Change search
Refine search result
1 - 27 of 27
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bell, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Speech, Music and Hearing. Telia Research, Sweden.
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Speech, Music and Hearing. Telia Research, Sweden.
    Real-time Handling of Fragmented Utterances2001In: Proceedings of the NAACL Workshop on Adaption in Dialogue Systems, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    this paper, we discuss an adaptive method of handling fragmented user utterances to a speech-based multimodal dialogue system. Inserted silent pauses between fragments present the following problem: Does the current silence indicate that the user has completed her utterance, or is the silence just a pause between two fragments, so that the system should wait for more input? Our system incrementally classifies user utterances as either closing (more input is unlikely to come) or non-closing (more input is likely to come), partly depending on the current dialogue state. Utterances that are categorized as non-closing allow the dialogue system to await additional spoken or graphical input before responding

  • 2.
    Bell, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Wirén, Mats
    Modality Convergence in a Multimodal Dialogue System2000In: Proceedings of Götalog, 2000, p. 29-34Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When designing multimodal dialogue systems allowing speech as well as graphical operations, it is important to understand not only how people make use of the different modalities in their utterances, but also how the system might influence a user’s choice of modality by its own behavior. This paper describes an experiment in which subjects interacted with two versions of a simulated multimodal dialogue system. One version used predominantly graphical means when referring to specific objects; the other used predominantly verbal referential expressions. The purpose of the study was to find out what effect, if any, the system’s referential strategy had on the user’s behavior. The results provided limited support for the hypothesis that the system can influence users to adopt another modality for the purpose of referring

  • 3.
    Boye, Johan
    TeliaSonera R&D, Farsta, Sweden.
    Dialogue management for automatic troubleshooting and other problem-solving applications2007In: Proceedings of the 8th SIGDial workshop on discourse and dialogue, 2007, p. 247-255Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a dialogue management method suitable for automatic troubleshooting and other problem-solving applications. The method has a theoremproving flavor, in that it recursively decomposes tasks into sequences of sub-tasks and atomic actions. An explicit objective when designing the method was that it should be usable by other people than the designers themselves, notably IVR application developers. Therefore the method has a transparent execution model, and is configurable using a simple scripting language.

  • 4.
    Boye, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Fredriksson, M.
    Götze, Jana
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Königsmann, J.
    Walk this way: Spatial grounding for city exploration2012In: IWSDS, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Boye, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Fredriksson, Morgan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Götze, Jana
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Königsmann, Jurgen
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Walk this way: Spatial grounding for city exploration2014In: Natural interaction with robots, knowbots and smartphones, Springer-Verlag , 2014, p. 59-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently there has been an interest in spatially aware systems for pedestrian routing and city exploration, due to the proliferation of smartphones with GPS receivers among the general public. Since GPS readings are noisy, giving good and well-timed route instructions to pedestrians is a challenging problem. This paper describes a spoken-dialogue prototype for pedestrian navigation in Stockholm that addresses this problem by using various grounding strategies.

  • 6.
    Boye, Johan
    et al.
    TeliaSonera.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    TeliaSonera.
    How to do dialogue in a fairy-tale world2005In: Proceedings of the 6th SIGDial workshop on discourse and dialogue, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work presented in this paper is an endeavor tocreate a prototype of a computer game with spokendialogue capabilities. Advanced spoken dialogue hasthe potential to considerably enrich computer games,where it for example would allow players to refer topast events and to objects currently not visible onthe screen. It would also allaow users to interactsocially and to negotiate solutions with the gamecharacters. The game takes place in a fairy-taleworld, and features two different fairy-talecharacters, who can interact with the player and witheach other using spoken dialogue. The fairy-talecharacters are separate entities in the sense that eachcharacter has its own set of goals and its ownperception of the world. This paper gives anoverview of the functionality of the implementeddialogue manager in the NICE fairy-tale gamesystem.

  • 7.
    Boye, Johan
    et al.
    TeliaSonera R&D, Farsta, Sweden.
    Wirén, M.
    Multi-slot semantics for natural-language call routing systems2007In: Proceedings of the Naacl’07 workshop Bridging the gap: Academic and industrial research in dialog technologie, 2007, p. 68-75Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Statistical classification techniques for natural-language call routing systems have matured to the point where it is possible to distinguish between several hundreds of semantic categories with an accuracy that is sufficient for commercial deployments. For category sets of this size, the problem of maintaining consistency among manually tagged utterances becomes limiting, as lack of consistency in the training data will degrade performance of the classifier. It is thus essential that the set of categories be structured in a way that alleviates this problem, and enables consistency to be preserved as the domain keeps changing. In this paper, we describe our experiences of using a two-level multi-slot semantics as a way of meeting this problem. Furthermore, we explore the ramifications of the approach with respect to classification, evaluation and dialogue design for call routing systems.

  • 8.
    Boye, Johan
    et al.
    TeliaSonera R and D.
    Wirén, M.
    Robust parsing and spoken negotiative dialogue with databases2008In: Natural Language Engineering, ISSN 1351-3249, E-ISSN 1469-8110, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 289-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a robust parsing algorithm and semantic formalism for the interpretation of utterances in spoken negotiative dialogue with databases. The algorithm works in two passes: a domain-specific pattern-matching phase and a domain-independent semantic analysis phase. Robustness is achieved by limiting the set of representable utterance types to an empirically motivated subclass which is more expressive than propositional slot–value lists, but much less expressive than first-order logic. Our evaluation shows that in actual practice the vast majority of utterances that occur can be handled, and that the parsing algorithm is highly efficient and accurate.

  • 9.
    Boye, Johan
    et al.
    TeliaSonera.
    Wirén, Mats
    TeliaSonera.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    TeliaSonera.
    Contextual reasoning in multimodal dialogue systems: two case studies2004In: Proceedings of The 8th Workshop on the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue Catalogue'04, Barcelona, 2004, p. 19-21Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes an approach to contextual reasoning for interpretation ofspoken multimodal dialogue. The approach is based on combining recencybased search for antecedents with an object-oriented domain representation insuch a way that the search is highly constrained by the type information of theantecedents. By furthermore representingcandidate antecedents from the dialoguehistory and visual context in a uniformway, a single machinery (based on -reduction in lambda calculus) can be usedfor resolving many kinds of underspecified utterances. The approach has beenimplemented in two highly different domains.

  • 10. Crook, N.
    et al.
    Field, D.
    Smith, C.
    Harding, S.
    Pulman, S.
    Cavazza, M.
    Charlton, D.
    Moore, R.
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Generating context-sensitive ECA responses to user barge-in interruptions2012In: Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces, ISSN 1783-7677, E-ISSN 1783-8738, Vol. 6, no 1-2, p. 13-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an Embodied Conversational Agent (ECA) that incorporates a context-sensitive mechanism for handling user barge-in. The affective ECA engages the user in social conversation, and is fully implemented. We will use actual examples of system behaviour to illustrate. The ECA is designed to recognise and be empathetic to the emotional state of the user. It is able to detect, react quickly to, and then follow up with considered responses to different kinds of user interruptions. The design of the rules which enable the ECA to respond intelligently to different types of interruptions was informed by manually analysed real data from human-human dialogue. The rules represent recoveries from interruptions as two-part structures: an address followed by a resumption. The system is robust enough to manage long, multi-utterance turns by both user and system, which creates good opportunities for the user to interrupt while the ECA is speaking.

  • 11. Crook, N
    et al.
    Pulman, S
    Smith, C
    Moore, R
    Cavazza, M
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Handling user interruptions in an embodied conversational agent2010In: Proceedings of the 9th international conference on autonomous agents and multi-agent systems (AAMAS'2010), 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a mechanism for handling “barge-in” interruptions from a user who is engaged in a ’social’ conversation with an Embodied Conversational Agent (ECA). The ECA is designed to recognise and be empathetic to the emotional state of the user. Occasionally, the ECA will attempt to positively influence the user’s emotional state through the conversation. A characteristic of these conversations is that both the user and the ECA will at times speak long, multi sentence utterances as the conversation progresses. The gener tion of long utterances from the ECA creates opportunities for the user to barge-in whilst the ECA is speaking. Furthermore, the long ECA utterances may even provoke a user interruption since they often include advice to the user about how they should deal with difficult or stressful situations that have arisen. This paper outlines an approach to handling user barge-in interruptions in conversations with an ECA and describes its implementation in the Companions English demonstrator.

