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  • 1.
    Bakyayita, Grace Kizito
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Makerere Univ, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Kampala, Uganda..
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kulabako, R. N.
    Makerere Univ, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Kampala, Uganda..
    Assessment of Levels, Speciation, and Toxicity of Trace Metal Contaminants in Selected Shallow Groundwater Sources, Surface Runoff, Wastewater, and Surface Water from Designated Streams in Lake Victoria Basin, Uganda2019In: Journal of Environmental and Public health, ISSN 1687-9805, E-ISSN 1687-9813, article id 6734017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The levels, speciation of elements, and toxicity of selected trace metals as well as other parameters in selected surface water, shallow groundwater sources, landfill leachate, and associated surface runoff in the Lake Victoria basin, Uganda, were studied. The WHO guidelines, Ugandan standards, Canadian guidelines and Swedish EPA were used for assessment. The shallow groundwater was acidic with pH values below 6.5. The pH, dissolved organic carbon, flouride, and sulphate levels for all springs were below the guideline values although 52.8% was contaminated with nitrates while 39% was contaminated with chloride ions. Some surface water samples had levels of major elements, such as iron, chromium, aluminium, and manganese, above the guideline values. Speciation studies showed that 74% of the metal ions was bound to dissolved organic matter in surface water, whereas in landfill leachates, the dominant ionic species was metal hydroxides or fulvic acid bound. Risk analysis based on the Swedish EPA showed varied risks of negative effects in 30%-76% of the sample sites ranging from high to increased risk in surface water, whereas the results from modelling sorption data using the Bio-met tool showed potential risk to toxicity effects of Cu2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, and Pb2+ in 15.3%-30.8% surface water samples and 8.3%-62.5% groundwater samples.

  • 2.
    Bakyayita, Grace Kizito
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE). Makerere University and Kyambogo University.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kulabako, Robinah N.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE). Department of Civil Engineering, CEDAT, Makerere University.
    Assessment of levels, speciation and toxicity of trace metal contaminants in selected shallow groundwater sources, surface runoff, wastewater and surface water from designated streams in Lake Victoria Basin, Uganda2019In: Hindawi Journal of Environmental and Public Health, ISSN 1687-9813, p. 1-18, article id 6734017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The levels, speciation of elements and toxicity of selected trace metals as well as other parameters in selected surface water, shallow groundwater sources, landfill leachate and associated surface runoff in the Lake Victoria basin, Uganda were studied. The WHO guidelines, Ugandan standards, Canadian guidelines and Swedish EPA were used for assessment. The shallow groundwater was acidic with pH values below 6.5. The pH, dissolved organic carbon, flouride and suphate levels for all springs were below the guideline values although 52.8% were contaminated with nitrates while 39% were contaminated with chloride ions. The water samples with had levels of major elements; iron, chromium, aluminium and manganese above the guideline values. Speciation studies showed that 74% of the metal ions were bound to dissolved organic matter in surface water whereas in landfill leachates the dorminant ionic species were metal hydroxides or fluvic acid bound. Risk analysis basing on the Swedish EPA showed that varied risks of negative effects in 30% – 76% of the sample sites ranging from high to increased risk in surface water whereas the results from Bio-met tool showed potential risk to toxicity effects of Cu2+, Ni2+, Zn2+and Pb2+ in 15.3% - 30.8% surface water samples and 8.3% - 62.5% groundwater samples.

  • 3.
    Bakyayita, Grace Kizito
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE). Makerere University, Kyambogo University.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kulabako, Robinah N.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE). Department of Civil Engineering, CEDAT, Makerere University.
    Characterisation and application of untreated and base-treated biosorbents from Albizia coriaria, Erythrina abyssinica and Musa spp. in the uptake of Cd (II) and Pb (II) ions from contaminated waterManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The barks of Albizia coriaria, Erythrina abyssinica and peels of Musa spp. were studied in batch for removal of aqueous Cd2+ and Pb2+ ions at pH 4.5, agitation time 3.0 hours for 10 g/L biomass dosage. The biosorbents’ surfaces contained an array of heterogeneous sorption sites for metal ions. The trace metals in the biomass were in trace amounts.Results form XRD showed that organic species in the biosorbent surfaces were electron rich species expected to play part in the metal ions uptake. The biomass negative potential for binding base cations was in the order; Musa spp. > A. coriaria > E. abyssinica and base treatment reduced DOC leaching from the biosorbents in the order; E. abyssinica > A. coriaria > Musa spp. Speciation studies showed that more ions were complexed to DOC in solutions at various pH levels. The maximum sorption intensities for both Cd2+ and Pb2+ ions uptake onto biomass was highest for lowest initial metal concentration; 5 mg/L. Musa spp had the highest soprtion performance for both Cd2+ and Pb2+ ions. Freundlich model best fitted data for Pb2+ ions uptake whereas Temkin model fitted the sorption data for Cd2+ ions onto both treated and untreated biomass.

