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  • 1. Ahlberg, J
    et al.
    Claesson, L
    Nauwelarts de Agé, M
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Relationen mellan upplevelsemått och fysiologiska mått på fysisk ansträngning1980In: Information från Psykotekniska institutet, ISSN 0347-2795, no 115Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Ahmed, Niaz
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Infrastructure.
    Wahlgren, Nils Gunnar
    Effect of intravenous nimodipine on blood pressure and outcome after acute stroke2000In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 1250-1255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose-The Intravenous Nimodipine West European Stroke Trial (INWEST) found a correlation between nimodipine-induced reduction in blood pressure (BP) and an unfavorable outcome in acute stroke. We sought to confirm this correlation with and without adjustment for prognostic variables and to investigate outcome in subgroups with increasing levels of BP reduction. Methods-Patients with a clinical diagnosis of ischemic stroke (within 24 hours) were consecutively allocated to receive placebo (n=100), 1 mg/h (low-dose) nimodipine (n=101), or 2 mg/h (high-dose) nimodipine (n=94). The correlation between average BP change during the first 2 days and the outcome at day 21 was analysed. Results-Two hundred sixty-five patients were included in this analysis (n=92, 93, and 80 for placebo, low dose, and high dose. respectively). Nimodipine treatment resulted in a statistically significant reduction in systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) from baseline compared with placebo during the first few days. In multivariate analysis, a significant correlation between DBP reduction and worsening of the neurological score was round for the high-close group (beta=0.49, P=0.048). Patients with a DBP reduction of greater than or equal to 20% in the high-dose group had a significantly increased adjusted OR for the compound outcome variable death or dependency (Barthel Index <60) (n/N=25/26, OR 10.16, 95% CI 1.02 to 101.74) and death alone (n/N=9/26, OR 4.3361 95% CI 1.131 16.619) compared with all placebo patients (n/N=62/92 and 14/92. respectively). There was no correlation between SEP change and outcome. Conclusions-DBP, but not SEP, reduction was associated with neurological worsening after the intravenous administration of high-dose nimodipine after acute stroke. For low-dose nimodipine, the results were not conclusive. These results do not confirm or exclude a neuroprotective property of nimodipine.

  • 3. Allgulander, Christer
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Safety Research.
    Regular hypnotic drug treatment in a sample of 32,679 Swedes: associations with somatic and mental health, inpatient psychiatricdiagnoses and suicide, derived with automated record-linkage1991In: Psychosomatic Medicine, ISSN 0033-3174, E-ISSN 1534-7796, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 101-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied Swedish survey responders who reported regular treatment with hypnotic drugs, to find associations to perceived health problems, inpatient psychiatric diagnoses, and subsequent suicide. Among 32,679 sampled Swedes, 26,952 (83%) participated, 500 of which (2%) reported regular hypnotic drug treatment. The rate of treatment was higher in women, and increased by age in both sexes. The major findings were high odds of concurrent psychoactive drug treatments, nervous symptoms and insomnia, as well as high rates of circulatory and musculoskeletal conditions in both sexes, with indicators of disability and sleep-disturbing symptoms. During a 15-year period, 35% of the men and 21% of the women who reported regular hypnotic drug treatment had also been admitted to inpatient psychiatric care. Substance abuse was diagnosed in 20% of the men and 4.3% of the women reporting hypnotic drug treatment. In multiple logistic regression models, the highest odds for regular hypnotic drug treatment were incurred by recent/current insomnia, nervous symptoms, and other psychoactive drug treatment. We conclude that therapy was principally given according to some current peer guidelines. Yet, further research is needed into the risk/benefit ratio of sustained hypnotic drug therapy in patients with qualifying somatic and psychiatric disorders to obtain a more uniformly based consensus.

  • 4.
    Almosawi, M.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ferrannini, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Buhlin, K.
    Karolinska Inst, Dent Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Dent Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kjellstrom, B.
    Karolinska Inst, Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Klinge, B.
    Karolinska Inst, Dent Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nygren, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. Royal Inst Technol, Ctr Safety Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svenungsson, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ryden, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Norhammar, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Long term outcome after a first myocardial infarction2021In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 42, p. 1106-1106Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5. Almquist, T.
    et al.
    Jacobson, S. H.
    Mobarrez, F.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Hjemdahl, P.
    Lipid-lowering treatment and inflammatory mediators in diabetes and chronic kidney disease2014In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 276-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Inflammation may contribute to the high cardiovascular risk in diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) facilitates the recruitment of monocytes into atherosclerotic lesions and is involved in diabetic nephropathy. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is important in atherosclerosis and increases the synthesis of chemokines including MCP-1. Lipid-lowering treatment (LLT) with statins may have anti-inflammatory effects, and ezetimibe cotreatment provides additional cholesterol lowering. Methods: After a placebo run-in period, the effects of simvastatin alone (S) or simvastatin + ezetimibe (S+E) were compared in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study on inflammatory parameters. Eighteen DM patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 15-59 mL/min × 1·73 m2 (CKD stages 3-4) (DM-CKD) and 21 DM patients with eGFR &gt; 75 mL/min (DM only) were included. Results: At baseline, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) (P = 0·03), IFNγ (P = 0·02), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) (P &lt; 0·01) and soluble vascular adhesion molecule (sVCAM) (P = 0·001) levels were elevated in DM-CKD compared with DM-only patients. LLT with S and S+E reduced MCP-1 levels (P &lt; 0·01 by anova) and IFNγ levels (P &lt; 0·01) in DM-CKD patients but not in DM-only patients. Reductions were most pronounced with the combination treatment. Conclusions: DM patients with CKD stages 3-4 had increased inflammatory activity compared with DM patients with normal GFR. Lipid-lowering treatment decreased the levels of MCP-1 and IFNγ in DM patients with concomitant CKD, which may be beneficial with regard to the progression of both atherosclerosis and diabetic nephropathy.

  • 6.
    Andreasson, A.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Uttervall, K.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Liwing, J.
    Janssen AB, Sollentuna, Sweden..
    Alici, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Aschan, J.
    Janssen AB, Sollentuna, Sweden..
    Nahi, H.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bortezomib, response and retreatment in 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th line of treatment in patients with multiple myeloma2012In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 97, p. 610-610Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7. Börjesson, M
    et al.
    Hamilton, C J
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Papaix, C
    Public opinion on congestion, free public transport and new roads investments in Stockholm, Helsinki and Lyon.2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Börjesson, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Hamilton, Carl J.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Papaix, Claire
    Factors driving public support for road congestion reduction policies: Congestion charging, free public transport and more roads in Stockholm, Helsinki and Lyon2015In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, E-ISSN 1879-2375, Vol. 78, p. 452-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on an across-the-board survey conducted among residents of Stockholm, Helsinki and Lyon, we explore the opinions on three policy measures to combat road congestion: congestion charging, free public transport and building more roads. The support for the two latter policies is substantially higher than the support for congestion charging, which is only supported by a majority in Stockholm. Self-interest is important for the formation of the opinion to all three policies. However, fundamental values and general political views, indicated by four attitudinal factors, are even more important in forming opinions towards the three transport policies. Of all attitudinal factors, the one indicating environmental concern most influences the support for all policies. Equity concerns, however, increase the support for free public transport and opposition to taxation increases the support for building more roads. Our results further suggest that the opinions towards free public transport and building more roads can be mapped along the left right political axis, where Environment and Equity are to the left and Pricing and Taxation are to the right. However, the opinion towards congestion charging cuts right through the political spectrum. The impact of the fundamental values and self-interest variables are similar for Stockholm and Helsinki, indicating that even if experience increases the overall support for charging, it does not change the relative strength of different political arguments to any major extent.

  • 9.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Langefors, Linda
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    The impact of fear on young people’s mobility2021In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study makes use of a dataset recently collected among young people in Stockholm, Sweden (N = 1122), to investigate the impact of fear on young people?s mobility and precautionary behaviour, after controlling for previous victimization as well as situational characteristics of daily trips. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and logistic regression models underlie the methodology of the study. Previous victimization, especially for sexual crimes, triggers precautionary behaviour among young people using trains and the metro. Signs of poorly maintained transit environments also affect young riders? mobility patterns, as they state that they avoid particular stations or routes at particular times. Informed by principles of environmental criminology and the theory of fear of crime, the implications of the findings for both theory and practice are discussed.

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  • 10.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Langefors, Linda
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Young people’s victimization and safety perceptions along the trip2021In: Nordic Journal of Criminology, ISSN 2578-983X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 106-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to assess whether, how and why young people’s safety perceptions vary along the trip. Informed by principles of environmental criminology, this study makes use of a dataset recently collected among young riders of public transportation (1,122 university students) in Stockholm, Sweden. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and logistic regression models underlie the methodology of the study. Findings indicate that safety perceptions of young riders are affected by previous experience of sexual crimes but are not affected by overall victimization. More importantly, being exposed to high crime environments on the way to the metro significantly reduces young people’s safety perceptions (but not on the way to bus stops), especially for men. Drunk people tend to affect women’s safety perceptions, especially in bus systems. The article finishes by discussing the implications of the results for future research and helps advocate more inclusion of young people’s safety needs when implementing safety and transportation policies.

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    fulltext
  • 11.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Catherine, Sundling
    Langefors, Linda
    KTH.
    Trygghet i kollektivtrafiken i Stockholm i ett internationellt perspektiv: En handlingsplan mot sexuella trakasserier och brott i transitmiljöer2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Safety and security are human rights - to feel free from risk and fear of danger is crucial for all people and a prerequisite for modern society. Safety promotes and encourages mobility, which is basic for an individual’s quality of life. This report presents Stockholm students' responses to a survey of experiences and perceptions of sexual harassment and sexual transit crimes in public transport conducted in May-June 2018 as part of an international study. The study contained 1,122 young people surveyed at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm and 309 students from Södertörn University in Huddinge. We investigated the victimization of sexual harassment and sexual crimes in transit environments, feelings of perceived security or lack thereof, and necessary improvements to make travel safer.

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    fulltext
  • 12.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Langefors, Linda
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Sexual violence on the move: An assessment of youth’s victimization in public transportation2021In: Women & Criminal Justice, ISSN 0897-4454, E-ISSN 1541-0323, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 294-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Informed by principles of environmental criminology, this study assesses patterns of sexual victimization among young riders of rail-bound public transportation using a sample of 1,122 university students in Stockholm, Sweden. Exploratory data analysis and logistic regression models underlie the methodology of the study. Findings indicate that the physical and social characteristics of transit environments have an impact on the likelihood of sexual victimization after controlling for individual factors. The theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed.

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    fulltext
  • 13.
    Ekane, Nelson
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. KTH, Stockholm.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    ‘Carrots’, ‘Sticks’, and ‘Sermons’: Household perspectives on sanitation and hygiene behaviours in Rwanda and UgandaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The appropriateness and effectiveness of different policy instruments in fostering improved sanitation and hygiene practices in different contexts is debated. ‘Sermons’ inform on recommended behaviours, ‘carrots’ initiate behaviours, and ‘sticks’ restrict, deter, and punish undesirable behaviours. Through the lens of ‘carrots’ ‘sticks’, and ‘sermons’, this article analyses two approaches to sanitation promotion as they have been implemented in Rwanda and Uganda. The Community Health Clubs (CHCs) approach is the policy choice in Rwanda whereas Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) is predominantly promoted in Uganda. Building on a survey of 1173 households in both countries, this article contributes to the ongoing debate with insights on how target populations perceive the options promoted by the different approaches in influencing behaviour change outcomes, or not.  

    This study reveals significant differences regarding observed latrines, handwashing facilities, soap and water at the handwashing facility, and reported handwashing with soap and water between most of the study sites with CHC and CLTS intervention and those with no CHC and CLTS intervention. The observed differences are indications of the effectiveness of the interventions in changing behaviours. Similar differences are observed between best performing CLTS (ODF declared) and poor performing CLTS (ODF not yet declared), which underlines the importance of proper implementation. The study suggests support for using a combination of ‘carrots’, ‘sticks’, and ‘sermons’ which are all perceived as effective but for different reasons. Incentives for good sanitation practices and proper hygiene behaviour are perceived by respondents as a source of commitment and competition. Health messages are generally preferred for raising community awareness. However, the application of educational appeals - which are perceived as the most legitimate instruments and predominantly used in CHC and CLTS interventions – is insufficient for achieving universal compliance in the short-term. Other instruments can trigger short-term desired changes but may not be legitimate. This is the case with fines and naming and shaming which are perceived as effective but may compromise social relations and values. Findings also reveal that there is a common understanding among respondents that the responsibility for providing resources for construction and maintenance of sanitation facilities is a shared one. However, respondents’ ability to fulfil this responsibility is partly hampered by poverty and water availability related constraints.

  • 14. Ekengren Oscarsson, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Lagercrantz, A
    Analys av vallokasundersökning.2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15. Ekengren Oscarsson, H
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Landahl, E
    Holmberg, S
    Valu 2018 - SVT exit poll survey parliamentary election 20182018Report (Other academic)
  • 16. Ekengren Oscarsson, H
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Landahl, E
    Holmberg, S
    Valu 2018: SVT:s vallokalsundersökning Riksdagsvalet 2018.2018Report (Other academic)
  • 17. Ekstrand, E
    et al.
    Buhlin, K
    Holmer, J
    Kjellström, B
    Norhammar, A
    Näsman, Per
    Rathnayake, N
    Rydén, L
    Salonen, A
    Gustafsson, A
    Poor Agreement between Radiographic and Clinical Diagnosis of Periodontitis.2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18. Ekstrand, E. E.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, A. G.
    Norhammar, A. N.
    Näsman, Per N.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Ryden, L. R.
    Kjellstrom, B. K.
    Periodontal disease: A potential risk factor for myocardial infarction in younger women2016In: EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, ISSN 0195-668X, Vol. 37, p. 350-350Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Ekstrand, E
    et al.
    Gustafsson, A
    Norhammar, A
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Ryden, L
    Kjellström, B
    Periodontal disease - a potential risk factor for myocardial infarction in younger women2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20. Elofsson, S
    et al.
    Nauwelarts de Agé, M
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Lokala arbetsmarknadsförhållandens betydelse för sysselsättningen1981Report (Other academic)
  • 21. Elofsson, S
    et al.
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Nauwelarts de Agé, M
    Väderleksbaserade skördeprognoser, icke-linjära modeller1978Report (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Eriksson, B.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Div Family Med, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Wandell, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Family Med, NVS, Solna, Sweden..
    Dahlstrom, U.
    Linköping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linköping, Sweden.;Linköping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Lund, L. H.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Unit Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Edner, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Cardiol Unit, N3 06, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Comorbidities, risk factors and outcomes in patients with heart failure and an ejection fraction of more than or equal to 40% in primary care- and hospital care-based outpatient clinics2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 207-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study is to describe patients with heart failure and an ejection fraction (EF) of more than or equal to 40%, managed in both Primary- and Hospital based outpatient clinks separately with their prognosis, comorbidities and risk factors. Further to compare the heart failure medication in the two groups. Design: We used the prospective Swedish Heart Failure Registry to include 9654 out-patients who had HF and EF >= 40%, 1802 patients were registered in primary care and 7852 in hospital care. Descriptive statistical tests were used to analyze base line characteristics in the two groups and multivariate logistic regression analysis to assess mortality rate in the groups separately. Setting: The prospective Swedish Heart Failure Registry. Setting: The prospective Swedish Heart Failure Registry. Subjects: Patients with heart failure and an ejection fraction (EF) of more than or equal to 40%. Main outcome measures: Comorbidities, risk factors and mortality. Results: Mean-age was 77.5 (primary care) and 70.3 years (hospital care) p < 0.0001, 46.7 vs. 36.3% women respectively (p < 0.0001) and EF >= 50% 26.1 vs. 13.4% (p < 0.0001). Co-morbidities were common in both groups (97.2% vs. 92.3%), the primary care group having more atrial fibrillation, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and COPD. According to the multivariate logistic regression analysis smoking, COPD and diabetes were the most important independent risk factors in the primary care group and valvular disease in the hospital care group. All-cause mortality during mean follow-up of almost 4 years was 315% in primary care and 27.8% in hospital care. One year-mortality rates were 7.8%, and 7.0% respectively. Conclusion: Any co-morbidity was noted in 97% of the HF-patients with an EF of more than or equal to 40% managed at primary care based out-patient clinics and these patients had partly other independent risk factors than those patients managed in hospital care based outpatients clinics. Our results indicate that more attention should be payed to manage COPD in the primary care group.

  • 23.
    Eriksson, Bjorn
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Family Med & Primary Care, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Wandell, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Div Family Med & Primary Care, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Dahlstrom, Ulf
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Lund, Lars H.
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Div Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Edner, Magnus
    Karolinska Inst, Div Family Med & Primary Care, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Limited value of NT-proBNP as a prognostic marker of all-cause mortality in patients with heart failure with preserved and mid-range ejection fraction in primary care: A report from the swedish heart failure register2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 434-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The prognostic value of natriuretic peptides in the management of heart failure (HF) patients with ejection fraction (EF) <40% is well established, but is less known for those with EF >= 40% managed in primary care (PC). Therefore, the aim of this study is to describe the prognostic significance of plasma NT-proBNP in such patients managed in PC. Subjects: We included 924 HF patients (48% women) with EF >= 40% and NT-proBNP registered in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry. Follow-up was 1100 +/- 687 days. Results: One-, three- and five-year mortality rates were 8.1%, 23.9% and 44.7% in patients with EF 40-50% (HFmrEF) and 7.3%, 23.6% and 37.2% in patients with EF >= 50% (HFpEF) (p = 0.26). Patients with the highest mean values of NT-proBNP had the highest all-cause mortality but wide standard deviations (SDs). In univariate regression analysis, there was an association only between NT-proBNP quartiles and all-cause mortality. In HFmrEF patients, hazard ratio (HR) was 1.96 (95% CI 1.60-2.39) p < 0.0001) and in HFpEF patients, HR was 1.72 (95% CI 1.49-1.98) p < 0.0001). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, adjusted for age, NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and GFR class, this association remained regarding NT-proBNP quartiles [HR 1.83 (95% CI 1.38-2.44), p < 0.0001] and [HR 1.48 (95% CI 1.16-1.90), p = 0.0001], HFmrEF and HFpEF, respectively. Conclusion: NT-proBNP has a prognostic value in patients with HF and EF >= 40% managed in PC. However, its clinical utility is limited due to high SDs and the fact that it is not independent in this population which is characterized by high age and much comorbidity.

  • 24.
    Ferrannini, G.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Södertälje Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fortin, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mellbin, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Norhammar, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Capio St Gorans Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance. Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Smetana, S.
    Ferrannini, E.
    CNR, Pisa, Italy..
    Ryden, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Empagliflozin improves insulin sensitivity in patients with a recent coronary syndrome and newly detected dysglycaemia2023In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 66, no SUPPL 1, p. S243-S244Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Ferrannini, G.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Norhammar, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Almosawi, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kjellstrom, B.
    Karolinska Inst, Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Buhlin, K.
    Karolinska Inst, Dent Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    De Faire, U.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Dent Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nygren, L. A.
    Clin Sci Danderyds Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Lindahl, B.
    Uppsala Univ, Med Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Naslund, U.
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umeå, Sweden..
    Svenungsson, E.
    Karolinska Inst, Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Klinge, B.
    Karolinska Inst, Dent Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ryden, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Periodontitis and cardiovascular outcome - a prospective follow-up of the PAROKRANK cohort2021In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 42, p. 1120-1120Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Ferrannini, Giulia
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Almosawi, Mariam
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Buhlin, Kare
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Dent Med, Div Periodontol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    De Faire, Ulf
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Sect Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kjellstrom, Barbro
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Clin Physiol, Lund, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden..
    Klinge, Bjorn
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Sect Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Malmö Univ, Fac Odontol, Dept Periodontol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Nygren, Ake
    Karolinska Inst, Danderyds Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR.
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ryden, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Norhammar, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Capio St Gorans Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Long-term prognosis after a first myocardial infarction: eight years follow up of the case-control study PAROKRANK2022In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 337-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To explore long-term cardiovascular outcomes and mortality in patients after a first myocardial infarction (MI) compared with matched controls in a contemporary setting. Methods. During 2010-2014 the Swedish study PAROKRANK recruited 805 patients <75 years with a first MI and 805 age-, gender-, and area-matched controls. All study participants were followed until 31 December 2018, through linkage with the National Patient Registry and the Cause of Death Registry. The primary endpoint was the first of a composite of all-cause death, non-fatal MI, non-fatal stroke, and heart failure hospitalization. Event rates in cases and controls were calculated using a Cox regression model, subsequently adjusted for baseline smoking, education level, and marital status. Kaplan-Meier curves were computed and compared by log-rank test. Results. A total of 804 patients and 800 controls (mean age 62 years; women 19%) were followed for a mean of 6.2 (0.2-8.5) years. The total number of primary events was 211. Patients had a higher event rate than controls (log-rank test p < .0001). Adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for the primary outcome was 2.04 (95% CI 1.52-2.73). Mortality did not differ between patients (n = 38; 4.7%) and controls (n = 35; 4.4%). A total of 82.5% patients and 91.3% controls were event-free during the follow up. Conclusions. In this long-term follow up of a contemporary, case-control study, the risk for cardiovascular events was higher in patients with a previous first MI compared with their matched controls, while mortality did not differ. The access to high quality of care and cardiac rehabilitation might partly explain the low rates of adverse outcomes.

  • 27.
    Ferrannini, Giulia
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kjellstrom, Barbro
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Elvin, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Div Immunol & Allergy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Grosso, Giorgia
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Ryden, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Norhammar, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Capio St Gorans Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with dysglycaemia: A neglected cardiovascular risk factor?2020In: Diabetes & Vascular Disease Research, ISSN 1479-1641, E-ISSN 1752-8984, Vol. 17, no 3, article id 1479164120922123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cardiovascular disease is a serious complication in patients with dysglycaemia, defined as either type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. Research focusing on the identification of potential markers for atherothrombotic disease in these subjects is warranted. The antiphospholipid syndrome is a common acquired prothrombotic condition, defined by a combination of thrombotic events and/or obstetric morbidity and positivity of specific antiphospholipid antibodies. Available information on antiphospholipid antibodies in dysglycaemia is scarce. Objective: This study investigates the association between antiphospholipid antibodies and dysglycaemia. Patients/Methods: The PAROKRANK (periodontitis and its relation to coronary artery disease) study included 805 patients, investigated 6-10 weeks after a first myocardial infarction, and 805 matched controls. Participants without known diabetes (91%) underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. Associations between antiphospholipid antibodies (anti-cardiolipin and anti-beta 2 glycoprotein-I IgG, IgM and IgA) and dysglycaemia were analysed. Results: In total, 137 (9%) subjects had previously known type 2 diabetes and 371 (23%) newly diagnosed dysglycaemia. Compared with the normoglycaemic participants, those with dysglycaemia had a higher proportion with first myocardial infarction (61% vs 45%,p < 0.0001) and were more often antiphospholipid antibody IgG positive (8% vs 5%;p = 0.013). HbA1c, fasting glucose and 2-h glucose were significantly associated to antiphospholipid antibody IgG. Odds ratios (ORs) were 1.04 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.06), 1.14 (95% CI 1.00 - 1.27) and 1.12 (95% CI 1.04 - 1.21), respectively, after adjustments for age, gender and smoking. Conclusions: This study reports an association between antiphospholipid antibody IgG positivity and dysglycaemia. Further studies are needed to verify these findings and to investigate if antithrombotic therapy reduces vascular complications in antiphospholipid antibody positive subjects with dysglycaemia.

  • 28.
    Ferrannini, Giulia
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Turin, Postgrad Sch Internal Med, Dept Med Sci, Turin, Italy..
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kjellstrom, Barbro
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Elvin, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Immunol & Transfus Med, Unit Clin Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Grosso, Giorgia
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Ryden, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Norhammar, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Capio St Gorans Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dysglycaemic patients with antiphospholipid antibodies IgG: a neglected group at high cardiovascular risk?2019In: Lupus, ISSN 0961-2033, E-ISSN 1477-0962, Vol. 28, p. 42-42Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Fortin, E.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Campi, B.
    CNRS, Inst Clin Physiol, Pisa, Italy..
    Ferrannini, E.
    CNRS, Inst Clin Physiol, Pisa, Italy..
    Mari, A.
    CNRS, Inst Neurosci, Padua, Italy..
    Mellbin, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Norhammar, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Ryden, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Saba, A.
    Univ Pisa, Dept Pathol, Pisa, Italy..
    Ferrannini, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    High mannose correlates with surrogate indexes of insulin resistance and predicts cardiovascular events independently of glycaemic status and traditional risk factors2023In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 66, no SUPPL 1, p. S493-S493Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Fortin, E.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Campi, B.
    CNR, Inst Clin Physiol, Pisa, Italy..
    Ferrannini, E.
    CNR, Inst Clin Physiol, Pisa, Italy..
    Mari, A.
    CNR, Inst Neurosci, Padua, Italy..
    Mellbin, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Norhammar, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Ryden, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Saba, A.
    Univ Pisa, Dept Pathol, Mass Spectrometry Lab, Pisa, Italy..
    Ferrannini, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    High mannose correlates with surrogate indexes of insulin resistance and predicts cardiovascular events independently of glycaemic status and traditional risk factors2023In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 44Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Fortin, E.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ferrannini, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Campi, B.
    CNR, Inst Clin Physiol, Pisa, Italy..
    Mellbin, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Norhammar, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Traffic Research, CTR.
    Saba, A.
    Univ Pisa, Dept Surg Med Mol & Crit Area Pathol, Lab Biochem, Pisa, Italy..
    Ferrannini, E.
    CNR, Inst Clin Physiol, Pisa, Italy..
    Ryden, L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Plasma mannose and a first myocardial infarction: associations according to glycaemic state2022In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 65, no SUPPL 1, p. S412-S413Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Fortin, Elena
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Div Cardiol, Norrbacka S1 02, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ferrannini, Giulia
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Div Cardiol, Norrbacka S1 02, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Campi, Beatrice
    CNR, Inst Clin Physiol, Pisa, Italy..
    Mellbin, Linda
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Div Cardiol, Norrbacka S1 02, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Heart Vasc & Neuro Theme, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Norhammar, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Div Cardiol, Norrbacka S1 02, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Capio St Gorans Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Saba, Alessandro
    Univ Pisa, Dept Pathol, Mass Spectrometry Lab, Pisa, Italy.;Santa Chiara Univ Hosp, Clin Pathol Lab, Pisa, Italy..
    Ferrannini, Ele
    CNR, Inst Clin Physiol, Pisa, Italy..
    Ryden, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med K2, Div Cardiol, Norrbacka S1 02, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Plasma mannose as a novel marker of myocardial infarction across different glycaemic states: A case control study2022In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Plasma mannose, an emerging novel biomarker of insulin resistance, is associated with both diabetes mellitus and coronary atherosclerosis, but the relationship between mannose concentrations and myocardial infarction (MI) across different glycaemic states remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the independent association between mannose and a first MI in a group of subjects characterized according to their glycaemic state. Methods Fasting plasma mannose concentrations were analysed in 777 patients 6-10 weeks after a first myocardial infarction and in 770 matched controls by means of high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Participants without known diabetes mellitus were categorized by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as having normal glucose tolerance (NGT, n = 1045), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, n = 246) or newly detected type 2 diabetes (T2DM, n = 112). The association between mannose and MI was investigated across these glycaemic states by logistic regression. Results Mannose levels increased across the glycaemic states (p < 0.0001) and were significantly associated with a first MI in the whole study population (odds ratio, OR: 2.2; 95% CI 1.4 to - 3.5). Considering the different subgroups separately, the association persisted only in subjects with NGT (adjusted OR: 2.0; 95% CI 1.2-3.6), but not in subgroups with glucose perturbations (adjusted OR: 1.8, 95% CI 0.8-3.7). Conclusions Mannose concentrations increased across worsening levels of glucose perturbations but were independently associated with a first MI only in NGT individuals. Thus, mannose might be a novel, independent risk marker for MI, possibly targeted for the early management of previously unidentified patients at high cardiovascular risk.

  • 33.
    Fortin, Elena
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundin, Magnus
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Physiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mellbin, Linda
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Norhammar, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden; Capio St Gorans Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Smetana, Stina
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sörensson, Peder
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Physiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ferrannini, Ele
    CNR, Dept Clin Physiol, Pisa, Italy.
    Rydén, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ferrannini, Giulia
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden; Södertälje Hosp, Internal Med Unit, Södertälje, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Empagliflozin improves insulin sensitivity in patients with recent acute coronary syndrome and newly detected dysglycaemia: Experiences from the randomized, controlled SOCOGAMI trial2023In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 208-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Empagliflozin reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and high cardiovascular risk via mechanisms which have not been fully explained. The mechanisms of such benefit have not been fully understood, and whether empagliflozin can be safely administered as first-line treatment in patients with CVD at the initial stages of glycaemic perturbations remains to be established. We investigated the effects of empagliflozin on insulin resistance, insulin sensitivity and β-cell function indexes in patients with a recent acute coronary event and newly detected dysglycaemia, i.e., impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or T2DM. METHODS: Forty-two patients (mean age 67.5 years, 19% females) with a recent myocardial infarction (n = 36) or unstable angina (n = 6) and newly detected dysglycaemia were randomized to either empagliflozin 25 mg daily (n = 20) or placebo (n = 22). Patients were investigated with stress-perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance imaging before randomization, 7 months after the start of study drug and 3 months following its cessation. Indexes of insulin resistance, sensitivity and β-cell function were calculated based on glucose and insulin values from 2-hour oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) and fasting C-peptide. The differences in glucose, insulin, C-peptide, mannose levels and indexes between the two groups were computed by repeated measures ANOVA including an interaction term between the treatment allocation and the time of visit. RESULTS: After 7 months, empagliflozin significantly decreased glucose and insulin values during the OGTT, whereas C-peptide, mannose and HbA1c did not differ. Empagliflozin significantly improved insulin sensitivity indexes but did not impact insulin resistance and β-cell function. After cessation of the drug, all indexes returned to initial levels. Insulin sensitivity indexes were inversely correlated with left ventricular mass at baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Empagliflozin improved insulin sensitivity indexes in patients with a recent coronary event and drug naïve dysglycaemia. These findings support the safe use of empagliflozin as first-line glucose-lowering treatment in patients at very high cardiovascular risk with newly diagnosed dysglycaemia. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: EudraCT number 2015-004571-73.

  • 34. Franzen-Dahlin, Asa
    et al.
    Billing, Ewa
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Safety Research.
    Martensson, Bjorn
    Wredling, Regina
    Murray, Veronica
    Post-stroke depression - effect on the life situation of the significant other2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 412-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the life situation among,significant others' to patients with post-stroke depression, and to identify associations between the life situation of the significant others and patient characteristics. Seventy-one dyads consisting of patients with a diagnosed post-stroke depression and their significant others were included. The patients were assessed for depression with the Montgomery-angstrom sberg Depression Rating Scale and diagnosed according to the DSM-IV. The assessments of significant others included their own life situation and proxy assessments of the patients' state of depression, anger, change of personality, and need of assistance. Significant others of male stroke patients reported a more negative impact on their life situation, than did significant others of female stroke patients (p = 0.04). There was a significant association between the patient's level of depression and physical function [activities of daily living (ADL)], with those with less impaired ADL having more major depression than those with more impaired ADL (p = 0.007). This study indicates that major post-stroke depression is more common among patients with limited functional deficits. This highlights the importance of assessment for depression also among seemingly recovered stroke patients in order to treat and support those in need. This study also stresses the importance of identifying different needs of the significant others in order to provide appropriate support in their caregiving role.

  • 35. Gerholm, TR
    et al.
    Meisels, S
    Brandell, L
    Thedéen, T
    Claesson, L
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Långsiktig energikonsumtionsutveckling1982Report (Other academic)
  • 36. Glimelius, B
    et al.
    Linné, T
    Hoffman, K
    Larsson, L
    Svensson, JH
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Svensson, B
    Helmers, C
    Epoetin Beta in the Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer1998In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 434-440Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37. Graham, C.
    et al.
    Lewis, S.
    Forbes, J.
    Mead, G.
    Hackett, M. L.
    Hankey, G. J.
    Gommans, J.
    Nguyen, H. T.
    Lundström, E.
    Isaksson, E.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH.
    Rudberg, A. -S
    Dennis, M.
    The FOCUS, AFFINITY and EFFECTS trials studying the effect(s) of fluoxetine in patients with a recent stroke: Statistical and health economic analysis plan for the trials and for the individual patient data meta-analysis2017In: Trials, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Small trials have suggested that fluoxetine may improve neurological recovery from stroke. FOCUS, AFFINITY and EFFECTS are a family of investigator-led, multicentre, parallel group, randomised, placebo-controlled trials which aim to determine whether the routine administration of fluoxetine (20 mg daily) for six months after an acute stroke improves patients' functional outcome. Methods/Design: The core protocol for the three trials has been published (Mead et al., Trials 20:369, 2015). The trials include patients aged 18 years and older with a clinical diagnosis of stroke and persisting focal neurological deficits at randomisation 2-15 days after stroke onset. Patients are randomised centrally via each trials' web-based randomisation system using a common minimisation algorithm. Patients are allocated fluoxetine 20 mg once daily or matching placebo capsules for six months. The primary outcome measure is the modified Rankin scale (mRS) at six months. Secondary outcomes include: living circumstances; the Stroke Impact Scale; EuroQol (EQ5D-5 L); the vitality subscale of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF36); diagnosis of depression; adherence to medication; serious adverse events including death and recurrent stroke; and resource use at six and 12 months and the mRS at 12 months. Discussion: Minor variations have been tailored to the national setting in the UK (FOCUS), Australia, New Zealand and Vietnam (AFFINITY) and Sweden (EFFECTS). Each trial is run and funded independently and will report its own results. A prospectively planned individual patient data meta-analysis of all three trials will provide the most precise estimate of the overall effect and establish whether any effects differ between trials or subgroups. This statistical analysis plan describes the core analyses for all three trials and that for the individual patient data meta-analysis. Recruitment and follow-up in the FOCUS trial is expected to be completed by the end of 2018. AFFINITY and EFFECTS are likely to complete follow-up in 2020.

  • 38.
    Grosso, Giorgia
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Unit Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sippl, Natalie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kjellstrom, Barbro
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Cardiol Unit, Dept Med Solna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Amara, Khaled
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Rheumatol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    de Faire, Ulf
    Karolinska Inst, Div Cardiovasc Epidemiol IMM, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Elvin, Kerstin
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Solna, Unit Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Unit Clin Immunol, Dept Clin Immunol & Transfus Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Ryden, Lars
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Norrhammar, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Capio St Gorans Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Div Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    IgG Antiphospholipid Antibodies, -a Common but Neglected Finding in Patients with Myocardial Infarction2018In: Arthritis & Rheumatology, ISSN 2326-5191, E-ISSN 2326-5205, Vol. 70Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Grosso, Giorgia
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sippl, Natalie
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kjellström, Barbro
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Amara, Khaled
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    de Faire, Ulf
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Elvin, Kerstin
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Ryden, Lars
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Norhammar, Anna
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.;Capio St Gorans Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svenungsson, Elisabet
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Patients With Myocardial Infarction2019In: Annals of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0003-4819, E-ISSN 1539-3704, Vol. 170, no 4, p. 277-280Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40. Gustafsson, A
    et al.
    Buhlin, K
    de Faire, U
    Kjellström, B
    Klinge, B
    Lindahl, B
    Norhammar, A
    Nygren, Å
    Näsman, P
    Svenungsson, E
    Rydén, L
    The Relation between Cardiovascular and Periodontal Disease - the PAROKRANK study.2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41. Gustafsson, T
    et al.
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Holmberg, S
    Senaste nytt ur SVT:s valundersökningar2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42. Gustavsson, J
    et al.
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Some information about the activities at the Department of Statistics, Stockholm University, Sweden1990Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43. Hedenus, M
    et al.
    Birgegård, G
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Ahlberg, L
    Karlsson, T
    Lauri, B
    Lundin, J
    Lärfars, G
    Österborg, A
    Adjuvant intravenous iron therapy potentiates epoetin beta treatment in anemic, non iron-depleted patients with lymphoproliferative disorders: Results of the NIFE study2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44. Hedenus, M.
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics.
    Liwing, J.
    Economic evaluation in Sweden of epoetin beta with intravenous iron supplementation in anaemic patients with lymphoproliferative malignancies not receiving chemotherapy2008In: Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-4727, E-ISSN 1365-2710, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 365-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Background and objective: Functional iron deficiency is one reason for lack of response to erythropoietin treatment. Concomitant intravenous (IV) iron supplementation has the potential to improve response to erythropoietin, allowing a decrease in erythropoietin dose requirements. In a recent study of anaemic, iron-replete patients with lymphoproliferative malignancies (Leukemia, 21, 2007, 627), the haemoglobin (Hb) increase and response rate were significantly greater in patients receiving epoetin beta with concomitant IV iron compared with patients receiving epoetin beta without IV iron (P < 0 05). The present analysis aimed to investigate whether a combination of epoetin beta and IV iron is cost-effective compared with epoetin beta without IV iron.

    Methods: This analysis was performed from a Swedish societal perspective as a within-trial evaluation of overall costs (based on differences in drug costs and resource use between groups) and effect (differences in Hb increases) during 16 weeks' treatment with epoetin beta with or without concomitant IV iron.

    Results and discussion: There was an improved response to epoetin beta with IV iron therapy and an almost 2-fold greater increase in Hb levels. Overall mean cost per patient in the epoetin beta with IV iron group was is an element of 5558 and in the epoetin beta without IV iron group was is an element of 6228. Thus, treatment with epoetin beta with IV iron resulted in overall cost savings of about 11% compared with epoetin beta without iron, mainly due to reduced erythropoietin dosages.

    Conclusion: Epoetin beta with concomitant IV iron in anaemic patients with lymphoproliferative malignancies not receiving chemotherapy resulted in better outcomes at lower cost compared with epoetin beta without iron. This suggests that epoetin beta with IV iron is a dominant therapy from a Swedish perspective.

  • 45. Hedenus, Michael
    et al.
    Birgegård, G.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Safety Research.
    Ahlberg, L.
    Karlsson, T.
    Lauri, B.
    Lundin, J.
    Lärfars, Gerd
    Österborg, A.
    Addition of intravenous iron to epoetin beta increases hemoglobin response and decreases epoetin dose requirement in anemic patients with lymphoproliferative malignancies: a randomized multicenter study2007In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 627-632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This randomized study assessed if intravenous iron improves hemoglobin (Hb) response and permits decreased epoetin dose in anemic (Hb 9 - 11 g/dl), transfusion-independent patients with stainable iron in the bone marrow and lymphoproliferative malignancies not receiving chemotherapy. Patients (n = 67) were randomized to subcutaneous epoetin beta 30 000 IU once weekly for 16 weeks with or without concomitant intravenous iron supplementation. There was a significantly (P < 0.05) greater increase in mean Hb from week 8 onwards in the iron group and the percentage of patients with Hb increase >= 2 g/dl was significantly higher in the iron group (93%) than in the no-iron group (53%) (per-protocol population; P < 0.001). Higher serum ferritin and transferrin saturation in the iron group indicated that iron availability accounted for the Hb response difference. The mean weekly patient epoetin dose was significantly lower after 13 weeks of therapy (P < 0.029) and after 15 weeks approximately 10 000 IU (425%) lower in the iron group, as was the total epoetin dose (P = 0.051). In conclusion, the Hb increase and response rate were significantly greater with the addition of intravenous iron to epoetin treatment in iron-replete patients and a lower dose of epoetin was required.

  • 46. Hedenus, Michael
    et al.
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Safety Research.
    Epoetin beta with intravenous iron results in overall cost savings in a population of anemic patients with lymphoid malignancies not receiving chemotherapy2007In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 110, no 11, p. 5179-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47. Hernborn, H
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Thedéen, T
    Valu Swedish Exit Polls2002Report (Other academic)
  • 48. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Valu 2003. SVT:s vallokalundersökning EMU-valet 20032003Report (Other academic)
  • 49. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Thedéen, T
    SVT:s vallokalundersökning 19911991Report (Other academic)
  • 50. Hernborn, H
    et al.
    Holmberg, S
    Näsman, P
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Thedéen, T
    Valu 2002. SVT:s vallokalundersökning 20022002Report (Other academic)
12345 1 - 50 of 245
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