no DS87-2, p. 417-426Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and analyses an exploration-capability model that is currently being introduced in an automotive OEM. An increasingly high environmental dynamism as well as a new level of competition in the automotive industry call for an improved capability to explore and realise more radical innovations to complement the established OEMs exploitation skills and present focus on incremental innovation. The model that is target for the study offers the employees in the OEM five different forms of interactions with start-ups as a way to develop the capability to explore. The different forms of interaction are found to make use of different modes of balancing ambidexterity and to introduce different means to improve and establish individual, entrepreneurial skills, as well as influence the innovation culture of the OEM. The paper lays the foundation for future research by describing how and why an OEM is designing a new model to develop its exploration capability through interacting with start-ups by analysing the model in relation to theory, and presenting propositions that will act as a baseline for further studies.

  • 10. Bäckmar, J
    et al.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Norell, Margareta
    Environmentally Friendly Product Development: Activities in Industrial Companies1998In: IEEE EMS International Engineering Management Conference, May 3-5, 1998, San Juan, Puerto Rico, 1998, p. 502-507Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11. Bäckmar, J
    et al.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Norell, Margareta
    Implementation of Environmental Management Systems in Swedish Industry1999In: Proceedings from 1st International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing: EcoDesign 99, February 1-3, Tokyo, Japan, 1999, p. 539-544Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12. Eneström, P.
    et al.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Arbetssätt och miljöhänsyn i produktutveckling: en intervjustudie i små och medelstora företag2000Report (Other academic)
  • 13. Eneström, P.
    et al.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Environmental adaptation of products in small and medium-sized enterprises2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14. Eneström, P
    et al.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Co-Operation Between Supplier: Buyer in Integrated Product Development1999In: Proceedings of 12th International Conference on Engineering Design, Munich, 1999, 1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15. Eneström, P
    et al.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Co-operation between Supplier-Buyer in Integrated Product Development : A Pilot Study1997In: International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Tampere, Finland, 1997, 1997Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16. Eneström, P.
    et al.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The need for supplier expertise in product development2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Grimheden, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Andersson, Sören
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Coaching Students into the Concept of Design Engineering2005In: Proceedings of the International conference on engineering design, ICED 05, Melbourne, Australia, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Gutiérres, Ernesto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Project Portfolio Management: research for improving practice2009Report (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Gutiérrez, Ernesto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Designing work procedures for project portfolio management2008In: PROCEEDINGS OF NORDDESIGN 2008 / [ed] Roosimolder, L., TALLINN UNIV TECH , 2008, p. 285-294Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Project Portfolio Management (PPM) is about how companies evaluate, select and prioritize ideas and projects for developing new products. This is aimed to align development investments with company's strategic goals and to reduce the risk caused by uncertainty. Research regarding the procedural aspects of PPM is still considered not enough developed. It is needed a better theoretical ground about which organizational processes should be included in PPM, how they influence each other, and how a work procedure should be designed for suiting a specific company. This paper focuses on understanding the characteristics of processes and activities within PPM. It is grounded on an empirical study in three companies based on qualitative research inter-views. It was found that that processes within PPM have five main characteristics: reciprocal influence, parallel running, network of actors, multiple decision levels and decision-realization gap. It is also discussed the implications of these findings for the design of work procedures for PPM.

  • 20.
    Gutiérrez, Ernesto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innovation and decision making: understanding selection and prioritization of development projects2008In: 2008 IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MANAGEMENT OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY, VOLS 1-3, IEEE , 2008, p. 333-338Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the problems decision makers experience when selecting and prioritizing new ideas and development projects. It is based on an explorative study, with interviews carried out in three companies that have new product development as a core competitive factor.

    The findings indicate that to deal with all the situations and problems that may arise in the innovation process, various approaches for making decisions and understanding innovation are needed. However, regardless of the appropriateness of these approaches for given circumstances, they receive different levels of acceptance at an organizational plane. This puts decision makers in the conflictive situation of sometimes having to use approaches to work that are appropriate but not accepted, and other times accepted but inappropriate. Furthermore, an organization's potential to create new products, and consequently its future competitiveness, depends on how its members deal with the organizational acceptance of the approaches used.

    We discuss the implications of these findings for designing work procedures for selecting and prioritizing ideas and projects.

  • 21.
    Hagman, J.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Stier, J. J.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    New vehicle buyers that are Battery Electric Vehicle Compatible (BEV-C)2016In: EVS 2016 - 29th International Electric Vehicle Symposium, Electric Vehicle Symposium and Exhibition , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aim to identify and investigate a group of potential adopters that are compatible with Battery Electric Vehicles (BEV) in terms of range and charging, a group labeled as BEV Compatible (BEV-C). The results reveal that the BEV-C group constitutes 14 % of new vehicle buyers and that their intention to adopt BEVs are stronger compared to the non BEV-C group. The BEV-C group can be characterized as individuals that are less likely to conduct occasional longer drives (over 150 km), perceive BEVs more positively, have higher environmental awareness and have been exposed to more BEV information compared to the non BEV-C group.

  • 22.
    Hagman, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Total Cost of Ownership paradox and its implications for Electric Vehicle diffusion2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Hagman, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Total cost of ownership and its potential implications for battery electric vehicle diffusion2016In: Research in Transportation Business and Management (RTBM), ISSN 2210-5395, E-ISSN 2210-5409, Vol. 18, p. 11-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) have been slow to diffuse on the international as well as the Swedish market. Previous studies have indicated situational factors such as economic factors, size and performance to be of major importance for vehicle purchasers in their choice of vehicle. In this paper, the authors explore a consumer centric total cost of ownership (TCO) model to investigate the possible discrepancy between purchase price and the TCO between internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs), hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and BEVs. The creation and testing of the TCO model reveals that computation could be a challenging task for consumers due to bounded access of relevant data and the prediction of future conditions. The application of the model to the vehicle sample found that BEVs could be cheaper compared to ICEVs and HEVs. The findings in this paper could prove to be of importance for policy and marketing alike in designing the most appropriate business models and information campaigns based on consumer conditions in order to further promoting the diffusion of BEVs in society.

  • 24.
    Hagman, Jens
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Stier, Jenny J.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Total cost of ownership and its potential implications for electric vehicle diffusion2014In: Proceedings of NordDesign 2014 Conference, NordDesign 2014, Aalto University , 2014, p. 366-375Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Battery Electric Vehicles have been slow to diffuse on the international as well as the Swedish market. Existing literature have pointed to situational factors such as economical factors, size and performance to be of high importance for car purchasers in their choice of car. In this paper the authors investigates the apparent discrepancy between purchase price and the Total Cost of Ownership between Internal Combustion Engine Vehicles and Battery Electric Vehicles. The Total Cost of Ownership computation reveals that Battery Electric Vehicles can be cost competitive with Internal Combustion Engine Vehicles, a significant finding that could prove to be of importance for the diffusion of Battery Electric Vehicles, although further studies are needed to test car purchasers' knowledge regarding the Total Cost of Ownership analysis.

