Change search
Refine search result
1 - 39 of 39
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    A Asif, Farazee M
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Bianchi, Carmine
    University of Palermo (ITALY) Faculty of Political Sciences - Department of International Studies .
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Performance analysis of the closed loop supply chain2012In: Journal of Remanufacturing, ISSN 2210-4690, Vol. 2, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The question of resource scarcity and emerging pressure of environmental legislations has brought a new challenge for the manufacturing industry. On the one hand, there is a huge population that demands a large quantity of commodities; on the other hand, these demands have to be met by minimum resources and pollution. Resource conservative manufacturing (ResCoM) is a proposed holistic concept to manage these challenges. The successful implementation of this concept requires cross functional collaboration among relevant fields, and among them, closed loop supply chain is an essential domain. The paper aims to highlight some misconceptions concerning the closed loop supply chain, to discuss different challenges, and in addition, to show how the proposed concept deals with those challenges through analysis of key performance indicators (KPI).

    Methods

    The work presented in this paper is mainly based on the literature review. The analysis of performance of the closed loop supply chain is done using system dynamics, and the Stella software has been used to do the simulation. Findings The results of the simulation depict that in ResCoM; the performance of the closed loop supply chain is much enhanced in terms of supply, demand, and other uncertainties involved. The results may particularly be interesting for industries involved in remanufacturing, researchers in the field of closed loop supply chain, and other relevant areas. Originality The paper presented a novel research concept called ResCoM which is supported by system dynamics models of the closed loop supply chain to demonstrate the behavior of KPI in the closed loop supply chain.

  • 2.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Lieder, Michael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Multi-method simulation based tool to evaluate economic and environmental performance of circular product systems2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 139, p. 1261-1281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The transition from linear to circular product systems is a big step for any organization. This may require an organization to change the way it does business, designs product and manages supply chain. As these three areas are interdependent, bringing change in one area will influence the others, for instance, changing the business model from conventional sales to leasing will demand changes in both product design and the supply chain. At the same time, it is essential for an organization to anticipate the economic and environmental impact of all changes before it may decide to implement the circular product systems. However, there is no tool available today that can assess economic and environmental performance of circular product systems. The purpose of this research is to develop a multi-method simulation based tool that can help to evaluate economic and environmental performance of circular product systems. Method: The conceptual models that are used to develop the tool have been formulated based on review of the state-of-the-art research. System Dynamics (SD) and Agent Based (AB) principles have been used to create the simulation model which has been implemented in Anylogic software platform. Originality: This research presents the first multi-method simulation based tool that can evaluate economic and environmental performance of circular product systems. Findings: Multi-method simulation technique is useful in designing dynamic simulation model that takes into consideration mutual interactions among critical factors of business model, product design and supply chain. It also allows predicting system's behaviour and its influence on the economic and environmental performance of circular product systems.

  • 3.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Bianchi, C.
    Nicolescu, Cornel Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    System dynamics models for decision making in product multiple lifecycles2015In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 101, p. 20-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main drivers for adopting product multiple lifecycles are to gain ecological and economic advantages. However, in most of the cases it is not straight forward to estimate the potential ecological and economic gain that may result from adopting product multiple lifecycles. Even though many researchers have concluded that product multiple lifecycles result in gain, there are examples which indicate that the gain is often marginal or even none in many cases. The purpose of this research is to develop system dynamics models that can assist decision makers in assessing and analysing the potential gain of product multiple lifecycles considering the dynamics of material scarcity. The foundation of the research presented in this paper is laid based on literature review. System dynamics principles have been used for modelling and simulations have been done on Stella iThink platform. The data used in the models have been extracted from different reports published by World Steel Association and U.S. Geological Survey. Some of the data have been assumed based on expert estimation. The data on iron ore reserves, iron and steel productions and consumptions have been used in the models. This research presents the first system dynamics model for decision making in product multiple lifecycles which takes into consideration the dynamics of material scarcity. Physical unavailability and price of material are the two main factors that would drive product multiple lifecycles approach and more sustainable decisions can be made if it is done by taking holistic system approach over longer time horizon. For an enterprise it is perhaps not attractive to conserve a particular type of material through product multiple lifecycles approach which is naturally abundant but extremely important if the material becomes critical. An enterprise could through engineering, proper business model and marketing may increase the share of multiple lifecycle products which eventually would help the enterprise to reduce its dependency on critical materials.

  • 4.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Roci, Malvina
    KTH.
    Lieder, Michael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Štimulak, M.
    Halvordsson, E.
    De Bruijckere, R.
    A practical ICT framework for transition to circular manufacturing systems2018In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier, 2018, p. 598-602Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition towards a circular economy has become important. Manufacturing industry being a major stakeholder in this transition has started exploring the potential of this transition and challenges in implementation. Ambitious companies such as Gorenje d.d. has taken the circular economy transition seriously and aims to become a pioneer in implementing circular manufacturing systems. One vital step in this transition is the business model shift from the linear (sales model) to a circular model such as 'product as a service'. This brings new challenges to Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) that have never been experienced in their conventional businesses. One of the challenges is to establish an information communication and technology (ICT) infrastructure that enables information management and sharing as well as establishes a real-time communication between relevant stakeholders. Outlining such an ICT infrastructure is the objective of this paper.

  • 5.
    Daghini, Lorenzo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Archenti, Andreas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Nicolescu, Cornel-Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Active alignment chuck for ultra precision machining2011In: Journal of Machine Engineering, ISSN 1895-7595, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 39-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultraprecision (UP) components have become common in everyday life products such as mobile phones or compact high resolution digital cameras. Thus the need of producing such components with high accuracy and low production cost. UP machine tools are capable of extremely high accuracy in tool positioning but still today the workpiece is positioned by hand, hence the high production cost of UP components. A fully automated chain of production has been developed within the EU-IP project “Production 4 micro”. This paper describes the active alignment chuck for workholding in UP machining. The chuck has been provided with a high damping interface (HDI) and to evaluate its efficiency the chuck has undergone an experimental modal analysis (EMA) as well as machining tests. The chosen operation was grooving by fly cutting using a diamond tool. The EMA showed that the HDI was effective for those modes where there was relative displacement between one side and the other of the HDI. This result was confirmed by the machining tests as well. The HDI resulted being effective in damping high frequency modes (around 4 – 5 kHz), hence one expected benefit would be a longer tool life.

  • 6.
    Frangoudis, Constantinos
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Fu, Qilin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Ur Rashid, Md. Masud
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nicolescu, Cornel Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Experimental analysis of the CNx nano-damping material’s effect on the dynamic performance of a milling process2013In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Advanced Manufacturing Engineering and Technologies / [ed] Archenti, Andreas; Maffei, Antonio, Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2013, p. 293-302Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vibration phenomena are a main consideration during the material removal operation, as it has prominent effects on the product quality, cutting tool life, and productivity of that machining operation. Within the context of machining performance, role of enhanced stiffness and damping on the dynamic behaviour of machining systems such as turning and milling is well established. In this experimental analysis, investigations have been conducted for identifying the natural characteristics and dynamic responses of a milling process with the application of a novel carbon based (CNx) nano-composite damping material. TheCNx material has been applied into the joint interface of a workholding device with adaptive dynamic stiffness. Prior investigations of this material, produced by theplasma enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) process, showed inherent damping capacity via interfacial frictional losses of its micro-columnar structures. For thisstudy, natural characteristics of the workholding system have been characterized bythe modal impact testing method. Dynamic responses during the machining processhave been measured through the vibration acceleration signals. The ultimate objective of this study is to comprehend the potentiality of CNx coating material forimproving machining process performance by analyzing the frequency response functions and measured vibration signals of the investigated milling process with varying stiffness and damping levels.

  • 7.
    Frangoudis, Constantinos
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Nicolescu, Cornel-Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Experimental Analysis of a Machining System with Adaptive Dynamic Stiffness2013In: Journal of Machine Engineering, ISSN 1895-7595, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 49-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A main consideration in the operation of machine tools is vibrations occurring during the cutting process.Whether they are forced vibrations or self-excited ones, they have pronounced effects on surface quality, tool lifeand material removal rate. This work is an experimental study of interactions between natural characteristics,control parameters and process parameters of a machining system designed with adaptive dynamic stiffness. Inorder to comprehend these interactions, the effect of changes in dynamic stiffness on the system’s response isexamined. The system under study consists of an end-milling tool, a steel workpiece and a work holding devicewith controllable stiffness. Natural dynamic characteristics of the system components are determined throughmodal impact testing. Then the behaviour of the whole machining system is examined under both high and lowcutting speed conditions by analysing vibration levels using acceleration signals acquired through a tri-axialsensor mounted on the workpiece. Cutting is performed in both directions of the horizontal plane of a CNCmilling machine. In both cases the results are presented for two extremes of stiffness and damping in the workholding device. The effect of control parameters on the system’s natural characteristics could be identifiedtogether with a relation between these parameters and the system’s response in high and low cutting speedconditions. The high-damping configuration reduces the vibration amplitudes significantly, while the increaseof pre-stress has a different effect depending on the cutting conditions.

  • 8.
    Frangoudis, Constantinos
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nicolescu, Cornel Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Development and analysis of a consciously designed Joint Interface Module for improvement of a machining system's dynamic performance2017In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 88, no 1-4, p. 507-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Machining vibrations and dynamic instability of machine tools is an important consideration in machining systems. Common approaches for improving their dynamic performance target either the process, or intelligent, yet complex control systems with actuators. Given that machine tools' dynamic characteristics are largely defined by the characteristics of the joints, this article proposes a novel concept, attempting to create a new paradigm for improving the dynamic behaviour of machine tools-introducing modular machine tools components (Joint Interface Modules-JIMs) with joints deliberately designed for increasing dynamic stiffness and enhancing damping with the use of viscoelastic materials. Through a systematic model-based design process, a prototype replicating a reference tool holder was constructed exploiting viscoelastic materials and the dynamic response of the machining system was improved as a result of its introduction; in machining experiments, the stability limit was increased from around 2 mm depth of cut to 4 mm depth of cut, without compromising the rigidity of the system or changing the process parameters. The article also includes the results of investigations regarding the introduction of such prototypes in a machine tool and discusses the shortcomings of the stability lobe diagrams as a method for evaluating the performance of machine tool components with viscoelastically treated joints.

  • 9.
    Frangoudis, Constantinos
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Österlind, Tomas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Control of milling process dynamics through a mechatronic tool holder with purposely designed Joint Interface2015In: 2015 10th International Symposium on Mechatronics and its Applications (ISMA), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Machine tool joints have significant influence on the dynamic characteristics of the machine tool and therefore on the response of the machining system to excitations from the cutting process. In cases of unstable response, generally described as chatter, surface quality of a machined workpiece and tool life deteriorate significantly. This paper presents a novel way of exploiting joints in order to control the dynamic response of the system, by integrating a mechatronic tool holder (Joint Interface Module - JIM) in the machine tool. This system has a purposely designed joint interface with controllable natural characteristics (stiffness and damping). These characteristics are controlled by altering the applied pre-load on the internal joint interface of the tool holder. The preload on the joint interface is controlled by pneumatic means. In doing so, a milling process during which the stability limit was exceeded became stable during the machining process, without alteration of the process parameters.

  • 10.
    FU, Qilin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Constraining the shear strain in viscoelastic materials and utlization of the “incompressible” properties for damping treatment in hybrid joint interface module to improve their effect for vibration control in machining2016In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 83, no 5, p. 1079-1097Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A hybrid joint interface module (HJIM) was developed using viscoelastic materials’ (VEM) “incompressible” property. The HJIM composes VEM layers compressed by screws. Its static stiffness and damping had been characterized by inverse receptance method. The analysis result showed that its static stiffness increases by nearly 50 % with increasing compression preload without compromising its loss factor. A comparison study of HJIM with a viscoelastic material joint interface module (VJIM) revealed that the change of the screws mechanical contact conditions affected the HJIM’s stiffness. Compression preload by fastening the screws, however, did not significantly affect the damping property of the HJIM. On the contrary to shear pre-strain, compression preload did not affect the VEM’s properties shown by studying the VJIM case. A workpiece was studied while fixed on the HJIM. Varying compression preload affected the stiffness of HJIM and that resulted in increased shear strain in VEM for certain modes while decreased shear strain in VEM for other modes. The affected shear strain in VEM altered the vibrational strain energy distribution and changed the receptance amplitude of different modes. In addition to apply the VEM where it is significantly strained, the analysis revealed that constraining the shear strain in VEM resulted in reduced receptance amplitude for different modes. The changes of receptance will further affect the vibration conditions in machining.

  • 11.
    Fu, Qilin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Joint interface characterization method using frequency response measurements on assembled structures only: theoretical development and experimental validation on a workholding fixture for machining2015In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 77, no 5-8, p. 1213-1228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A computation model based on inverse receptance coupling method is presented in this paper aiming for obtaining the joint interface's stiffness and damping properties using frequency response functions measured on assembled structures only. In the model, it is emphasized that the joint stiffness and damping should be modeled with frequency dependency. The model's validity is checked both through finite element (FE) simulation and experimental analyses. In the FE simulation example, the computation model gives more accurate results with noise-free data. In the experimental example, where noise in the data is unavoidable, the computation model is explored further for its applicability in the real industrial environment. Results from applications of the computational model show that it is even capable of obtaining the joint interface stiffness and damping values over the structure's resonance frequency. A viable process of predicting behaviors of workpiece with receptance coupling method through identifying the joint interface properties is presented in the end of the paper. The applicability of this computation model and the factors that influence the accuracy of the model are discussed in the end of the paper.

  • 12.
    FU, Qilin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Nicolescu, Cornel Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Improving machining performance against regenerative tool chatter through adaptive normal pressure at the tool clamping interface2013In: Journal of Machine Engineering, ISSN 1895-7595, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 93-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chatter in machining process is one of the common failures of a production line. For a cantilever tool, such as a boring bar, the rule of thumb requires the overhang length of the tool to be less than 4 times the diameter. The reason is because longer overhang will induce severe tool vibration in the form of chatter during machining. When a longer overhang than 4 times diameter is necessary for performing special machining operations, damping methods are needed to suppress tool chatter. One of the methods is the constrained layer damping method. Materials, such viscoelastic material, are applied in the vibration node regions of the structure to absorb the concentrated vibration strain energy and transform the mechanical energy to heat. With a cantilever tool clamped in a tool holder, the clamping interface is usually the vibration node region. The friction in the joint interface with low normal pressure became another source of damping and can be used for tool chatter suppression in mechanical structures. Joint interfaces are well known to possess normal pressure dependent stiffness and damping. The normal pressure’s effect on the structures frequency response function had been observed by H. Åkesson [1] et al, and L.Mi [2] et al. However, the direct effect of the joint interface normal pressure on machining process stability hasn’t been investigated. In this paper, a cantilever tool with 6.5 overhang length to diameter ratio is investigated. The direct effect of the tool clamping interface’s normal pressure on the machining process stability is studied. Three different levels of clamping normal pressure are tested with an internal turning process. The machining results indicate another adaptable solution on shop floor for suppressing tool chatter.

  • 13.
    Krajnik, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Pusavec, F.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nanofluids: Properties, Applications and Sustainability Aspects in Materials Processing Technologies2011In: Advances in Sustainable Manufacturing / [ed] Seliger, Günther; Khraisheh, Marwan M.K.; Jawahir, I.S., Berlin Heidelberg: Springer , 2011, p. 107-113Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanofluids could be used to provide cooling and lubrication action and to control thermo-physical and tribo-chemical properties of material processing. It is foreseen that properly designed nanofluids could surpass conventional cutting fluids with respect to thermal conductivity, convective heat transfer coefficient, critical heat flux, viscosity, and wettability. These properties have a promising potential to lead to the development of new coolants and lubricants with applications in a wide variety of materials processing technologies. This paper analyses the developments in research on the properties of nanofluids and evaluates their potential for applications in machining, focusing on their thermal and tribological aspects. The increasing use of nanofluids leads to a need for information on their sustainability in order to recognize and avoid risks. Sustainability is discussed in view of occupational health and safety and toxicity of nanoparticles.

  • 14.
    Krajnik, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Pusavec, Franci
    Remskar, Maja
    Yui, Akinori
    Nikkam, Nader
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Transitioning to sustainable production - part III: developments and possibilities for integration of nanotechnology into material processing technologies2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 112, p. 1156-1164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A nanoparticle-based cooling-lubricating fluid (nCLF), designed and fabricated by suspending engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in biodegradable vegetable-based fluids, has been developed for integration into material processing technologies. This new product exhibits tribological properties superior to those of conventional metalworking fluids. The major innovation is the ability to create a stable nCLF through the modification of ENP surfaces. Functionalized MoS2 nanotube ENPs were successful used as low friction additives. The experimental work, required for the proof-of-concept and technology validation, was carried out on three different levels to quantify the improved tribological behavior of nCLF. These experiments include standard tribological tests, mock-up tests to simulate machining, and actual machining tests. It is demonstrated that the specific properties of ENPs, fluid design and composition, as well as specific lubrication mechanisms, exhibit superior performance of nCLF in terms of friction and wear. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate how recent nanotechnology developments support innovation needed for transitioning to sustainable production via new product development and integrated industrial applications.

  • 15.
    Lieder, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. ---.
    A. Asif, Farazee M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. ---.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. ---.
    Towards Circular Economy Implementation: An agent-based simulation approach for business model changes2017In: Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems, ISSN 1387-2532, E-ISSN 1573-7454Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces an agent-based approach to study customer behavior in terms of their acceptance of new business models in Circular Economy (CE) context. In a CE customers are perceived as integral part of the business and therefore customer acceptance of new business models becomes crucial as it determines the successful implementation of CE. However, tools or methods are missing to capture customer behavior to assess how customers will react if an organization introduces a new business model such as leasing or functional sales. The purpose of this research is to bring forward a quantitative analysis tool for identifying proper marketing and pricing strategies to obtain best fit demand behavior for the chosen new business model. This tool will support decision makers in determining the impact of introducing new (circular) business models. The model has been developed using an agent-based modeling approach which delivers results based on socio-demographic factors of a population and customers’ relative preferences of product attributes price, environmental friendliness and service-orientation. The implementation of the model has been tested using the practical business example of a washing machine. This research presents the first agent-based tool that can assess customer behavior and determine whether introduction of new business models will be accepted or not and how customer acceptance can be influenced to accelerate CE implementation. The tool integrates socio-demographic factors, product utility functions, social network structures and inter-agent communication in order to comprehensively describe behavior on individual customer level. In addition to the tool itself the results of this research indicates the need for systematic marketing strategies which emphasize CE value propositions in order to accelerate customer acceptance and shorten the transition time from linear to circular. Agent-based models are emphasized as highly capable to fill the gap between diffusion-based penetration of information and resulting behavior in the form of purchase decisions.

  • 16.
    Lieder, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    A. Asif, Farazee M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Mihelič, Aleš
    Gorenje d.d..
    Kotnik, Simon
    Gorenje d.d..
    Towards circular economy implementation in manufacturing systems using a multimethod simulation approach to link design and business strategy2017In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 93, no 5-8, p. 1953-1970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent circular economy movement has raised awareness and interest about untapped environmental and economic potential in the manufacturing industry. One of the crucial aspects in the implementation of circular or closed-loop manufacturing approach is the design of circular products. While it is obvious that three post-use strategies, i.e., reuse, remanufacturing, and recycling, are highly relevant to achieve loop closure, it is enormously challenging to choose “the right” strategy (if at all) during the early design stage and especially at the single component level. One reason is that economic and environmental impacts of adapting these strategies are not explicit as they vary depending on the chosen business model and associated supply chains. In this scenario, decision support is essential to motivate adaptation of regenerative design strategies. The main purpose of this paper is to provide reliable decision support at the intersection of multiple lifecycle design and business models in the circular economy context to identify effects on cost and CO2 emissions. The development of this work consists of a systematic method to quantify design effort for different circular design options through a multi-method simulation approach. The simulation model combines an agent-based product architecture and a discrete event closed-loop supply chain model. Feasibility of the model is tested using a case of a washing machine provided by Gorenje d.d. Firstly, design efforts for reuse, remanufacturing, and recycling are quantified. Secondly, cost and emissions of different design options are explored with different business model configurations. Finally, an optimization experiment is run to identify the most cost-effective combination of reused, remanufactured, and recycled components for a business model chosen on the basis of the explorative study results.

  • 17.
    Lieder, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Mihelič, Aleš
    Gorenje d.d..
    Kotnik, Simon
    Gorenje d.d..
    A conjoint analysis of circular economy value propositions for consumers: using “washing machines in Stockholm” as a case study2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 172, p. 264-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In industrial practice a transition from a linear (take-make-dispose) to a circular product system (considering reuse/remanufacturing/recycling) requires the change of business models through new value propositions. In doing so the focus of the value proposition shifts from selling a physical product to providing access to functionality through business innovation. One key factor related to circular business transitions is market acceptance. It is particularly challenging to understand what complexity a new concept like circular economy (CE) brings to established businesses where the success and the failure of the business is dependent on customer's acceptance of new value propositions. Purpose: This paper empirically explores the opportunities of a circular business approach for washing machines in the city of Stockholm by quantifying and assessing customer preferences for CE value propositions for a business to customer (B2C) scenario. Method: This study uses the method of choice-based conjoint analysis to investigate preferences based on the attributes price and payment scheme, environmental friendliness as well as service level. Originality: This paper is the first of its kind to assess customer preferences from the CE market acceptance point of view using a conjoint approach and provides insight to what extent new CE value propositions may be adopted. Findings: Results indicate that there is general interest in paying for access rather than for ownership. Service levels have the strongest impact on customer utility of a washing machine offer. If associated with reduction in CO2 emissions the number of remanufacturing cycles can increase purchase probability. As a method choice-based conjoint analysis is highlighted as beneficial to break down CE value propositions and to identify to what extent particular service-related attributes and product-related attributes contribute to overall customer utility. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Lieder, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    de Bruijckere, Ruud
    Signifikant Svenska AB.
    Abdullah Asif, Farazee Mohammad
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Löfstrand, Mattias
    Signifikant Svenska AB.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    An IT-platform prototype as enabler for service-based business models in manufacturing industry2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Lieder, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Towards circular economy implementation: a comprehensive review in context of manufacturing industry2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 115, p. 36-51Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of circular economy (CE) is to an increasing extent treated as a solution to series of challenges such as waste generation, resource scarcity and sustaining economic benefits. However the concept of circularity is not of novel as such. Specific circumstances and motivations have stimulated ideas relevant to circularity in the past through activities such as reuse, remanufacturing or recycling. Main objectives of this work are: to provide a comprehensive review of research efforts encompassing aspects of resources scarcity, waste generation and economic advantages; to explore the CE landscape in the context of these three aspects especially when they are considered simultaneously; based on an idea of a comprehensive CE framework, propose an implementation strategy using top-down and bottom-up approach in a concurrent manner. To fulfill this objective a comprehensive review of state-of-the-art research is carried out to understand different ideas relevant to CE, motivation for the research and context of their recurrence. Main contributions of this paper are a comprehensive CE framework and a practical implementation strategy for a regenerative economy and natural environment. The framework emphasizes on a combined view of three main aspects i.e. environment, resources and economic benefits. It also underlines that joint support of all stakeholders is necessary in order to successfully implement the CE concept at large scale. The proposed framework and implementation strategy also identify new avenues for future research and practice in the field of CE.

  • 20.
    Melander, Arne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Arshad, Saad
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Formability of different aluminium alloys in Single Point Incremental Forming (SPIF) processes2012In: International Deep Drawing Research Group 2012, Mumbai, 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Frangoudis, C.
    KTH.
    Semere Tesfamariam, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Archenti, Andreas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    New Paradigm in Control of Machining System’s Dynamics2015In: Journal of Machine Engineering, Vol. 15, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing demands for precision and efficiency in machining call for effective control strategies based on the identification of static and dynamic characteristics under operational conditions. The capability of a machining system is significantly determined by its static and dynamic stiffness. The aim of this paper is to introduce novel concepts and methods regarding identification and control of a machining system’s dynamics. After discussing the limitations in current methods and technologies of machining systems’ identification and control, the paper introduces a new paradigm for controlling the machining system dynamics based on design of controllable structural Joint Interface Modules, JIMs, whose interface characteristics can be tuned using embedded actuators. Results from the laboratory and industrial implementation demonstrate the effectiveness of the control strategy with a high degree of repeatability.

  • 22. Pervaiz, S.
    et al.
    Deiab, I.
    Darras, B.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nicolescu, Cornel Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Performance evaluation of TiAlN- PVD coated inserts for machining Ti-6Al-4V under different cooling strategies2013In: Advanced Materials Research III, Trans Tech Publications Inc., 2013, Vol. 685, p. 68-75Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Titanium alloys are labeled as difficult to materials because of their low machinability rating. This paper presents an experimental study of machining Ti-6Al-4V under turning operation. All machining tests were conducted under dry, mist and flood cooling approaches by using a TiAlN coated carbide cutting inserts. All cutting experiments were conducted using high and low levels of cutting speeds and feed rates. The study compared surface finish of machined surface and flank wear at cutting edge under dry, mist and flood cooling approaches. Scanning electron microscopy was utilized to investigate the flank wear at cutting edge under various cooling approaches and cutting conditions. Investigation revealed that TiAlN coated carbides performed comparatively better at higher cutting speed.

  • 23. Pervaiz, S.
    et al.
    Deiab, I.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    An experimental analysis of energy consumption in milling strategies2012In: 2012 International Conference on Computer Systems and Industrial Informatics, ICCSII 2012, IEEE , 2012, p. 6454527-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pocket milling operation is one of the widely used milling operations. CAM packages offer different tool path strategies to execute a machining operation. In the presented work zigzag, constant overlap spiral, parallel spiral and oneway tool path strategies were compared in terms of power and energy consumption for pocket milling of Al 6061 aluminum alloy. All pocketing operations were conducted using 8 mm diameter High Speed Steel (HSS) end milling cutters. Energy utilization was analysed for all tool path strategies. This work aims to develop better understanding towards sustainability concept in core machining phase.

  • 24.
    Pervaiz, Salman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Deiab, I
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Experimental and numerical investigation of Ti6A14V alloy machinability using TiAIN coated tools2014In: Transactions of the North American Manufacturing Research Institution of SME, Society of Manufacturing Engineers , 2014, no January, p. 104-113Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Titanium alloys exhibit extraordinary characteristics such as excellent strength-to-weight ratio, superior corrosive and erosive resistance and capability to operate at high operating temperatures. These alloys show poor machinability rating due their low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity. This study investigates the machinability of Ti6A14V using TiAIN coated tools by analyzing cutting forces and cutting temperatures. The simulated cutting force data was used to predict the total energy utilized by the process. Cutting tool temperatures during the machining operation were measured by an Infrared (IR) camera with cutting forces experiments. Finite element simulations can offer a cost effective solution when evaluating the machining performance of difficult to cut materials such as Titanium alloys. The study incorporated modified Johnson-Cook constitutive equation and friction model to develop the finite element simulations of the machining process. The finite element simulated results of forces and tool temperature presented good agreement with the experimental results. Copyright

  • 25.
    Pervaiz, Salman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Deiab, Ibrahim
    Amir, Rashid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Prediction of energy consumption and environmental implications for turning operation using finite element analysis2015In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part B, journal of engineering manufacture, ISSN 0954-4054, E-ISSN 2041-2975, Vol. 229, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is concerned with the experimental and numerical investigation of energy consumption involved in the turning of Ti6Al4V titanium alloys. Energy consumption of a machining process is considered as an important machining performance indicator. This article aims to propose an approach for the prediction of energy consumption and related environmental implications using finite element modeling simulations. Machining experiments were conducted using uncoated carbide tools under dry cutting environment. DEFORM-3D software package was utilized to simulate finite element–based machining simulations. Experimental validation was mainly conducted by focusing on the cutting forces and power consumption measurements. Simulated results of the cutting force and power consumption were found in a good agreement with the experimental findings. The amount of CO2 emission resulting from energy consumption during the machining phase is highly dependent on the geographical location. This study also incorporated the energy mix of United Arab Emirates for the environmental calculations. Finally, in the light of proposed methodology, possible future directions and recommendations have also been presented.

  • 26.
    Pervaiz, Salman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. Amer Univ Sharjah, U Arab Emirates.
    Deiab, Ibrahim
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Minimal quantity cooling lubrication in turning of Ti6Al4V: Influence on surface roughness, cutting force and tool wear2017In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part B, journal of engineering manufacture, ISSN 0954-4054, E-ISSN 2041-2975, Vol. 231, no 9, p. 1542-1558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Titanium alloys generally show low machinability ratings. They are referred as difficult-to-cut materials due to their inherent properties such as low thermal conductivity, high chemical reactivity and high strength at elevated temperatures. Cooling strategies play an important role to improve the machining performance of the cutting process. In order to facilitate the heat dissipation from the cutting zone, generous amount of coolant is used when machining highly reactive metals such as titanium alloys. Generally, cutting coolants are nominated as pollutants due to their non-biodegradable nature. This article presents experimental evaluation of a minimal quantity cooling lubrication system. The study investigates a combination of sub-zero-temperature air and vegetable oil-based mist as possible environmentally benign alternative to conventional cooling methods. The results are compared with the dry and flood cutting environments as well. Machinability was evaluated experimentally by considering the surface finish, cutting forces, tool life and their associated tool wear mechanisms. It was concluded from the results obtained from the surface roughness, cutting force and tool life investigation that minimal quantity cooling lubrication (internal) cooling strategy has encouraging potential to replace the conventional flood cooling method.

  • 27.
    Pervaiz, Salman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Deiab, Ibrahim
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Minimal Quantity Cooling Lubrication (MQCL) in Turning of Ti6Al4V: Influence on Surface roughness, Cutting force and Tool WearManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Pervaiz, Salman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. American University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates .
    Deiab, Ibrahim
    Wahba, Essam Moustafa
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    A coupled FE and CFD approach to predict the cutting tool temperature profile in machining2014In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, E-ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 17, p. 750-754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents an innovative methodology of coupling the conventional finite element machining simulations with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to analyse the temperature distribution at the cutting tool. The conventional finite element machining simulations were conducted using DEFORM 2D to predict the heat generation and tool tip temperature during the cutting action. Machining simulations were conducted using Ti6Al4V and uncoated carbide as a workpiece and tool material respectively. Modified version of Johnson-Cook constitutive model was incorporated in the conventional finite element based machining simulations to predict the behavior of flow stresses for Ti6Al4V titanium alloy. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed using ANSYS (R) CFX. CFD model has incorporated air as a cooling media to simulate the dry cutting and temperature distribution at the tool surface was obtained. The coupled numerical modeling methodology showed encouraging potential of predicting precise temperature distribution on the cutting tool. The approach can be further evaluated to predict temperature distribution under flood cooling and minimum quantity lubrication (MQL).

  • 29.
    Pervaiz, Salman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Deiab, Ibrahim
    University of Guelph, CANADA.
    Wahba, Essam
    Mechanical Engineering, American University of Sharjah.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    A novel numerical modeling approach to determine the temperature distribution in the cutting tool using conjugate heat transfer (CHT) analysis2015In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 80, no 5, p. 1039-1047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with the conjugate heat transfer problem of a single point cutting tool under turning operation dissipating heat in the tool material and streams of the surrounding air. In order to estimate the cutting temperature during the turning operation, the DEFORM-3D finite element package was utilized. A machining simulation material model for Ti6Al4V was utilized using a modified Johnson–Cook equation. The maximum cutting temperature value was obtained from the finite element model. The temperature was then used as a constant heat source on the tool tip, and the conjugate heat transfer (CHT) approach was used to develop a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The CFD model utilized a 3D heat and fluid flow analysis using ANSYS ® CFX. A cutting insert with a constant heat source was exposed to the stream velocities of the dry air. The numerical equations governing the flow and thermal fields in the fluid domain and energy equation in the solid domain were solved in parallel by maintaining the continuity of temperature and heat flux at the solid–fluid interface. The presented conjugate heat transfer (CHT) approach provided a very useful understanding of the temperature profile development at the cutting tool that is still a complex challenge for the existing experimental and numerical techniques.

  • 30. Pervaiz, Salman
    et al.
    Deiab, Ibrahim
    Wahba, Essam
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    A numerical and experimental study to investigate convective heat transfer and associated cutting temperature distribution in single point turning2018In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 94, no 1-4, p. 897-910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the metal cutting operation, heat generation at the cutting interface and the resulting heat distribution among tool, chip, workpiece, and cutting environment has a significant impact on the overall cutting process. Tool life, rate of tool wear, and dimensional accuracy of the machined surface are linked with the heat transfer. In order to develop a precise numerical model for machining, convective heat transfer coefficient is required to simulate the effect of a coolant. Previous literature provides a large operating range of values for the convective heat transfer coefficients, with no clear indication about the selection criterion. In this study, a coupling procedure based on finite element (FE) analysis and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been suggested to obtain the optimum value of the convective heat transfer coefficient. In this novel methodology, first the cutting temperature was attained from the FE-based simulation using a logical arbitrary value of convective heat transfer coefficient. The FE-based temperature result was taken as a heat source point on the solid domain of the cutting insert and computational fluid dynamics modeling was executed to examine the convective heat transfer coefficient under similar condition of air interaction. The methodology provided encouraging results by reducing error from 22 to 15% between the values of experimental and simulated cutting temperatures. The methodology revealed encouraging potential to investigate convective heat transfer coefficients under different cutting environments. The incorporation of CFD modeling technique in the area of metal cutting will also benefit other peers working in the similar areas of interest.

  • 31.
    Pervaiz, Salman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Deiab, I.
    Nicolescu, Cornel M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    An experimental investigation on effect of minimum quantity cooling lubrication (MQCL) in machining titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V)2016In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 87, no 5-8, p. 1371-1386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the machining operation, elevated temperatures are achieved at the cutting interface due to the presence of high plastic deformation and friction in between the tool and chip contacting area. Efficient heat dissipation from the cutting interface is required to achieve better machining performance. Elevated temperature in the cutting area results in lower tool life as it facilitates different types of wear mechanisms. Metal working fluids (MWFs) are employed to reduce heat and friction in the cutting zone, simultaneously to help in the flushing of waste particles. The MWFs are based on either water or petroleum oil and include several additives which make them non-biodegradable and toxic in nature. The minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) method offers a feasible substitute to the MWF-based conventional flood cooling method. In this study, a vegetable oil-based MQL system was mixed with sub-zero temperature air to design a new minimum quantity cooling lubrication (MQCL) system. The study investigates the machinability of Ti6Al4V using an MQCL system under various oil flow rates and compared its machining performance with both dry cutting and conventional flood cooling. For further evaluation, the study investigated surface roughness, flank wear, and associated wear mechanisms. It was found that in the MQCL system (60–70 ml/h), oil supply rates provided reliable machining performance at higher feed levels.

  • 32.
    Pervaiz, Salman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Deiab, Ibrahim
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Influence of Tool Materials on Machinability of Titanium- and Nickel-Based Alloys: A Review2014In: Materials and Manufacturing Processes, ISSN 1042-6914, E-ISSN 1532-2475, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 219-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Titanium and nickel alloys are the most commonly used in the demanding industries like aerospace, energy, petrochemical, and biomedical. These highly engineered alloys offer unique combination of heat resistance, corrosion resistance, toughness, high operating temperature, and strength-to-weight ratio. These alloys are termed as "Difficult to cut materials" because of their low machinability rating. They are difficult to machine because of properties like low thermal conductivity, high strength at elevated temperatures, and high chemical reactivity. Machining of titanium- and nickel-based alloys causes problems of surface integrity and selection of cutting tool materials that is always a challenge for manufacturers. In this work, machinability studies for titanium and nickel alloys are reviewed with reference to cutting tool materials, associated wear mechanisms, failure modes, and novel tooling techniques. It also discusses major surface integrity defects like carbide cracking, white layer formation, work hardening layer formation, residual stresses, and microstructural alterations. Major aim of this work is to evaluate the challenges involved in improving machinability of the titanium- and nickel-based alloys, and determine the future research direction for productivity improvements in machining these alloys.

  • 33.
    Pervaiz, Salman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Deiab, Ibrahim
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Machinability of Ti6Al4V using minimum quantity cooling lubrication under various oil supply ratesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Rashid, Amir
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    On passive and active control of machining system dynamics: analysis and implementation2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 35.
    Rashid, Amir
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    A Asif, Farazee M
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Krajnik, Peter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Multiple Life Cycles Product Systems: Redefining the Manufacturing Paradigm for Resource Efficient Production and Consumption2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The products and the business models developed for conventional open-loop product systems are unable to cope with the requirements for resource efficiency. This paper redefines the conventional paradigm of closed-loop product systems and outlines the novel concept of multiple lifecycle products. The newly developed conceptual framework considers the conservation of energy, material and value added with waste prevention and environment protection as integrated components of the product design and development strategy. It also presents innovative ideas regarding designing products with multiple life cycles, business model for closed-loop supply chain, empowering customers, and multi-stakeholder approach required for the transition towards resource efficient production and consumption.

  • 36.
    Rashid, Amir
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Asif, Farazee M. A.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Krajnik, Peter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nicolescu, Cornel Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Resource Conservative Manufacturing: an essential change in business and technology paradigm for sustainable manufacturing2013In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 57, p. 166-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For sustainability of our future societies we need sustainable manufacturing strategies with resource and environment conservation as their integral part. In this perspective closed-loop supply chains are considered as the most feasible solution. However, their implementation within the paradigm of prevailing open-loop product systems seems extremely complicated and practically infeasible. This paper argues for a radical shift in thinking on the closed-loop systems and presents the novel concept of Resource Conservative Manufacturing (ResCoM). The ResCoM concept considers the conservation of energy, material and value added with waste prevention and environment protection as integrated components of the product design and development strategy. It also presents the innovative idea of products with multiple lifecycles where several lifecycles of predefined duration are determined already at the product design stage thus demanding for new design strategies and methodologies. To succeed with this concept ResCoM advocates for new approach to supply chain design and business models as well, where the customers are integral part of manufacturing enterprises and the product design is effectively connected with the supply chain design. This work concludes that the products, supply chains and the business models developed for open-loop product systems are unable to cope with the dynamics of closed-loop systems. The uncertainties associated with product returns are inherent to the conventional concept of lifecycle and closed-loop systems. The ResCoM concept has much better capability in dealing with these uncertainties while developing sustainable closed-loop systems. The presented work outlines and discusses the conceptual framework of ResCoM. A comprehensive work on the strategic and tactical issues in the implementation of the ResCoM concept will follow.

  • 37.
    Rashid, Amir
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nicolescu, Cornel Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Active vibration control in palletised workholding system for milling2006In: International journal of machine tools & manufacture, ISSN 0890-6955, E-ISSN 1879-2170, Vol. 46, no 12-13, p. 1626-1636Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the development implementation and testing of an active controlled palletised workholding system for milling operations. The traditional approach to controlling vibration in a machining system is to develop control systems for cutting tools or machine spindles as in the case of milling machines. This work is a deviation from the traditional approach and targets a workholding system for the control of unwanted vibration. Palletised workholding systems, due to their compact design, offer an opportunity to design active control systems that are economical and easier to implement in the case of milling machines. The active control system developed here is based on an adaptive filtering algorithm, the filtered X-LMS, and employs piezo-actuators for dynamic control force. The system has been tested experimentally to demonstrate the reduction in dynamic force due to vibration. Extensive testing has been carried out to validate the performance of the system in terms of parameters of practical importance such as improvement in surface finish and increase in tool life.

  • 38.
    Rashid, Amir
    et al.
    System 3R International AB, Vällingby, Sweden.
    Nicolescu, Cornel Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Design and implementation of tuned viscoelastic dampers for vibration control in milling2008In: International journal of machine tools & manufacture, ISSN 0890-6955, E-ISSN 1879-2170, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1036-1053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Passive means of vibration attenuation have been employed successfully and efficiently in machining systems such as turning and milling. Traditional approach to controlling vibration in a milling system is to develop control mechanisms for cutting tools or machine spindles. However, due to the nature of milling operations where the cutting tools rotate at high speed, the passive vibration control methods find very limited application with the traditional approach. In order to utilise the potential of the passive vibration control methodology in milling applications, the milling operation should be viewed as a system comprising an elastic structure and operation parameters. Dynamics of this closed-loop system should improve with improvement in dynamics of any of the system components, especially within the elastic structure that comprises the cutting tool, the machine tool, the workholding system and the workpiece. Although the level of improvement will vary depending on which component of the elastic chain is targeted for this purpose. This paper presents the development and testing of tuned viscoelastic dampers (TVDs) for vibration control through their application on a workpiece in milling operations. This work targets workpiece held on a palletised workholding system for the control of unwanted vibration and thus deviates from the traditional approach where cutting tool and/or machine spindles are targeted for vibration control strategies. Palletised workholding systems, due to their compact design, offer an opportunity to design passive damping mechanisms that are easier to implement in the case of a milling system. The TVD developed through this research is based on a commercially available viscoelastic damping polymer. Advantage of such materials is their high damping performance over a wide range of excitation frequencies. The TVD design process has used a unique combination of analytical modelling with experimental FRF data. Modal impact testing showed that the application of the TVD reduced the amplitude of vibration acceleration by 20dB for the target mode. Since the target mode corresponded to torsional vibration, the TVD was effective in two planar coordinates, i.e. X and Y. In addition, the TVD also significantly reduced the amplitude of a vibration mode far from the mode it was designed for. The system has been tested experimentally to demonstrate significant reduction in vibration amplitudes during a milling process. The milling tests with different combinations of cutting parameters show that multi-TVD approach is always valid regardless of the parameters being used. The only requirement for TVDs to function effectively is that the natural frequency of the system, for which the TVDs are designed, is excited during the milling process.

  • 39.
    Rashid, Amir
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Experimental analysis of the influence of a high dampinginterface in a machining system designed for improvingmilling process performance2010In: Process machine interactions: conference proceedings, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Role of structural damping in the machining systems is well established andit is known that higher damping in machine tool structures extends the limits ofunconditional process stability regime in the stability lobes diagrams. Despite itssignificant contribution in process improvement the research on damping-basedimprovement in machining performance has been very limited in comparison toadaptive control of dynamic instability through optimum process parameters based onstability lobes’ characteristics of the machine tools. Conventional solutions forimproving damping in machining systems usually target one component at a time, e.g.cutting tools in case of boring bars, machine spindles in case of milling etc. Thisapproach has its limitations as the damping in single components can’t be increased tolevels for a significant contribution at the system level and very often withoutworsening their rigidity. An alternate to this conventional approach is to consider allcomponents of the elastic chain of the machining system- the machine, the cutting toolsand the workholding- for addition of damping, simultaneously. In this way a muchhigher amount of damping can be added into the system without deteriorating structuralrigidity of a single component. This research investigates the potential of high dampingin a milling system added through a workholding system, in this case. A High DampingInterface (HDI), based on a composite of metal-viscoelastic polymer is developed andintegrated in a palletized workholding system and analyzed experimentally. Theexperimental modal analysis and lab-machining tests show more than 50% reduction invibration amplitudes of natural frequency modes of the workpiece held on theworkholding system. The system is further tested in industrial machining environmentshowing up to 17x increase in metal removal rates and 100% improvement in surfacefinish in end milling operations. Ultimate objective of this research is to develop amachining system with its critical joint-interfaces replaced by HDIs with knowncharacteristics. The HDIs should be designed and distributed throughout the system in amanner that they play a dominant role in defining the dynamic behavior of themachining system.

1 - 39 of 39
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf