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  • 1.
    Assbring, Linda
    et al.
    KTH.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    What’s in it for industry? A case study on collaborative doctoral education in Sweden2017In: Industry & higher education, ISSN 0950-4222, E-ISSN 2043-6858, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 184-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The knowledge economy and the changing nature of knowledge production, the increased interaction between public agencies, industry and universities, and the changing labour market for doctoral degree holders are forces that together have led to an increased interest in the organization of doctoral education – particularly the role of collaborative doctoral education. Models like the Triple Helix have become important frameworks for conceptually capturing the interactions and dynamics of industry, government and university collaborations at various levels. Yet, empirical research on the motivations of and outcomes for the industrial partners in collaborative PhD education remains scanty. Through a case study conducted in Sweden, this article discusses the perceived industrial benefits of participating in collaborative doctoral education. The analysis shows that the outcomes of industrial participation are highly connected to the organization of the collaboration, and the authors identify four important criteria that are key to ensuring industrial relevance. The article also highlights significant policy implications for encouraging and supporting collaborative doctoral training, as the authors conclude that it is a powerful tool in addressing skills gaps in industry.

  • 2.
    Brulin, Göran
    et al.
    KTH. Business Networking Learning: Håkan Håkansson and Jan Johansson.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics. Business Networking Learning: Håkan Håkansson and Jan Johansson.
    Business Networking Learning: Håkan Håkansson and Jan Johansson (Eds.); Pergamon Press, Netherlands, 2001, 250pp2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 512-513Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Ekstedt, Eskil
    et al.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Call centre cluster- a knowledge paradox2004In: 15th RIDWL congress held in Durban South Africa, February 2001, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Gustafsson, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Policy Induced Regional Interactions in Enhancing Global Industrial Competitiveness2011In: Economic Geography of Globalization / [ed] Piotr Pachura, INTECH , 2011, p. 83-98Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Gustavsson, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Aligning Triple Helix Framework with Regional Innovation Systems: insights and challenges from Swedish policy practice2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Gustavsson, Linda
    et al.
    The Knowledge Foundation, Sweden.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    What does industry gain from collaborative doctoral education?2016In: EDULEARN16 proceedings: 8th international conference on education and new learning technologies, 2016, p. 4344-4352Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through an exploratory case study, this paper identifies the benefits that industry can draw from participating in collaborative doctoral education. The results show that regional industry-university collaborations a) generate valuable commercialisable knowledge and b) are an important source of human capital for regional industry.

  • 7.
    Gustavsson, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics.
    Between the regional and the global: regional innovation systems policy and industrial knowledge formation2012In: Innovation Governance in an open Economy: Shaping Regional Nodes in a Globalized world / [ed] Rickne, A, Laestadius, S and Etzkowitz, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Gustavsson, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Knowledge Foundation, Sweden.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Söderlind, Johan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    An impact analysis of regional industry–university interactions:the case of industrial PhD schools2016In: Industry and Higher Education, ISSN 0950-4222, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 41-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors discuss Triple Helix collaborations in the context of regional competitiveness. Through an exploratory case study, they identify and analyse the impact of the establishment of industrial PhD schools for participating industry and universities. The study was conducted in Sweden in 2014 and focuses on three industry–university initiatives involving a total of 57 doctoral students, 9 universities and 39 companies. The results indicate that PhD schools based on the dynamics of the Triple Helix can be of great benefit for both industry and regional universities. In addition, the paper identifies critical success factors for industry–university collaborations involving joint PhD education.