  • 25.
    Hagman, Lars Arne
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Teaching in Integrated Product Development: experiences from project based learning2001In: The International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED 01, aug 2001, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Hagman, Lars Arne
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Integration of Environmental Assessments Functions in Design and Product Development Tools2004In: Computer-Aided Design and Applications, ISSN 1686-4360, Vol. 1, no 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Hagman, Lars Arne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Johansson, J.
    The use and implementation of CAD in the Swedish furniture industry2006In:  Forest Products Society 58th Annual Meeting, Bangkok, Thailand, 2004, 2006, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 73-81Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the results of and conclusions drawn from a questionnaire survey concerning the use and implementation of computer-aided design (CAD) in the Swedish furniture industry. The main question areas were how far the Swedish furniture industry has progressed in the use of CAD in product development, and how implementation has been performed. It was regarded as important to find out what impacts implementation has on the usage of CAD and whether companies in the furniture industry think the use of CAD could improve their product development. More than half of all product-developing companies in the Swedish furniture industry are using CAD today, and an increasing number of companies are implementing it. The furniture industry has come rather far in the use of CAD, but it could be better at implementing the systems in a proper manner. This could be related to companies often not planning their implementation; accordingly, they do not examine issues like organizational needs and goals, what the tool might be used for, and the resources required. The study found that the following factors are involved in successful implementation: management support, realistic budgeting, selection of system, and effective, company-specific training. Most CAD users are satisfied with their system and think that it fulfills their needs. Many of the difficulties referred to by respondents can be related to the implementation phase, and they could be avoided. In general, the furniture industry considers that CAD improves their product development work.

  • 28. Hagström, L.
    et al.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Integration of environmental assessment functions in design and product development tools2004In: Computer-Aided Design and Applications, ISSN 1686-4360, Vol. 1, no 1-4, p. 33-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a computer-based environmental tool that will make it possible for product designers to integrate environmental assessments into their work. The environmental tool described in this paper is a concept for integrated environmental assessment functions in design and product development tools. The concept presents a way of reducing modelling time by making simplified assessments. The concept, and finally the environmental tool, is based upon companies' demands and wishes regarding how a tool for making environmental assessments during the product development process might be useful for them. The intended user is the company product designer.

  • 29.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Challenges in Concept Decisions in Complex Product Development2008In: Proceedings of 15th International Product Development Management Conference, IPDMC, EIASM, June 29 - July 1, Hamburg, Germany, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    DEPENDENCIES IN CONCEPT DECISIONS IN COMPLEX PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT2008In: 10TH INTERNATIONAL DESIGN CONFERENCE - DESIGN 2008 / [ed] Marjanovic D; Storga M; Pavkovic N; Bojcetic N, 2008, no 48, p. 1159-1166Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents results from a retrospective case study in the automotive industry with the purpose to identify dependencies in product concept decisions taking into consideration social aspects, decision structures and technology. Interviews and document reviews, such as gate reports and design reviews, formed the empirical base. The company in question has a documented and mandatory product development process with defined instructions, process maps and a basic chain of command. In spite of the operational support, the company still suffers from a certain amount of rework based on incorrect concept decisions. Results from the empirical study show how both formal and informal factors did affect the concept decision in the studied case.

  • 31.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Navigating in uncertainty: identifying dependence factors in concept decision makingIn: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lund, Katarina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Planning Industrial PhD projects in practice: Speaking both 'Academia' and 'Practitionese'2011In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED11): Design Education / [ed] Culley, S.J.; Hicks, B.J.; McAloone, T.C.; Howard, T.J. & Ion, B., Copenhagen, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discuss the planning and organising of research conducted by Industrial PhD students, i.e. PhD students conducting research studies aiming for a PhD while employed in industrial companies. Industrial PhD projects within engineering design research in Sweden can be considered a phenomenon, i.e. existing but sparsely documented. This paper provides empirical illustrations by presenting three Industrial PhD projects conducted in three companies with product developing operations in Sweden. The specific research design of Industrial PhD projects provides benefits such as an effective bridging between academia and industry. Additionally, this type of research projects face challenges, such as having two-folded aims of the project: both academic and industrial goals. Based on experiences from these projects, implications for planning and organising of future Industrial PhD projects are discussed. Finally, we suggest that Industrial PhD projects are effective means, if used properly, for assimilation of research findings to industry, and for academia to understand the industrial practice.

  • 33.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Compatibility before completeness - Identifying intrinsic conflicts in concept decision making for technical systems2012In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 79-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the practice of concept decision-making, i.e. making decisions on technical solutions in early product development stages. An empirical study was conducted in a Swedish automotive company, using a qualitative approach. The study reveals that a major challenge in concept decision-making is to achieve compatibility between systems in the product before the system solutions are completely developed. Managers and product developers need to know that conceptual solutions are good enough to progress into detailed development without performing detailed analysis. In the concept-decision process a number of intrinsic conflicts that these actors have to address are identified: understanding of the overall development process as iterative or stepwise; developing satisfying or optimized solutions; using defined or interpreted criteria when comparing solutions; and composing a complete car from different systems solutions, prioritizing project targets or long-term system targets. Consequences of these intrinsic conflicts, omnipresent in the process, are characterized and discussed. The authors suggest a number of means to address these intrinsic conflicts, such as enhancing actors' awareness of psychological biases. The authors also suggest to have clear and well-communicated visions regarding both product and development process, in order to guide individuals' daily judgments and trade-offs that have to be made.

  • 34.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Concept Decisions – a Web of Interconnected Actions2009In: Proceeding of 16th International Product Development Management Conference, IPDMC, EIASM, 7-9 juni, Twente, Holland, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Deficiencies in Management of the Concept Development Process: Theory and Practice2009In: Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED'09, Design Society / [ed] Norell Bergendahl, M.; Grimheden, M.; Leifer, L.; Skogstad, P.; Lindemann, U., 2009, p. 267-278Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concept development is a key success factor in product development and in theory concept development means that a number of concept solutions are generated and evaluated in an objective way using a systematic evaluation method. This paper presents identified deficiencies in both theoretical models and industrial product development. The aim is to supplement previous research, by increasing the understanding of how concept decisions are managed in product development in practice, in order to suggest proposals for improvement of management procedures. Empirical studies have been performed in two large product developing companies that act on the global market. The results imply that actors in the concept development, instead of evaluating different alternatives (as recommended in theory), rather are struggling with developing a solution that will fulfill the specifications. Decisions concerning concepts are found to be embedded in a complex weave of actors and activities that characterizes concept development. It is concluded that changes are required in theory as well as in working procedures in practice in order to actually support the actors in product development.

  • 36.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Improving the concept decision-making process: a study of an automotive company2011In: 12th International CINet Conference, Aarhus, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Kihlander, Ingrid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Leda och organisera för innovation2014Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Malvius, Diana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Redell, Ola
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Introducing structured information handling in automotive EE development2006In: Proceedings of the 16th INCOSE International Symposium, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One way for the automotive industry to cope with the demand of a more structured information handling is to adjust model-based development (MBD) to multidisciplinary needs. Many of the issues faced in this transition are as much organizational and managerial as they are technical. In a case study carried out at a global automotive manufacturer a project to improve the electrical and electronics (EE) development has been followed and analyzed. The project originated from different needs identified by management in their ongoing work effort towards MBD as well as by developers who experienced that tools did not support their work situation. This paper describes how the introduction of a new tool support was made in a project carried out within EE development, further it reports on benefits achieved by using the tool. Both the effect on the work of affected EE developers and the expansion of a new information model are discussed, leaving important implications for management. Success keys for putting new support tools into practice are identified here and include; a bottom-up approach, user involvement from the beginning, focus on the individual needs and adaptation to current work practice. Further, management support and adequate resources are essential for extracting long-term benefits.

  • 39.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Management controls and ambidexterity2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Creating organizational routines to foster innovation2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring the Use of Innovation Performance Measurement to Build Innovation Capability in a Medical Device Company2014In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 183-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to increase their innovation capability, many organizations make the effort to actively change their R&D working practices. In parallel, measurement is an important issue with regard to managing innovation. In this paper, innovation management and measurement theory are combined with empirical investigations of experiences of using measurement as a support to the development of innovation capability in practice. The paper reports results from analysis of measurement data and a semi-structured interview study, encompassing 19 interviews with managers and engineers involved in the current change activities of the case company. The study reveals that various innovation measurement mechanisms are used in different departments in the R&D organization, reflecting the diverse views of what constitutes innovation that dominate in each group, as well as the group's level of involvement in the on-going building of innovation capability - from heavily involved (innovation leaders) to attentiveness from a distance (innovation laggards and progress evaluators). This, together with challenges related to identifying relevant metrics to support both incremental and radical innovation and managing existing reward and goal-setting systems, is seen to have implications on the capability development in the organization requiring attention to how innovation measurement is designed, implemented and used in practice.

  • 42.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Manage To Measure And Measure To Manage: Experiences From Using Performance Measurement In The Early Phases Of Product Innovation2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Selecting and developing organizational routines to support innovationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Creating conditions conducive to innovation requires companies to consider a broad range of aspects and not the least identifying and implementing new processes and routines. The purpose of this paper is to address what innovation routines are selected and developed in a company with the ambition to involve a broad base of its employees in innovation. It investigates the similarities and differences of organizational routines selected in four different units in a large global R&D organization and analyses reasons to and consequences of these differences. The study shows that how innovation is regarded in an organization will play an important role, that addressing innovation as a process is critical and that the conflicts emerging when people strive to create new routines that largely deviate from normal operations can become a valuable source for innovation capabilities. By combining innovation management research with recent organizational routines literature this paper is able to identify some interesting patterns both when it comes to how innovation routines are selected and developed and when it comes to what routine characteristics can be more or less effectively combined to support innovation. The study aims to contribute to the emerging literature exploring intra-organizational evolution of ideas and routines.

  • 44.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh-Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus P.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innovating every day: making innovation everyone´s businessManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the efforts of a large company when assigning everyone in the organization to work with innovation, and its implication on managing radical and incremental innovation. The analysis rests on an interview investigation within a global high-technology company with 31 managers in different contexts. These managers have been identified as top performers on innovation in an employee survey conducted in the organization. The study illustrates how a large mature organization has involved a broad base of its employees in innovation, emphasizing that innovation is a daily effort and the actions performed in different parts of the organization. The results reveal that it is feasible to both empower people in the organization by having a bottom-up approach supporting daily incremental innovation and combine this with more systematic approaches for managing and enabling radical innovation.

  • 45.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Wallin, Johanna
    Benaim, Andre
    Annosi, Maria Carmela
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Berntsson, Richard
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Re-thinking Innovation Measurement to Manage Innovation-Related Dichotomies in Practice2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Inducing radical innovation or innovation management as usual2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    KTH Integrated Product Development, Machine Design2006In: Design Process Improvement: a Review of Current Practice / [ed] Clarkson, J.; Eckert, C, London: Springer Verlag , 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Strategies for mutual learning between academia and industry2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of challenges facing companies in their development activities is numerous, some coming from new markets and technologies, and some more abstract, like conflicts between short term efficiency and long term innovativeness. Improving collaboration between industry and academia is considered critical—the aim of this paper is to contribute to the discussion on long term learning collaboration between academia and industry, being a core competence area in itself. Another purpose is to form a platform for experience sharing, and increased integration capability for sustaining common knowledge—and practice development. The paper includes an analysis of several collaboration programs between academia and industry conducted in Sweden, resulting in conclusions and advises concerning what to consider for collaborative work.

  • 49.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Adamsson, Niklas
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Sundström, Per
    Uppvall, Lars
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Interne und externe Kooperation in der Produktentwicklung: Praxiserfahrungen2005In: Handbuch Produktentwicklung / [ed] Schäppi, B.; Andreasen, M.M.; Kirchgeorg, M.; Radermacher, F.-J, Hanser , 2005, p. 341-354Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Forslin, J
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Kaulio, Matti
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Engineering Management : ledning för innovation och lärande i tekniska utvecklingsprocesser2002Report (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 89
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