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  • 1.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Dias-Ferreira, Joao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Continuous precise workload control method2014In: IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management, 2014, p. 511-515Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The diversity of requirements and the frequency of change in the market can only be competed with dynamicity and responsiveness in both production and planning systems. In this sense, working principles of a novel workload control method, called continuous precise workload control are presented in this paper. The implementation of the method is based on a multi-agent based architecture. The presented approach generates dynamic non periodic release decisions exploiting real time shop floor information. The performance of the system and correlation of norm value against the assessment range are investigated through an experimented test case.

  • 2.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Ferreira, Joao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Operational characterization of evolvable productionsystems2012In: 4th CIRP Conference on Assembly Technologies and Systems – CATS 2012, 2012, p. 85-90Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the way to achieve mass customization production systems have to obtain the capability of rapid reconfiguration of not only physical components but also from control point of view. Evolvable Production System targets highly adaptable mechanical and control solutions that can enhance reusability and interoperability of modules, enabling lifetime extension of the modules. The focus of EPS paradigm is to achieve overall system adaptability by autonomous modules which are dedicated to specific processes with the capability of short deployment time at shop floor without reprogramming effort. From the operational point of view EPS brings significant enhancements considering shop floor dynamics and performances therefore positioning of EPS principles and approaches in production system typology from different perspectives is essential. This has been done by two means which are process flow structure and customer order decoupling point location.

  • 3.
    Antonelli, Dario
    et al.
    Department of Management and Production Engineering, Polytechnic University of Turin, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10138 Torino, Italy, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24..
    Aliev, Khushid
    Department of Management and Production Engineering, Polytechnic University of Turin, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10138 Torino, Italy, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24..
    Soriano, Marco
    Department of Management and Production Engineering, Polytechnic University of Turin, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10138 Torino, Italy, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24..
    Samir, Kousay
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering.
    Monetti, Fabio Marco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering, Industrial Production Systems.
    Exploring the limitations and potential of digital twins for mobile manipulators in industry2024In: 5th International Conference on Industry 4.0 and Smart Manufacturing (ISM 2023), Elsevier BV , 2024, Vol. 232, p. 1121-1130Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the qualification of a digital twin (DT) for a mobile manipulator (MOMA) in industrial applications. We discuss the development of different DT models based on various industrial needs and highlight the dependence of model accuracy on online sensor precision. Limitations of DTs for MOMA are examined, including challenges in respecting qualifiers due to the inability to incorporate unstructured aspects of the factory environment. Through a case study and some examples, we show the latent potential and limitations of DTs for MOMA in industrial contexts. The challenges of fidelity, real-time operation, and environment modeling are discussed. It is emphasized that creating a true digital twin of a mobile manipulator is hindered by the inability to include the complete surrounding environment. Recommendations for future research focus on addressing these limitations to enhance the effectiveness of DTs for MOMA in Industry 4.0 and smart manufacturing.

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  • 4.
    Antonelli, Dario
    et al.
    Politecn Torino, Corso Duca Abruzzi 24, I-110129 Turin, Italy..
    D'Addona, Doriana M.
    Univ Napoli Federico II, Dept Chem Mat & Ind Prod Engn, Naples, Italy..
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Modrak, Vladimir
    TUKE, Kosice, Slovakia..
    Putnik, Goran
    UMINHO, Braga, Portugal..
    Stadnicka, Dorota
    Rzeszow Univ Technol, Al Powstancow Warszawy 12, PL-35959 Rzeszow, Poland..
    Stylios, Chrysostomos
    Technol Educ Inst Epirus, Kostakioi Arta 47100, Greece..
    Tiphys: An Open Networked Platform for Higher Education on Industry 4.02019In: 12TH CIRP CONFERENCE ON INTELLIGENT COMPUTATION IN MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING / [ed] Teti, R DAddona, DM, ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV , 2019, p. 706-711Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective of Tiphys project is building an Open Networked Platform for the learning of Industry 4.0 themes. The project will create a Virtual Reality (VR) platform, where users will be able to design and create a VR based environment for training and simulating industrial processes but they will be able to study and select among a set of models in order to standardize the learning and physical processes as a virtual representation of the real industrial world and the required interactions so that to acquire learning and training capabilities.. The models will be structured in a modular approach to promote the integration in the existing mechanisms as well as for future necessary adaptations. The students will be able to co-create their learning track and the learning contents by collaborative working in a dynamic environment. The paper presents the development and validation of the learning model, built on CONALI learning ontology. The concepts of the ontology will be detailed and the platform functions will be demonstrated on selected use cases.

  • 5.
    Archenti, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
    Maffei, AntonioKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Proceedings of the International Conference on Advanced Manufacturing Engineering and Technologies2013Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
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    NEWTECH 2013 Vol. 1
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    NEWTECH 2013 Vol. 2
  • 6.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Handling complexity in Evolvable Production Systems2010In: IEEE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS (ISIE 2010), 2010, p. 2664-2668Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current demand for agile and sustainable production systems increases the needs of strategies to cope with the arising complexity of product transformation. In the EPS framework these strategies include a process-oriented modularization as well as distributed control solutions based on Multi-Agent technology. Reference Architecture and ontological representation of the logical and physical links in the system are at the basis of developing and running a production system in an EPS environment. This paper provides a review of EPS features and their effects on the complexity and the ability to handle it.

  • 7.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Evolvable Production Systems: A Coalition-Based Production Approach2011In: Handbook of Research on Mobility and Computing: Evolving Technologies and Ubiquitous Impacts / [ed] Maria Manuela Cruz-Cunha and Fernando Moreira, IGI Global, 2011, p. 821-835Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Boffa, Eleonora
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Lupi, Francesco
    Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, University of Pisa, 56122, Pisa, Italy.
    Lanzetta, Michele
    Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, University of Pisa, 56122, Pisa, Italy.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    The Digitalization of Engineering Curricula: Defining the Categories that Preserve Constructive Alignment2022In: Higher Education Learning Methodologies and Technologies Online / [ed] Gabriella Casalino, Marta Cimitile, Pietro Ducange, Natalia Padilla Zea, Riccardo Pecori, Pietro Picerno, Paolo Raviolo, Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH , 2022, p. 333-346Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly changed the education domain boosting its digitalization. A pedagogical shift from live to virtual teaching, learning, and assessment activities is the primary outcome of this transition. This work analyses two courses included in the Industrial Engineering program offered in two prominent European higher education institutions. The Constructive Alignment (CA) approach is the baseline of this work and is used to analyze how the Teaching and Learning Activities (TLAs) and the Assessment Tasks (ATs) of the selected courses are adjusted to maintain alignment with the Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) defined before the Digital Transition (DT). The main contribution is the definition of the relevant categories, i.e., Technology, Interaction, and Time, to guide the DT in engineering and beyond by maintaining the alignment on ILO-TLA-AT. 

  • 9.
    Boffa, Eleonora
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Digital Smart Production.
    Lupi, Francesco
    Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, University of Pisa, 56122 Pisa, Italy.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Digital Smart Production.
    Lanzetta, Michele
    Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, University of Pisa, 56122 Pisa, Italy.
    The digital transformation of Engineering curricula: the categories that preserve Constructive Alignment2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientific publications discussing online/distance learning have significantly in-creased throughout the last decade. The COVID-19 pandemic represented an unexpected condition that significantly changed people ́s lifestyle along withthe education domain boosting even further its digitalization, mostly at higherlevels. The digitalization of education is facilitating a pedagogical shift from physical to virtual. Distance learning is becoming more popular as it may par-tially replace on-campus education. In this new digital scenario, the focus on engagement, the instructor’s role, and course design is of crucial importance.

    As for the course design, teachers have been challenged to comply with the Con-structive Alignment (CA) approach. In this work we assume that Teaching Learning Activities (TLA) and Assessment Tasks (AT) should be adjusted to achieve the same Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO) set before distance learn-ing [5]. In view of the above, this paper assesses two courses selected from the Industrial Engineering study program o↵ered in two prominent European highereducation institutions. The CA approach is the baseline of this work and is used to analyse how the TLA and AT of the selected courses are adjusted to main-tain alignment with the ILOs defined before the digital transition. The main contribution is defining a set of categories to guide the digital transaction inengineering and beyond by maintaining the alignment on ILO-TLA-AT.

  • 10.
    Boffa, Eleonora
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    A descriptive framework to characterize the manufacturing domain in the context of business models2019In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier BV , 2019, p. 1360-1365Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological advancements require sound application to deliver their innovation potential. Bringing a new technology to the market involves accounting for infrastructures, network and competences of a firm across a timeframe spanning from short to long term. A growing part of the scientific community addresses this heterogeneous task through the definition of the Business Model (BM). BM is emerging as a separate field of study including all the aspects related with technological application: their definition, use, interconnection and evolution. Nevertheless, BM is a relatively poorly explored area of contribution in the manufacturing domain. This paper delves into specific literature to provide a more extensive characterization of the aspects discussed within manufacturing research through the lens of the BM perspective. Specifically, it contributes to describe the impact of trends such as Servitization and Sustainability which affect the BM´s components and could possibly trigger a Business Model Innovation in manufacturing firms.

  • 11.
    Boffa, Eleonora
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Classification of Sustainable Business Models: a Literature Review and a Map of Their Impact on the Sustainable Development Goals2021In: FME TRANSACTIONS, ISSN 1451-2092, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 784-794Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable Business Models (SBM) have been seen as a suitable vehicle for organizations to convey sustainability. The SBM requires a company's business strategy to be shaped around sustainability goals. These goals can be integrated into the business strategy by creating an internal commitment focused on sustainability. Enablers play a crucial role in this integration process. The 2030 Agenda issued by the United Nations set clear goals on sustainable development, i.e. the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Firms are encouraged to design SBM to fulfil these goals. Yet, an extensive investigation of the effect of the SBM applications on the SDGs is lacking. This paper is based on a semantic analysis of the relevant literature. The results show the internal enablers that support the integration process of sustainability into the organization's strategy. In addition to that, the underlying classification process highlights the clusters of applications for the SBM. These are, in turn, mapped over the SDGs to show the impact of each cluster on each SDG.

  • 12.
    Boffa, Eleonora
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering, Industrial Production Systems.
    Development and application of an Integrated Business Model framework to describe the digital transformation of manufacturing - a bibliometric analysis2023In: Production & Manufacturing Research, E-ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 2164952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digitalisation trend is affecting the manufacturing industry byadopting several emerging technologies that can increase the efficiencyand output of production processes and operations. A growingbody of literature shows that this trend demands a structuralrethink of how companies do business. However, there is a lack ofholistic contributions describing how aspects of manufacturing digitalisationalign with the Business Model Innovation process. Thisstudy uses a bibliometric mapping approach to analyse the literatureon manufacturing digital transformation through the IntegratedBusiness Model (IBM) lens. The results identify the major researchtopics discussed in the analysed domain and propose an enrichedIBM framework with specific descriptions and connections amongthe components and their relative strengths. Holistically, the resultingenhanced model may ultimately assist practitioners in understandingthe innovation process of the BM triggered bytechnological shifts in their manufacturing, enabling an alignmentof the manufacturing strategy with IBM’s components.

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  • 13.
    Boffa, Eleonora
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering.
    How does Manufacturing Strategy Impact the Goals of a Firm?: A Relational Framework Characterizing the Related Business Models' Components2023In: Management and Production Engineering Review, ISSN 2080-8208, E-ISSN 2082-1344, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 18-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fourth industrial revolution has resulted in technology advancements in the manufacturing industry. However, the innovation potential embedded in these technologies should be unlocked by a viable application, i.e., the business model (BM). The BM as a holistic concept featuring different interacting elements is thus emerging as a promising vehicle for innovation. Current BM research describes the entire domain but lacks depth in the characterization of its individual components. This paper investigates the available manufacturing literature through the lens of the BM concept performing a scientometric analysis. The results are presented in a relational framework that provides an in-depth characterization of the manufacturing element of the BM and highlights identified connections that link the BM components. This is the basis for tools that will support firms in developing manufacturing portfolios aligned with their strategic goals.

  • 14.
    Boffa, Eleonora
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering, Industrial Production Systems.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering, Industrial Production Systems.
    Investigating the impact of digital transformation on manufacturers’ Business model: Insights from Swedish industry2024In: Journal of Open Innovation: Technology, Market, and Complexity, E-ISSN 2199-8531, Vol. 10, no 2, article id 100312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital transformation (DT) triggers a fundamental technological shift in industry enabling the creation of smart and connected factories. DT is not only a technology-driven innovation approach: it also requires changes of the Business Model (BM). Despite this, there is a lack of comprehensive studies that examine how aspects of manufacturing digitalisation align with the Business Model Innovation (BMI) process. To address this gap, this paper analyses the DT journey of several Swedish medium and large firms through semi-structured interviews with staff involved in such process. The empirical findings reveal that the BM elements addressing value creation and strategy aspects are the most affected by DT. Additionally, this study identifies the links among such elements. The findings are compiled in a holistic framework that can serve as a blueprint for practitioners seeking to adopt digital technologies in their production environments. This holistic approach aims at supporting practitioners to understand the BMI process triggered by DT and consequently aligning their manufacturing strategy with the BM's components.

  • 15.
    Chen, De Jiu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Control Systems.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    De Sousa Dias Ferreira, João
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Khabazzi, Mahmood Reza
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Zhang, Xinhai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Control Systems.
    A Virtual Environment for the Management and Development of Cyber-Physical Manufacturing Systems2015In: IFAC DCDS15, IFAC Papers Online, 2015, Vol. 48, p. 29-36Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern machineries are often cyber-physical system-of-systems controlled by intelligent controllersfor collaborative operations on the productions of complex products. To assure theefficiency and effectiveness, a consolidation of concerns across managerial levels, product lifecyclestages, and product lines or families becomes necessary. This calls for a common informationinfrastructure in terms of ontology, models, methods and tools. For industrial manufacturerssubjected to increased cost pressure and market volatility, the availability of such an informationinfrastructure would promote their abilities of making optimized and proactive decisions andthereby their competitiveness and survivability. This paper presents a virtual environment thatconstitutes an information infrastructure for the management and development of evolvableproduction systems (EPS) in manufacturing. It adopts mature modeling frameworks throughEAST-ADL for an effective model-based approach. The contribution is centered on a meta-modelthat offers a common data specification and semantic basis for information management acrossproduct lifecycle, models and tools, both for resource planning and for anomaly treatment. Aprototype tool implementation of this virtual environment for validation is also presented.

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  • 16.
    de Giorgio, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Cacace, Stefania
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 1, 20156 Milan, Italy.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Monetti, Fabio Marco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Digital Smart Production.
    Roci, Malvina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Manufacturing and Metrology Systems.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Sustainable Production Systems.
    Assessing the influence of expert video aid on assembly learning curves2021In: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the introduction of the concept of learning curves in manufacturing, many articles have been applying the model to study learning phenomena. In assembly, several studies present a learning curve when an operator is trained over a new assembly task; however, when comparisons are made between learning curves corresponding to different training methods, unaware researchers can show misleading results. Often, these studies neglect either or both the stochastic nature of the learning curves produced by several operators under experimental conditions, and the high correlation of the experimental samples collected from each operator that constitute one learning curve. Furthermore, recent studies are testing newer technologies, such as assembly animations or augmented reality, to provide assembly aid, but they fail to observe deeper implications on how these digital training methods truly influence the learning curves of the operators. This article proposes a novel statistical study of the influence of expert video aid on the learning curves in terms of assembly time by means of functional analysis of variance (FANOVA). This method is better suited to compare learning curves than common analysis of variance (ANOVA), due to correlated data, or graphical comparisons, due to the stochastic nature of the aggregated learning curves. The results show that two main effects of the expert video aid influence the learning curves: one in the transient and another in the steady state of the learning curve. The transient effect of the expert video aid, where the statistical tests suffer from a high variance in the data, appears to be a reduction in terms of assembly time for the first assemblies: the operators seem to benefit from the expert video aid. As soon as the steady state is reached, a slower and statistically significant effect appears to favor the learning processes of the operators who do not receive any training aid. Since the steady state of the learning curves represents the long term production efficiency of the operators, the latter effect might require more attention from industry and researchers.

  • 17.
    de Giorgio, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Cacace, Stefania
    Politecn Milan, Dept Mech Engn, Via La Masa 1, I-20156 Milan, Italy..
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Monetti, Fabio Marco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Digital Smart Production.
    Roci, Malvina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Manufacturing and Metrology Systems.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Sustainable Production Systems.
    Assessing the influence of expert video aid on assembly learning curves2022In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 62, p. 263-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the introduction of the concept of learning curves in manufacturing, many articles have been applying the model to study learning phenomena. In assembly, several studies present a learning curve when an operator is trained over a new assembly task; however, when comparisons are made between learning curves corresponding to different training methods, unaware researchers can show misleading results. Often, these studies neglect either or both the stochastic nature of the learning curves produced by several operators under experimental conditions, and the high correlation of the experimental samples collected from each operator that constitute one learning curve. Furthermore, recent studies are testing newer technologies, such as assembly animations or augmented reality, to provide assembly aid, but they fail to observe deeper implications on how these digital training methods truly influence the learning curves of the operators. This article proposes a novel statistical study of the influence of expert video aid on the learning curves in terms of assembly time by means of functional analysis of variance (FANOVA). This method is better suited to compare learning curves than common analysis of variance (ANOVA), due to correlated data, or graphical comparisons, due to the stochastic nature of the aggregated learning curves. The results show that two main effects of the expert video aid influence the learning curves: one in the transient and another in the steady state of the learning curve. The transient effect of the expert video aid, where the statistical tests suffer from a high variance in the data, appears to be a reduction in terms of assembly time for the first assemblies: the operators seem to benefit from the expert video aid. As soon as the steady state is reached, a slower and statistically significant effect appears to favor the learning processes of the operators who do not receive any training aid. Since the steady state of the learning curves represents the long term production efficiency of the operators, the latter effect might require more attention from industry and researchers.

  • 18.
    de Giorgio, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Sustainable Production Systems.
    Towards online reinforced learning of assembly sequence planning with interactive guidance systems for industry 4.0 adaptive manufacturing2021In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 60, p. 22-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Literature shows that reinforcement learning (RL) and the well-known optimization algorithms derived from it have been applied to assembly sequence planning (ASP); however, the way this is done, as an offline process, ends up generating optimization methods that are not exploiting the full potential of RL. Today’s assembly lines need to be adaptive to changes, resilient to errors and attentive to the operators’ skills and needs. If all of these aspects need to evolve towards a new paradigm, called Industry 4.0, the way RL is applied to ASP needs to change as well: the RL phase has to be part of the assembly execution phase and be optimized with time and several repetitions of the process. This article presents an agile exploratory experiment in ASP to prove the effectiveness of RL techniques to execute ASP as an adaptive, online and experience-driven optimization process, directly at assembly time. The human-assembly interaction is modelled through the input-outputs of an assembly guidance system built as an assembly digital twin. Experimental assemblies are executed without pre-established assembly sequence plans and adapted to the operators’ needs. The experiments show that precedence and transition matrices for an assembly can be generated from the statistical knowledge of several different assembly executions. When the frequency of a given subassembly reinforces its importance, statistical results obtained from the experiments prove that online RL applications are not only possible but also effective for learning, teaching, executing and improving assembly tasks at the same time. This article paves the way towards the application of online RL algorithms to ASP.

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  • 19.
    de Giorgio, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering. Artificial Engineering, Via del Rione Sirignano 10, 80121 Naples, Italy.
    Monetti, Fabio Marco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering.
    Romero, Mario
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering.
    Adopting extended reality?: A systematic review of manufacturing training and teaching applications2023In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 71, p. 645-663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The training of future experts and operators in manufacturing engineering relies on understanding procedural processes that require applied practice. Yet, current manufacturing education and training overwhelmingly continues to depend on traditional pedagogical methods that segregate theoretical studies and practical training. While educational institutes have generally improved theoretical studies, they often lack facilities and labs to properly reproduce the working environments necessary for practice. Even in industrial settings, it is difficult, if not impossible, to halt the actual production lines to train new operators. Recently, applications with extended reality (XR) technologies, such as virtual, augmented, or mixed reality, reached a mature technology readiness level. With this technological advancement, we can envision a transition to a new teaching paradigm that exploits simulated learning environments. Thus, it becomes possible to bridge the gap between theory and practice for both students and industrial trainees. This article presents a systematic literature review of the main applications of XR technologies in manufacturing education, their goals and technology readiness levels, and a comprehensive overview of the development tools and experimental strategies deployed. This review contributes: (1) a state-of-the-art description of current research in XR education for manufacturing systems, and (2) a comprehensive analysis of the technological platforms, the experimental procedures and the analytical methodologies deployed in the body of literature examined. It serves as a guide for setting up and executing experimental designs for evaluating interventions of XR in manufacturing education and training.

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  • 20.
    de Giorgio, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Sustainable Production Systems.
    Roci, Malvina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Jocevski, Milan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Wang, Lihui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Sustainable Production Systems.
    Measuring the effect of automatically authored video aid on assembly time for procedural knowledge transfer among operators in adaptive assembly stations2021In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Can automatically-authored videos of industrial operators help other operators to learn procedural tasks? This question is relevant to the advent of the industrial internet of things (IIoT) and Industry 4.0, where smart machines to help human operators rather than replacing them, in order to benefit from the best of humans and machines. The study considers an industrial ecosystem where procedural knowledge (PK) is quickly and effectively transferred from one operator to another. Assembly tasks are procedural in nature and present a certain complexity that still does not allow machines and their sensors to capture all the details of the operations. Especially if the assembly operation is adaptive and not fixed in terms of assembly sequence plan. In order to help the operators, videos of other operators executing the complex procedural tasks can be automatically recorded and authored from machines. This study shows by means of statistical design and analysis of experiments that expert aid, provided before each subassembly, can reduce the assembly time of an untrained operator, whereas automatically authored video aids can transfer PK but producing an opposite effect on the assembly time. Therefore, hybrid training methods are still necessary and trade-offs have to be considered. Managerial insights from the results suggest an unneglectable impact of the choice to digitize industrial operations too early. The experimental studies presented can act as guidelines for the correct statistical testing of innovative solutions in industry.

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  • 21.
    Dias-Ferreira, Joao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Ribeiro, Luis
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Characterization of an Agile Bio-inspired Shop-Floor2014In: 2014 12TH IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INDUSTRIAL INFORMATICS (INDIN), 2014, p. 404-410Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability is currently one of the biggest challenges and drivers of manufacturing industry. With traditional automation approaches becoming evermore inadequate to support sustainable mass customized production, the research focus is moving towards agile systems that enact companies with the ability to quickly reconfigure their shop-floors by seamlessly deploying or removing modules. Such systems are envisioned as key for attaining a profitable and sustainable industrial development. In this sense, this paper attempts to characterize an innovative approach that relies on bio-inspired concepts as the main control mechanism, in order to foster sustainability by attaining the necessary shop-floor agility. Furthermore an experimental setup is presented and the results are analysed, in order to understand the influence and impact of the main properties of the approach towards the system performance.

  • 22.
    Ericsson, Kristian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering, Process Management and Sustainable Industry.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering, Industrial Production Systems.
    A Systematic Literature Review on Combinations of Industry 4.0 and Lean Production2023In: Advances in Production Management Systems. Production Management Systems for Responsible Manufacturing, Service, and Logistics Futures: IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference, APMS 2023, Proceedings, Springer Nature , 2023, p. 139-156Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior literature reviews on combining Industry 4.0 (I4.0) and Lean Production (LP) in production has often described the paradigms as “supportive”, where either “I4.0 supports LP” or “LP supports I4.0”. In this systematic review of 50 studies from this growing area of research, we find evidence of cases where combinations have not been “supportive”. We also find evidence of causal interactions that cannot be subordinated “I4.0 supports LP” nor “LP supports I4.0”, and that plainly go beyond those two categories. Additionally, we find that several studies evaluate the merits of I4.0- and LP combinations without looking at their effects on results in production, which substantially reduces the use of these evaluations to production managers. We encourage future studies to use nomenclature that does not unnecessarily limit the overall perception of the properties of I4.0- and LP combinations, to evaluate the merits of such combinations more in line with the requirements of production managers, and to be more cautious when concluding on causal interactions between I4.0 and LP.

  • 23.
    Lupi, Francesco
    et al.
    Department of Information Engineering, University of Pisa, Italy.
    Mabkhot, Mohammed M.
    Intelligent Automation Centre, The Wolfson School of Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK.
    Boffa, Eleonora
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    Intelligent Automation Centre, The Wolfson School of Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK.
    Antonelli, Dario
    Department of Management and Production Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino, Italy.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering, Industrial Production Systems.
    Lohse, Niels
    Intelligent Automation Centre, The Wolfson School of Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK.
    Lanzetta, Michele
    Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, University of Pisa, 56122 Pisa, Italy.
    Automatic definition of engineer archetypes: A text mining approach2023In: Computers in industry (Print), ISSN 0166-3615, E-ISSN 1872-6194, Vol. 152, article id 103996Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the rapid and continuous advancements in technology, as well as the constantly evolving competences required in the field of engineering, there is a critical need for the harmonization and unification of engineering professional figures or archetypes. The current limitations in tymely defining and updating engineers' archetypes are attributed to the absence of a structured and automated approach for processing educational and occupational data sources that evolve over time. This study aims to enhance the definition of professional figures in engineering by automating archetype definitions through text mining and adopting a more objective and structured methodology based on topic modeling. This will expand the use of archetypes as a common language, bridging the gap between educational and occupational frameworks by providing a unified and up-to-date engineering professional figure tailored to a specific period, specialization type, and level. We validate the automatically defined industrial engineer archetype against our previously manually defined profile.

  • 24.
    Lupi, Francesco
    et al.
    Univ Pisa, Dept Civil & Ind Engn, I-56122 Pisa, Italy..
    Mabkhot, Mohammed M.
    Loughborough Univ, Intelligent Automat Ctr, Wolfson Sch Mech Elect & Mfg Engn, Loughborough LE11 3TU, Leics, England..
    Finzgar, Miha
    Univ Ljubljana, Fac Mech Engn, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia..
    Minetola, Paolo
    Politecn Torino, Dept Management & Prod Engn, I-10129 Turin, Italy..
    Stadnicka, Dorota
    Rzeszow Univ Technol, Fac Mech Engn & Aeronaut, PL-35959 Rzeszow, Poland..
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Litwin, Pawel
    Rzeszow Univ Technol, Fac Mech Engn & Aeronaut, PL-35959 Rzeszow, Poland..
    Boffa, Eleonora
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    Loughborough Univ, Intelligent Automat Ctr, Wolfson Sch Mech Elect & Mfg Engn, Loughborough LE11 3TU, Leics, England..
    Podrzaj, Primoz
    Univ Ljubljana, Fac Mech Engn, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia..
    Chelli, Riccardo
    Univ Pisa, Dept Civil & Ind Engn, I-56122 Pisa, Italy..
    Lohse, Niels
    Loughborough Univ, Intelligent Automat Ctr, Wolfson Sch Mech Elect & Mfg Engn, Loughborough LE11 3TU, Leics, England..
    Lanzetta, Michele
    Univ Pisa, Dept Civil & Ind Engn, I-56122 Pisa, Italy..
    Toward a sustainable educational engineer archetype through Industry 4.02021In: Computers in industry (Print), ISSN 0166-3615, E-ISSN 1872-6194, Vol. 134, article id 103543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade, a shift toward Sustainable Development (SD) in engineering has started in the educational and occupational framework. Therefore, the need to rethink the professional figures of an engineer has become a necessity. Unfortunately, neither a formal methodology to define a standard engineer archetype nor procedural methods to evaluate such archetypes' contribution to SD are investigated. This paper bridges the first gap by proposing a general methodology to define specific engineer archetypes as technical competences from educational -Semi Structured Intended Learning Outcomes (SS-ILOs) -and occupational -European Skills, Competences, Qualifications and Occupations (ESCO) -frameworks. The second gap is addressed by a procedural method based on indirect mapping of the identified archetypes onto United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN-SDGs). Since Industry 4.0 (I4.0) is the working environment of future engineers and has a promising potential to achive SDGs, I4.0 technologies influences on SDGs are used as a bridge to evaluate sustainability of the defined enigineer archetypes. Finally, we provide the application of our proposed methodology to the Industrial engineering case study. The results show that significant limitations toward sustainability remain open challenges. However, the intrinsic nature of the industrial engineer is confined to some specific goals, and a characteristic signature on sustainability emerged.

  • 25.
    Lupi, Francesco
    et al.
    Department of Information Engineering, University of Pisa, 56122 Pisa, Italy.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering, Industrial Production Systems.
    Lanzetta, Michele
    Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, University of Pisa, 56122 Pisa, Italy.
    CAD-based Autonomous Vision Inspection Systems2024In: 5th International Conference on Industry 4.0 and Smart Manufacturing, ISM 2023, Elsevier BV , 2024, p. 2127-2136Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Automated industrial Visual Inspection Systems (VIS) are typically customized for specific applications, limiting their flexibility. They are characterized by a demanding setup, high capital investments, and significant knowledge barriers. In this paper, we propose an alternative architecture for the visual inspection of 3D printed parts or complex assemblies using a robotic arm equipped with hand-eye sensors and controllable lighting system. The core of the proposed Flexible Vision Inspection System (FVIS) is the self-extraction of 3D text annotations from STandard for the Exchange of Product model (STEP) AP242 files. The system self-selects and parametrizes the most suitable inspection algorithm, including lighting settings. Additionally, it autonomously performs self-localization, self-referencing of physical products, and self-planning of robot inspection path based on CAD information. This framework, characterized by self-X, cost-effective, non-invasive, and plug-and-play architecture has the potential to disrupt the business model of vision inspection, enabling an as-a-service solution aligned with the next generation of flexible manufacturing.

  • 26.
    M. Mabkhot, Mohammed
    et al.
    Loughborough Univ, Wolfson Sch Mech Elect & Mfg Engn, Intelligent Automat Ctr, Loughborough LE11 3TU, Leics, England..
    Ferreira, Pedro
    Loughborough Univ, Wolfson Sch Mech Elect & Mfg Engn, Intelligent Automat Ctr, Loughborough LE11 3TU, Leics, England..
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Podrzaj, Primoz
    Univ Ljubljana, Fac Mech Engn, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia..
    Madziel, Maksymilian
    Rzeszow Univ Technol, Fac Mech Engn & Aeronaut, PL-35959 Rzeszow, Poland..
    Antonelli, Dario
    Politecn Torino, Dept Management & Prod Engn, I-10129 Turin, Italy..
    Lanzetta, Michele
    Univ Pisa, Dept Civil & Ind Engn, I-56122 Pisa, Italy..
    Barata, Jose
    UNINOVA Inst Desenvolvimento Novas Tecnol, Ctr Technol & Syst, P-2829517 Caparica, Portugal.;NOVA Univ Lisbon, NOVA Sch Sci & Technol, Dept Elect & Comp Engn, P-2829516 Caparica, Portugal..
    Boffa, Eleonora
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Finzgar, Miha
    Univ Ljubljana, Fac Mech Engn, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia..
    Pasko, Lukasz
    Rzeszow Univ Technol, Fac Mech Engn & Aeronaut, PL-35959 Rzeszow, Poland..
    Minetola, Paolo
    Chelli, Riccardo
    Univ Pisa, Dept Civil & Ind Engn, I-56122 Pisa, Italy..
    Nikghadam-Hojjati, Sanaz
    UNINOVA Inst Desenvolvimento Novas Tecnol, Ctr Technol & Syst, P-2829517 Caparica, Portugal..
    Wang, Xi Vincent
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Sustainable Production Systems.
    Priarone, Paolo C.
    Lupi, Francesco
    Univ Pisa, Dept Civil & Ind Engn, I-56122 Pisa, Italy..
    Litwin, Pawel
    Rzeszow Univ Technol, Fac Mech Engn & Aeronaut, PL-35959 Rzeszow, Poland..
    Stadnicka, Dorota
    Rzeszow Univ Technol, Fac Mech Engn & Aeronaut, PL-35959 Rzeszow, Poland..
    Lohse, Niels
    Loughborough Univ, Wolfson Sch Mech Elect & Mfg Engn, Intelligent Automat Ctr, Loughborough LE11 3TU, Leics, England..
    Mapping Industry 4.0 Enabling Technologies into United Nations Sustainability Development Goals2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 5, article id 2560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emerging of the fourth industrial revolution, also known as Industry 4.0 (I4.0), from the advancement in several technologies is viewed not only to promote economic growth, but also to enable a greener future. The 2030 Agenda of the United Nations for sustainable development sets out clear goals for the industry to foster the economy, while preserving social well-being and ecological validity. However, the influence of I4.0 technologies on the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) has not been conclusively or systematically investigated. By understanding the link between the I4.0 technologies and the SDGs, researchers can better support policymakers to consider the technological advancement in updating and harmonizing policies and strategies in different sectors (i.e., education, industry, and governmental) with the SDGs. To address this gap, academic experts in this paper have investigated the influence of I4.0 technologies on the sustainability targets identified by the UN. Key I4.0 element technologies have been classified to enable a quantitative mapping with the 17 SDGs. The results indicate that the majority of the I4.0 technologies can contribute positively to achieving the UN agenda. It was also found that the effects of the technologies on individual goals varies between direct and strong, and indirect and weak influences. The main insights and lessons learned from the mapping are provided to support future policy.

  • 27.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Characterisation of the Business Models for Innovative, Non-Mature Production Automation Technology2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing companies are nowadays facing an unprecedented series of challenges to their survival: global competition and product mass-customization are the shaping forces of tomorrow’s business success. The consequent need for agile and sustainable production solutions is the utmost motivation behind the development of innovative approaches which often are not in line with the state of art. It is well documented that companies fail in recognizing how such disruptively innovative approaches can yield an interesting economic output. This, in turn, enhances the risk of leaving the aforementioned promising technologies conceptually and practically underdeveloped.  In the field of automatic production systems the Evolvable Production System paradigm proposes modular architectures with distributed, autonomous control rather than integral design and hierarchical, centralized control. EPS technology is thus disruptive: it refuses the present paradigm of Engineer to Order in industrial automation by proposing an advanced Configure to Order system development logic.

    This dissertation investigates the possibility of using the recent sophisticated developments of the concept of Business Model as a holistic analytical tool for the characterization and solution of the issue of bringing disruptive and non-fully mature innovation to proficient application in production environments. In order to purse this objective the main contributions in the relevant literature have been extracted and combined to an original definition of business model able to encompass the aspects deemed critical for the problem. Such a construct is composed of three elements: (1) Value Proposition that describe the features of a technology that generates value for a given customer, (2) the Value Configuration and the (3) Architecture of the Revenue which describe the mechanisms that allows to create and capture such value respectively.   

    The subsequent work has focused on the EPS paradigm as a specific case of the overall problem. The first step has been a full characterization of the related value proposition through an innovative approach based on a bottom-up decomposition in its elementary components, followed by their aggregation into meaningful value offerings: with reference to the EPS paradigm such an approach has disclosed an overall value proposition composed of six potentially independent value offerings. This collection of Value Offerings has then been used as a basis to generate the EPS business models. In particular for each single offering a possible set of necessary activities and resources has been devised and organized in a coherent value configuration. The resulting creation mechanisms have then been linked among each other following a logical supplier-customer scheme for capturing the value: this allowed establishing the architecture of revenue, last element of the overall production paradigm. Finally the results have been validated in a semi-industrial system developed for the (IDEAS, 2010-2013) project through the individuation of the areas of application of such business models.

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    Characterisation of the Business Models for Innovative, Non-Mature Production Automation Technology
  • 28.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Evolvable production systems: A new business environment2011In: Proc. - IEEE Int. Symp. Assem. Manuf., ISAM, 2011, p. 5942341-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing threats and opportunities, on the global markets, challenge today the company at several levels. The actual Manufacturing Systems becomes dramatic for the survival and prosperity of the organization. Agility, Sustainability and high rate of Re-usability are the main objectives of an Evolvable Production System. Task-specific and process-oriented modules with embedded intelligence, together with distributed control based on agent technology are the cornerstones of an EPS. The realization and management of this kind of systems entail an ontological approach due to their implicit complexity. The reference architecture is the key to canalize the underlying holism of an EPS towards an effective instantiation, which exploits the Emergent Behavior, the key driver of the Evolvability of a system. The issues related with the application of this view, such as dynamic link between product and system design as well as the management of a module repository, underline the weakness of present business models. Therefore a model for the emplacement of a System that follows the Evolvable Paradigm predicament has been produced in order to enable further studies. One of the conclusions of the work is the need for a more suitable approach to business by the main actors involved in the realization of an EPS. Sharing information and standards about product design and modules realization becomes a compulsory strategic

  • 29.
    Maffei, Antonio
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Evolvable Production Systems: foundations for new business models2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Flores, Luis
    CTO, Engineering Director Introsys – Global Control System Designers .
    Characterization of costs and strategies for automation in Evolvable Production Systems2013In: Proceedings - 2013 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, SMC 2013, IEEE conference proceedings, 2013, p. 4866-4871Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rise of global competition and the demands for mass customization observed in recent years are the main shaping forces of the manufacturing domain. Current approaches to industrial production automation are not suitable to cope with the resulting increasing requirement in term of system agility and sustainability. While a quite large amount of innovative and sound technical solutions for automation address such an issue, it is not clear how the new generation of automatic production system will be economically connoted. This work proposes a first step towards an economical characterization of the Evolvable Paradigm: one among the most promising aforementioned innovative industrial automation technologies. A basic description of the state-of-the-art of the related Evolvable Assembly/Production System allows inferring a cost model able to account for such an installation. This, in turn, enable a quantitative description of how the focal innovative approach enables a more effective and rational use of industrial automation.

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  • 31.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Design and Management of Manufacturing Systems, DMMS.
    Lohse, Niels
    Analysis of the Student Perception of the Link between Product and Production System: Towards Effective Strategies to Teach the Holistic Nature of Product Design2014In: International journal of engineering education, ISSN 0949-149X, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 1357-1366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product design has a huge and widespread impact on the eventual design of the related production processes, such as procurement, manufacturing, assembly, maintenance and recycling, amongst others. Understanding the full the nature of such a complex relationship is a cornerstone in the professional development of any production engineering student and practitioner. Acquiring sophisticated concepts is a long process consisting of acquiring the necessary notions and mentally structuring them through different semantic links in a consistent body of knowledge. This generates a large set of intermediate states between the novice and the expert. Phenomenography focuses on identifying and classifying these perceptions with the aim of identifying the related pattern for good learning. In particular, this phenomenographic analysis focuses on investigating the students' perception of the articulated link between the design of a product and that of the related assembly process. The study is based on courses that exploit the principles of Design for Assembly (DFA) methods to present and detail such a domain. In the first section of the paper, the aforementioned focal issue is fully characterized as a 'Threshold Concept'. The central part of the paper describes five generic levels of understanding of such a matter: from a simple mechanical use of DFA to a more sophisticated correct holistic understanding of all the implications of such a tool. The classification has been inferred through a series of informal, semi-structured interviews with the students. The characterization introduced is finally discussed with the aim of disclosing the pattern of good learning that, in turn, could provide the base for studies aimed at disclosing useful hints for the effective development of the related teaching activities.

  • 32.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Akillioglu, Hakan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Ferreira, Joao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Emerging Behavior as Driver for the Sustainability of a Modular, "Skills-Centric" Production System2011In: IEEE AFRICON 2011, IEEE , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current main challenge for the future production system lies in the correct integration of the issues related to sustainability and to agility. The "Evolvable Paradigm" addresses this concern with a new way of engineering the whole production system. The concept of Skill is declined as common denominator between the definitions of manufacturing process and manufacturing equipment. Each production module holds some of the skills that compose the process definition and it is endowed with the necessary intelligence to come together with the other modules in an organized society. This work introduces the approach adopted in the IDEAS project (Instantly Deployable Evolvable Assembly System) to cope with the above mentioned requirement through the presented paradigm. While fully featured and described IDEAS mechatronic architecture allows rapid reconfiguration of the system, the issue of sustainability is targeted by the open definition of the concepts of skill and skills interaction. The result of skill aggregation is hereby called Emergent Behavior and in the proposed model it can be seen as the main driver for the sustainable use of the system.

  • 33.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, XPRES, Excellence in production research. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Digital Smart Production.
    Antonelli, Dario
    Politecnico di Torino.
    Stylios, Chrysostomos
    University of Ioannina.
    Overcoming the obstacles hindering the application of Virtual Reality to e-learning2021In: HELMeTO 2021  Third International Workshop on  Higher Education Learning Methodologies and Technologies Online, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study presents the approach and main findings of the Erasmus + Tiphys project where we developped an Open Networked Platform for learning Industry 4.0 (I4.0) themes. A Virtual Reality (VR) platform has been created for training and simulating industrial processes for Industry 4.0 enabling technologies. It discusses the didactic experience that privi-leges self-learning to teaching activities

  • 34.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Boffa, Eleonora
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    From Invention to Innovation: Teaching Business Models to Manufacturing Researchers2021In: Journal of Business Models, E-ISSN 2246-2465, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 17-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The competence and skills required to bring technological advancements to the market are increasingly perceived asa key element in the engineering researchers’ toolbox. Nevertheless, business modelling is rarely taught in technical engineering programs. This paper presents the design and implementation of a course called “Business DrivenProduction Development” for manufacturing PhD students at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm,Sweden.

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  • 35.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Boffa, Eleonora
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Lupi, Francesco
    Univ Pisa, Dept Civil & Ind Engn, I-56122 Pisa, Italy..
    Lanzetta, Michele
    Univ Pisa, Dept Civil & Ind Engn, I-56122 Pisa, Italy.;Univ Pisa, Interdept Ctr Lifelong Learning Training & Educ R, I-56122 Pisa, Italy..
    On the Design of Constructively Aligned Educational Unit2022In: Education Sciences, E-ISSN 2227-7102, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 438-, article id 438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern pedagogy is moving away from traditional transmissive approaches, and it is extensively embracing constructive theory of learning. A prominent practical embodiment of this paradigm shift is a method called Constructive Alignment (CA). This approach focuses on learners' actions and starts from a clear communication of the Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) of the focal unit. ILOs are made of content, a context, and an Educational Goal Verb (EGV). According to the Bloom Taxonomy, the EGV is the core of an ILO and refers to the action the learners are expected to be able to master after completing the educational unit. The ILO is then aligned to the course activity using the EGV (i.e., EGVs are enacted through Teaching and Learning Activities (TLAs) and verified through Assessment Tasks (ATs)). Despite the ILO definition being extensively investigated and described, the extant literature has poorly explored how to devise suitable TLAs and ATs, lacking comprehensive contributions that identify and describe the different kinds of TLAs and ATs available to course designers. In view of the above gap, the authors searched and reviewed the literature (scientific papers (i.e., top-down, deductive approach)) and practices in higher education (university websites and blogs (i.e., bottom-up, inductive approach)) to identify all the possible sources of TLA and AT descriptions available. The results propose standardized templates that support the course design process, providing extensive descriptions of TLA and AT based on the best practices identified. The proposed templates include the core dimensions that proved to be suitable for designing traditional and remote-learning activities. Finally, the examples provided in the paper show how to use these templates on a few kinds of selected on-campus and digital TLAs and ATs from the educational units identified in the Erasmus+ MAESTRO project, which is based on Industry 4.0 technological enablers and their application in support of manufacturing sustainability.

  • 36.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Boffa, Eleonora
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    An Ontological Framework for the Analysis of Constructively Aligned Educational Units2019In: ADVANCES IN MANUFACTURING II, VOL 3 - QUALITY ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT / [ed] Hamrol, A Grabowska, M Maletic, D Woll, R, SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN , 2019, p. 185-193Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education institutions are increasingly abandoning traditional teaching methods based on transmissive pedagogy and embracing a model based on the constructivist theory of learning. This is a necessary shift to face current challenges in their domain such as shrinking resources and need to reach students with different level of motivation and learning styles. Constructive Alignment (CA) combines the new pedagogical approach with aligned design for outcome-based teaching education and it is the leading approach under-pinning current requirements for program specification and single course description. Another important trend emerging from digitalization of higher education is the collection and use of educational data to improve all the aspects of the learning process. This research community has produced a large body of valuable tools and methods, but there is no specific contribution targeting the analysis of constructively aligned education. The CONALI ontology is an ongoing modelling effort that currently provides a framework to describe the CA body of knowledge including all the relevant semantic relationships. This paper presents a new version of such ontology that supports collection and analysis of educational data from constructively aligned educational units as a first step to fill the gap described above. The specific requirements for this iterative upgrade have been inferred from a literature review of the typical analysis conducted in the domain of educational big data.

  • 37.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Daghini, Lorenzo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Archenti, Andreas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Lohse, N.
    Loughborough University.
    CONALI Ontology. A Framework for Design and Evaluation of Constructively Aligned Courses in Higher Education: Putting in Focus the Educational Goal Verbs2016In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier, 2016, p. 765-772Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing number of Higher Education professionals have embraced the Constructivism theory in contrast with the traditional transmissive pedagogy approach where the focal figure is the teacher. Constructivists emphasizes that the learners acquire, or construct, knowledge through their own activities and previous knowledge. Teacher role is to set up an environment that can provide a good learning experience for the students. In view of this the alignment of the intended learning outcome (ILO) with the teaching and learning activity (TLA) and the assessment task (AT) of the course becomes an important requirement for good learning. The driver of the alignment is the educational goal verb (EGV) that represents the educational goal underling a specific intended learning outcome (ILO). This verb should be elicited by the course's TLA and be the base for the consequent AT. The convergence of constructivism with this concept generates the constructive alignment pedagogical paradigm. The CONALI ontology answers the requirement for a structured framework to describe the vast body of knowledge developed in such a field. The salient aspects of constructive alignment have been extracted and classified in a comprehensive taxonomy. The following description of the semantic relationships among the different classes resulted in the CONALI ontology. The chosen modelling language is OWL: this provides the possibility to describe in a computer understandable way a higher education courses to an unprecedented level of detail. OWL enables also the creation of a specific knowledge base by populating the model. The knowledge base can then be analysed and interrogated on many important issues concerning the alignment of the instantiated course. The CONALI ontology becomes an important tool to design and synthesize the related domain knowledge. This paper proves the usability of CONALI ontology as tool to represent the courses in an engineering program and evaluate the alignment of their activities. The specific instantiation is based on the Industrial Engineering program at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden.

  • 38.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering, Industrial Production Systems.
    Enoksson, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Digital Learning.
    What is the optimal blended learning strategy throughout engineering curricula? Lesson learned during Covid-19 pandemic2023In: EDUCON 2023 - IEEE Global Engineering Education Conference, Proceedings, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) , 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent Covid-19 pandemic has forced HEI to quickly adjust their approach to teaching and learning by massively adopting, basically overnight, approaches based on digital learning. Covid-19 gave a huge impulse to the spread of digital tools and the consequent literature is rich in details and information about more and less successful experiences with digital learning. This unexpected 'experiment' exposed the effectiveness and efficiency of well-conceived learning strategies that blend digital and traditional learning approach. While blended learning per se is an established discipline, a unified framework to go from theory to practice is still elusive. Given the above, the knowledge developed and acquired during the pandemic has a huge potential to reveal what are the features of a good blended learning strategy in different educational situation. This work aims at investigating what would be an optimal blended learning strategy for program design in the context of engineering education. The contribution is based on a focus group discussion involving teacher from 6 different European HEI and results indicates that the level of understanding, as presented in the Bloom taxonomy, of the focal activity and the correct balance between the educational and social dimensions of student's university life are the two critical drivers for blended learning design. The study confirms also the main findings in literature, related to the use of digital tools before and during the pandemic and suggests that the Covid-19 had a positive impact on the readiness to adopt digital tool of HEI. Finally a few problems experienced in the post covid phase are presented along with the identified future directions of research.

  • 39.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    A FRAMEWORK FOR PHENOMENOGRAPIC ANALYSIS AND CLASSIFICATION OF TROUBLESOME KNOWLEDGE IN THE ENGINEERING DOMAIN2016In: EDULEARN16: 8TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION AND NEW LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A& DEVELOPMENT , 2016, p. 5882-5888Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of effective teaching and learning activities must create an experience able to elicit the intended learning outcomes of the educational unit. For this purpose, it is then fundamental to account for the different ways students can experience the specific content taught. This paper introduces a structured approach to perform phenomenographic studies aimed at disclosing the most common student perceptions of a given topic and highlight the patterns that can bring students with poor understanding of the target concept to a more sophisticated perception. The method has been formulated based on specific cases in the production engineering domain. In detail a phenomenographic study the first step is to describe, as a knowledgeable person would do, both the subject of the study and its domain. This description is then considered the target perception of the focal topic. In the second phase the students that have already been assessed for the educational unit in exam must be interviewed with open question about both subject and domain. Their answer must be plotted according to sound parameters along two dimension (again subject and domain related) of increasingly sophisticated level of understanding. The result of such interview must be then classified in clusters of understanding that will give the different common perception of the students about the given topic. Finally, the relation among the cluster must be studied with the aim of disclosing suitable teaching and learning activities to help students migrate to a perception cluster close to the above-mentioned target perception.

  • 40.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Giudici, Marco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering.
    Samir, Kousay
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    An ontological framework to support the creation and use of phenomenograpical knowledge2019In: EDUNINE 2019 - 3rd IEEE World Engineering Education Conference: Modern Educational Paradigms for Computer and Engineering Career, Proceedings, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of effective teaching and learning activities should create an experience able to elicit the intended learning outcomes of the focal educational unit. For this purpose, it is fundamental to account for the different ways students can experience the specific content taught. One of the few methods to investigate this issue is phenomenology, a powerful yet not extensively applied tool. The main reason lies in the lack of a structured approach to document phenomenological studies. This work proposes an ontological framework able to capture the main operational concepts and semantic of this body of knowledge. This framework can be used as basis to make explicit the domain assumption enabling the sharing of common understanding of the structure of information among people or software agents. This, in turn, opens the possibility to analyze, reuse and maintain phenomenological knowledge.

  • 41.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Grahn, Sten
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Characterization of the impact of digitalization on the adoption of sustainable business models in manufacturing2019In: Proceedings 52nd CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems (CMS), Elsevier BV , 2019, Vol. 81, p. 765-770Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sustainability and digitalization are fast growing sub-topics in the domain of manufacturing research and they will both be main forces shaping the future production systems. An overview of the related literature reveals two big bodies of knowledge being created in these fields, but also a little intersection among them. The reason lies in the fact that while digitalization is a trend aimed mainly at technological advancement, sustainability requires a long term commitment to reshape the whole approach to business of a manufacturing firm. However, there is a growing indication in literature that digitalization can be a powerful tool in the necessary road towards sustainable manufacturing. This work analyses the related scientific contribution through the lens of the concept of Business Model (BM) and Business Model Innovation (BMI) as understood by leading economic literature. The result is a characterisation, and when possible a description of the ways digitalization can support manufacturing firms in the adoption of sustainable business models.

  • 42.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Hofmann, Andreas
    From Flexibility to true Evolvability: an introduction to the basic requirements2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the field of production engineering, most of the past paradigms introduced automation and computer science at shopfloor level based on the concept of system flexibility. Nevertheless their limits in approaching some fundamental areas such as the modularisation or the control issues, make them unsuitable to tackle the current dynamic scenarios & challenges. In this paper a review of past approaches, underlining their weaknesses, leads to propose a methodology for the creation of a manufacturing system, based on the Evolvable Paradigm. The salient points of this scheme are the process oriented approach to modularisation and the link between the development of the system and the design of the product. The potential economical benefits can render automation a sustainable solution even for SMEs. One fundamental requirement to pursue Full Autonomy and Evolvability is to deeply study the processes in order to represent them at hardware level, enabling the exploitment of the Emergent Behavior by the Control System, that for this reason has to be distributed.

  • 43.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering.
    Mura, Michela Dalle
    Univ Pisa, Dept Civil & Ind Engn, I-56122 Pisa, Largo Lazzarino, Italy..
    Monetti, Fabio Marco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering.
    Boffa, Eleonora
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production engineering.
    Dynamic Mixed Reality Assembly Guidance Using Optical Recognition Methods2023In: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 13, no 3, article id 1760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Augmented (AR) and Mixed Reality (MR) technologies are enablers of the Industry 4.0 paradigm and are spreading at high speed in production. Main applications include design, training, and assembly guidance. The latter is a pressing concern, because assembly is the process that accounts for the biggest portion of total cost within production. Teaching and guiding operators to assemble with minimal effort and error rates is pivotal. This work presents the development of a comprehensive MR application for guiding novice operators in following simple assembly instructions. The app follows innovative programming logic and component tracking in a dynamic environment, providing an immersive experience that includes different guidance aids. The application was tested by experienced and novice users, data were drawn from the performed experiments, and a questionnaire was submitted to collect the users' perception. Results indicate that the MR application was easy to follow and even gave confidence to inexperienced subjects. The guidance support was perceived as useful by the users, though at times invasive in the field of view. Further development effort is required to draw from this work a complete and usable architecture for MR application in assembly, but this research forms the basis to achieve better, more consistent instructions for assembly guidance based on component tracking.

  • 44.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Dias Ferreira, João
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Barata, José
    Characterization of the Student Perception of Flexibility in the Manufacturing Domain: Highlighting the Patterns of Effective Learning2014In: Proceeding of: 8th International Technology, Education and Development Conference - INTED 2014, At Valencia, Spain, Valencia, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The word “flexibility” is often abused and not univocally understood within the manufacturing science domain and in particular in the context of industrial automation. Since the raise of industrial robots in the 1960’, different researchers and practitioners have been using such a common word with different meanings. This has generated a very articulated concept, spanning from capability of a system to increase the production volumes to ability to handle product mix variation. Several authors have tried to count the current meanings of such a word in manufacturing and someone arrived to more than 50!. In spite of this fuzziness in both the definition and scope, the concept of flexibility remain one of the cornerstones in the curriculum of industrial and production engineers, and it appears in many courses along the bachelor and master studies. The apparent paradox that higher education institutions have to teach things that are not even well-defined and agreed in the scientific world is, in fact, quite a usual practice. In order to clarify what is, or should be, learnt this work analyzes first the established literature to extract a “working” characterization of the flexibility concept. The resulting understanding is then used to represent the experts’ perception of the topic which in turn is used as ideal level of understanding that a student should achieve her/himself when studying such a concept.   

    The second phase of the work aims at disclosing and classifying the multifaceted perceptions of flexibility that two different classes of industrial engineering students have after two courses in which the focal concept of manufacturing flexibility has been presented using two different approaches. The research is based on a phenomenographic analysis of a series of well-designed interviews to the students. The collected data have consequently been structured in a finite set of clusters according of: (1) the level of understanding of the key concept (as expressed in the Bloom’s taxonomy) and (2) the nature of the shown knowledge (as presented in the SOLO taxonomy). The classification is then the basis for defining an epistemological sound approach to develop suitable teaching and learning activities to ensure optimal acquisition of the concept of flexibility.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 45.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Dias-Ferreira, Joao
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Barata, Jose
    UNINOVA UNL, Lisbon, Portugal..
    CHARACTERIZATION OF THE STUDENT PERCEPTION OF THE CONCEPT OF FLEXIBILITY IN THE MANUFACTURING DOMAIN: HIGHLIGHTING THE PATTERNS OF EFFECTIVE LEARNING2014In: INTED2014: 8TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION A& DEVELOPMENT , 2014, p. 4759-4767Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The word "flexibility" is often abused and not univocally understood within the manufacturing science domain and in particular in the context of industrial automation. Since the raise of industrial robots in the 1960', different researchers and practitioners have been using such a common word with different meanings. This has generated a very articulated concept, spanning from capability of a system to increase the production volumes to ability to handle product mix variation. Several authors have tried to count the current meanings of such a word in manufacturing and someone arrived to more than 50 [1]!. In spite of this fuzziness in both the definition and scope, the concept of flexibility remain one of the cornerstones in the curriculum of industrial and production engineers, and it appears in many courses along the bachelor and master studies. The apparent paradox that higher education institutions have to teach things that are not even well-defined and agreed in the scientific world is, in fact, quite a usual practice. In order to clarify what is, or should be, learnt this work analyzes first the established literature to extract a "working" characterization of the flexibility concept. The resulting understanding is then used to represent the experts' perception of the topic which in turn is used as ideal level of understanding that a student should achieve her/himself when studying such a concept. The second phase of the work aims at disclosing and classifying the multifaceted perceptions of flexibility that two different classes of industrial engineering students have after two courses in which the focal concept of manufacturing flexibility has been presented using two different approaches. The research is based on a phenomenographic analysis of a series of well-designed interviews to the students [2]. The collected data have consequently been structured in a finite set of clusters according of: (1) the level of understanding of the key concept (as expressed in the Bloom's taxonomy [3]) and (2) the nature of the shown knowledge (as presented in the SOLO taxonomy [4]). The classification is then the basis for defining an epistemological sound approach to develop suitable teaching and learning activities to ensure optimal acquisition of the concept of flexibility.

  • 46.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Dias-Ferreira, João
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Barata, J.
    Characterisation of the student perception of the concept of flexibility in the manufacturing domain: Highlighting the patterns of effective learning2014In: Global Journal of Engineering Education, ISSN 1328-3154, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 80-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work introduces a phenomenographic analysis of the concept of flexibility in the domain of production science. Flexibility is a cornerstone in the education of industrial and production engineers; however, it still appears as a broadly and even inconsistently defined construct. In order to clarify what is or should be learnt, this work analyses first the established literature to extract a working characterisation of the flexibility concept. The resulting understanding is then used to represent the experts' perception of the topic, which in turn is used as the ideal level of understanding that a student should achieve herself/himself when studying such a concept. The second phase of the work aims at disclosing and classifying the multifaceted perceptions of flexibility that two classes of industrial engineering students have after two courses in which the focal concept of manufacturing flexibility has been presented using two different approaches. The research is based on a survey completed by students. The data collected have consequently been structured into a finite set of clusters according to: a) the level of understanding of the key concept; and b) the nature of the shown knowledge. The classification is, then, the basis for defining an epistemologically sound approach to develop suitable teaching and learning activities to ensure optimal acquisition of the concept of flexibility.

  • 47.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Neves, Pedro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Identification of the value proposition of an evolvable production system2013In: Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Mechatronics and its Applications (ISMA13), IEEE , 2013, p. 6547366-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current production paradigms and related biases concerning automation are an obstacle for the technological development and subsequent application of intelligent assembly solutions such as the automation based on the evolvable paradigm. A deeper understanding of the potential behind such technology is a fundamental step towards a proficient industrial embodiment. The concept of Value Proposition can be used as a holistic analytical tool able to support a full characterization of the appeal that such technology has on the assembly automation market. The two dimensional bottom-up approach proposed in this work allows the identification and description of six potential value offerings connected with an Evolvable Assembly system, which in turn pave the way to more efficient business models.

    Download full text (pdf)
    IDENTIFICATION OF THE VALUE PROPOSITION OF AN EVOLVABLE PRODUCTION SYSTEM
  • 48.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Johansson, Petter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Are we teaching engineering ethics in the right way?: Evidence from a student survey2019In: 13TH INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE (INTED2019) / [ed] Chova, LG Martinez, AL Torres, IC, IATED-INT ASSOC TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION & DEVELOPMENT , 2019, p. 9854-9854Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Evaluation of the potential impact of fully-immersive virtual reality on production engineering curricula2019In: IEEE AFRICON Conference, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtual Reality, or VR, is a family of technologies defined in the 60s that aims at mimicking reality through computers with different purposes. VR is usually classified according to the level of user immersion achieved. VR has attracted increasing attention between academic and practitioners during the last decade due to technological progresses that achieved high reliability and relatively low cost. VR potential to visualize information, replace physical presence and stimulate interaction make of this technology an essential part in the toolbox of future engineers. Higher Education Institution must align their curricula to fulfill this purpose. At the same time VR can be a support to enhance the learning process itself. This work analyses the impact of fully-immersive VR technology on an average production engineering curricula based on the educational offer at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden. The results show that VR has a great potential to shape the production engineering curricula in the coming years both in term of content and design of the learning experiences. 

  • 50.
    Maffei, Antonio
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Dencker, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    From Flexibility to Evolvability: ways to achieve Self-Reconfigurability and Full-Autonomy2009In: 9th IFAC Symposium on Robot Control, SYROCO '09, Gifu, Japan, 2009, Vol. 42, p. 74-79Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the field of production engineering the past paradigms have focused on the concept of system flexibility; introducing both automation and computer science at shop floor level. Nevertheless their limits in approaching some fundamental areas, such as modularization and control issues, make them unsuitable for tackling the challenges in the manufacturing scenario of today. In this paper the past approaches with their underlining weaknesses have been reviewed, which leads up to the proposal of a methodology for the creation of a manufacturing system that is based on the Evolvable Paradigm. The salient points of this scheme are: the process oriented approach to modularization, the link between the development of the system and the design of the product. Fundamental requirements in pursuing these issues are to deeply study the processes in order to represent them at the hardware level, and to develop a distributed control system to handle emergent behaviour. The potential economical benefits that come from the Evolvable Paradigm include that automation can be a sustainable approach both large enterprises and for SMEs.

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