  • 12.
    Fredriksson, Morgan
    et al.
    Liquid Media.
    Königsmann, Jugen
    Liquid Media.
    Bartie, Phil
    Edinburgh University.
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Dalmas, Tiphaine
    Edinburgh University.
    Götze, Jana
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Mollevik, Johan
    Umeå University.
    Janarthanam, Srini
    Heriot Watt.
    Lemon, Oliver
    Heriot Watt.
    Liu, Xingkun
    Heriot Watt.
    Minock, Michael
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    D5.2.2: Final city search SpaceBook prototype2014Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Bell, Linda
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Johan, Boye
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Edlund, Jens
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Wirn, Mats
    Constraint Manipulation and Visualization in a Multimodal Dialogue System2002In: Proceedings of MultiModal Dialogue in Mobile Environments, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Götze, Jana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Deriving Salience Models from Human Route Directions2013In: Workshop on Computational Models of Spatial Language Interpretation and Generation 2013: (CoSLI-3), 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an approach to derive individual preferences in the use of landmarks for route instructions in a city environment. Each possible landmark that a person can refer to in a given situation is modelled as a feature vector, and the preference (or salience) associated with the landmark can be computed as a weighted sum of these features. The weight vector, representing the person's personal salience model, is automatically derived from the person's own route descriptions. Experiments show that the derived salience models can correctly predict the user's choice of landmark in 69% of the cases.

  • 15.
    Götze, Jana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Learning Landmark Salience Models from Users' Route Instructions2016In: Journal of Location Based Services, ISSN 1748-9725, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 47-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Route instructions for pedestrians are usually better understood if they include references to landmarks, and moreover, these landmarks should be as salient as possible. In this paper, we present an approach for automatically deriving a mathematical model of salience directly from route instructions given by humans. Each possible landmark that a person can refer to in a given situation is modelled as a feature vector, and the salience associated with each landmark can be computed as a weighted sum of these features. We use a ranking SVM method to derive the weights from route instructions given by humans as they are walking the route. The weight vector, representing the person’s personal salience model, determines which landmark(s) are most appropriate to refer to in new situations.

  • 16.
    Götze, Jana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Resolving spatial references using crowdsourced geographical data2015In: Proceedings of the 20th Nordic Conference of Computational Linguistics, NODALIDA 2015, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015, p. 61-68Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a study in which we seek to interpret spatial references that are part of in-situ route descriptions. Our aim is to resolve these references to actual entities and places in the city using a crowdsourced geographic database (OpenStreetMap). We discuss the problems related to this task, and present a possible automatic reference resolution method that can find the correct referent in 68% of the cases using features that are easily computable from the map.

  • 17.
    Götze, Jana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    "Turn left" vs. "Walk towards the cafe": When relative directions work better than landmarks2015In: AGILE 2015: Geographic Information Science as an Enabler of Smarter Cities and Communities. Part III / [ed] Bacao, F., M.Y. Santos, M. Painho, Springer Publishing Company, 2015, p. 253-267Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An automatic mechanism that gives verbal navigation instructions to pedestrians in situ needs to take into account a number of factors. Besides giving the instruction at the righttime and place, the information needs to be as unambiguous as possible for the user to both choose the correct path and be confident in doing so. Humans make extensive use of landmarks when describ-ing the way to others and are more successful following instructions that in-clude landmarks. We present a study comparing landmark-based instructions with relative direction instructions on pedestrians in a real city environment, measuring both objective and subjective success. We find that atsome deci-sion points, relative direction instructions work better. We present a method that uses openly available geographic data to predict which kindof instruction is preferable ata given decision point.

  • 18.
    Götze, Jana
    et al.
    KTH.
    Johan, Boye
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Reference resolution for pedestrian wayfinding systems2017In: 20th AGILE International Conference on Geographic Information Science, 2017, Kluwer Academic Publishers , 2017, p. 59-75Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    References to objects in our physical environment are common especially in language about wayfinding. Advanced wayfinding systems that interact with the pedestrian bymeans of (spoken) natural language therefore need to be able to resolve references given by pedestrians (i.e. understand what entity the pedestrian is referring to). The contribution of this paper is a probabilistic approach to reference resolution in a large-scale, real city environment, where the context changes constantly as the pedestrians are moving. The geographic situation, including information about objects’ location and type, is represented using OpenStreetMap data.

  • 19. Henkel, Martin
    et al.
    Perjons, Erik
    Sneiders, Eriks
    Karlgren, Jussi
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Thelemyr, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Language technology for eGovernment - business cases2014In: New Perspectives in Information Systems and Technologies, Volume 1, Springer, 2014, no VOLUME 1, p. 83-95Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Language technologies and tools, such as text mining, information extraction, and question and answering systems, have been developed during many years. These technologies are becoming mature and should be ready for deployment in private and public organizations. However, little focus has been paid to how these technologies can be applied to tackle real-world problems within organizations. In this paper, we present a set of business cases where language technologies can have a significant impact on public organizations, including their business processes and services. We describe how each business case can influence the service quality, as seen from a consumer perspective, and the business processes efficiency, as seen from a public organizational perspective. The business cases are based on, and exemplified with, cases from large Swedish public organizations.

  • 20.
    Kalpakchi, Dmytro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    SpaceRefNet: a neural approach to spatial reference resolution in a real city environment2019In: Proceedings of the 20th Annual SIGdial Meeting on Discourse and Dialogue, Association for Computational Linguistics , 2019, p. 422-431Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adding interactive capabilities to pedestrian wayfinding systems in the form of spoken dialogue will make them more natural to humans. Such an interactive wayfinding system needs to continuously understand and interpret pedestrian’s utterances referring to the spatial context. Achieving this requires the system to identify exophoric referring expressions in the utterances, and link these expressions to the geographic entities in the vicinity. This exophoric spatial reference resolution problem is difficult, as there are often several dozens of candidate referents. We present a neural network-based approach for identifying pedestrian’s references (using a network called RefNet) and resolving them to appropriate geographic objects (using a network called SpaceRefNet). Both methods show promising results beating the respective baselines and earlier reported results in the literature.

  • 21.
    Mackaness, William
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Clark, Stephen
    Fredriksson, Morgan
    Geffner, Hector
    Lemon, Oliver
    Minock, Michael
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Webber, Bonnie
    The SpaceBook Project: Pedestrian Exploration of the City Using Dialogue Based Interaction over Smartphones2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Meena, Raveesh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Skantze, Gabriel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Crowdsourcing Street-level Geographic Information Using a Spoken Dialogue System2014In: Proceedings of the SIGDIAL 2014 Conference, Association for Computational Linguistics, 2014, p. 2-11Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a technique for crowd-sourcing street-level geographic information using spoken natural language. In particular, we are interested in obtaining first-person-view information about what can be seen from different positions in the city. This information can then for example be used for pedestrian routing services. The approach has been tested in the lab using a fully implemented spoken dialogue system, and is showing promising results.

  • 23.
    Meena, Raveesh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Skantze, Gabriel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Gustafson, Joakim
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Using a Spoken Dialogue System for Crowdsourcing Street-level Geographic Information2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a novel scheme for enriching geographic database with street-level geographic information that could be useful for pedestrian navigation. A spoken dialogue system for crowdsourcing street-level geographic details was developed and tested in an in-lab experimentation, and has shown promising results.

  • 24.
    Minock, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Clark, Stephen
    Fredriksson, Morgan
    Geffner, Hector
    Lemon, Oliver
    Mackaness, William
    Webber, Bonnie
    Initial description of results and plans for dissemination2012Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Minock, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Boye, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Clark, Stephen
    Cambridge University.
    Fredriksson, Morgan
    Liquid Media.
    Geffner, Hector
    Barcelona PFU.
    Lemon, Oliver
    Heriot Watt.
    Mackaness, William
    Edinburgh University.
    Webber, Bonnie
    Edinburgh University .
    Summary of SpaceBook project results2014Report (Other academic)
  • 26. Pulman, S.
    et al.
    Boye, Johan
    University of Oxford.
    Cavazza, M.
    Smith, C.
    Santos de la Cámara, R.
    How was your day?2010In: Proceedings of the 2010 Workshop on Companionable Dialogue Systems, ACL 2010, 2010, p. 37-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe a 'How was your day?' (HWYD) Companion whose purpose is to establish a comforting and supportive relationship with a user via a conversation on a variety of work-related topics. The system has several fairly novel features aimed at increasing the naturalness of the interaction: a rapid 'short loop' response primed by the results of acoustic emotion analysis, and an 'interruption manager', enabling the user to interrupt lengthy or apparently inappropriate system responses, prompting a replanning of behaviour on the part of the system. The 'long loop' also takes into account the emotional state of the user, but using more conventional dialogue management and planning techniques. We describe the architecture and components of the implemented prototype HWYD system.

  • 27. Smith, C.
    et al.
    Crook, N.
    Boye, Johan
    Oxford University Computing Laboratory, Wolfson Building, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Charlton, D.
    Dobnik, S.
    Pizzi, D.
    Cavazza, M.
    Pulman, S.
    De La Camara, R.S.
    Turunen, M.
    Interaction strategies for an affective conversational agent2010In: Proceedings of the 10th international conference on intelligent virtual agents, 2010, p. 301-314Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of Embodied Conversational Agents (ECA) as Companions brings several challenges for both affective and conversational dialogue. These include challenges in generating appropriate affective responses, selecting the overall shape of the dialogue, providing prompt system response times and handling interruptions. We present an implementation of such a Companion showing the development of individual modules that attempt to address these challenges. Further, to resolve resulting conflicts, we present encompassing interaction strategies that attempt to balance the competing requirements. Finally, we present dialogues from our working prototype to illustrate these interaction strategies in operation.

1 - 27 of 27
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf