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  • 1.
    Bamzar, Roya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    The nature and the geography of elderly injuries in Sweden2015In: GeoJournal, ISSN 0343-2521, E-ISSN 1572-9893, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 279-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assesses the nature and the geography of elderly injuries in Sweden. The most dominant types of accidents affecting the elderly in their homes and near environments are identified by using county-specific data from 2001 to 2010 followed by a correlation analysis of possible environmental factors underlying patterns of falls among the elderly. Geographical information systems are used to map rates by type. Slipping, tripping and stumbling are the causes of more than half of cases of elderly falls in Sweden, and is more typical in the Northern counties. Findings also show there has been a rise in rates of elderly falls since 2001 in most of the Southern counties, especially in Östergötland and Skåne Counties. Population age and gender affect the ecology of geography of fall rates and counties experiencing long cold winters tend to show higher rates of indoor falls than those with warmer temperature across the year. The article finalizes with a discussion of the results and implication for future research.

  • 2.
    Bamzar, Roya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    The nature and the geography of elderly injuries in Sweden2015In: GeoJournal, ISSN 0343-2521, E-ISSN 1572-9893, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 279-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assesses the nature and the geography of elderly injuries in Sweden. The most dominant types of accidents affecting the elderly in their homes and near environments are identified by using county-specific data from 2001 to 2010 followed by a correlation analysis of possible environmental factors underlying patterns of falls among the elderly. Geographical information systems are used to map rates by type. Slipping, tripping and stumbling are the causes of more than half of cases of elderly falls in Sweden, and is more typical in the Northern counties. Findings also show there has been a rise in rates of elderly falls since 2001 in most of the Southern counties, especially in Östergötland and Skåne Counties. Population age and gender affect the ecology of geography of fall rates and counties experiencing long cold winters tend to show higher rates of indoor falls than those with warmer temperature across the year. The article finalizes with a discussion of the results and implication for future research.

  • 3.
    Bamzar, Roya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    The regional ecology of elderly falls in Sweden2016In: GeoJournal, ISSN 0343-2521, E-ISSN 1572-9893, Vol. 81, no 1, p. 23-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study assesses exploratory the geography of the elderly fall in Sweden in relation to the ecology of the socio-demographic characteristics of the Swedes older population. Kendall Test is used to measure the association between elderly fall rates and demographic, socio-economic characteristics of the population, costs of elderly care and accessibility measures at county level. Results show a number of significant associations: high rates of the elderly fall are associated with high cost of the elderly care but also low rate of elderly fall and good accessibility to basic services (e.g., grocery store, health care and cash machines). The articles finalizes with reflections of the results and suggestions for future research.

  • 4.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Assessing the Impact of Modernization on Fertilty: The Case of Mozambique2000Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mozambique is one of the poorest countries in the world. It also has one of the world’shighest birth rates. Until recently there has been virtually no way to studyMozambique’s high fertility because of the civil war. This paper uses a very recentsurvey of Mozambican women from 1997. The objective of this paper is to assess theimpact of modernization on fertility in Mozambique, using as a background the“supply-demand theory” presented by Easterlin and Crimmins (1985). The first part ofthis paper describes the indicators of modernization for Mozambique by using maps,and indicates eventual correlations. The second part deals with the estimation ofequations for demand for children, the supply of children and the use of contraception.The third part shows how the modernization variables visualized in the first part of thepaper influence all these equations. The results show that the country has one of thehighest demands for children in the world, but also one of the largest supply of children,followed by high infant and child mortality. In many provinces, the regulation costs arestill high. Those who deliberately use contraceptives already have many children.Among the modernization variables, education is the factor that most affects supply,demand and also regulation costs in Mozambique.

  • 5.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Banco de dados geo-relacinal aplicado a qualidade de vida urbana1994In: Symposium of quantification in Geo-sciences, Rio Claro, SP: UNESP , 1994Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Crime and space: patterns of offences and offenders’ paths to crime portrayed by Geographic Information Systems (GIS)2008In: Kartan och Verkligheten / [ed] Thomas Lunden, Stockholm: YMER , 2008, p. 191-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The way spatial information has been approached by literature in crimeanalysis varies highly, following both the development of urban criminologyas a discipline (Shaw and McKay 1942, Newman 1972, Cohen andFelson 1979, Brantingham and Brantingham 1991, Sampson et al. 1997,Wikström 2003, 2004) and the diffusion of spatial technologies such asGeographic Information Systems (GIS) in human sciences (Haining1990, 2003, Anselin 1999, Fotheringham and Rogerson 2002, Chaineyand Ratcliffe 2006). In this article, I review how certain notions of spacehave been incorporated into urban criminology research using GIS.

  • 7.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Crime dynamics at Lithuanian borders2007In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 131-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares levels and patterns of offences in different parts of Lithuaniawith the aim of assessing whether border regions are more susceptible to crimethan the rest of the country. The article focuses on identifying and explainingthese patterns for selected categories of offences while taking account ofcontextual factors. Spatial statistical techniques and Geographic InformationSystems underpin the methodology employed. Findings suggest that there arevariations in the level and geography of offences between border regions and therest of the country. Despite the fact that the highest average increases in recordedcriminal offences were found in two border regions, non-border regions had ahigher average increase in the 1990s. This partially explains why, out of the sixselected offences, only assault shows an increase owing to the ‘border effect’. Theproportion of the population living in urban areas is by far the most importantcovariate in explaining the regional variations in offence ratios.

  • 8.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Crime in a City in Transition: The Case of Tallinn, Estonia2009In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 1611-1638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to characterise the criminogenic conditions of an eastern European city experiencing the transition from a planned to a market-oriented economy. Tallinn, the capital of Estonia, has been chosen as the case study. The article first describes the various levels of a set of expressive and acquisitive offences in Tallinn and then assesses whether patterns of crime in Tallinn are caused by underlying processes similar to the ones indicated in the Western literature of urban criminology. The study identifies variables that most significantly contribute to the variation of crime ratios using regression models, GIS and spatial statistical techniques. Findings suggest that, although there is no dramatic difference between the geography of crimes in Tallinn and those found in western European and North American cities, some of the explanatory variables function in ways which would not be predicted by Western literature.

  • 9.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Crime prevention in rural areas: addressing violence against women2011In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to report experiences of local crime prevention initiatives onviolence against women in rural Sweden. The study relies on a combination of secondary dataand surveys. Although violence against women is higher in urban areas, rural municipalitiesare showing more cases than in the past. The geography of violence against women is farfrom being homogeneous across the country, reflecting not only population structuraldifferences but also local and regional capabilities of criminal justice and society overallconditions to deal with this type of violence. Beyond the problems imposed by geographicalisolation, some of the challenges shared by those working with violence against women inrural areas are limited resources to assist victims and difficulties in putting in practice nationalpolicy guidelines. The article concludes with a summary of results and suggestions for futureresearch.

  • 10.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Ensuring safe mobility in Stockholm, Sweden2015In: Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Municipal engineer, ISSN 0965-0903, E-ISSN 1751-7699, Vol. 168, no 1, p. 74-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stockholm is one of the most accessible cities in Europe. This Scandinavian capital received the 2013 Access City award for disabled-friendly cities, a third place after Berlin and Nantes, France. However, the goal of providing safe mobility for all remains a challenge. People with one or more disabilities report being victims of assault and robbery twice as often as the general population. They avoid going out after dark because they are afraid of being exposed to crime more often than the rest of the population. The elderly, women and the disabled are often pointed out as being more fearful than other groups of passengers. The aim of this paper is to report on the safety conditions for passengers who report themselves as having a disability using data from different sources. The study also illustrates a number of initiatives that are intended to provide safe mobility for all, both from the perspective of those who are responsible for the delivery of transportation services and from those who use the system. The paper finishes with a discussion of current challenges both in practice and research.

  • 11.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Expressive crimes in post-socialist states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania2008In: Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, ISSN 1404-3858, E-ISSN 1651-2340, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 2-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents trends inexpressive crimes in Estonia,Latvia, and Lithuania from1993 to 2000 and examines howdemographic, socio-economic,land use, and institutional factorsrelate to their geography in2000. Geographical InformationSystem (GIS) and spatial regressionmodels are employed in thestudy, which make use of countryregions as the unit of analysis.Issues concerning crime dataavailability and quality are discussed.While police official statisticsshow a significant rise inrates of expressive crime in theBaltic countries during the 1990s(with the exception of homicide),victimization crime surveys indicatethat there have been nosignificant changes in crimelevels and composition. Resultsalso show that indicators ofregions’ social structure, suchas divorce rate, more stronglypredict the variation of 2000’sexpressive crime ratios thanother indicators, such as landuse and economic covariates.Most of these covariates functionin ways which are predicted byWestern literature on crime geography.

  • 12.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    From ‘defensible space’ to ‘space of flows’: integrating geographical information into urban safety research and planning2011In: Proceedings of the ICE - Urban Design and Planning, ISSN 1755-0793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to discuss the use of Geographical Information (GI) and spatial analyticalmethodologies in urban safety research and planning. Based on previous empirical examples, the article discusses advances and challenges of studying crime and perceived safety using GI and spatial analytical methodologies. Thearticles reviews the analysis of crime and perceived fear at the micro-level landscape followed by a discussion of ecological studies often searching for associations between socio-economic characteristics of small areas. The use ofGI and visualisation techniques has also been incorporated into research and planning in public participation schemes and, more recently, into new methodologies aiming at predicting human movement patterns using real-timedata. The paper also reviews some of the current challenges for spatial urban safety research and concludes with prospects on the value of this form of analysis in the near future.

  • 13.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    GIS, rumslig dimension och livskvalitet1999In: PLAN, Vol. 3, p. 151-158Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14. Ceccato, Vania
    Homicide in Sao Paulo, Brazil: Assessing spatial-temporal and weather variations2005In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 307-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although Sao Paulo is one of the most dangerous cities in the world, very little is known about the variations of levels of crime in this Brazilian city over time. This article begins by investigating whether or not homicides are seasonal in Sao Paulo. Then, hypotheses based on the principles of routine activities theory are tested to evaluate the influence of weather and temporal variations on violent behaviour expressed as cases of homicides. Finally, the geography of space-time clusters of high homicide areas are assessed using Geographical Information System (GIS) and Kulldorff's scan test. The findings suggest that central and peripheral deprived areas show the highest number of killings over the year. Moreover, homicides take place when most people have time off: particularly during vacations (hot months of the year), evenings and weekends. Overall, the results show that temporal variables are far more powerful for explaining levels of homicide than weather covariates for the Brazilian case-a finding that lends weight to the suggested hypotheses derived from routine activity theory.

  • 15.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Integrating geographical information into urban safety research and planning2013In: Proceedings of the Institute of Civil Engineers: Urban Design and Planning, ISSN 1755-0793, E-ISSN 1755-0807, Vol. 166, no 1, p. 15-23Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the use of geographical information and spatial analytical methodologies in urban safety research and planning. Based on previous empirical examples, the paper investigates the advances and challenges of studying crime and perceived safety using geographical information and spatial analytical methodologies. Studies of crime and perceived fear at the micro-level in the urban landscape are also reviewed, followed by a discussion of ecological studies, which often search for associations between crime and socio-economic characteristics of small areas. The use of geographical information and visualisation techniques has been incorporated into research and planning in public participation schemes and, more recently, into new methodologies aiming at predicting human movement patterns using real-time data. The paper reviews some of the current challenges for spatial urban safety research and concludes with prospects on the value of this form of analysis in the near future.

  • 16.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Objective and subjective indicators of quality of life in two districts in Stockholm County1998In: Urban Ecology, Springer Publishing Company, 1998, p. 283-287Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Plats som motverkar våld2011In: Miljöforskning, ISSN 1650-4925, no 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Quality of life and social cohesion: a methodological discussion and their implications in planning2002In: Reshaping regional planning: a Northern perspective / [ed] F Snickars, B Olerup and L O Persson, Hampshire,: Ashgate, 2002, p. 135-165Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Quality of life: concepts and some methodologies of study1996In: Design methodologies in urban context / [ed] Reza Kazemian, Stockholm: Architecture, KTH , 1996, p. 183-193Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Rural crime and community safety2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Crime is often perceived as an urban issue rather than a problem that occurs in rural areas, but how far is this view tenable? This book explores the relationship between crime and community in rural areas and addresses the notion of safety as part of the community dynamics in such areas. Rural Crime and Community Safety makes a significant contribution to crime science and integrates a range of theories to understand patterns of crime and perceived safety in rural contexts. Based on a wealth of original research, Ceccato combines spatial methods with qualitative analysis to examine, in detail, farm and wildlife crime, youth related crimes and gendered violence in rural settings. Making the most of the expanding field of Criminology and of the growing professional inquiry into crime and crime prevention in rural areas; rural development; and the social sustainability of rural areas, this book builds a bridge by connecting Criminology and Human Geography. This book will be suitable for academics, students and practitioners in the fields of criminology, community safety, rural studies, rural development and gender studies.

  • 21.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Rural crime and community safety2015In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 39, p. 157-159Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Safety on the move: Crime and perceived safety in transit environments Introduction2014In: Security Journal, ISSN 0955-1662, E-ISSN 1743-4645, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 127-131Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Special Issue: Finance, Harm And White Collar Crime2016In: Crime, law and social change, ISSN 0925-4994, E-ISSN 1573-0751, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 109-113Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Säkrare utomhusmiljöer med bättre samhällsplanering2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    The nature of rape places2014In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 40, p. 97-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to characterise the distribution and the urban landscape in which outdoor rapes happen in Stockholm, the capital of Sweden. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) underlie the methodology of this research that combines crime police records, police protocols and information from fieldwork of a sample of rape places. Rapes are concentrated in the inner city areas but follow a patchy pattern in some parts of the periphery. Rapes happen in places with poor visibility but that offer an easy escape for the offender. A large share of them happen in the weekends, holidays and hot months of the year, which can be associated with unstructured leisure routine activities of individuals. Results show that the role of environment on the occurrence of rape varies over time and space - a fact with important implications for research and safety interventions.