  • 4.
    Bakyayita, Grace Kizito
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Makerere univ.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kulabako, Robinah Nakawunde Akawunde
    Makerere univ.
    Competitive and Noncompetitive Batch Sorption Studies of Aqueous Cd(II) and Pb(II) Uptake onto Coffea canephora Husks, Cyperus papyrus Stems, and Musa spp. Peels2015In: Journal of Chemistry, ISSN 2090-9063, E-ISSN 2090-9071, article id 696098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coffea canephora, Cyperus papyrus, and Musa spp. were studied for competitive and noncompetitive removal of aqueous Cd2+ and Pb2+. The optimal conditions were pH 4.5 and agitation time 3.0 hours. Biomass constituent ions showed no interference effects whereas cation exchange capacity values corresponded to the sorption efficiencies. XRD spectroscopy revealed surface oxygen and nitrogen groups that provide binding sites for metal ions. The maximum sorption efficiency ranges for metal ions in noncompetitive media were 95.2-98.7% for C. canephora, 42.0-91.3% for C. papyrus, and 79.9-92.2% for Musa spp. and in competitive sorption 90.8-98.0% for C. canephora, 19.5-90.4% for C. papyrus, and 56.4-89.3% for Musa spp. The Pb2+ ions uptake was superior to that of Cd2+ ions in competitive and noncompetitive media. In competitive sorption synergistic effects were higher for Cd2+ than Pb2+ ions. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted experimental data with 0.917 <= R-2 >= 1.000 for Pb2+ ions and 0.711 <= R-2 >= 0.999 for Cd2+ ions. The Langmuir model fitted noncompetitive sorption data with 0.769 <= R-2 >= 0.999; moreover the Freundlich model fitted competitive sorption data with 0.867 <= R-2 >= 0.989. Noncompetitive sorption was monolayer chemisorption whereas competitive sorption exhibited heterogeneous sorption mechanisms.

  • 5.
    Bakyayita Kizito, Grace
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kulabako, Robinah
    2Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Makerere University, Uganda.
    Nalubega, Mai
    Water and Sanitation Department, African Development Bank, Tunis, Tunisia.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Equilibrium batch studies for biosorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions from single-and binary-component aqueous mediaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bakyayita Kizito, Grace
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Nalubega, Mai
    Water and Sanitation Department, African Development Bank, Tunis.
    Robinah, Kulabako
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Makerere University, Uganda .
    Kinetic studies of Cd (II) and Pb (II) ions biosorption from aqueous media using untreated and chemically treated biosorbents2014In: Water Science and Technology: Water Supply, ISSN 1606-9749, E-ISSN 1607-0798, Vol. 69, no 11, p. 2230-2236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Untreated and chemically treated Albizia coriaria, Erythrina abyssinica and Musa spp were studied in batch for uptake of Cd2+ and Pb2+ ions at pH 2.0–9.0 and agitation time; 30–390 min. Optimum biosorption conditions were; pH 4 for Pb2+ ions and pH 5 for Cd2+ ions, contact time was 3.5 hours at 24 ± 1 °C for 10 mg/L biosorbent dosage and initial metal ions concentration of 20 mg/L. Chemical treatment had a 10–17% biosorption efficiency enhancement for Cd2+ ions and a 1.6–2.3% reduction effect for Pb2+ ions. The sorption capacities for Cd2+ and Pb2+ ions for treated biosorbents were between 1.760–1.738 mg g−1 compared to 1.415–1.539 mg g−1 for untreated materials. The pseudo second order model suitably fitted the Cd2+ and Pb2+ ions biosorption data with regression coefficients (R2) between 0.9784–0.9999. Fitting of the Ho model to the experimental data showed that the biosorption mechanism for both metal ions studied was mainly a chemisorption process. Therefore, treated A. coriaria, E. abyssinica and Musa spp were potential biosorbents for remediation of Cd2+ ions and the untreated materials suitable for removing Pb2+ ions from contaminated aqueous media.

  • 7.
    Berggren Kleja, Dan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Elert, Mark
    Kemakta Konsult AB.
    Gustafsson, Jon Petter
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jarvis, las
    Markvetenskap, SLU.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Metallers mobilitet i mark2006Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I rapporten beskrivs nuvarande kunskapsläge när det gäller metallers uppträdande imark. Riskbedömningar för metaller i förorenad mark diskuteras.De flesta metaller binds i viss utsträckning i marken, oftast genom olika ytreaktioner med markens organiska material eller med järn- och aluminiumoxider, ochibland även genom utfällningsreaktioner. I vilken omfattning detta sker beror avfaktorer som t.ex. pH, redoxförhållanden, löst organiskt material (DOC) i markvattnet, samt förekomst av konkurrerande joner. Det är också viktigt att beaktavilka former metallerna förekommer som i markvattnet. Komplexbildning medt.ex. DOC minskar i regel toxiciteten. För att bättre ta hänsyn till markkemiskaförhållanden i riskbedömningen bör geokemiska modeller komma till ökad användning.Metaller lösta i vattnet följer med när vattnet strömmar och kan transporterastill grund- och ytvatten eller tas upp av växter. Hur snabbt detta går beror, förutomkemiska och biologiska processer, även på en rad olika jordegenskaper. Till exempel innehåller vissa jordar s.k. makroporer vilka ger upphov till preferentiellt flöde.Detta innebär att en del av metallerna snabbare kan transporteras genom marken,förbi jordpartiklar där metallerna annars skulle bindas.De olika modeller som används för att beskriva påverkan av markförorening pågrundvatten kan delas in i två grupper: stationära modeller antar att källtermen ärkonstant och tar enbart hänsyn till den utspädning som sker i grundvattnet. Exempel på sådana modeller är den svenska riktvärdesmodellen, JAGG och RBCA. I detvå senare modellerna finns möjlighet att ta hänsyn till nedbrytning av organiskaämnen. Tidsberoende modeller antar en avklingande källterm och en tidsberoendetransport i grundvattnet, exempelvis RISC och TAC-modellen. För beräkning avtransport i grundvattnet tas hänsyn till flödes- och fastläggningsmekanismer somadvektion, dispersion och linjär sorption.Med hjälp av laktester kan man uppskatta den andel av metallföroreningen somär löslig i vatten. Denna information kan sedan användas för att beräkna adsorptionsparametrar (Kd-värden, m.m.) för spridningsmodeller. Laktester kan ibland gemissvisande resultat eftersom de orsakar utspädning av provet, bl.a. blir DOCkoncentrationerna alltför låga. Dessutom bör de inte användas för sulfidjordar.Geokemiska modeller kan användas för att förbättra tolkningen av laktester för attfå till stånd realistiska uppskattningar av Kd-värden.Det finns ett antal spridningsmodeller som kan användas för att bedöma riskenför spridning till grundvatten och ytvatten. De är kraftfulla verktyg som dock ännuinte använts i någon större utsträckning i Sverige. Detta beror på flera orsaker, bl.a.de hydrogeologiska förhållandena i Sverige, behovet av anpassningen av de modeller som är allmänt tillgängliga, svårigheter att ta fram bra dataunderlag samt ensvag tradition i att använda modeller och förstå modellresultat.Ett par angelägna forsknings- och utvecklingsinsatser är att ta fram bättre uppskattningar av metalladsorption i svensk mark, och att anpassa existerande spridningsmodeller för användning i riskbedömningar.

  • 8. Blomqvist, Göran
    et al.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Johansson Thunqvist, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
    Miljöproblem vid drift och underhåll av vägar2001Report (Other academic)
  • 9. Daneshvar, Ehsan
    et al.
    Sohrabi, Mohammad Salar
    Kousha, Masoud
    Bhatnagar, Amit
    Aliakbarian, Bahar
    Converti, Attilio
    Norrstrom, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Shrimp shell as an efficient bioadsorbent for Acid Blue 25 dye removal from aqueous solution2014In: Journal of the Taiwan Institute of Chemical Engineers / Elsevier, ISSN 1876-1070, E-ISSN 1876-1089, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 2926-2934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focused on kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of Acid Blue 25 (AB25) dye biosorption from aqueous solution using the shell of Penaeus indicus shrimp as a biosorbent. Optimum sorption conditions were identified by varying solution pH, biomass dosage, initial dye concentration, contact time, salinity and ionic strength. Equilibrium data were well fitted by the Temkin, Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models, while the pseudo-second order model best described kinetics. Thermodynamic data showed that AB25 dye biosorption onto shrimp shell was a feasible, spontaneous and exothermic one. The biosorption capacity increased with decreasing the sorbent particle size and with the addition of salts (NaCl, MgSO4, KNO3 and KH2PO4). The high sorption capacity of P. indicus shell obtained in this study suggests its use as an effective, low-cost biosorbent for the removal of acid dyes from wastewaters.

  • 10.
    Grace, Bakyayita Kizito
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Nalubega, Mai
    2Water and Sanitation Department, African Development Bank, Tunis.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Kulabako, Robinah
    3Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Makerere University, Uganda.
    Single and binary biosorption kinetics for Cd and Pb from aqueous media using Coffea canephora, Cyperus papyrus and Musa sppManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Hydrochemistry and hydrology of forest riparian wetlands2004In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 196, no 03-feb, p. 187-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forest stream riparian wetlands have a number of important features. This investigation treats one aspect, the nitrogen retention after upland clear-cutting which leads to elevated nitrate leaching, and the importance of the flow pathways in this connection. The runoff occurs mainly via the upper permeable section of the peat while the lower peat act as an aquitard, restricting the flow from the underlying till. The till groundwater is progressively artesian towards the discharging stream. Water analyses from piezometers show that the water chemistry in the peat is rather variable, indicating the presence of channelling. Channelling is also indicated by spring discharges from the peat that have elevated nitrate contents pointing to bypass flow. Redox bars indicating sulphate reduction display the same picture of irregular distribution. However, a general observation is that volumes with sulphate reduction increase towards the stream and that sulphate reduction occurs preferably in the surface peat, indicating the importance of a degradable substrate for the sulphate reducers. Nitrate reduction during the growth season occurs predominantly close to the upland till areas. The riparian tree stand is dominated by spruces which are likely to be disfavoured by the rising groundwater level after clear-cutting. The riparian tree stand does not extend far enough towards the upland to be benefited by the elevated nitrate flux. Buffer stands should be broader, extending into the till upland where they can utilise the leached nitrate and, more important, thanks to their deeper rooting depth protect the peatland trees against wind felling.

  • 12.
    Norrström, Ann Catrine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Löv, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Uranium theoretical speciation for drinking water from private drilled wells in Sweden: Implications for choice of removal method2014In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 51, p. 148-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elevated concentrations of uranium (U) from natural sources have been measured in drinking water from private drilled wells in Sweden and many other countries world-wide. Although U is a radioactive element, radioactivity is not the main concern, but rather chemical toxicity, e. g. kidney damage. Uranium chemistry is complex and U in water has a very high tendency to form complexes with other compounds. Since speciation is crucial for the properties of U, and therefore the removal efficiency, this study determined theoretical U species in drinking water from private drilled wells using the geochemical model Visual MINTEQ. The drinking water samples used in modelling were from two datasets: (1) 76 water samples selected from a previous survey of 722 wells; and (2) samples of drinking water from 21 private wells sampled in May 2013. The results showed that neutrally charged U complexes dominated in the pH range 6.7-7.8, which is common in private drilled wells. This has important implications for removal method, since charge is an important factor for U removal efficiency. In the alkaline pH range, one of two calcium-UO2 carbonate complexes dominated and calcium (Ca) concentration proved to be a key factor determining the Ca-UO2 carbonate complex formed: the neutral Ca2UO2(CO3)(3)(0)(aq) or the negative CaUO2(CO3)(3)(2). Complexes with organic carbon (C) varied greatly in the acidic range, indicating that it is crucial to measure organic C content in the water since it is critical for the dissolved organic matter (DOM)-UO2 complex formation. Therefore before U removal method is selected, some crucial parameters for complex formation should be measured. Based on our results, such measurements should include pH, Ca, alkalinity and organic C concentration, as these determine the type of complexes formed and their charge.

  • 13.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Acid-base status of soils in groundwater discharge zones -relation to surface water acidification1995In: Journal of Hydrology, ISSN 0022-1694, E-ISSN 1879-2707, Vol. 170, p. 87-100Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Chemistry and by-pass flow in groundwater/surfacewater interfaces: important for surface water acidification?1997In: BIOGEOMON, 3rd International Symposium on Ecosystem Behaviour, June 21-25, Villanova, USA., 1997Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Concentration and chemical species of Fe in soils fromthe groundwater/surface water ecotones.1993In: Hydological Journal of Soil Science, Vol. 40, p. 319-329Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Concentration and fractionation of heavy metals inroadside soils receiving de-icing salts1998In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 218, p. 161-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil was sampled along two lines of a highway, 0.5 m and 2.5 m from the asphalt surface, and in an infiltration pond for highway runoff. The study area was located in the infiltration area of the reserve water supply for a community. The concentrations of Cd, Pb and Zn in soil samples from the highway 0.5 m. andror in the infiltration pond exceeded guideline values for less sensitive land-use with groundwater protection. The highest Pb concentration measured 542 mg kgy1. was 34 times the average Pb concentration in soils in Sweden, and exceeded the Swedish guideline value by a factor of almost two. Cadmium in the infiltration pond exceeded the guideline value almost three times. An increased concentration with soil depth for Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn and PAHs in the infiltration pond showed that downward transport had occurred. This was supported by a Pb concentration exceeding the limit for drinking water quality in the groundwater 4.5 m below the soil surface in the infiltration pond. The ESP exchangeable sodium percentage. in some samples was high enough 10]27%. for dispersion of soil colloids to occur. The Tessier’s sequential extraction scheme showed that Pb and Zn occurred mostly in association with the oxide bound fraction whereas Cu was mainly associated with the organic fraction, e.g. colloids. Another important fraction for Pb was the carbonate fraction. The study showed that a large part of the Pb, Cu and Zn in roadside soils is vulnerable to leaching when exposed to a high NaCl concentration, reducing conditions or to a lowering in pH. Regression analyses showed that a high concentration of Na predominately displaces Ca of the base cations from the exchange sites in the soil. The highly significant relationships observed between soil properties and chemical fractions of the metals make the result reliable for the fractions that predominate.

  • 17.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Field-measured redox potentials in soils at the groundwater/surface water interface.1994In: Eurepean Journal of Soil Science, Vol. 45, p. 31-35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Heavy metal mobilization from roadside soils receivingde-icing salts; a risk for groundwater resources?1998In: WATER - the key to socio-economic development andquality of life pp 183-185, 1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Metal mobility by de-icing salt from an infiltration trench for highway runoff2005In: Applied Geochemistry, ISSN 0883-2927, E-ISSN 1872-9134, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 1907-1919Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil from an infiltration trench for highway runoff was leached in columns alternately with NaCl and de-ionised water to simulate the runoff of de-icing salt into the trench followed by snowmelt or rainwater. Simultaneously, two columns with the same soil were leached with de-ionised water throughout the experiment. In addition, the groundwater below the infiltration trench was sampled on some occasions. The column leachate and groundwater were split into two sub samples, one was filtered though a 0.45 mu m filter; both were analysed for Pb, Cd, Zn, Fe and total organic carbon (TOC). The column experiment showed clearly that an extensive mobilisation of Pb occurred in low electrolyte water leaching following NaCl leaching. The high Pb concentration coincided with peaks in Fe and TOC concentrations and implied colloid-assisted transport. Conversely, Cd and Zn concentrations were raised in the NaCl leachate and a high correlation with Cl showed that Cl complexes are important for the mobilisation, although a pH effect and ionic exchange cannot be excluded. Only 0.15% and 0.06% of the total amount of Pb was leached from the columns leached with alternating NaCl and deionised water confirming the usual hypotheses about the high immobility of Pb in soils. However, on one occasion when the ionic strength and pH was the lowest measured the concentration of Pb in groundwater sampled from 2.5 m depth was 27 mu g L-1 in the dissolved phase (< 0.45 mu m) and 77 mu g L-1 in the particle phase (> 0.45 mu m). These Pb concentrations are almost 3 and 8 times above the Swedish limit for drinking water quality. Accordingly, in spite of the immobility of Pb the accumulation in roadside soils is so large that groundwater quality is threatened. In conclusion, the study suggests that roadside soils impacted by NaCl from de-icing operations contribute Pb to groundwater by colloid-assisted transport.

  • 20.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    RETENTION AND CHEMISTRY OF ALUMINIUM INGROUNDWATER DISCHARGE AREAS1993In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 81, p. 269-275Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Water pathways and chemistry at the groundwater/surface waterinterface to Lake Skjervatjern, Norway1996In: Water resources research, ISSN 0043-1397, E-ISSN 1944-7973, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 2221-2229Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Även skogen läcker näring2002In: Våtmarksboken: skapande och nyttjande av värdefulla våtmarker / [ed] Tonderski K, Weisner S, Landin J, Oscarsson H, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2002, p. 105-122Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Bergstedt, E.
    The impact of road de-icing salts (NaCl) on colloid dispersion and base cation pools in roadside soils2001In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, ISSN 0049-6979, E-ISSN 1573-2932, Vol. 127, no 04-jan, p. 281-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The maintenance of safe-driving conditions in snow and ice-affected areas in the wintertime includes the use of sodium chloride (NaCl) as de-icing salts. In this study, the impact of NaCl on soil-colloid mobilisation and exchangeable base-cation leaching has been evaluated. The chemistry of groundwater samples below an infiltration trench for highway runoff and leachate from column studies suggested that soil-colloid mobilisation had occurred, as the exchangeable sodium (Na) concentration and the electrical conductivity (EC) in the groundwater/column leachate reached the threshold values for colloid dispersion. Generally, samples with no dispersion problems had high Na and calcium (Ca) concentrations, suggesting that the initial effect of the de-icing salt was to stabilise the colloids. In the column study there was a good agreement between the degree of colloid dipersion problems and lead (Pb) concentration when the pH value was above 7.0. Significant negative correlations between Na/CEC (cation exchange capacity) and Ca/CEC in roadside soils from three sites indicated that Na preferentially displaces Ca from the exchange sites. However, the groundwater data indicated that Na ions also displace potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg). A positive effect of NaCl seen at one site was an increase in the K concentration, which is highly likely an effect of Na ions displacing fixed K between the layers of 2:1 type clay minerals. In soils lacking these types of clay minerals, severe K shortage may result from a high plant demand combined with the low K concentration in the readily available fractions in the original soil and a high susceptibility to leaching. The most significant impact on soil exchange processes was found to occur within 6 m from the road.

  • 24.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Knutsson, Gert
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Identifying the sources of different pollutants to municipal wells in hard rock, SE Sweden2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Knutsson, Gert
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Stable lead isotopes as tracers of groundwater pollution in the water supply for a small village2012In: Environmental Earth Sciences, ISSN 1866-6280, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 1085-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High lead (Pb) concentration has been measured in the incoming water to the water supply for a small Swedish village since the 1990s. There are several sources of the contamination and the objective of this study was to identify these by analysis of Pb isotopes. Lead has four stable isotopes in nature (Pb-204, Pb-206, Pb-207, Pb-208) and the relative proportions of these vary according to their geological source. The study showed that two anthropogenic sources of Pb, a glassworks deposit and a highway, had similar Pb isotope ratios and thus it was not possible to separate them. However, the very high Pb concentration in the glassworks deposit suggested that this is the main source of the very high concentrations observed occasionally in low flow conditions. The soil in the recharge area of the most important well for the water supply had elevated Pb concentrations compared with background values in soils. Moreover, the Pb ratios in this soil differed from those in the anthropogenic sources. Several sites of mineralisation or natural enrichment have been identified in outcrops about 14 km northwest of the site and several anomalies in Pb exist in the glacial till. The conclusion was that Pb originating from the soil in the recharge area generally dominates and leads to Pb concentrations in water of 1-2 A mu g L-1. However, at higher concentrations, e.g. around 10 A mu g L-1, water transported in cracks and fissure from the glassworks deposit becomes more important.

  • 26.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Somerville, Richard
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Low-cost adsorption media for removal of toxic metals from contaminated water2009In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, ISSN 0016-7037, E-ISSN 1872-9533, Vol. 73, no 13, p. A953-A953Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Somerville, Richard
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Norrström, Ann-Catrine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Application of two low-cost adsorption media for removal of toxic metals from contaminated water2009In: Water Science and Technology, ISSN 0273-1223, E-ISSN 1996-9732, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 935-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the operational costs of commonly used materials for adsorption of toxic metals can be substantial, natural material may be of great interest for treatment applications. Two types of natural material that have shown particular promise are seaweed and seafood waste. In this study, adsorption capacity of Brown seaweed and shrimp shells were compared with a strong acid cation exchange resin (CER). A case study site was used as a reference point and column experiments were designed in a similar manner although at different scale. Each media reduced concentrations of the target metals to levels below defined reference values. If the alternative adsorption media perform as well in the field as the laboratory, the results suggest that the media tested would completely remove the toxic metals in groundwater and runoff water. Seaweed and shrimp shells had stronger affinities for Pb and Cu than CER. However, CER was superior in affinity for Zn, the most weakly bound metal. Moreover, the results showed that Ca in the solution reduced the adsorption capacity of the other metals. This illustrates the limitations of applying the behaviour of the batch studies with single metal solutions to a multi-component system with competitive adsorption.

1 - 27 of 27
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