  • 9.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics.
    Take to the City? Where?2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Hetemi, Ermal
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). UPM Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Mere, J. O.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Exploring mechanisms underlying lock-in in large infrastructure projects: A management perspective2017In: CENTERIS 2017 - International Conference on ENTERprise Information Systems / ProjMAN 2017 - International Conference on Project MANagement / HCist 2017 - International Conference on Health and Social Care Information Systems and Technologies, CENTERIS/ProjMAN/HCist 2017, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 121, p. 681-691Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research in large scale infrastructure projects have argued that the overall project performance is subject to lock-in, yet this is little understood empirically and more research is needed. Recently studies reported that lock-in can occur both at the decision-making level and at the project execution level respectively. The underlying patterns influencing project scope transformation, due to evolving expectations and/or stakeholder's perspective and the occurrence of lock-in influence in project performance. This paper explores the relationship between project scope and lock-in within large infrastructure projects in the context of cost over-run. Based on empirical data from 20 High Speed Rail (HSR) projects in Spain with multinational sets of actors, and anchored in the Management of Project (MoP) paradigm, the paper shows that a holistic perspective is essential for successful outcome. Methodologically, the paper uses data mining and a case study approach to explore mechanisms that underlie lock-in in relation with scope demarcation - tracked through contract change. It suggests that an investigation of lock-in in relationship to scope demarcation and through the lens of path dependence contributes to the understanding of cost over-run emergence. Preliminary findings highlight contract type and its content to have a great influence in cost over-run.

  • 11.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Diffusion of eco-innovations: A review2014In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 33, no May, p. 392-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Literature in the field of eco-innovations often focuses on policy, regulations, technology, market and firm specific factors rather than diffusion. However, understanding of diffusion of eco-innovations recently has gained more importance given the fact that some eco-innovations are already at a mature stage. This paper aims to clarify the concept of diffusion of eco-innovation and provide a current overview of this emerging literature. Within this review framework, we identify the most cited relevant publications and corresponding research streams. We also describe the strengths and limitations of these research streams in the concept of diffusion of eco-innovations. The results summarize insights from different research streams in different disciplines and outline an entry point for researchers new to the emerging field of diffusion of eco-innovations.

  • 12.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Diffusion of eco-innovations: Exploring the literature2013In: IAMOT2013 Proceedings, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the importance of the management of eco-innovations has been growing, more in practice than in academia. However, although in the literature there are already some evidences focussed on management of eco-innovations, there is no comprehensive review on the knowledge base of diffusion of eco-innovations. This paper provides a current overview of the existing body of literature, identifying the most active scholars and relevant publications in this field, and deepening in the major disciplines and research streams. Results show that the theory of diffusion of innovations which provided the philosophical underpinnings of how innovations are diffused is not the main knowledge base to explain the diffusion of eco-innovations. Lead market hypothesis, sustainable transitions and the ecological modernization appear as the initial base of the cognitive platform that can contribute to the understanding of diffusion of eco-innovations.

  • 13.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Motivators for adoption of photovoltaic systems at grid parity: A case study from Southern Germany2015In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 43, p. 1090-1098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In some countries, photovoltaic (PV) technology is at a stage of development at which it can compete with conventional electricity sources in terms of electricity generation costs, i.e., grid parity. A case in point is Germany, where the PV market has reached a mature stage, the policy support has scaled down and the diffusion rate of PV systems has declined. This development raises a fundamental question: what are the motives to adopt PV systems at grid parity? The point of departure for the relevant literature has been on the impact of policy support, adopters and, recently, local solar companies. However, less attention has been paid to the motivators for adoption at grid parity. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of the diffusion of PV systems, explaining the impact of policy measures, adopters and system suppliers. Anchored in an extensive and exploratory case study in Germany, we provide a context-specific explanation to the motivations to adopt PV systems at grid parity.