  • 26.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    The urban fabric of crime and fear: an introduction2012In: The urban fabric of crime and fear / [ed] Vania Ceccato, Springer Netherlands, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities are places of social interaction. Some social interactions – such as being a victim of crime – are unpleasant experiences. We live in a world in which security concerns have become an integral part of our daily thoughts, putting in check one of the basic elements of cities’ virtues ─ their liveability. Fences, padlocks, dogs, guards, security electronic devices, hermetic shopping malls or gated communities are just part of the commodified security urban landscape.

    The objective of this book is to provide a theoretical and empirical discussion of security issues in the urban context. This is important since we cannot plan cities that are socially sustainable without taking security into account. Although there is no such thing as a place free of crime, a sustainable city should aim at being free from the risk (or fear) of crime, where a feeling of security underpins a wider sense of place attachment and social cohesion. The fact is that the risk of being a victim of crime is not equally or randomly distributed over space. How does the city’s urban fabric relate to crime and fear, and how is that fabric affected by crime and fear? Does the urban environment affect one’s decision to commit an offence? Is there a victimisation-related inequality within cities? How do crime and fear interrelate to inequality and segregation in cities of developing countries? What are the challenges to planning cities which are both safe and sustainable? This book searches for answers to these questions in the nature of the city, particularly in the social interactions that take place in urban space distinctively guided by different land uses and people’s activities.  In other words, the book deals with the urban fabric of crime and fear.

    The novelty of the book is to place security on the urban scale by (1) showing links between urban structure, and crime and fear, (2) illustrating how different disciplines deal with urban vulnerability to (and fear of) crime (3) including concrete examples of issues and challenges found in European and North American cities, and, without being too extensive, also in cities of the Global South.

    Finally, and importantly, this book will be entirely unique. Simply put: there is no other book like it. Books about similar issues may present a general perspective of  security (Dodds and Pippard, 2005, UNHS, 2007) or often deal with specific themes, such as perceived safety (e.g., Van den Berg, 2006), crime geography (e.g., Hirschfield and Bowers, 2001) or about practical issues of crime prevention by urban design (e.g., Brennan and Zelinka, 2001). These issues might be relevant only to a specific area (e.g., Atkinson, 2001).

    Our goal in creating this book is to take advantage of the expanding field of urban criminology and of the growing number of professionals interested in security in the urban context. We will accomplish this by providing a fundamental book that will act as a starting point for those carrying out or interested in research on urban criminology, urban planning, urban geography and urban design. We believe our book will fill a growing niche and meet the demand of an expanding discipline for years to come.

    As we are sure you are aware, the quality of book relies heavily upon both the editor and the contributors. Given our passion for this topic, and our sincere desire to fill the current void and to create a quality product, we are very carefully selecting the contributors. Many will be leading scholars in their particular area of work.  For example, those who have already provided or agreed to provide a chapter include Bill Hillier, Nick Tilley, Anastasia Loukaitou-Sideris, Per Olof Wikström, Alba Zaluar, Robert Haining, and others. To further ensure quality and to make sure the edited volume is not derivative,  each of the chapters in the book will represent original scholarship prepared specifically for this project. These internationally renowned researchers will be looking at a single theme but from different perspectives (e.g., architecture, urban geography, criminology, sociology) which will make the book potentially useful to a wide group of professionals and practitioners interested in urban security issues, such as urban planners, criminologists, architects, geographers as well as those working directly with security interventions.

  • 27. Ceccato, Vania
    Tools in the Spatial Analysis of Offenses: Evidence from Scandinavian Cities2005In: GIS for Sustainable Development / [ed] Michele Campagna, Taylor & Francis, 2005, p. 267-286Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines the potential of GIS in combination with spatial statisticsin an exploratory analysis of urban geography of offenses in two Scandinavian cities.The term exploratory analysis implies here the use of techniques for detection ofpatterns in data (clusters) as well as statistical modeling. Techniques such as Kmeansportioning and Kulldorff’s scan test are used to provide a simplified representationof where significant statistical concentrations of offenses occur across thecity, while regression models are applied to explain such clusters. Three clustertechniques are applied to data on pickpocketing in Copenhagen, the capital ofDenmark. This is followed by an attempt to explain patterns of vandalism usingdemographic, socioeconomic, and land use covariates in Malmö, the third largestSwedish city. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the strengths and limitationsof these techniques for local planning.

  • 28.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Understanding the nature of outdoor rape2012In: Women, Crime and Criminal Justice Practice, Cambridge, UK, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What can we learn about women’s mobility and urban environments from cases of outdoor rape? Are there ‘typical places’ for rape? How do they look like? How do victims relate to the rape place? To what extent do these places relate to women´s overall fear of crime? These are some of the questions to be answered in the research project entitled “Putting women in their place: city environment and female mobility, lessons from cases of outdoor rapes” using cases of outdoor rapes in Stockholm, Sweden. The objective of the study is to two-fold. First, it contributes to better understanding of the urban environment and the spatial dynamics in which outdoor rapes take place. Second, it uncovers how crime place is recalled and perceived by the victim and by doing that, the study searches for insights on how victim’s immediate mobility pre and post rape relates to current patterns of women’s fear of crime in city environments. One of the novelties of this research is to incorporate accurate knowledge of places where one third of all rapes in Sweden take place. In this presentation we will focus on preliminary results of the study by discussing the nature of these places in relation to overall city environment.

  • 29.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Women’s Mobility and the Situational Conditions of Rape: Cases Reported to Hospitals2017In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, p. 1-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A third of all rapes in Stockholm, the capital of Sweden, take place in public outdoor places. Yet, little is known about the events that precede this type of sexual offence and less about the situational context of rape. This study aims to improve the understanding of the nature of situational conditions that immediately precede events of rape. Using medical records of 147 rape victims during 2012 and 2013, we constructed time- and place-specific records of the places women traveled through or spent time at, the activities they engaged in, and the people they interacted with sequentially over the course of the day when they were raped. The analysis uses visualization tools (VISUAL-TimePAcTS), Geographical Information Systems, and conditional logistic regression to identify place-, context-, and social interaction–related factors associated with the onset of rape. Results for this sample of cases reported to hospitals show that being outdoors was not necessarily riskier for women when compared with indoor public settings; some outdoor environments were actually protective, such as streets. Being in a risky social context and engaging in a risky activity before the event was associated with an increased risk of rape, and the risk escalated over the day. Among those women who never drank alcohol, the results were similar to what was observed in the overall sample, which suggests that risky social interaction and risky activity made independent contributions to the risk of rape. The article finishes with suggestions for rape prevention

  • 30.
    Ceccato, Vania A.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Preface2012In: The Urban Fabric of Crime and Fear, Springer Netherlands, 2012, p. vii-viiiChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Ceccato, Vania A
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Public Space and the Situational Conditions of Crime and Fear2015In: International Criminal Justice Review, ISSN 1057-5677, E-ISSN 1556-3855, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 69-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue explores the situational conditions of crime and perceived safety in public spaces. In this foreword, we first examine the concept of public space and then discuss how public spaces relate to crime and fear of crime. In the final session we introduce the different articles that compose the Special Issue, with contributions from Australia, Colombia, India, Sweden and the United States.

  • 32.
    Ceccato, Vania A
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    The urban fabric of crime and fear2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities are places of social interaction. Some social interactions — such as being a victim of crime “ are unpleasant experiences. Even if there is no such thing as a place free of crime, many would argue that a liveable city should aim to control the risk or fear of crime, where a feeling of security underpin a sense of place attachment and the social cohesion of its residents. Security includes individuals” risk of being a victim of crime as well as their perceived safety. Some would argue that, although security is necessary for urban quality of life, prioritising it may restrict social interaction, exclude certain groups of individuals and stigmatise others. Cities cannot aim at being socially sustainable without considering their citizens' security concerns seriously. However, the determination to ensure security must follow policies and practices which have a wide sense of inclusion and fairness. The objective of this book is to provide a theoretical and empirical discussion of security issues in the urban context based on different research traditions. From an academic point of view, the book shows examples of potentialities and limitations within different research disciplines when dealing with urban crime and fear of crime. From a practical point of view, the book has the potential to help practitioners and planners to set out a more realistic agenda for what can be planned and achieved when the issues are crime and fear of crime.

  • 33.
    Ceccato, Vania A
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Bamzar, Roya
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Elderly Victimization and Fear of Crime in Public Spaces2015In: International Criminal Justice Review, ISSN 1057-5677, E-ISSN 1556-3855, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 115-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing upon environmental criminology principles and fear of crime literature, this article investigates the types of outdoor places where most crimes against the elderly happen as well as the types of places most feared by them. The study employs an analysis of secondary data, crime mapping, fieldwork, and interviews with residents in a senior housing area in Stockholm, Sweden. Results show that most crime victims were exposed to theft, and all incidents took place in the environment close to the senior housing. Elderly perceived safety follows a “distance decay” from the residence, the safest places being the areas immediately outside the entrance of the senior housing, while the least safe are the deserted areas close to the petrol station. Findings also show that for those who are fairly mobile, the fact that they avoid some places does not necessarily mean their mobility is restricted, as previously expected, but it makes them walk farther. © 2016, 2016 Georgia State University.

  • 34.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Benson, Michael L.
    Tax evasion in Sweden 2002-2013: interpreting changes in the rot/rut deduction system and predicting future trends2016In: Crime, law and social change, ISSN 0925-4994, E-ISSN 1573-0751, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 217-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we report on the effects of recent changes in tax policy in Sweden as a case study of tax evasion. We use situational crime prevention principles and insights drawn from situational action theory to construct an analytical framework to assess how changes in tax policy affect individuals' and companies' motivations for tax evasion; first decreasing motivations and then increasing them. The analysis relies mostly on secondary data from reports published by the Swedish Tax Agency. We then make specific predictions regarding future trends in tax evasion. We analyse how buyers and providers of certain services that are taxed might be affected by changes in the tax deduction system and we predict that an increasing percentage of them will consider engaging in tax evasion. We conclude by discussing actions that the tax authorities might take to prevent increases in tax evasion.

  • 35.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Ceccato, H.
    Violence in the Rural Global South: Trends, Patterns, and Tales From the Brazilian Countryside2017In: Criminal Justice Review, ISSN 0734-0168, E-ISSN 1556-3839, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 270-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to discuss the trends and nature of rural violence in Brazil. Assuming the hypothesis of an increase in violence rates, urban–rural violence rates are compared at three geographical levels: national (Brazil), state (São Paulo), and municipal (Rio Claro). The study combines the analyses of official statistics with newspaper reports, videos, and articles published by the national media. Findings indicate an increase in violence in rural areas in recent decades but such a rise is far from homogenous across the country; it shows links to patterns of population change, economic expansion, and organized crime. Although violence has long being an inherent characteristic of rural Brazil—a place of conflicts and struggles—it is argued here that the more recent rise in violence is distinct from the past, at least in its portrayal by the media. The article finalizes by suggesting a research agenda to improve the understanding of the dynamics of violence in the Brazilian context.

  • 36.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Courtney, Paul
    University of Aberdeen, UK.
    Atterton, Jane
    University of Aberdeen, UK.
    The DORA Project – Methodological Considerations at the European Level2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews the rationale for the adoption of a multiple-methods interdisciplinaryapproach in a European comparative research project entitled the Dynamics ofRural Areas (DORA), and describes some of the experiences, advantages and limitations ofthe selected approach. DORA has as a main goal to assess the underlying reasons fordifferential economic performance in eight European regions, and involves research teams inScotland, Germany, Greece and Sweden. Four key issues are discussed. Firstly, the challengesfaced in designing a ‘common’ methodology within a multi-disciplinary international teamthat reflects both researchers’ backgrounds and specific country contexts. Secondly, some ofthe problems related to the sensitivity of economic indicators and the collection ofcomparable secondary data across different countries. Thirdly, the potential conflicts that canarise between a requirement for international comparability combined with a need torecognise the unique circumstances of individual case study areas, and finally, the variationsin respondents’ perceptions and opinions that can occur between qualitative and morequantitative approaches, and how these can be dealt with. The discussion is illustrated by apresentation of some key findings of the study, and concludes with some suggestions to helptake the debate forward.

  • 37.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Dolmen, Lars
    Crime in rural Sweden2011In: Applied Geography, ISSN 0143-6228, E-ISSN 1873-7730, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 119-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to assess the levels and spatial patterns of crime in rural Sweden This involves a summary of the changing levels and composition of a selected group of offences from 1996 to 2007 in two groups of rural areas (remote and accessible) in relation to urban areas Crime rates are modelled cross-sectionally as a function of the municipalities structural indicators Geographical information systems (GIS) and spatial statistics techniques are used to assess shifting patterns of concentration of thefts and violence as well as for modelling crime rates Findings show that rural areas have become more criminogenic than they were a decade ago Changes in the rates and geography were found using cluster techniques for both violence and theft. Although models of rural crime do not show any special rural dimension the predicting variables in models containing both urban and rural areas are not exactly the same as in models with rural areas only Crime is often linked to the presence of alcohol-selling premises characteristics of family structure and proportion of young male population.

  • 38.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Dolmen, Lars
    National Police Board.
    Crime prevention in rural Sweden2013In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 89-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we report examples of crime prevention (CP) experiences using case studies in rural municipalities in Sweden. Data from three different sources were analysed: semi-structured interviews with representatives of CP groups in eight rural municipalities, responses from an email survey, and a database of CP projects receiving funding from the Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention. Findings show that youth-related problems are the major CP concern, which are translated into projects against violence and alcohol and drug addiction. National CP guidelines overlook the nature of rural crime, its seasonality and what happens outside the urban core. Although CP groups in rural Sweden face a number of challenges, they show indications of being well prepared to address youth-related problems. The article concludes with a summary of results and flags the need to extend the international evidence on crime prevention to include experiences that go beyond large city problems.

  • 39.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Dolmen, Lars
    Swedish Policy Academy.
    Domestic violence in rural Sweden2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Dolmen, Lars
    Swedish Policy Academy.
    Violence against women in rural Sweden2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Foresti, Celina
    INPE, BRAZIL.
    Kurkdjian, Maria
    INPE, BRAZIL.
    Gerenciamento urbano e qualidade de vida usando dados de sensoriamneto remoto1995In: Analise Ambiental: estrategias e acoes / [ed] Tauk-Tornisielo, S, Rio Claro, SP, Brazil: Centre of Environmental Studies, Rio Claro, UNESP , 1995Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42. Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    Foresti, Celina
    Kurkdjian, Maria de Lourdes Neves de Oliveira
    Proposta metodológica para avaliação da qualidade de vida urbana a partir de dados convencionais e de sensoriamento remoto, sistema de informações geograficas.1993In: Anais do VII Simposio Brasileiro de Sensoriamento Remoto / [ed] INPE, 1993, p. 32-39Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43. Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    Haining, R.
    Assessing the geography of vandalism: Evidence from a Swedish city2005In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 42, no 9, p. 1637-1656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the occurrence of vandalism at the small-area level for the Swedish city of Malmo using data from the Skane Police Authority's database. Demographic, socioeconomic and land use characteristics measured at the small-area level are used as predictors of vandalism with particular interest in the role of collective resources. Standardised vandalism ratios were calculated and mapped using a geographical information system (GIS). Spatial regression models were used to test hypotheses relating to the variation in vandalism rates. Findings show that spatial variation in vandalism is significantly related to social disorganisation risk factors as well as land use factors, but that the physical presence of local leisure associations (a 'collective resource') produces higher vandalism rates.

  • 44.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure and Planning.
    Haining, R.
    Crime in border regions: The Scandinavian case of Öresund, 1998-20012004In: Annals of the Association of American Geographers, ISSN 0004-5608, E-ISSN 1467-8306, Vol. 94, no 4, p. 807-826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares offense patterns at two points in time in Öresund, a Scandinavian border region that spans Sweden and Denmark. The aim of the analysis is to contribute to a better understanding of the relationships between crime and demographic, socioeconomic, and land use covariates in a border area that has been targeted with long-term investments in transport. The changes effected by the construction of the Öresund bridge might be expected to have an impact on both the levels and the geographies of different offenses by creating new sites for offending and new, more vulnerable, transient groups. The article focuses on identifying and explaining changes in the geography of crime before and after the bridge was built. Spatial statistical techniques and GIS underpin the methodology employed. The article shows that there have been changes in the levels and the geography of some offenses. Crime in border regions is likely to be of growing interest in Europe as a result of European Union (EU) enlargement and increasing intra-European cross-border movement facilitated by improved communication systems.

  • 45.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure and Planning.
    Haining, R.
    Signoretta, P.
    Exploring offence statistics in Stockholm City using spatial analysis tools2002In: Annals of the Association of American Geographers, ISSN 0004-5608, E-ISSN 1467-8306, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 29-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to investigate changes since the early 1980s in offence patterns for residential burglary, theft of and from cars, and vandalism in Stockholm City using methods from spatial statistics. The findings of previous Swedish studies on crime patterns and the insights provided by different theories, notably one propounded by Wikstrom (1991), provide a background for this study and are briefly reviewed. The analytical elements of the article are presented in two main parts. The first consists of a brief description of methodological procedures to obtain robust estimates of small-area standardized offence ratios. Attention is pail to both the spatial framework and the method of calculating rates. Standardized offence ratios (SORs) are calculated and mapped using GIS, and the Getis-Ord statistic is used to identify areas of raised incidence. The variation in a relative risk is modeled as a function of socioeconomic variables using the linear regression model, recognizing the complications raised by the spatial nature of the data. Results suggest that while there have been no dramatic changes in the geographies of these offences in Stockholm City during the last decade, there have been some shifts both in geographical patterns and in their association with underlying socioeconomic conditions.

  • 46. Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    Haining, Robert
    Kahn, Tulio
    The geography of homicide in Sao Paulo, Brazil2007In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 1632-1653Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors investigate geographical patterns of homicide in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The geography of crime in developing world cities has been an underresearched area in part because of the lack of good-quality, geocoded offence data. In the case of Sao Paulo the availability of a new digital police dataset has provided the opportunity to improve our understanding of its crime patterns. The authors report the testing of hypotheses about the spatial variation in homicide rates. This variation is explained by poverty, situational conditions determined by differences in land use, and processes that indicate links with the geography of drug markets and the availability of firearms.

  • 47.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure and Planning.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure and Planning.
    A new information theoretical measure of global and local spatial association, S2002In: The Review of Regional Research, Vol. 22, p. 13-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a new measure of spatial association, the S statistics, is developed.The proposed measure is based on information theory by defininga spatially weighted information measure (entropy measure) that takes thespatial configuration into account. The proposed S-statistics has an intuitiveinterpretation, and furthermore fulfils properties that are expected from anentropy measure. Moreover, the S statistics is a global measure of spatialassociation that can be decomposed into Local Indicators of Spatial Association(LISA). This new measure is tested using a dataset of employmentin the culture sector that was attached to the wards over Stockholm Countyand later compared with the results from current global and local measuresof spatial association. It is shown that the proposed S statistics share manyproperties with Moran’s I and Getis-Ord Gi statistics. The local Si statisticsshowed significant spatial association similar to the Gi statistic, but has the advantage of being possible to aggregate to a global measure of spatialassociation. The statistics can also be extended to bivariate distributions.It is shown that the commonly used Bayesian empirical approach can beinterpreted as a Kullback-Leibler divergence measure. An advantage of Sstatisticsis that this measure select only the most robust clusters, eliminatingthe contribution of smaller ones composed by few observations and that mayinflate the global measure.

  • 48.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Lukyte, Nijole
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Safety and sustainability in a city in transition: The case of Vilnius, Lithuania2011In: Cities, ISSN 0264-2751, E-ISSN 1873-6084, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 83-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban experts have long recognised crime and fear of crime as dominant challenges to sustainable cities. A sustainable community is a place free from the fear of crime, where a feeling of security underpins a wider sense of place attachment and place attractiveness. In this article, we follow the recent strand of Western research and suggest a framework for assessing safety, which includes the analysis of the geography of crime, fear of crime and crime prevention. Empirical evidence is based on Vilnius, Lithuania. Findings show that whilst Vilnius' geography of crime shows patterns similar to those found in Western cities, fear of crime shows a complex pattern, playing a minor role when citizens judge their residential quality. Crime prevention incorporates top-down features as well as approaches previously adopted by Western cities. The article concludes with an assessment of the proposed framework and directions for future work.

  • 49.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Masci, S.
    Airport Environment and Passengers' Satisfaction with Safety2017In: Journal of Applied Security Research, ISSN 1936-1610, E-ISSN 1936-1629, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 356-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to report patterns of passenger's satisfaction with their safety at an international European airport.1 The study is based on an analysis of a 2014–2015 passenger safety survey with particular focus on the impact of the airport's environment on passenger safety. Chi-square analysis and binary logistic regression underpin the methodology used in the study. Findings show that about one third of passengers are dissatisfied with their perceived safety. Airport entrances, security checkpoints, boarding areas, toilets, and restaurants are places where passengers declare feeling less satisfied with their safety. Regardless whether passengers are arriving or departing, their satisfaction with safety is affected by their perception of an airport's environment (e.g., elevators, overall maintenance) and also by the overall experience of being in transit. Findings call for research and interventions that consider passenger safety as a multifaceted phenomenon and that adopt a whole-journey approach to transit safety.

  • 50.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Oberwittler, Dietrich
    Comparing spatial patterns of robbery: Evidence from a Western and an Eastern European city2008In: Cities, ISSN 0264-2751, E-ISSN 1873-6084, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 185-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we test hypotheses about the spatial variation in rates of robbery in West and East European cities (Cologne, Germany and Tallinn, Estonia). This comparison represents an interesting case study because Tallinn is an example of former socialist cities which have undergone a period of profound political and socio-economic change since the country's independence in the early 1990s (including EU membership). These changes are expected to have implications for the level and composition of offences as well as their geographies. Using cross-sectional datasets, we examine whether or not levels and patterns of robbery in Tallinn follow similar processes to the ones found in Cologne applying GIS (Geographical Information System) and spatial statistical techniques. Findings show that although levels of robberies (rates) are higher in Tallinn than in Cologne, their geography (ratios) follows the same overlapping components of social contexts, as social disorganization and, particularly, routine activities.

12 1 - 50 of 81
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