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  • 1.
    Ackebo, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Brandt, Anna-Clara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Dobraja, Kristine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Isaksson, Sarah
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Liebmann, Andrew
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Lindberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Lundgren, Monia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Song, Meng
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Zachrisson, Maja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    What is the potential to create a just social-ecological in Fisksätra/Saltsjöbaden?: Report from the Ecosystem support and Environmental Justice course (AG2803)2013Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Björklund, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Roth, Liselott
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Giftfria och resurssnåla kretslopp: Åtgärdsstrategier under olika omvärldsutveckling2007Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bradley, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Fuehrer, Paul
    Gunnarsson Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Hagbert, Pernilla
    Hornborg, Alf
    Isaksson, Karolina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Öhlund, Erika
    Därför är ekonomisk tillväxt en risk2016In: Dagens samhälle, ISSN 1652-6511, article id 9 marsArticle, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Håkansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Including second order effects in environmental assessments of ICT2014In: Environmental Modelling & Software, ISSN 1364-8152, E-ISSN 1873-6726, Vol. 56, p. 105-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) can have both negative and positive impacts on the environment. Immediate negative environmental impacts arise due to the production, use and disposal of ICT products, while positive effects can arise because ICT products and services replace other products. Other, more indirect consequences of introducing new technologies include e.g. that money saved by reducing costs due to ICT-induced energy efficiency, is being used in consumption of other goods and services that also need energy in their production. Such effects are examined within different disciplines under headings such as rebound effects, indirect effects, second order effects and ripple effects. This paper presents a review and discussion of different second order effects that can be linked to ICT usage in general, using e-commerce as an example. This is a first necessary step in developing methods which include second order effects when analysing the environmental impacts of ICT.

  • 5.
    Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Rädda maten - Åtgärder för svinnminskande beteendeförändringar hos konsument2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents results from a literature review of different studies and scientific evaluations of behaviour interventions aim- ing to decrease avoidable food waste, that are directed private consumers. In this report food waste refers to foods that could have been eaten if was handled differently, but that was thrown away. The food waste may appear both in people’s homes and when they eat in restaurants. Studies included in our overview contain various types of strategies: E.g. education and infor- mation regarding the importance of decreasing food waste; apps and other tools for people to keep track of their food in order to avoid buying food they don’t need; apps to share spare food. Restaurants have tested strategies of providing guests with smaller plates. Private individuals can also be encouraged to contribute to reducing food waste in other areas of the food chain, for example by encouraging purchasing of food that is approaching the best- before date. Mostly, the evaluations of the behaviour interventions have only been carried out using smaller groups of people. Longitudinal studies of their effects are mostly missing. Nevertheless, the studies of interventions where evaluations exist, indi- cate a significant effect regarding the decrease of food waste as well as raising households’ awareness and encouraging their re- flection. On the other hand, many initiatives and strategies formed to decrease food waste are not evaluated at all. Consider- ing environmental, social and economic consequences of food waste, this is problematic. We, thus, suggest that effects of ongoing initiatives, such as selling not-consumed food from restaurants at a lower price should be evaluated in the short span as well as in longitudinal studies. We also suggest that interventions which have been successful in other countries should be tested in Sweden. This includes various tools for keeping track of contents in the fridge as well as tools for sharing left-overs. There is also a need for further understanding how individuals and societal structures may consociate for lowering food waste and a need for evaluating results from food waste intervention campaigns with larger groups of households than what was done so far. 

  • 6.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Adapting cities to climate change: goal conflicts and methods of conflict resolution2009In: Fifth Urban Research Symposium 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision-making concerning adaptation to climate change ofteninvolves choosing between different options, each of which can have importantimplications for the achievability of other goals and policies. In this article,adaptation measures and goal conflicts are investigated using the City ofStockholm as an empirical basis. The investigation shows that goal conflicts inadaptation are common phenomena. This points to the need for assessing andpredicting the environmental, social and economic impacts of adaptation measures,strategies and policies at an early stage in the decision-making process. To ensurethe coherence with other policy goals, there is a need for tools to assess and predictoutcomes, but also to balance those outcomes in situations where they are noteasily reunited.

  • 7.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Goal Conflicts in Adaptation to Climate Change. An inventory of goal conflicts tn the Swedish sectors of the built environment, tourism and outdoor recreation, and human health2009Report (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Engström, Rebecka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Dreborg, Karl-Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Åkerman, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Åtgärdspaket och omvärldsscenarier för de svenska miljömålen2007Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Hornborg, Alf
    Four sustainability goals in a Swedish low-growth/degrowth contextManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Continual environmental degradation and an unfair distribution of environmental burdens and benefits are two great challenges for humanity.

    Economic growth is often taken for granted when planning for the future.  However, it is often argued that maintaining economic growth is in conflict with keeping human activities adjusted to ecological boundaries and finite resources, at least for the more-developed countries.  With this paper we present sustainability goals for building and planning in Sweden 2050 in a context of limited or even negative economic growth. The sustainability goals should ensure that all groups in society have sufficient resources and a good life within planetary boundaries. The goals are set at a national level but in a global context. We select four goals, two environmental goals related to climate change and land use and two social goals, related to welfare and participation. Our results show that achieving the sustainability goals, especially for land use and climate, will require significant reductions of Sweden's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and land use compared to today's level. Regarding the social goals, these are in many aspects reasonably well fulfilled in Sweden today although many challenges remain in order to ensure similar opportunities for all Swedish residents. The main challenge, however, is to ensure that these goals are fulfilled even within environmental limits and if economic growth should halt or become negative.

     

     

    Key words: Sustainability goals; Degrowth; Environmental Justice; Futures studies.

  • 10.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Hornborg, Alf
    Lund University, Department of Human Geography and the Human Ecology Division.
    Four Sustainability Goals in a Swedish Low-Growth/Degrowth Context2016In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 8, no 1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continual environmental degradation and an unfair distribution of environmental burdens and benefits are two great challenges for humanity. Economic growth is often taken for granted when planning for the future. However, it is often argued that maintaining economic growth conflicts with keeping human activities adjusted to ecological boundaries and finite resources, at least for the more-developed countries. With this paper, we present sustainability goals for building and planning in Sweden to be achieved by 2050 in a context of limited or even negative economic growth. These goals should ensure that all groups in society have sufficient resources and a good life within planetary boundaries. We select four goals in a participatory process: two environmental goals related to climate change and land use and two social goals related to welfare and participation. Our results show that achieving the environmental goals will require significant reductions of Sweden’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and land use compared to today’s levels. Regarding the social goals, these are, in many aspects, reasonably well fulfilled in Sweden today, although disparities remain between groups of citizens. The main challenge, however, is to ensure that these goals are fulfilled even within environmental limits and if economic growth should halt.

  • 11.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Carlsson, P-O
    Wintzell, H
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    University of Gävle.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Eriksson, M
    Erlandsson, M
    Linholm, T
    Ohring, I
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Andersson, J
    Malmström, T.-G
    Testfasen i miljöklassningsprojekten2007Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Ekvall, Tomas
    Arushanyan, Yevgenia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Bisaillon, Mattias
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Ljungren Söderman, Maria
    Sahlin, Jenny
    Stenmarck, Åsa
    Sundberg, Johan
    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Söderholm, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle.
    Forsfält, Tomas
    Guath, Mona
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Policy Instruments towards a Sustainable Waste Management2013In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 841-881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to suggest and discuss policy instruments that could lead towards a more sustainable waste management. The paper is based on evaluations from a large scale multi-disciplinary Swedish research program. The evaluations focus on environmental and economic impacts as well as social acceptance. The focus is on the Swedish waste management system but the results should be relevant also for other countries. Through the assessments and lessons learned during the research program we conclude that several policy instruments can be effective and possible to implement. Particularly, we put forward the following policy instruments: “Information”; “Compulsory recycling of recyclable materials”; “Weight-based waste fee in combination with information and developed recycling systems”; “Mandatory labeling of products containing hazardous chemicals”, “Advertisements on request only and other waste minimization measures”; and “Differentiated VAT and subsidies for some services”. Compulsory recycling of recyclable materials is the policy instrument that has the largest potential for decreasing the environmental impacts with the configurations studied here. The effects of the other policy instruments studied may be more limited and they typically need to be implemented in combination in order to have more significant impacts. Furthermore, policy makers need to take into account market and international aspects when implementing new instruments. In the more long term perspective, the above set of policy instruments may also need to be complemented with more transformational policy instruments that can significantly decrease the generation of waste.

  • 13.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Ekvall, Tomas
    IVL.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    von Borgstede, Chris
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Forsfält, Thomas
    Konjunkturinstitutet.
    Guath, Mona
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Ljunggren Söderman, Maria
    IVL.
    Stemarck, Åsa
    IVL.
    Sundqvist, Jan-Olof
    IVL.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Söderholm, Patrik
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Åkesson, Lynn
    Lunds Universitet.
    Regeringen måste satsa på resurseffektivt samhälle2013In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2013-04-01Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Regeringen förbereder en avfallspolitisk proposition. Den kommer förhoppningsvis att klargöra vem som ska ha ansvaret att samla in våra förpackningar. Men fokus borde också ligga på hur vi kan gå mot ett samhälle där resurser används så effektivt som möjligt, skriver forskare på miljöområdet.

  • 14.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Carlsson, P.-O
    Erlandsson, M
    Andersson, J
    Wintzell, H
    Lindholm, T
    Malmström, T.-G
    A Swedish Environmental rating Tool for Buildings2009In: Programme Book of SETAC 15th LCA Case Studies Symposium, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    et al.
    University of Gävle.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Carlson, Per-Olof
    Erlandsson, Martin
    Andersson, Johnny
    Wintzell, Helene
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Lindholm, Torbjörn
    Malmström, Tor-Göran
    Miljöklassning av byggnader: Slutrapport2008Report (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    et al.
    University of Gävle.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Eriksson, O
    Development of an environmental classification system for buildings through a new kind of dialogue between stakeholders and researchers2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    et al.
    University of Gävle.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle.
    Development of an environmental rating tool for buildings through a new kind of dialogue between stakeholders and researchers2009In: Archnet-IJAR : International Journal of Architectural Research, ISSN 1994-6961, E-ISSN 1938-7806, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 116-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Buildings need to be more environmentally benign since the building sector is responsible for about 40% of all of energy and material use in Sweden. For this reason a unique cooperation between companies, municipalities and the Government called “Building-Living and Property Management for the future”, in short “The Building Living Dialogue” has going on since 2003. The project focuses on: a) healthy indoor environment, b) efficient use of energy, and c) efficient resource management. In accordance with the dialogue targets, two research projects were initiated aiming at developing an Environmental rating tool taking into accounts both building sector requirements and expectations and national and interna-tional research findings. This paper describes the first phase in the development work where stake-holders and researchers cooperate. It includes results from inventories and based on this experience discusses procedures for developing assessment tools and what the desirable features of a broadly accepted building rating tool could be.

  • 18.
    Gunnarsson Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Creating Feminist Futures2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Participatory methods for creating feminist futures2012In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 914-922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender perspectives in futures studies are rare and often sidelined, but there is also a feminist quest for feminist descriptions of the future. In this paper we explore how feminist futures could be devised, by analysing three one-day workshops designed to elaborate on feminist futures. The aim of the paper is twofold: to explore the possibilities of creating feminist images of the future and to develop and test participatory workshop methods for this in various settings. In all, around 70 participants (staff at a national funding agency/feminist researchers and practitioners working with gender equality/students in a futures studies course) took part in the workshops. The participants were guided through a sequence of activities including brainstorming and visioning with the ultimate aim of creating images of feminist futures, fulfilling a pre-specified goal: a society free of structural inequalities based on sex. The participants listed factors in the present and trends that may prevent us from achieving the goal and how these factors could be described in a feminist future. We argue that futures studies methods need to be changed in order to incorporate a critical gender perspective. In the paper we examine the results of the workshop and elaborate on how feminist futures can be created.

  • 20.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Dreborg, Karl Henrik
    KTH.
    Engström, Rebecka
    KTH.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Experiences of the development and use of scenarios for evaluating Swedish environmental quality objectives2011In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 498-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents and evaluates a method for encouraging long-term thinking and for considering a variety of scenarios in environmental policy processes. The Swedish environmental policy is based on 16 environmental quality objectives (EQOs) that national authorities are obliged to observe. These objectives are reviewed annually and evaluated in depth every four years. Here we describe and explore a futures study project for introducing more long-term thinking into work on the EQOs, which we tested in the in-depth evaluation in 2008. We found it difficult to design a collective scenario for a case with a wide variety of objectives and individuals with different backgrounds. However, this difficulty makes it even more important to incorporate futures studies into the work of the relevant authorities. Scenario work is often subcontracted, leading to a constant lack of futures studies expertise and thinking within authorities. Despite the difficulties, we found that experts within the authorities did begin to recognise the opportunities provided by futures studies. The project revealed an interest and need for futures studies within the authorities in charge of Swedish environmental quality objectives and our findings show that the authorities need to build up their own skills in futures studies. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 21.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Dreborg, Karl Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Engström, Rebecka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Experiences of the development and use of scenarios for evaluating Swedish national environmental objectives (vol 43, pg 1, 2011)2011In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 497-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents and evaluates a method for encouraging long-term thinking and for considering a variety of scenarios in environmental policy processes. The Swedish environmental policy is based on 16 environmental quality objectives (EQOs) that national authorities are obliged to observe. These objectives are reviewed annually and evaluated in depth every four years. Here we describe and explore a futures study project for introducing more long-term thinking into work on the EQOs, which we tested in the in-depth evaluation in 2008. We found it difficult to design a collective scenario for a case with a wide variety of objectives and individuals with different backgrounds. However, this difficulty makes it even more important to incorporate futures studies into the work of the relevant authorities. Scenario work is often subcontracted, leading to a constant lack of futures studies expertise and thinking within authorities. Despite the difficulties, we found that experts within the authorities did begin to recognise the opportunities provided by futures studies. The project revealed an interest and need for futures studies within the authorities in charge of Swedish environmental quality objectives and our findings show that the authorities need to build up their own skills in futures studies.

  • 22.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Dreborg, Karl-Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Engström, Rebecka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Gunnarsson Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Experiences of the development and use of scenarios for evaluating Swedish national environmental objectives2011In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present paper is to present and evaluate a method for encouraging long-term thinking and considerations of a variety of scenarios in environmental policy processes. The Swedish environmental policy is based on 16 environmental objectives that national authorities are responsible for. They are evaluated annually and also in-depth every fourth year. Here we describe and explore a futures study project for introducing a more long-term thinking in the work with the environmental objectives, tested in the in-depth evaluation 2008. An experience was that it is difficult to design a collective scenario work in a case with a wide variety of objectives and with individuals with different backgrounds. However, this difficulty makes it even more important to incorporate futures studies in authorities work. Scenario work is often subcontracted, leading to a constant lack of futures studies competence and thinking at the authorities. Another experience is that despite the difficulties, experts at the authorities did start thinking more in terms of opportunities with futures studies. A general conclusion from the work was that there is an interest and need for futures studies at the authorities in charge of the environmental objectives. The possibly most important conclusion from this project was that the authorities need to build up their own competences in futures studies.

  • 23.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Wangel, Josefin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Backcasting öppnar upp framtiden2012In: Att utforska framtiden: valda perspektiv / [ed] Alm, S., Palme, J., Westholm, E., Stockholm: Dialogos Förlag, 2012, p. 1-255Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24. Malmaeus, Mikael
    et al.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Sundkvist, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Bradley, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Calmer, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Fuehrer, Paul
    Hagbert, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Hornborg, Alf
    Isaksson, Karolina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    Skånberg, Kristian
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Ölund, Erika
    Riskabelt att tro att tillväxt ska lösa våra problem.2018In: Svenska Dagbladet, article id 28 novemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Carlson, Per-Olof
    Erlandsson, Martin
    Andersson, Johnny
    Wintzell, Helene
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Lindholm, Torbjörn
    Malmstrom, Tor-Göran
    A Swedish environmental rating tool for buildings2011In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 1893-1899Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2003, a joint effort between the Swedish government, a number of companies in the building and construction sectors, some municipalities, insurance companies and banks set a target that by 2009, all new buildings and 30% of existing Swedish buildings should be rated using a voluntary environmental rating tool. In a major research programme finished in 2008, a tool was developed to be used in this context. The tool covers three assessment areas: Energy, Indoor environment and Material & Chemicals. These areas are split into 11 aspects with one or a few indicators. Rating criteria are specified for each indicator, stipulating requirements for a rating Gold, Silver, Bronze and Rated. Indicator results can then be aggregated to aspect, area and a single raring for building level for enhanced result communication. The tool builds on previous experiences regarding environmental building rating tools and therefore includes some special characteristics which aim to tackle some of the criticism directed towards the first generation of such tools. At the time of writing, the first buildings have received official ratings and an independent stakeholder group is promoting broader implementation of the tool. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 26.
    Milestad, Rebecka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Dreborg, Karl Henrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Developing integrated explorative and normative scenarios: The case of future land use in a climate-neutral Sweden2014In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 60, p. 59-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transition from the current oil-based world economy to an economy based on renewable resources can become a strong driving force for land use change. This paper describes the development of integrated explorative and normative scenarios for the analysis of future land use in a climate-neutral Sweden. The aim is to show how backcasting scenarios fulfilling far-reaching greenhouse gas reduction targets can be related to assumptions on possible external developments, in order to contribute to the discussion on future sustainable land use. A target-fulfilling scenario element was combined with an external scenario element, i.e. developments that cannot be influenced by the targeted actors. The scenarios were developed and analysed in collaboration with local actors. Four scenarios were used to describe how land in Sweden could be used when Sweden has achieved zero emissions of greenhouse gases in 2060. The explorative dimension stretched from a situation where there is no international climate agreement to one where there is an international agreement on reducing greenhouse gases. The backcasting dimension illustrated different strategies to achieve the target and stretches from a very influential municipal level to one where the national/EU level is most influential.

  • 27.
    Reynolds, Christian
    et al.
    University of Sheffield.
    Goucher, Liam
    University of Sheffield.
    Quested, Tom
    Waste & Resources Action Programme (WRAP), UK.
    Bromley, Sarah
    Waste & Resources Action Programme (WRAP), UK.
    Gillick, Sam
    Waste & Resources Action Programme (WRAP), UK.
    Wells, Victoria K.
    University of York, UK.
    Evans, David
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Koh, Lenny
    University of Sheffield.
    Carlsson Kanyama, Annika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Jackson, Peter
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Review: Consumption-stage food waste reduction interventions – What works and how to design better interventions2019In: Food Policy, ISSN 0306-9192, E-ISSN 1873-5657, Vol. 83, p. 7-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food waste prevention has become an issue of international concern, with Sustainable Development Goal 12.3 aiming to halve per capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels by 2030. However there is no review that has considered the effectiveness of interventions aimed at preventing food waste in the consumption stages of the food system. This significant gap, if filled, could help support those working to reduce food waste in the developed world, providing knowledge of what interventions are specifically effective at preventing food waste.

    This paper fills this gap, identifying and summarizing food-waste prevention interventions at the consumption/consumer stage of the supply chain via a rapid review of global academic literature from 2006 to 2017.

    We identify 17 applied interventions that claim to have achieved food waste reductions. Of these, 13 quantified food waste reductions. Interventions that changed the size or type of plates were shown to be effective (up to 57% food waste reduction) in hospitality environments. Changing nutritional guidelines in schools were reported to reduce vegetable waste by up to 28%, indicating that healthy diets can be part of food waste reduction strategies. Information campaigns were also shown to be effective with up to 28% food waste reduction in a small sample size intervention.

    Cooking classes, fridge cameras, food sharing apps, advertising and information sharing were all reported as being effective but with little or no robust evidence provided. This is worrying as all these methods are now being proposed as approaches to reduce food waste and, except for a few studies, there is no reproducible quantified evidence to assure credibility or success. To strengthen current results, a greater number of longitudinal and larger sample size intervention studies are required. To inform future intervention studies, this paper proposes a standardised guideline, which consists of: (1) intervention design; (2) monitoring and measurement; (3) moderation and mediation; (4) reporting; (5) systemic effects.

    Given the importance of food-waste reduction, the findings of this review highlight a significant evidence gap, meaning that it is difficult to make evidence-based decisions to prevent or reduce consumption-stage food waste in a cost-effective manner.

  • 28. Staffas, Louise
    et al.
    Tufvesson, Linda
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Åström, Staffan
    Torén, Johan
    Arushanyan, Yevgeniya
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Alternative sources for products competing with forest based biofuel, a pre-study2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Forest biomass is used for many products including paper based products, sawn wood products and solid fuels. The production of forest derived liquid transportation fuels is currently limited  but predicted to increase.

    Biomass is a renewable resource and therefore of high interest for applications such as new innovative materials, liquid and gaseous fuels. The production of various biofuels for transportation is forecast to increase and Sweden has a goal of a fossil-independent transportation system by 2030. Other, non-material, uses of forest biomass include the so called eco system services biodiversity, fishing, hunting, recreation, berry picking etc. which are also competing for forest biomass.

    There is currently a net growth of forest in Sweden, which theoretically could allow for an increased use of this resource. However, the amount of forest biomass is not unlimited and its harvest should not exceed its growth. Therefore, forest biomass should be considered as a limited resource and its use should aim to maximize the environmental benefit compared to the use of fossil resources. For this reason, environmental impact evaluations of forest biomass based products should include alternative sources for products competing with this resource.

    The pre-study reported herein included: a review of Swedish forestry and the relationships between different types of forest biomass and fuels; a workshop in which the competition for forest biomass was discussed with experts in the area; a theoretical reasoning around indirect effects and biomass potentials; and two case studies in which the theoretical reasoning is applied. Traditional assessments of environmental impacts of products and processes do not include the aspect of resource scarcity or competition for raw materials. In the case of bioethanol this has been shown to affect the results of such evaluation andthe same thing applies also to other forest biomass based fuels.

    The main conclusion of the study is that alternative sources for products competing with forest biomass should be taken into account when assessing the environmental impacts of forest biomass derived products. This is, however, complex as indirect effects are difficult to predict and depend on numerous factors including market situations, financial instruments, legislation and policies etc. Nevertheless, the question is important for the development of biobased substitutes for fossil derived products .

  • 29.
    Sundkvist, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Carlsson-Kanyama, A.
    Wallgren, C.
    Lokala livsmedelsmarknader - en fallstudie: Miljöaspekter på transporter och funktion för ökat medvetande om miljövänlig matproduktion2004Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Sundkvist, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Eriksson, O
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Bergman, S
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Stenbeck, S
    Wintzell, H
    Miljöklassning av byggnader: Inventering av metoder och intressenters behov2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport innehåller resultatet av projektets inledningsfas, kapitel 2 är en genomgång av politiska och andra mål för hållbar utveckling inom området byggnader med syfte att sätta miljöklassningssystemet i ett sammanhang, kapitel 3 är en redovisning av hur inledningsfasen genomförts, kapitel 4 innehåller resultatet av intervjuer med företag inom bygg och fastighetsbranschen om deras inställning till ett miljöklassningsystem samt intervjuer med aktörer som potentiellt kan skapa incitament för att företag och fastighetsägare ska ansluta sig till miljöklassningssystemet, kapitel 5 behandlar översiktligt genomgången av befintliga metoder för miljöbedömning av byggnader, kapitel 6 redovisar utgångspunkter för det fortsatta arbetet med ett miljöklassningsystem, kapitel 7 innehåller diskussion och slutsatser. Befintliga metoder för miljöbedömning av byggnader redovisas som informationsblad i bilaga 7 (svenska) och bilaga 10 (utländska).

  • 31.
    Sundkvist, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Stakeholder needs study on indicators for IPP (Integrated Product Policy)2007In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 323-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrated Product Policy, or IPP, is an approach that seeks to reduce environmental impacts through the life cycle of products. The aim of this study was to evaluate the need for indicators to monitor the IPP approach, with the focus on national indicators for Sweden. This was achieved by interviewing different stakeholders. Government/authority stakeholders identified a need for IPP indicators in order to monitor the process and show politicians the use and effectiveness of the policy. However, they also identified obstacles to construct meaningful indicators that would be able to show a cause and effect relationship between the policy and e.g. decreased environmental impact. Non-government stakeholders did not express a need for IPP indicators to monitor the IPP process to the same extent and most were more critical towards IPP as a concept. Several governmental and non-governmental stakeholders saw indicators for environmental performance of products as relevant from a general/public interest. However, since different stakeholders have different needs, indicators for IPP should be tailored to suit different user groups.

  • 32.
    Sundkvist, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Social Justice Perspectives on Energy And Climate TargetsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Are justice principles discussed and applied when setting energy and climate targets? We review a selection of targets and justice principles that are in use or could be considered in policy and planning. We analyse existing official targets and alternative targets in relation to justice principles and categorise them according to who is the receiver of justice, what is distributed and according to what principle. We find that official targets often lack justice perspectives, and when justice is addressed, it is often vaguely formulated. We conclude that justice perspectives should be applied to climate targets, and formulated in a concrete and explicit manner in order to be scrutinised and discussed, and also implemented in order to achieve justice in transitions towards halted climate change.

  • 33.
    Sundkvist, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Milestad, Rebecka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Jansson, AnnMari
    Stockholm University.
    On the importance of tightening feedback loops for sustainable development of food systems2005In: Food Policy, ISSN 0306-9192, E-ISSN 1873-5657, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 224-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the process of searching for sustainable trajectories in the food system, this paper reviews and discusses the importance of tightening feedback loops between ecosystems, actors in the food production chain and consumers. Intensification, specialization, distancing, concentration and homogenization are trends identified as major constraints for tightened feedback loops. These trends can mask or make it possible to disregard feedback signals from unhealthy ecosystems and weaken communication in the food chain. We explore possibilities for improved feedback management on local to global scales and present examples where feedback loops have been tightened. Enhanced communication between the actors in the food system and consciousness of ecological feedback, through e.g., increased reliance on local resources, are possibilities for improvement. However, where distances between resource and resource user are too large, feedback has to be directed through institutions on an overarching level, e.g., policy measures or environmental and social labelling of products.

  • 34.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    Stockholm University.
    Regional  food supply and sustainable use of natural resources2000Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis presents a theoretical framework for evaluating sustainability in industrialized regions, especially with respect to food systems. The focus is on ecosystem life-support as a basis for food production and the potential for moving towards a sustainable food supply system. My hypothesis is that by analyzing imports, use of local resources and scope for increasing local production - possibilities and obstacles for developing a sustainable food supply system can be identified. The thesis is based on two papers:

     

    In paper I, an energy analysis is used in a study of a small island community, Nämdö in the Stockholm archipelago. Energy and material flows, including primary and secondary production in natural and cultivated ecosystems, human production and consumption of food and production of waste are estimated. The results show that the island community imports a lot of food and energy while only a minor amount of locally available resources are utilized. Instead it depends heavily on functioning transport communications with the Swedish mainland. Based on our findings we recommend making use of locally available renewable resources and increasing recycling of organic materials for achieving a more sustainable community.

     

    In paper II, the environmental consequences of local small-scale versus centralized large-scale bread production and the potential for self-sufficiency of bread on the island of Gotland are analyzed. The results show that bread production based on locally produced ingredients, primarily flour, would lower the need for transportation but calls for investments in energy efficient techniques adapted to small scale production. Further, a redirection of a part of the exported bread grain and grain used as animal feed, to human consumption is needed for increasing self-sufficiency in bread and flour production.

  • 35.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Two strategies for dealing with uncertainty in social-ecological systems2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The scale of environmental problems is increasing. Globalisation and trade haveweakened the links between the ecosystems in which goods are produced and thecommunities in which they are consumed. This, combined with variability anddynamics in ecological and social systems, means that there are great uncertaintiesabout production conditions and about the impact on humans and theenvironment of decisions made at different levels in society. In order to achievesustainable management of ecosystems, more knowledge is needed when possible.In other cases, strategies for dealing with the uncertainties are needed. This thesis,in which ecological and social systems are regarded as integrated, analyses twostrategies for dealing with uncertainties in such social-ecological systems andthereby improving the potential for sustainable management of these systems.The strategies are i) Using futures studies as a method and ii) creating a tighterfeedback loop between society and ecosystems.Of the five studies included in this thesis, Papers I and II explore possibilities toreduce uncertainties through better feedback between ecosystems and society in aglobalised food system. A tighter feedback loop between society and ecosystemscould increase the potential of society to detect negative environmental impacts ofdifferent activities, respond to such signals (feedback) and make changes thatreduce the negative consequences. Papers III, IV and V develop methods andanalyse the use of futures studies as a tool for managing uncertainty inenvironmental policy processes, specifically the Swedish environmental qualityobjectives. It is difficult and sometimes impossible to predict future developmentsand there are also uncertainties because social-ecological systems are constantlychanging, sometimes in unexpected ways. In addition, the apparently most likelydevelopments may not be the most desirable. Futures studies are used in PapersIII-V to deal with these types of uncertainties. Within the context of these futuresstudies, methods for working together with stakeholders to identify actions andchanges needed to achieve environmental goals are also developed and tested.The results show that the potential exists to reduce certain types of uncertainty byreducing the distance between production and consumption (through localisedfood systems and institutions which transmit feedback). Another conclusion isthat a local food market (farmers’ market), which represents a direct link betweenproduction and consumption, could reduce a sense of uncertainty aboutproduction conditions for individual consumers, through the establishment oftrust in their relationship with the producer. However, only a few examples ofincreased ecological knowledge or increased knowledge about productionconditions were found among these consumers. The results also show that futuresstudies were able to serve as a framework for analysing environmental policyprocesses (the environmental quality objectives), as they provide a long-termperspective and help manage uncertainty by increased knowledge of alternativeactions in relation to several possible developments. Futures studies as ananalytical tool can also help identify partnerships and stakeholders that arenecessary to promote change in order to achieve environmental goals.

  • 36.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Alfredsson, Eva
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Aretun, Åsa
    VTI.
    Bradley, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Fuehrer, Paul
    Södertörns Högskola.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Hagbert, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    VTI.
    Malmaéus, Mikael
    IVL.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Stigson, Peter
    IVL.
    Testversion av scenarier för hållbart samhällsbyggande bortom BNP-tillväxt2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The strong research environment ”Beyond GDP growth - Scenarios for sustainable building and planning” explores what could happen in the Swedish society when growth is not seen as an end in itself but the goal is instead other qualities that society might wish to achieve. The purpose of this report is to describe the test version of scenarios for Sweden in 2050. The scenarios are qualitative and aim to create a basis for further development, discussion and analysis. The scenarios are so-called normative backcasting scenarios which means that they illustrate future states in which four sustainability targets (climate, land use, participation and resource security) are to be attained. The focus of the four scenarios are: 1) collaborative economy, 2) local self-sufficiency, 3) automisation for quality of life, and 4) circular economy in the welfare state. The scenarios are presented as descriptions of the future in Sweden, with a brief description of global trends and developments in Sweden that may explain the scenario assumptions. A lot of work remains. For example, the scenarios will be presented and discussed in several forums in the coming year, and the feedback from the discussions will be incorporated into a new version of the scenarios. Economic modeling of the scenarios will also be performed, and after that sustainability assessments of scenarios and in depth studies of parts of the scenarios.

  • 37.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Alfredsson, Eva
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Bradley, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Fuehrer, Paul
    Södertörn Högskola.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Malmaeus, Mikael
    IVL Svenska Miljöinstitutet.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Aretun, Åsa
    VTI.
    Buhr, Katarina
    IVL, Svenska Miljöinstitutet.
    Hagbert, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    VTI.
    Öhlund, Erika
    Södertörn University.
    Skånberg, Kristian
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Stigson, Peter
    IVL, Svenska Miljöinstitutet.
    Scenarios for sustainable futures beyond GDP growth 2050Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of continued economic growth is increasingly questioned and critically analysed on the basis of its potential negative sustainability impact. Along with the critique, visions and strategies for alternative systems need also be brought onto the agenda. The aim of this paper is to present the qualitative content of scenarios that explore sustainability strategies for Swedish society when economic growth is not seen as an end in itself, and the goal is instead other values/goals that society might wish to achieve. Multi-target backcasting scenarios are developed, that illustrate future states in which four sustainability targets (climate, land use, participation and resource security) are to be attained. The focus of the four scenarios is: 1) collaborative economy, 2) local self-sufficiency, 3) automation for quality of life, and 4) circular economy in the welfare state. In the paper, we also present the process of the development of the scenarios and feedback from stakeholders. Although the focus is on Sweden, the process and scenarios should also be relevant for other similar countries. The scenarios are discussed in terms of their relevance and their purpose, the fulfilment of the sustainability goals and the multi-target approach.

  • 38.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika
    FOI.
    Farmers’ markets – linking food consumption and the ecology of food production?2010In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 453-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban and industrialised societies usually involve little connection between consumers and the resource base upon which the production of goods depends. Changing this situation could potentially enhance social and ecological sustainability. This study explored ecological aspects of the educational role of local food supply, with the aim of identifying signs of enhanced consumer understanding or awareness of the ecology of food production resulting from producer-consumer interaction. A series of qualitative interviews were carried out with customers at a farmers' market in Stockholm. The results showed that the interviewees were mainly concerned with quality, price and taste, and not production conditions. In addition, a number of interviewees experienced a sense of trust when shopping at the market. We found few examples of contributions to ecological knowledge among customers at the market, but there were some examples of learning opportunities. The local food supplied by the market reminded customers of the seasonality of production. Stallholders also provided information on how to store, prepare and cook vegetables, which may encourage a change in diet that is preferable from an environmental standpoint.

  • 39.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Milestad, Rebecka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Potential goal conflicts related to climate change mitigation strategies generated through backcasting scenariosManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In planning for mitigating future climate change, different options and strategies have to be considered. Scenarios are a useful strategy for exploring such options, particularly in collaboration with stakeholders. However, measures generated through scenarios that are opted for achieving one particular target, such as mitigation, can have important implications for the achievability of other goals and policies. When the implementation of a measure makes it more difficult to fulfil some other goal that the decision maker aims to achieve, a conflict arises between these goals. To this date, scenarios presenting/suggesting options for attaining mitigation targets deal mostly with illustrations of future states in which the targets are fulfilled, and/or measures and changes for achieving these targets. Conflicts that scenario generated measures and changes could impose on other policy goals have not been analysed and neither have synergies between goals. The purpose of this paper is to identify potential goal conflicts and synergies as potential consequences of four future scenarios assuming zero CO2 emissions 2060, and discuss strategies for dealing with such conflicts. The scenarios were developed for rural land use in Sweden, and an analysis of potential goal conflicts, with relevance for Swedish climate change mitigation processes was made. We have focused on the Swedish environmental goals. We present the analysis of goal conflicts and synergies that could arise in the context of climate change mitigation, we discuss potential strategies for addressing them, and we point at research needs that have to be addressed if we are to better understand how to produce scenarios that can inform climate change mitigation policies, but with less risk of imposing on other policy goals. 

  • 40.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Engström, Rebecka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Hushållning med mark, vatten och bebyggd miljö: åtgärdsstrategier under olika omvärldsutvecklingar2007Report (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Engström, Rebecka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Use of explorative scenarios in environmental policy making: Evaluation of policy instruments for management of land, water and the built environment2010In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 42, no 10, p. 1166-1175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to achieve the Swedish Environmental Quality Objectives (EQOs), three action strategies have been adopted by the Swedish parliament. The strategy addressed in this paper deals with the management of land, water and the built environment. The paper reports on a project involving authorities and researchers in which policy measures required for achieving relevant targets for the strategy were gathered, structured and analysed regarding their potential assuming alternative futures. Measures with proposed policy instruments were qualitatively evaluated against one business as usual scenario and four explorative scenarios varying along two dimensions; level of governance and level of embeddedness. The results show a heavy predominance of administrative policy instruments. This policy strategy depends on a future development where such policy instruments are accepted. In order to achieve the EQOs regardless of future developments, more robust packages of measures including a larger variation in policy instruments need to be developed.

  • 42.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Engström, Rebecka
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Svane, Örjan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Decreased energy use in buildings by 50% by 2050: a backcasting study using stakeholder groups2011In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 78, no 5, p. 785-796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a backcasting study focusing on fulfilment of a national target to decrease energy consumption in residential and commercial buildings by 50% by 2050 compared with the consumption in 1995, and identifying possible measures for achieving it. A method based on a combination of backcasting methodology and focus group methodology was used. Two different scenarios were developed. They were used in discussions with stakeholders in the building sector, to explore and identify measures and actors important for target fulfillment. The main outcomes were ideas for strategies and measures needed to achieve the target. The current potential for target fulfilment was also analysed and discussed. The discussions in the different stakeholder groups were mainly concerned with changes in attitude and behaviour and the need for radical changes in social structures. For example, enhanced communication between actors in the building chain, and the need for relevant feedback in order to illustrate the link between the effort in decreasing energy use and actual outcome. The findings suggest that there is sufficient technical potential to achieve the target by 2050 but that this potential will not be realised to a sufficient extent. Achieving the target would be facilitated by policy that is oriented more towards identifying actors with direct influence to promote change. An analysis of incentives for these actors to act, and how different actors can cooperate for energy-efficient solutions should be integrated into the process of suggesting and implementing policy measures.

  • 43.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Framtidsstudier och osäkerheter2012In: Att utforska framtiden: Valda perspektiv / [ed] Alm, S., Palme, J. and Westholm, E., Dialogos Förlag, 2012, p. 111-128Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Social justice perspectives on energy and climate targetsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to explore what kind of justice principles are discussed and applied on energy and climate targets in different contexts and on different scales.  We achieve the aim by reviewing a selection of energy and climate targets as well as allocation principles that are in use or could be considered in energy and climate policy and planning.  We include examples of targets in official documents at different geographical and institutional levels, as well as targets promoted by NGOs and research publications. On local and regional levels the focus is on Sweden. Examples of justice principles were sought for in the same literature and documents, and additional perspectives were found in scientific literature. The justice approaches were analysed and categorised in accordance with theoretical perspectives of justice, regarding who is the receiver, what is distributed and according to what principle. Based on our review, we found that the official climate and energy targets did not to any great extent include or consider justice perspectives, particularly not on sub EU levels. Besides, when justice is addressed, it is often vaguely formulated. There are however more concrete suggestions in the scientific literature. We conclude that justice perspectives need to be applied to climate targets, and that the chosen perspectives should be formulated in a concrete and explicit manner. This way they can be scrutinised and discussed, and eventually implemented in order to achieve transformation towards halted climate change that is also just.

  • 45.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Zapico, Jorge Luis
    Sustainable food systems with ICT?2016In: Proceedings of ICT for Sustainability 2016, Atlantis Press , 2016, p. 194-201Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The food system is burdened by many and severe negative environmental and social impacts. Two of the reasons for the impacts are the increasing scale and globalisation of the food system. ICT has been put forward as a means to enhance sustainability in society, yet the potential for food systems is un-derexplored. In this paper we review ICT solutions for improved sustainability of food systems, which are used in practice or are discussed as potential solutions. The aim is to identify ICT solutions that can potentially enhance sustainability in the food system. We review mostly scientific literature. The ICT solutions are categorized according to four main purposes of the approach, to 1) efficiency through monitoring and assessment of environmental impact, 2) enhance transparency and traceability in the food system, 3) creating network between actors in the food chains, 4) influence and change food practices. We conclude that there is no coherent research field covering ICT in food systems. The papers reviewed are scattered over several disciplines and scientific journals. We also conclude that there is a predominance of research on monitoring of food production and transparency and traceability in the food chain. More research is needed that take on holistic approaches and include several parts of the food system. Furthermore, we would also like to see more research on what sustainable food systems could be like and how ICT could support and perhaps sometimes hinder such developments.

  • 46. Tapio, Petri
    et al.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Varho, V
    Exploring the space of alternatives: Heuristics in sustainability scenarios2014In: Transdisciplinary Sustainability Studies: A Heuristic Approach / [ed] Huutoniemi, London: Routledge, 2014, p. 85-99Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Van der Voorn, Tom
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Systems ResearchUniversity of OsnabrückOsnabrückGermany.
    Sundkvist, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Fauré, Eléonore
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Milestad, Rebecka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Towards multi-target backcasting approach for robust climate change mitigation strategies: A Swedish case study on an environmental assessment of climate mitigation scenarios.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the face of climate change, a major challenge for policy makers is to develop robust scenario-based strategies for climate change adaptation and mitigation options. This paper presents a novel approach for environmental assessment of climate change mitigation scenarios. Scenarios, and particularly backcasting scenarios, are often used as a strategy for exploring options and measures for achieving environmental targets, such as climate change mitigation. Measures and options generated through backcasting scenarios are often opted for achieving one particular target and such scenarios are seldom assessed in relation to other environmental aspects. This limits the achievability of other goals and policies. When the implementation of a measure makes it more difficult to fulfil some other goal that the decision maker aims to achieve, a conflict arises between these goals. This paper presents a qualitative environmental assessment of scenarios that identifies conflicts and synergies in regard to a broad range of environmental targets. The method is illustrated in an assessment of four future scenarios assuming zero greenhouse gas emissions 2060 in relation to a variety of environmental aspects, operationalized in policy goals. The scenarios concern rural land use in Sweden, and the goals were the Swedish environmental goals. In this paper potential goal conflicts and synergies that could arise if the strategies and developments in the scenarios were to be realised are analysed. We discuss the assessment and point at research needs that have to be addressed if we are to understand how to better assess

    1

    environmental goal conflicts, and produce scenario outcomes that can inform specific policies, but with less risk of imposing on fulfilment of other policy goals.

  • 48.
    von Oelreich, Jacob
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Wikman-Svahn, Per
    FOI.
    Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika
    FOI.
    Framtida havsnivåhöjning i kommunal planering2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A warmer climate leads to rising sea levels. Despite uncertainties about how rapid and substantial future sea level rise will be, society needs to prepare. In this report we examine how 33 coastal municipalities in southern Sweden plan for rising sea levels and what estimated future sea levels their planning is based on. We also analyse the responses in a number of interviews with individuals responsible for sea level planning at the studied municipalities, county administrative boards, the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency (MSB), the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) and a consultancy firm.

    The greatest uncertainty in future sea level projections is how the inland ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica will react to climate change. The reaction so far has been more rapid than previously thought. Recently, increasing levels have been mentioned in several articles published in scientific journals. In these articles, sea level rise is estimated to 1–2 metres by 2100 for the highest emissions scenarios. The sea will continue to rise for many centuries, even if greenhouse gas emissions cease completely. Local sea level rise differs from the global average and is affected by several factors.

    Our survey of municipal planning documents reveals that there are considerable gaps in current planning for future sea level rise. Almost one third of the municipalities studied have no estimates of future sea levels whatsoever in their planning. Among the municipalities that in fact estimate future sea levels, six out of ten lack clear sources for their estimates.

    SMHI is the dominant source for municipalities' estimates of future sea level rise. There is, however, considerable difference between the estimates of various municipalities. This illustrates the uncertainty that exists about what future sea level rise estimate is most reasonable to relate to. In recent years there is evidence of a trend that municipalities are using SMHI's estimate of a sea level rise of "around one metre" by 2100. Despite scientific studies indicating higher levels, most coastal municipalities in southern Sweden do not plan for sea level rise above one metre by the end of the 21st century.

    Currently planning for sea level rise beyond 2100 is lacking. SMHI, the County Administrative Board of Skåne and the municipality of Helsingborg emphasize the importance of planning more than 100 years into the future. However, few other municipalities plan for this time frame. This indicates that long-term planning for sea level rise needs to be improved.

    Our study reveals a lack of preparedness for more substantial sea level rise than estimated in current planning. The interviews show that even if several interviewees request planning for worst-case scenarios of future sea level rise, only MSB takes into account the worst possible outcome, as required by the European Union's Floods Directive.

    The study shows that municipalities and county administrative boards in southern Sweden demand increased clarity from the state, both in terms of concrete planning support and clear government guidelines for planning for sea level rise. Our study indicates a need for a government strategy for sea level planning in Sweden.

  • 49.
    von Oelreich, Jacob
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Wikman-Svahn, Per
    FOI.
    Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika
    FOI.
    Planning for future sea-level rise in Swedish municipalities2015In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 459-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A warmer climate leads to rising sea levels. Despite uncertainties about how rapid and substantial future sea-level rise (SLR) will be, society needs to prepare and adapt. This study examines the state of planning for future SLR in Sweden by surveying 33 coastal municipalities in southern Sweden and interviewing local, regional and national authorities with relevant accountability. The results reveal that there are considerable gaps in current planning for SLR. Almost one-third of municipalities lack guiding planning documents for SLR, and more than two-thirds do not discuss SLR beyond 2100. We argue that the prevailing uncertainty and ambiguity in assessments of future SLR is problematic within a traditional “predict-then-act” paradigm, and that robust approaches, such as scenario planning, can reduce many of these problems.

1 - 49 of 49
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