  • 14.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Social sciences and the mining sector: some insights into recent research trends2018In: Resources policy, ISSN 0301-4207, E-ISSN 1873-7641, Vol. 58, no October 2018, p. 257-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of science publications is growing exponentially, thus increasing the need for understanding the knowledge base of various research streams and their emerging branches. From a social science perspective, the literature on the mining sector – the industrial sector that extracts ores and minerals from the ground – has also witnessed steady growth. However, this literature is rather fragmented in regards to the thematic topics and the geographical focus. To respond to this, this paper offers a systematic literature review of the social science research on the mining sector. The publication database of this review includes a set of 483 systemically selected papers from 976 authors, covering empirical research conducted in 73 countries from 5 continents: Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia and America. Our contribution is twofold. Firstly, we provide an analysis of the geography of the research in terms of both authorship and empirical focus. In terms of the geographical coverage of the empirical cases, Australia appears as the most studied country in the field, followed by countries in other regions such as Asia (China, India, Russia and Turkey), Africa (Ghana, South Africa and the Democratic Republic of the Congo), North America (the USA and Canada), Latin America (Brazil and Chile) and Europe (Poland, Spain and Sweden). However, this dispersion is not reflected in the geographical coverage of the affiliations of the authors. Secondly, we identify the most popular social science research topics on the mining sector. Our results show that the social science research on the mining sector shifted from the traditional research streams (e.g., industrialisation and growth, colonialization, technological and economic development, and the resource curse) to the new streams of research on social, environmental and economical sustainability (e.g., the social license to operate, corporate social responsibility, criticality of the rare earth elements, material flow analysis and environmental impacts). Overall, our study serves as an entry point for researches who are interested in social science research on the mining sector.

  • 15.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Assbring, Linda
    KK-stiftelsen, Sweden.
    Potential transitions in the iron and steel industry in Sweden: Towards a hydrogen-based future?2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 195, p. 651-663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The iron and steel industry accounts for one third of global industrial CO2emissions, putting pressure on the industry to shift towards more sustainable modes of production. However, for an industry characterised by path dependency and technological lock-ins, sustainability transitions are not straightforward. In this study, we aim to explore the potential pathways for sustainability transitions in the iron and steel industry. To do so, we have conducted a case study in Sweden where there are policy and industry commitments towards fossil-free steel production. Our theoretical points of departure are the technological innovation system (TIS) approach and the multi-level perspective (MLP), and our paper presents the dynamics behind an emerging case of transition towards a hydrogen-based future. The paper has two major contributions to the literature on sustainability transitions. First, it attempts to borrow some concepts from the MLP and integrate them with the TIS approach. Second, it empirically presents an in-depth case study of the iron and steel industry – an understudied context in the field of sustainability transitions. By doing so, it sheds some light on the dynamics between an emerging TIS and potential transition pathways of a regime.

  • 16.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Barbara, Breitschopf
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Lead markets at sub-national levelManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on lead markets has long argued that the global diffusion of innovations is often driven by country-specific attributes of a lead country. However, less attention has been paid to the sub-national level. Can region-specific attributes of a lead region drive the national diffusion? The paper takes the lead market model and applies it in a sub-national context.  Based on spatiotemporal data and an extensive case study on diffusion of solar photovoltaic systems in Germany, this paper identifies the presence of both lead and lag markets at the sub-national level. Our findings indicate that the lead market model of the international diffusion of innovations is also applicable in a national context. 

  • 17.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics. Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Breitschopf, B
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Spatial Dimension of Lead Markets: Evidences from Diffusion of Photovoltaic Systems in Germany2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diffusion of innovations is a spatial process. Spatial conditions and demand preferences may inducecreation of spatial lead markets before national and international adoptions take place. This paper aimsto extend the Lead Markets concept in a spatial dimension, considering local differences. We firstlydiscuss theoretical underpinnings of the spatial dimension of Lead Markets concept and then apply theconcept to the case of photovoltaic systems’ diffusion in Germany. Based on spatial data and anextensive case study, we show how an innovation is deployed in local areas of a country before beingadopted nationwide. We also apply the system of lead market attributes (demand, price, export,transfer and market structure advantages) to the case and discuss how a local lead market could takeoff in a particular region of a country. Our findings have significant implications not only in theory butalso for practice, providing recommendations for policy makers who seek to enhance the level ofdiffusion for particular innovations.

  • 18.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Business Model Challenge: Learnings from a Local Solar Company in Germany2014In: Ist European Doctorate in Industrial Management conference, 2014, p. 23-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics. Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Business model challenge: Lessons from a local solar company2016In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 85, p. 1026-1035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solar photovoltaic systems are considered vital renewable energy sources for mitigating climate change and reducing dependency on fossil fuels. However, in some countries, the diffusion rate of photovoltaic systems is decreasing. A case in point is Germany, the country with the highest installed capacity of photovoltaic systems. Given the new conditions in the German market, the diffusion rate continuously declined in both 2012 and 2013. Whether the diffusion rate will again take off is not known. While the recent literature has pointed out that local solar companies have a vital driving role in diffusion, not many studies have yet discussed the business models and challenges such local companies may have. Through an extensive case study, this paper explores the business model of a local solar company in a town of 43,000 habitants in Southern Germany. The case of this company tells about an important business model challenge. Overcoming such challenges may not only let the company survive but also drive the diffusion of solar photovoltaic systems in the region. The results include implications for both industrial actors and policymakers.

  • 20.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Modelling the Diffusion of Photovoltaic: Concepts and Applications2013In: IAMOT2013 Proceedings, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Korhonen, Jouni
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Feldmann, Andreas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Birkie, Seyoum Eshetu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Circular economy as an essentially contested concept2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 175, p. 544-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Circular Economy (CE) is currently a popular notion within the policy and business advocacy groups. Despite being visionary and provocative in its message, the research on the CE concept is emerging. The two intertwined objectives of the paper are; first to identify, discuss and develop the various definitions provided by the emerging literature. Secondly, to suggest an initial research approach with which research on CE can be conducted. Our analysis shows that the existing CE work is mainly done on the practical and technical levels of the actual physical flows of materials and energy in production-consumption systems. The focus of the extant literature is on concrete metrics, tools, instruments and computations. Therefore, the basic assumptions concerning the values, societal structures, cultures, underlying world-views and the paradigmatic potential of CE remain largely unexplored. We argue that CE has already become what Gallie (1955) more than six decades ago termed as an “essentially contested concept” (ECC). The paper further suggests a model for CE research that helps in the categorization, classification and organization of research and investigation on CE. The model can help in limiting the observed unbalance and enhance the contribution of the CE approach to a more sustainable global society.

  • 22.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Regionala innovationssystem som politisk praktik - en fallstudie av Triple Steelix2007In: Regional växtkraft I en global Ekonomi: Den svenska vinnväxt programmet, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag , 2007, p. 189-219Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    The disequilibrium path in natural resource economics2010Book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Triple Steelix - a Regional Innovation System in the Making?2006Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Ylinenpää, Håkan
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Regional växtkraft i en global ekonomi2007In: Regional växtkraft i en global ekonomi / [ed] Laestadius, Nuur & Ylinenpää, Santérus Academic Press Sweden, 2007, p. 13--26Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, CaliKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics.Ylinenpää, HåkanKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Regional växtkraft i en global ekonomi: Det svenska Vinnväxt programmet2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Lapko, Yulia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Trucco, Paolo
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    The business perspective on materials criticality: Evidence from Manufacturers2016In: Resources policy, ISSN 0301-4207, Vol. 50, p. 93-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Commission identified a group of materials that were claimed to be critical due to their high economic importance and high supply constraints, which could become bottlenecks for the deployment of emerging technologies and enabling sustainable production. Currently this discourse takes place at the industrial system level from a policyperspective, and it is unclear if what is perceived by policy circles as critical could be true for manufacturing operations. This paper explores how five EU manufacturing companies in different sectors and supply chains see materials criticality, and their strategies to mitigate such criticality. On the one hand, the results indicate the limited scope of the criticalityfactors and employed mitigation strategies considered, compared to those established in the literature. On the other hand, the findings point to the existence of interdependences between companies within and between supply chains, which should be incorporated into the materials criticality assessment, if viable implications for the industrial systems are to be developed. The paper concludes by discussing the implications for manufacturing companies and policy-makers, and suggests prospects for further research.

  • 28.
    Lapko, Yulia
    et al.
    Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy .
    Trucco, Paolo
    Trianni, Andrea
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Implications for Collaborative Development of Reverse Distribution Network: A System Perspective2014In: Implications for Collaborative Development of Reverse Distribution Network: A System Perspective, Springer-Verlag New York, 2014, p. 351-357Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the recurring challenges that industries and society face is the availability of and access to resources. The scarcity of resources creates instability in the supply chains of firms and in turn affects competitiveness. In recent years, the notion of a reverse distribution network has been put forth as a possible solution to remedy not only the volatility of the supply chains but also as an indispensable approach for sustainable development. This paper examines the current state of the literature on reverse distribution networks from a system perspective. Two major findings were identified. Firstly, there are no clear grounds for decision making regarding supply network development. Secondly, collaborations offers great opportunities to develop reverse distribution networks and build robust supply chains.

  • 29.
    Levihn, Fabian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Biomass and waste incineration CHP: co-benefits of primary energy savings, reduced emissions and costs2014In: Wit Transactions on Ecology and The Environment, ISSN 1746-448X, E-ISSN 1743-3541, Vol. 190, p. 127-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy utility companies face trade-offs in navigating through today’s environmental challenges. On the one hand they face intense political, social and environmental pressures to move towards adopting energy systems that incorporate the use of renewable energy resources. By making this transition they would contribute to carbon reduction and mitigate climate change. On the other hand, they need to coordinate their resources and become efficient when investing in new plants or upgrading existing production systems. This paper seeks to address the gains that utility companies can make when replacing older fossil fuel base- plants with efficient combined heat and power (CHP) plants. We discuss the system effects from the changes in production of other units when new plants are constructed. Using one of the largest energy utility companies in Sweden, Fortum, as empirical point of departure, we analyzed the company’s transition from using coal and hydrocarbons to an increased use of renewables and waste incineration CHP. Our analysis was based on comprehensive production data on CO2, SOx and NOx emissions. Our findings suggest that primary energy consumption drops when older, less efficient fossil plants are substituted for new efficient CHP plants; this drop includes the effect on remaining production. The benefits in terms of primary energy savings might even be greater than what is achieved in meeting the goal of climate change abatement through reduced CO2 emissions; NOx and SOx emissions are decreased with new biomass CHPs. Waste incineration CHP increase NOx and SOx emissions, when there is less fossil fuel to replace after the use of biomass is extended. In both cases, economic efficiency increase as costs are reduced.

  • 30.
    Levihn, Fabian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Co-benefits of primary energy conservation, reduced emissions and costs through biomass and waste incineration chp in district heating2016In: International Journal of Energy Production and Management, ISSN 2056-3272, E-ISSN 2056-3280, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 87-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy utility companies face trade-offs in navigating through today’s environmental challenges. On the one hand, they face intense political, social and environmental pressures to move toward adopting energy systems that incorporate the use of renewable energy resources. By making this transition, they would contribute to carbon reduction and mitigate climate change. On the other hand, they need to coordinate their resources and become efficient when investing in new plants or upgrading existing production systems. This paper seeks to address the gains that utility companies can make when replacing older fossil-fuel-based plants with efficient combined heat and power (CHP) plants. We discuss the system effects from the changes in production of other units when new plants are constructed. Using one of the largest energy utility companies in Sweden, Fortum, as empirical point of departure, we analyzed the company’s transition from using coal and hydrocarbons to an increased use of renewables and waste incineration CHP. Our analysis was based on comprehensive production data on CO2, SOx and NOx emissions. Our findings suggest that primary energy consumption drops when older, less efficient fossil plants are substituted for new efficient CHP plants; this drop includes the effect on remaining production. The benefits in terms of primary energy savings might even be greater than what is achieved in meeting the goal of climate change abatement through reduced CO2 emissions; NOx and SOx emissions are decreased with new biomass CHPs. Waste incineration CHP increases NOx and SOx emissions, when there is less fossil fuel to replace after the use of biomass is extended. In both cases, economic efficiency increase as costs are reduced.

  • 31.
    Levihn, Fabian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Blomgren, Henrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Corporate response to climate change mitigation: What can we learn from annual reports of European industries?2011In: International Journal of Industrial Engineering and Management, ISSN 2217-2661, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 77-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change and how best to mitigate its impact has in recent decades prefigured in the industrialdevelopment debate. Awareness about future costs related to increased atmospheric temperaturesprovides an incentive for lowering greenhouse gas emissions such as CO2. At the same time,measures to mitigate climate change do not only induce corporate uncertainty and pressure, but it isalso provides opportunities for new businesses domains and models. The coverage of climate changeissues from mass media broke with earlier trends and increased in the middle of the last decade. Howabout corporate focus? Was climate change issue on the corporate agenda by then?This study presents a content analysis of more than 1100 shareholder letters from 131 of the largestEuropean public liability companies between 2000 to 2009. The main purpose of this paper is toanalyze climate change from a corporate perspective. Was climate change discussed by ChiefExecutive Officers (CEO) and board chairmen during this time? If so, to what extent and are thereindustrial differences?This study shows that climate change appeared on the corporate strategic agenda in year 2005, frompreviously occupying a marginal place. In 2008, corporate climate change discussions were largelypushed aside by the financial crisis. It also show a trend where a shift has occurred from a generalinterest, towards one more divided between different industries.

  • 32.
    Levihn, Fabian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Marginal abatement cost curves and abatement strategies: Taking option interdependency and investments unrelated to climate change into account2014In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 76, p. 336-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms usually have optimization tools for evaluating various investment options; policymakers likewise need tools for designing economically efficient policies. One such tool is the MACC (marginal abatement cost curve), used to capture the least-cost sequence of abatement options. Such curves are also used for understanding the implications of government policies for markets and firms. This article explores dynamic path-dependent aspects of the Stockholm district heating system case, in which the performance of some discrete options is conditioned by others. In addition, it proposes adding a feedback loop to handle option redundancy when implementing a sequence of options. Furthermore, in an energy system, actions unrelated to climate change abatement might likewise affect the performance of abatement options. This is discussed together with implications for climate change policy and corporate investment optimization. Our results indicate that a systems approach coupled with a feedback loop could help overcome some of the present methodological limitations.

  • 33.
    Levihn, Fabian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Marginal Abatement Cost Curves (MACC): The need for an evolutionary approach2013In: IAMOT2013 Proceedings, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marginal Abatement Cost Curves (MACC) has become standard decision making tools in evaluating options for CO2 abatement. Originally derived for optimizing investments in energy conservation after the oil crises during the 1970s and early 1980s under the name Conservation Supply Curves (CSC) today the discussions on climate change mitigation has given them renewed relevancy to identify the optimum CO2 abatement options for industry and a decision base to devise emission trading schemes or taxes for policy makers.Historically, the development of MACC adopted an iterative process in revealing the optimal route for energy conservation. However, today the iterative process is often dropped in favour of simpler (stand alone) analysis of individual options without regard to dynamic interrelationships. How does this affect economic and abatement performance?The aim of this paper is to analyse the limits of using the MACC model in circumstances where there are highly interdependent options such as within energy systems. We have conducted simulations to examine possible abatement options for the Stockholm district heating network according to the base production plan of the energy provider Fortum Värme. The base production plan includes options decided on or under consideration and planned to be implemented before 2018. The result shows that if an evolutionary approach is not used, the abatement potential for the Stockholm district heating network is overestimated with 19% or 63 kton CO2 p.a. At the same time, cost reductions are overestimated with 329% or 197 MSEK p.a. This means that when the abatement options are subject to dynamic relationships, the effect relative to the now dominant approach to MACC is of concern. The results also show suggested measures to be rational during an iterative process, becoming redundant when an evolutionary approach is applied. The main lesson is that dynamic interrelations between abatement options must never be neglected when performing a MACC-analysis. An evolutionary approach must be applied where the growth of the whole system is taken into account, including changes with negative or no effect on CO2 emissions.

  • 34.
    Mertanen, Oskari
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Gustavsson, Linda
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Remnants from the past or industries for the future? The case of Swedish iron ore mining2016In: 18th EBES conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Novotny, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics.
    The importance of local institutions in promoting entrepreneurship and innovations in peripheral regions2010In: Remote innovations conference, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Novotny, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    The Transformation of Pulp and Paper Industries: The role of Local Networks and Institutions2013In: International Journal of Innovation and Regional Development, ISSN 1753-0660, E-ISSN 1753-0679, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 41-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pulp and paper industry has historically played a significant role in countries in the northern hemisphere (Biermann, 1996; Hylander, 2009; Laurila, 1998). However, the process of globalisation manifested among others by the rise of BRIC countries on the one hand and increasing environmental concerns on the other have combined to impose what may be termed as transformative pressure. This pressure is exacerbated by the fact that many pulp and paper plants are located in peripheral regions which find themselves in the midst of a development discourse on the necessity of creating mechanisms to promote regional innovation systems. The aim of this paper is to discuss and illustrate how local institutions enabled the transformation of a pulp plant in a peripheral region in Sweden into a biorefinery. The study suggests that agents from industry and local government were important and that their actions took place in an institutional framework containing key processes of change –knowledge formation, market formation, aspects of local legitimation leading to positive externalities.

  • 37.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    An Exploratory Case Study of Call Centers Firms in Ljusdal2002In: The Third International Congress of the Work & Labour Network "Labour, Globalisation and The New Economy", 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics.
    Att forska om periferin i periferin- en personlig odyssey2007In: Samtal och samhandling- erfarenheter från FOU-Centrum i Söderhamn interaktiv forskning i praktiken, Söderhamn: Söderhams förlag , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Business Networking Between Information Technology Companies in Söderhamn2002In: Forskningssamverkan och nya former av kunskapsbildning / [ed] Kjell Eriksson, Halmstadsförag , 2002Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Cluster Dynamics and Industrial Policy in Peripheral Regions: a study of cluster formation as a local development process2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid growth of the global economy in the last two decades has created a new economic reality in many municipalities in peripheral regions of Sweden. Having earlier relied on traditional industry as the source of employment, today municipalities in peripheral regions are struggling to survive in a completely changed economic landscape, with new conditions for development. The dismantling of trade barriers, accessibility of new markets for production, and faster and cheaper modes of communication and transportation have combined in changing the conditions for development. While historically peripheral regions have depended on manufacturing firms as a source of employment, indications today show that local and regional development is enhanced through the development of locally acquired relationships that promote knowledge creation and transmission. In the past, the Swedish government had put in place measures to promote a degree of regional parities. These included enticement schemes to industry and the relocation of public bodies. Faced with the global winds of change that have arisen in the last few decades, this approach is becoming unsustainable.

    The overall aim of this dissertation is to contribute to the research aimed at enhancing regional economic development and to increase the understanding of as well as give insights into local economic development processes aimed at meeting global challenges in a peripheral region. In it I explore the two interrelated questions of 1) what are the mechanisms influencing location of economic activities and industrial policy in peripheral regions? 2) How do these mechanisms manifest themselves in a peripheral region?

    In this study, three case studies of local development processes in the two municipalities of Ljusdal and Söderhamn, in the geographical region of Hälsingland are presented. The case studies are named the business case, the policy case and the hybrid case to reflect the mechanisms that induced them.

  • 41.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Cluster Dynamics and Industrial Policy in Peripheral Regions: a study of cluster formation as a local development process2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid growth of the global economy in the last two decades has created a new economic reality in many municipalities in peripheral regions of Sweden. Having earlier relied on traditional industry as the source of employment, today municipalities in peripheral regions are struggling to survive in a completely changed economic landscape, with new conditions for development. The dismantling of trade barriers, accessibility of new markets for production, and faster and cheaper modes of communication and transportation have combined in changing the conditions for development. While historically peripheral regions have depended on manufacturing firms as a source of employment, indications today show that local and regional development is enhanced through the development of locally acquired relationships that promote knowledge creation and transmission. In the past, the Swedish government had put in place measures to promote a degree of regional parities. These included enticement schemes to industry and the relocation of public bodies. Faced with the global winds of change that have arisen in the last few decades, this approach is becoming unsustainable.

    The overall aim of this dissertation is to contribute to the research aimed at enhancing regional economic development and to increase the understanding of as well as give insights into local economic development processes aimed at meeting global challenges in a peripheral region. In it I explore the two interrelated questions of 1) what are the mechanisms influencing location of economic activities and industrial policy in peripheral regions? 2) How do these mechanisms manifest themselves in a peripheral region?

    In this study, three case studies of local development processes in the two municipalities of Ljusdal and Söderhamn, in the geographical region of Hälsingland are presented. The case studies are named the business case, the policy case and the hybrid case to reflect the mechanisms that induced them.

  • 42. Nuur, Cali
    Det Digitala Klivet2000Book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Exporting higher education from old industrialized nations to developing countries; who benefits?2017In: INTED2017: 11TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A& DEVELOPMENT , 2017, p. 2080-2080Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Hur gör man i Sverige?2011In: Leva någon annanstans: Elva berättelser i Sverige / [ed] Marie Peterson, Lund: Columbi Publishing , 2011Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Location as a matrix of competition2016In: A Dynamic Mind. Perspectives on Industrial Dynamics in Honour of Staffan Laestadius(2016), / [ed] Pär Blomkvist & Petter Johansson, Stockholm: Kungliga Tekniska högskolan, 2016, p. 109-151Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46. Nuur, Cali
    et al.
    Brulin, Göran
    Business Network Learning2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 512-513Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Nuur, Cali
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Gustafsson, Linda
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    The role of regional innovation systems The cases of Robotdalen and Triple Steelix2007In: 10th Uddevalla symposium, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Nuur, Cali
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Gustavsson, Linda
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Capability creation in the natural resource-based sector: experiences from Swedish mining2018In: Innovation and Development, ISSN 2157-930X, E-ISSN 2157-9318, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 103-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the political arena, natural resources activities – including mining– are generally viewed as low-tech and are not associated with the technological innovations that serve as the precursors of competition. In old industrialized nations, mining is limited to a few countries and mining-related activities are typically considered low-tech endeavours that rely on old and outdated technologies. In addition, mining districts are seen as lacking the prerequisites of economic development, such as an entrepreneurial spirit, knowledge formation mechanisms and diverse human capital formation. This paper discusses mining in the old industrialized nation of Sweden where mining is an important contributor to national competitiveness. Through a case study of two mines and the mining district, we argue that in orderto understand the processes underlying the competitiveness of the natural resource-based sector, that is, mining sector in the context of a high-income nation, Sweden, it is important to dig deeper as regards mechanisms such as overall economic and institutional conditions as well as industrial adoptions of generic technologies, learning and upstream collaborations. The paper concludes with suggestions for further research and provides policy implications in the context of competence development.

  • 49.
    Nuur, Cali
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Gustavsson, Linda
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Promoting regional innovation systems in a global context2009In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 123-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ever since the innovation systems (IS) concept was coined in the late 1980s, it has been accepted as a mechanism of economic and technological development in policy circles. This recognition follows a change in our understanding of the characteristics of the innovation process as a non-linear process and having a systemic character. This changed understanding is also reflected in the movement in policy focus from science and technology (S&T) policy towards innovation policy. In recent years, the IS approach has been downscaled from the national level (NIS) to the regional level (RIS), a system's level that has gained the interest of policy makers. There are many rationales for this regionalization of innovation policy. However, as this paper points out, there are several challenges to implement an IS policy on the regional level. Based on a case study of a Swedish regional policy programme, this paper highlights (some of) the challenges related to defining the regional system's domain, implementing functional regions and securing sufficient regional knowledge infrastructure. This paper argues that when the IS approach is put into policy practice and downscaled to the regional level, it stands the risk of losing its strength as a tool for coping with the structural problems connected to innovation and globalization. Based on the identified challenges, the paper is concluded with a number of more general policy implications for IS-based policies with regional intentions.

  • 50.
    Nuur, Cali
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Anomalies in the Resource Curse Paradigm: The Case of Sweden2009Book (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 58
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