Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 138
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1. Ahlberg, J
    et al.
    Claesson, L
    Nauwelarts de Agé, M
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Relationen mellan upplevelsemått och fysiologiska mått på fysisk ansträngning1980In: Information från Psykotekniska institutet, ISSN 0347-2795, no 115Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Ahmed, Niaz
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Wahlgren, Nils Gunnar
    Effect of intravenous nimodipine on blood pressure and outcome after acute stroke2000In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 1250-1255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose-The Intravenous Nimodipine West European Stroke Trial (INWEST) found a correlation between nimodipine-induced reduction in blood pressure (BP) and an unfavorable outcome in acute stroke. We sought to confirm this correlation with and without adjustment for prognostic variables and to investigate outcome in subgroups with increasing levels of BP reduction. Methods-Patients with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic stroke (within 24 hours) were consecutively allocated to receive placebo (n=100), 1 mg/h (low-dose) nimodipine (n=101), or 2 mg/h (high-dose) nimodipine (n=94). The correlation between average BP change during the first 2 days and the outcome at day 21 was analysed. Results-Two hundred sixty-five patients were included in this analysis (n=92, 93, and 80 for placebo, low dose, and high dose. respectively). Nimodipine treatment resulted in a statistically significant reduction in systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) from baseline compared with placebo during the first few days. In multivariate analysis, a significant correlation between DBP reduction and worsening of the neurological score was round for the high-close group (beta=0.49, P=0.048). Patients with a DBP reduction of greater than or equal to 20% in the high-dose group had a significantly increased adjusted OR for the compound outcome variable death or dependency (Barthel Index <60) (n/N=25/26, OR 10.16, 95% CI 1.02 to 101.74) and death alone (n/N=9/26, OR 4.3361 95% CI 1.131 16.619) compared with all placebo patients (n/N=62/92 and 14/92. respectively). There was no correlation between SEP change and outcome. Conclusions-DBP, but not SEP, reduction was associated with neurological worsening after the intravenous administration of high-dose nimodipine after acute stroke. For low-dose nimodipine, the results were not conclusive. These results do not confirm or exclude a neuroprotective property of nimodipine.

  • 3. Allgulander, Christer
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Safety Research.
    Regular hypnotic drug treatment in a sample of 32,679 Swedes: associations with somatic and mental health, inpatient psychiatricdiagnoses and suicide, derived with automated record-linkage1991In: Psychosomatic Medicine, ISSN 0033-3174, E-ISSN 1534-7796, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 101-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied Swedish survey responders who reported regular treatment with hypnotic drugs, to find associations to perceived health problems, inpatient psychiatric diagnoses, and subsequent suicide. Among 32,679 sampled Swedes, 26,952 (83%) participated, 500 of which (2%) reported regular hypnotic drug treatment. The rate of treatment was higher in women, and increased by age in both sexes. The major findings were high odds of concurrent psychoactive drug treatments, nervous symptoms and insomnia, as well as high rates of circulatory and musculoskeletal conditions in both sexes, with indicators of disability and sleep-disturbing symptoms. During a 15-year period, 35% of the men and 21% of the women who reported regular hypnotic drug treatment had also been admitted to inpatient psychiatric care. Substance abuse was diagnosed in 20% of the men and 4.3% of the women reporting hypnotic drug treatment. In multiple logistic regression models, the highest odds for regular hypnotic drug treatment were incurred by recent/current insomnia, nervous symptoms, and other psychoactive drug treatment. We conclude that therapy was principally given according to some current peer guidelines. Yet, further research is needed into the risk/benefit ratio of sustained hypnotic drug therapy in patients with qualifying somatic and psychiatric disorders to obtain a more uniformly based consensus.

  • 4. Almquist, T.
    et al.
    Jacobson, S. H.
    Mobarrez, F.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Hjemdahl, P.
    Lipid-lowering treatment and inflammatory mediators in diabetes and chronic kidney disease2014In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 276-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Inflammation may contribute to the high cardiovascular risk in diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) facilitates the recruitment of monocytes into atherosclerotic lesions and is involved in diabetic nephropathy. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is important in atherosclerosis and increases the synthesis of chemokines including MCP-1. Lipid-lowering treatment (LLT) with statins may have anti-inflammatory effects, and ezetimibe cotreatment provides additional cholesterol lowering. Methods: After a placebo run-in period, the effects of simvastatin alone (S) or simvastatin + ezetimibe (S+E) were compared in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study on inflammatory parameters. Eighteen DM patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 15-59 mL/min × 1·73 m2 (CKD stages 3-4) (DM-CKD) and 21 DM patients with eGFR &gt; 75 mL/min (DM only) were included. Results: At baseline, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) (P = 0·03), IFNγ (P = 0·02), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) (P &lt; 0·01) and soluble vascular adhesion molecule (sVCAM) (P = 0·001) levels were elevated in DM-CKD compared with DM-only patients. LLT with S and S+E reduced MCP-1 levels (P &lt; 0·01 by anova) and IFNγ levels (P &lt; 0·01) in DM-CKD patients but not in DM-only patients. Reductions were most pronounced with the combination treatment. Conclusions: DM patients with CKD stages 3-4 had increased inflammatory activity compared with DM patients with normal GFR. Lipid-lowering treatment decreased the levels of MCP-1 and IFNγ in DM patients with concomitant CKD, which may be beneficial with regard to the progression of both atherosclerosis and diabetic nephropathy.

  • 5. Andreasson, J
    et al.
    Uttervall, K
    Liwing, J
    Alici, E
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Aschan, J
    Nahi, H
    Bortezomib, response and retreatment in 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th line of treatment in patients with multiple myeloma2012In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 97, no supplement 1, p. 610-610Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Börjesson, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport planning, economics and engineering. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Hamilton, Carl J.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport planning, economics and engineering.
    Papaix, Claire
    Factors driving public support for road congestion reduction policies: Congestion charging, free public transport and more roads in Stockholm, Helsinki and Lyon2015In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 78, p. 452-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on an across-the-board survey conducted among residents of Stockholm, Helsinki and Lyon, we explore the opinions on three policy measures to combat road congestion: congestion charging, free public transport and building more roads. The support for the two latter policies is substantially higher than the support for congestion charging, which is only supported by a majority in Stockholm. Self-interest is important for the formation of the opinion to all three policies. However, fundamental values and general political views, indicated by four attitudinal factors, are even more important in forming opinions towards the three transport policies. Of all attitudinal factors, the one indicating environmental concern most influences the support for all policies. Equity concerns, however, increase the support for free public transport and opposition to taxation increases the support for building more roads. Our results further suggest that the opinions towards free public transport and building more roads can be mapped along the left right political axis, where Environment and Equity are to the left and Pricing and Taxation are to the right. However, the opinion towards congestion charging cuts right through the political spectrum. The impact of the fundamental values and self-interest variables are similar for Stockholm and Helsinki, indicating that even if experience increases the overall support for charging, it does not change the relative strength of different political arguments to any major extent.

  • 7. Ekstrand, E. E.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, A. G.
    Norhammar, A. N.
    Näsman, Per N.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Ryden, L. R.
    Kjellstrom, B. K.
    Periodontal disease: A potential risk factor for myocardial infarction in younger women2016In: EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, ISSN 0195-668X, Vol. 37, p. 350-350Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Elofsson, S
    et al.
    Nauwelarts de Agé, M
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Lokala arbetsmarknadsförhållandens betydelse för sysselsättningen1981Report (Other academic)
  • 9. Elofsson, S
    et al.
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Nauwelarts de Agé, M
    Väderleksbaserade skördeprognoser, icke-linjära modeller1978Report (Other academic)
  • 10. Franzen-Dahlin, Asa
    et al.
    Billing, Ewa
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Safety Research.
    Martensson, Bjorn
    Wredling, Regina
    Murray, Veronica
    Post-stroke depression - effect on the life situation of the significant other2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 412-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the life situation among,significant others' to patients with post-stroke depression, and to identify associations between the life situation of the significant others and patient characteristics. Seventy-one dyads consisting of patients with a diagnosed post-stroke depression and their significant others were included. The patients were assessed for depression with the Montgomery-angstrom sberg Depression Rating Scale and diagnosed according to the DSM-IV. The assessments of significant others included their own life situation and proxy assessments of the patients' state of depression, anger, change of personality, and need of assistance. Significant others of male stroke patients reported a more negative impact on their life situation, than did significant others of female stroke patients (p = 0.04). There was a significant association between the patient's level of depression and physical function [activities of daily living (ADL)], with those with less impaired ADL having more major depression than those with more impaired ADL (p = 0.007). This study indicates that major post-stroke depression is more common among patients with limited functional deficits. This highlights the importance of assessment for depression also among seemingly recovered stroke patients in order to treat and support those in need. This study also stresses the importance of identifying different needs of the significant others in order to provide appropriate support in their caregiving role.

  • 11. Gerholm, TR
    et al.
    Meisels, S
    Brandell, L
    Thedéen, T
    Claesson, L
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Långsiktig energikonsumtionsutveckling1982Report (Other academic)
  • 12. Glimelius, B
    et al.
    Linné, T
    Hoffman, K
    Larsson, L
    Svensson, JH
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Svensson, B
    Helmers, C
    Epoetin Beta in the Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer1998In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 434-440Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Gustavsson, J
    et al.
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Some information about the activities at the Department of Statistics, Stockholm University, Sweden1990Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14. Hedenus, M
    et al.
    Birgegård, G
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Ahlberg, L
    Karlsson, T
    Lauri, B
    Lundin, J
    Lärfars, G
    Österborg, A
    Adjuvant intravenous iron therapy potentiates epoetin beta treatment in anemic, non iron-depleted patients with lymphoproliferative disorders: Results of the NIFE study2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15. Hedenus, M.
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics.
    Liwing, J.
    Economic evaluation in Sweden of epoetin beta with intravenous iron supplementation in anaemic patients with lymphoproliferative malignancies not receiving chemotherapy2008In: Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-4727, E-ISSN 1365-2710, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 365-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Background and objective: Functional iron deficiency is one reason for lack of response to erythropoietin treatment. Concomitant intravenous (IV) iron supplementation has the potential to improve response to erythropoietin, allowing a decrease in erythropoietin dose requirements. In a recent study of anaemic, iron-replete patients with lymphoproliferative malignancies (Leukemia, 21, 2007, 627), the haemoglobin (Hb) increase and response rate were significantly greater in patients receiving epoetin beta with concomitant IV iron compared with patients receiving epoetin beta without IV iron (P < 0 05). The present analysis aimed to investigate whether a combination of epoetin beta and IV iron is cost-effective compared with epoetin beta without IV iron.

    Methods: This analysis was performed from a Swedish societal perspective as a within-trial evaluation of overall costs (based on differences in drug costs and resource use between groups) and effect (differences in Hb increases) during 16 weeks' treatment with epoetin beta with or without concomitant IV iron.

    Results and discussion: There was an improved response to epoetin beta with IV iron therapy and an almost 2-fold greater increase in Hb levels. Overall mean cost per patient in the epoetin beta with IV iron group was is an element of 5558 and in the epoetin beta without IV iron group was is an element of 6228. Thus, treatment with epoetin beta with IV iron resulted in overall cost savings of about 11% compared with epoetin beta without iron, mainly due to reduced erythropoietin dosages.

    Conclusion: Epoetin beta with concomitant IV iron in anaemic patients with lymphoproliferative malignancies not receiving chemotherapy resulted in better outcomes at lower cost compared with epoetin beta without iron. This suggests that epoetin beta with IV iron is a dominant therapy from a Swedish perspective.

  • 16. Hedenus, Michael
    et al.
    Birgegård, G.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Safety Research.
    Ahlberg, L.
    Karlsson, T.
    Lauri, B.
    Lundin, J.
    Lärfars, Gerd
    Österborg, A.
    Addition of intravenous iron to epoetin beta increases hemoglobin response and decreases epoetin dose requirement in anemic patients with lymphoproliferative malignancies: a randomized multicenter study2007In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 627-632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This randomized study assessed if intravenous iron improves hemoglobin (Hb) response and permits decreased epoetin dose in anemic (Hb 9 - 11 g/dl), transfusion-independent patients with stainable iron in the bone marrow and lymphoproliferative malignancies not receiving chemotherapy. Patients (n = 67) were randomized to subcutaneous epoetin beta 30 000 IU once weekly for 16 weeks with or without concomitant intravenous iron supplementation. There was a significantly (P < 0.05) greater increase in mean Hb from week 8 onwards in the iron group and the percentage of patients with Hb increase >= 2 g/dl was significantly higher in the iron group (93%) than in the no-iron group (53%) (per-protocol population; P < 0.001). Higher serum ferritin and transferrin saturation in the iron group indicated that iron availability accounted for the Hb response difference. The mean weekly patient epoetin dose was significantly lower after 13 weeks of therapy (P < 0.029) and after 15 weeks approximately 10 000 IU (425%) lower in the iron group, as was the total epoetin dose (P = 0.051). In conclusion, the Hb increase and response rate were significantly greater with the addition of intravenous iron to epoetin treatment in iron-replete patients and a lower dose of epoetin was required.

  • 17. Hedenus, Michael
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Safety Research.
    Epoetin beta with intravenous iron results in overall cost savings in a population of anemic patients with lymphoid malignancies not receiving chemotherapy2007In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 110, no 11, p. 5179-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Valu 2003. SVT:s vallokalundersökning EMU-valet 20032003Report (Other academic)
  • 19. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Thedéen, T
    SVT:s vallokalundersökning 19911991Report (Other academic)
  • 20. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Thedéen, T
    Valu 2002. SVT:s vallokalundersökning 20022002Report (Other academic)
  • 21. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Thedéen, T
    Valu Sveriges Televisions vallokalsundersökningar2003Report (Other academic)
  • 22. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Thedéen, T
    Valu-94 SVT:s vallokalsundersökning 19941994Report (Other academic)
  • 23. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Thedéen, T
    Valu-94EU SVT:s vallokalsundersökning Folkomröstningen 19941994Report (Other academic)
  • 24. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Thedéen, T
    Valu-95 SVT:s vallokalsundersökning EU-parlamentsvalet 19951995Report (Other academic)
  • 25. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Thedéen, T
    Valu-98 SVT:s vallokalsundersökning riksdagsvalet 19981998Report (Other academic)
  • 26. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Thedéen, T
    Valu-99 SVT:s vallokalsundersökning EU-parlamentsvalet 19991999Report (Other academic)
  • 27. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Safety Research.
    Valu 2006. Riksdagsvalet 20062006Other (Other academic)
  • 28. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Safety Research.
    Valu 2006. SVT:s vallokalundersökning riksdagsvalet 20062006Report (Other academic)
  • 29. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Safety Research.
    Valu i allmänhetens tjänst2006Report (Other academic)
  • 30. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Valu-vaka med besked! Inför rysarkvällen den 17 september 20062006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31. Hjemdahl, P.
    et al.
    Eriksson, S.V.
    Held, C.
    Forslund, L.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Safety Research.
    Rehnqvist, N.
    Favourable long term prognosis in stable angina pectoris:  an extended follow up of the angina prognosis study in Stockholm (APSIS)2006In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 92, no 2, p. 177-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the long term prognosis of patients with stable angina pectoris.

    Design: Registry based follow up ( median 9.1 years) of patients participating in the APSIS ( angina prognosis study in Stockholm), which was a double blind, single centre trial of antianginal drug treatment.

    Patients: 809 patients (31% women) with stable angina pectoris < 70 ( mean (SD) 59 (7) years at inclusion) and an age and sex matched reference population from the same catchment area.

    Interventions: Double blind treatment with metoprolol or verapamil during 3.4 years ( median), followed by referral for usual care with open treatment. Main outcome measures: Cardiovascular ( CV) death and non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) in the APSIS cohort and total mortality in comparison with reference subjects.

    Results: 123 patients died ( 41 MI, 36 other CV causes) and 72 had non-fatal MI. Mortality (19% v 6%, p< 0.001) and fatal MI (6.6% v 1.6%, p< 0.001) were increased among male compared with female patients. Diabetes, previous MI, hypertension, and male sex independently predicted CV mortality ( p, 0.001). Diabetes greatly increased the risk in a small subgroup of female patients. Male patients had higher mortality than men in the reference population during the first three years ( cumulative absolute difference 3.8%) but apparently not thereafter. Female patients had similar mortality to women in the reference population throughout the 9.1 years of observation.

    Conclusions: Female patients with stable angina had similar mortality to matched female reference subjects but male patients had an increased risk. Diabetes, previous MI, hypertension, and male sex were strong risk factors for CV death or MI.

    Objective: To evaluate the long term prognosis of patients with stable angina pectoris.

    Design: Registry based follow up ( median 9.1 years) of patients participating in the APSIS ( angina prognosis study in Stockholm), which was a double blind, single centre trial of antianginal drug treatment.

    Patients: 809 patients (31% women) with stable angina pectoris < 70 ( mean (SD) 59 (7) years at inclusion) and an age and sex matched reference population from the same catchment area.

    Interventions: Double blind treatment with metoprolol or verapamil during 3.4 years ( median), followed by referral for usual care with open treatment. Main outcome measures: Cardiovascular ( CV) death and non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) in the APSIS cohort and total mortality in comparison with reference subjects.

    Results: 123 patients died ( 41 MI, 36 other CV causes) and 72 had non-fatal MI. Mortality (19% v 6%, p< 0.001) and fatal MI (6.6% v 1.6%, p< 0.001) were increased among male compared with female patients. Diabetes, previous MI, hypertension, and male sex independently predicted CV mortality ( p, 0.001). Diabetes greatly increased the risk in a small subgroup of female patients. Male patients had higher mortality than men in the reference population during the first three years ( cumulative absolute difference 3.8%) but apparently not thereafter. Female patients had similar mortality to women in the reference population throughout the 9.1 years of observation.

    Conclusions: Female patients with stable angina had similar mortality to matched female reference subjects but male patients had an increased risk. Diabetes, previous MI, hypertension, and male sex were strong risk factors for CV death or MI.

  • 32. Holmberg, Sören
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301), Transport and Location Analysis (closed 20110301).
    Valu är public service2009Report (Other academic)
  • 33. Holmberg, Sören
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Väljarna i fokus2010Report (Other academic)
  • 34. Holmberg, Sören
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Wännström, K.
    SVT:s vallokalsundersökning. EUP-valet 20092009Report (Other academic)
  • 35. Holmberg, Sören
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Wännström, Kent
    Valu 2010- SVT exit poll survey parliamentary election 2010 (Valu10): English version2010Report (Other academic)
  • 36. Holmberg, Sören
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Wännström, Kent
    Valu 2010- SVT:s vallokalundersökning riksdagsvalet 2010 (Valu10): Svensk version2010Report (Other academic)
  • 37. Holmberg, Sören
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Wännström, Kent
    Väljarnas röst2012Report (Other academic)
  • 38. Ivert, Torbjorn
    et al.
    Dalen, Magnus
    Ander, Charlotte
    Stalesen, Ragnhild
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Lordkipanidze, Marie
    Hjemdahl, Paul
    Platelet function one and three months after coronary bypass surgery in relation to once or twice daily dosing of acetylsalicylic acid2017In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 149, p. 64-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Current guidelines recommend acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatment after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) to reduce thrombotic vein graft occlusion. The optimal dosage of ASA is not known. Materials and methods: Forty-two patients undergoing elective CABG were randomized to receive either ASA 75 mg or 160 mg once daily (OD) or 75 mg twice daily (BID) after the operation. Platelet function testing was performed before, and one and three months after the operation. Results: White blood cell counts increased during the initial postoperative days whereas platelet countswere initially slightly reduced after the operation but increased after one month without any major changes of mean platelet volumes. Serum thromboxane B-2 was more effectively suppressed at one and three months after the operation with ASA 75 mg BID or 160 mg OD than with 75 mg OD (p < 0.001). ASA 75 mg BID and 160 mg OD were equally effective. Adenosine diphosphate stimulated platelet aggregation in whole blood (Multiplate (R)) was increased one and three months after the operation, and this was counteracted by ASA 75 mg BID but not by 75 or 160 mg OD. Arachidonic acid-induced aggregation was more effectively inhibited by 75 mg BID or 160 mg OD compared to 75 mg OD at three months. Conclusions: Less effective inhibition of platelet activation was obtained with ASA 75 mg OD than with ASA 160mg OD or 75mg BID up to three months after CABG. Especially the latter dose is of interest for further studies of efficacy and clinical outcomes after CABG.

  • 39. Johansson, I.
    et al.
    Dahlstrom, U.
    Edner, M.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Ryden, L.
    Norhammar, A.
    Glycosylated haemoglobin predicts mortality in patients with heart failure and unknown diabetes: insights from the Swedish Heart Failure registry (SwedeHF)2016In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 59, p. S532-S532Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40. Johansson, I.
    et al.
    Dahlström, U.
    Edner, M.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Ryden, L.
    Norhammar, A.
    Glycosylated haemoglobin predicts mortality in patients with heart failure and unknown diabetes: insights from the Swedish heart failure registry (SwedeHF)2016In: EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, ISSN 0195-668X, Vol. 37, p. 733-733Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41. Johansson, I.
    et al.
    Dahlström, U.
    Edner, M.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Rydén, L.
    Norhammar, A.
    Prognostic Implications of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Ischemic and Nonischemic Heart Failure2016In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 68, no 13, p. 1404-1416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Heart failure (HF) is a common and serious complication in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The prognosis of ischemic HF and impact of revascularization in such patients have not been investigated fully in a patient population representing everyday practice. Objectives This study examined the impact of ischemic versus nonischemic HF and previous revascularization on long-term prognosis in an unselected population of patients with and without T2DM. Methods Patients stratified by diabetes status and ischemic or nonischemic HF and history of revascularization in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry (SwedeHF) from 2003 to 2011 were followed up for mortality predictors and longevity. A propensity score analysis was applied to evaluate the impact of previous revascularization. Results Among 35,163 HF patients, those with T2DM were younger, and 90% had 1 or more associated comorbidities. Ischemic heart disease (IHD) occurred in 62% of patients with T2DM and 47% of those without T2DM, of whom 53% and 48%, respectively, had previously undergone revascularization. T2DM predicted mortality regardless of the presence of IHD, with adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of 1.40 (1.33 to 1.46) and 1.30 (1.22 to 1.39) in those with and without IHD, respectively. Patients with both T2DM and IHD had the highest mortality, which was further accentuated by the absence of previous revascularization (adjusted HR: 0.82 in favor of such treatment; 95% CI: 0.75 to 0.91). Propensity score adjustment did not change these results (HR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.78 to 0.96). Revascularization did not abolish the impact of T2DM, which predicted mortality in those with (HR: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.24 to 1.48) and without (HR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.33 to 1.56) a history of revascularization. Conclusions Ninety percent of HF patients with T2DM have preventable comorbidities. IHD in patients with T2DM had an especially negative influence on mortality, an impact that was beneficially influenced by previous revascularization.

  • 42. Johansson, I.
    et al.
    Edner, M.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Dahlstrom, U.
    Ryden, L.
    Norhammar, A.
    Diabetes mellitus, a serious co-morbidity especially in younger heart failure patients: A report from the Swedish Heart Failure Registry (RiksSvikt)2012In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 33, p. 640-640Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43. Johansson, I.
    et al.
    Edner, M.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Dahlstrom, U.
    Ryden, L.
    Norhammar, A.
    Impact of diabetes mellitus on heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: a Swedish registry based analysis2015In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 36, p. 877-877Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44. Johansson, I.
    et al.
    Edner, M.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Dahlstrom, U.
    Ryden, L.
    Norhammar, A.
    Women with heart failure and diabetes are at increased risk for mortality compared to men with and women without diabetes2012In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 33, p. 178-178Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45. Johansson, I.
    et al.
    Edner, M.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Dahlström, U.
    Rydén, L.
    Norhammar, A.
    Impact of diabetes mellitus on long-term prognosis in patients with preserved heart failure - a report from the Swedish Heart Failure Registry (S-HFR)2014In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 35, p. 334-335Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46. Johansson, I.
    et al.
    Edner, M.
    Ryden, L.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR.
    Dahlstrom, U.
    Norhammar, A.
    Impact of diabetes mellitus on long-term prognosis in patients with preserved heart failure: a report from the Swedish Heart Failure Registry (S-HFR)2014In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 57, p. S25-S25Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47. Johansson, Isabelle
    et al.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Edner, Magnus
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport planning, economics and engineering.
    Rydén, Lars
    Norhammar, Anna
    Risk factors, treatment and prognosis in men and women with heart failure with and without diabetes2015In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 101, no 14, p. 1139-1148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To test the hypothesis that risk factor pattern, treatment and prognosis differ between men and women with heart failure (HF) with and without diabetes in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry. Methods Patients with (n=8809) and without (n=27 465) type 2 diabetes (T2DM) included in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry (2003-2011) were followed for mortality during a median follow-up of 1.9 years (range 0-8.7 years). All-cause mortality, differences in background and HF characteristics were analysed in women and men with and without T2DM and with a special regard to different age groups. Results Of 36 274 patients, 24% had T2DM and 39% were women. In patients with T2DM, women were older than men (78 years vs 73 years), more frequently had hypertension, renal dysfunction and preserved ventricular function. Regardless of T2DM status, women with reduced ventricular function, compared with their male counterparts, were less frequently offered, for example, ACE inhibitors/angiotensin receptor II blockers (ARB). Absolute mortality was 48% in women with T2DM, 40% in women without; corresponding male mortality rates were 43% and 35%, respectively. Kaplan-Meier curves revealed shorter longevity in women with T2DM but female sex did not remain a significant mortality predictor following adjustment (OR 95% CI 0.90; 0.79 to 1.03). In those without T2DM, women compared with men lived longer; this pattern remained after adjustment (OR 0.72; 0.66 to 0.78). T2DM was a stronger predictor of mortality in women (OR 1.72; 1.53 to 1.94) than in men (OR 1.47; 1.34 to 1.61). Conclusions T2DM is a strong mortality predictor in men and women with HF, somewhat stronger in women. The shorter survival time in women with T2DM and HF related to comorbidities rather than sex per se. Evidence-based management was less prevalent in women. Mechanisms behind these findings remain incompletely understood and need further attention.

  • 48. Johansson, Isabelle
    et al.
    Edner, Magnus
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Rydén, Lars
    Norhammar, Anna
    Is the prognosis in patients with diabetes and heart failure a matter of unsatisfactory management?: An observational study from the Swedish Heart Failure Registry2014In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 409-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To analyse the long-term outcome, risk factor panorama, and treatment pattern in patients with heart failure (HF) with and without type 2 diabetes (T2DM) from a daily healthcare perspective. Methods and results Patients with (n = 8809) and without (n = 27 465) T2DM included in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry (S-HFR) 2003-2011 due to a physician-based HF diagnosis were prospectively followed for long-term mortality (median follow-up time: 1.9 years, range 0-8.7 years). Left ventricular function expressed as EF did not differ between patients with and without T2DM. Survival was significantly shorter in patients with T2DM, who had a median survival time of 3.5 years compared with 4.6 years (P < 0.0001). In subjects with T2DM. unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for mortality were 1.37 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-1.44) and 1.60 (95% CI 1.50-1.71), and T2DM predicted mortality in all age groups. Ischaemic heart disease was an important predictor for mortality (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.47-1.94), more abundant in patients with T2DM (59% vs. 45%) among whom only 35% had been subjected to coronary angiography and 32% to revascularization. Evidence-based pharmacological HF treatment was somewhat more extensive in patients with T2DM. Conclusion The combination of T2DM and HF seriously compromises long-term prognosis. Ischaemic heart disease was identified as one major contributor; however, underutilization of available diagnostic and therapeutic facilities for ischaemic heart disease was obvious and may be an important area for future improvement in patients with T2DM and HF.

  • 49. Kahan, T.
    et al.
    Forslund, L.
    Held, C.
    Björkander, I.
    Billing, E.
    Eriksson, S. V.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Rehnqvist, N.
    Hjemdahl, P.
    Risk prediction in stable angina pectoris2013In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 141-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although stable angina pectoris often carries a favourable prognosis, it remains important to identify patients with an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) complications. Many new markers of disease activity and prognosis have been described. We evaluated whether common and easily accessible markers in everyday care provide sufficient prognostic information. Materials and methods: The Angina Pectoris Prognosis Study in Stockholm treated 809 patients (248 women) with stable angina pectoris with metoprolol or verapamil double blind during a median follow-up of 3·4 years, with a registry-based extended follow-up after 9·1 years. Clinical and mechanistic variables, including lipids and glucose, renal function, ambulatory and exercise-induced ischaemia, heart rate variability, cardiac and vascular ultrasonography, and psychosocial variables were included in an integrated analysis. Main outcome measures were nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) and CV death combined. Results: In all, 139 patients (18 women) suffered a main outcome. Independent predictive variables were (odds ratio [95% confidence intervals]), age (1·04 per year [1·00;1·08], P = 0·041), female sex (0·33 [0·16;0·69], P = 0·001), fasting blood glucose (1.29 per mM [1.14; 1.46], P &lt; 0·001), serum creatinine (1·02 per μM [1·00;1·03], P &lt; 0·001) and leucocyte counts (1·21 per 106 cells/L [1·06;1·40], P = 0·008). Smoking habits, lipids and hypertension or a previous MI provided limited additional information. Impaired fasting glucose was as predictive as manifest diabetes and interacted adversely with serum creatinine. Sexual problems were predictive among men. Conclusions: Easily accessible clinical and demographic variables provide a good risk prediction in stable angina pectoris. Impaired glucose tolerance and an elevated serum creatinine are particularly important.

  • 50. Kjellstrom, B.
    et al.
    Ekstrand, E.
    Gustafsson, A.
    Nygren, A.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Ryden, L.
    Asberg, M.
    Symptoms of depression and exhaustion and their relation to myocardial infarction and periodontitis2016In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 15, p. S96-S97Article in journal (Other academic)
123 1 - 50 of 138
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf